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CLASSIC QUEEN THE SYMPHONY WILL ROCK YOU PAGE 31 SHOW ME THE MONEY WHO’S FUNDING THE SPORTSPLEX? PAGE 13

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y retirement plan had been to die young. That didn’t work out. And now that I’m a father — little Julia turned 2 in November — I’m forced to contemplate the future more than ever. What’s the world going to look like for Julia when I’m dead and gone? That had mostly been an abstract question, but with new climate reports putting humanity’s situation into very stark terms, we have to face facts. Many of us are going to live long enough to see the dramatic effects of CLIMATE CHANGE — droughts, wildfires, food shortages, coastal flooding, refugee crises, disease outbreaks, heat waves and extreme weather disasters that cripple entire cities. My retirement plan is looking a little better right about now, I’m guessing. And that’s one of the major problems facing climate activists: How do you make things feel real for people without making them want to simply give up? To be sure, we can’t lose hope. Nor can we simply hope for a miracle. My recommendation, for starters: Read staff writer Samantha Wohlfeil’s excellent report beginning on page 22. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2019, Inland Publications, Inc.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT DO YOU FEAR MOST ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Dan Nailen (x239) MANAGING EDITOR/ARTS & CULTURE Chey Scott (x225)

MICHAELA SCULLY The obvious, destruction of Earth. But I think that the inability now for a large number of people to realize that we can help slow down climate change and that it’s already pretty bad now. And people don’t really realize that. So I think my fear is that it’ll get bad and then humans will understand too late how bad it really is.

FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

Nathan Weinbender (x250) FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

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Wilson Criscione (x282), Josh Kelety (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

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TRAVIS THOMPSON Honestly, the fact that we’re all going to be underwater. How should we prevent that from happening as a society? Stop using fossil fuels. That’s a big one. Do you think that enough people are aware of the validity of climate change? A lot of them know about it, but just don’t care.

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8 SARA SIVALON I would be really sad if all the polar bears went away. I heard about the wildlife, if climate change was to impact them to where we would have a lot more extinct or even more endangered species that would be really sad because they hold a lot of value for nature and for society.

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SEAN MCCURDY I just have no idea what’s going to happen. I just watched Blue Planet two days ago and they were talking about how in the past decade 40 percent of the polar ice caps melted. In the past decade. Which I knew that was happening, but I didn’t know it was that severe.

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N

ow that President Donald Trump and Congressional leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer seem locked in a stalemate, an assessment is appropriate. To start with, President Trump misspoke when he identified a “crisis” at the southern border. A crisis can be identified as “a time when a difficult or important decision must be made.” The decision about placement of a border wall on the southern border need not be made

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

immediately. It would take time to build. There needn’t be a standoff of epic dimensions such as there is now. A little compromise by Trump and the two Democratic leaders can get the government back open and avoid further economic and governmental damage. Both leaders and the president are hard-headed and perhaps unable to satisfy their political bases by compromising. If they had America more in mind than their self-interests, compromise would be more likely.

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“The whole long weekend seems like more proof that — just as humans — we are probably not meant to be connected in this way, at this speed!”

DONATIONS WANTED: Spokane Public Radio is seeking donations of gently used music, movies and audio/video equipment for its annual Record Sale on Feb. 23-24. Donations are accepted through Fri, Feb. 15 at 4000 Holes (1610 N. Monroe), The Long Ear (2405 N. Fourth St., CdA) and Spokane Public Radio Station (1229 N. Monroe). Details at spokanepublicradio.org.

A tweet by Charlie Warzel, who’s been covering tech issues for Buzzfeed, referring to the speed at which people shared, analyzed, distorted and misinterpreted a viral video last weekend showing a Native American drummer and MAGA-hat-wearing teen standing face to face in Washington, D.C.


The word “compromise” is not an epithet. Recent Gallup polling shows that 54 percent of Americans favor compromise by government officials to get things done, while only 18 percent favor no compromise. As Trump’s approval rating sinks to 37 percent, he should consider compromise as a political strategy, especially as the 2020 presidential election draws nearer. There’s no question that fencing of some kind, or some other mechanism, keeps undocumented immigrants from unlawfully entering the United States. The Democratic leaders, and many of those who follow them, have already supported border security funding, so they should do so again by setting aside their contempt for the president. Wily as he can be, President Trump should “coax” them into supporting his plan for border security, with a promise of comprehensive immigration reform to follow. Immigration reform will be even harder. It will take effort by Trump, but it will be worth it — and it’s something he could tout if he seeks re-election. But what exactly should he seek in such reforms? Recall that his campaign stressed the following: no amnesty, no chain migration, no illegal immigration, no visa lottery, a “pause” on green card issuance, and construction of a wall. The wall can be finessed, and so can visa lottery, green card issuance and chain migration. President Trump should be satisfied if comprehensive immigration includes “no amnesty and no illegal immigration.” Background checks on all citizenship applicants are required now, and DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) subjects (mostly students) should pass background checks and civics examinations at a minimum. President Trump was correct when he reversed President Obama’s Executive Order on DACA and challenged Congress to correct the law involving DACA subjects. Congress has failed to act on either Obama’s EO or Trump’s. Comprehensive immigration legislation has eluded Congress for years — the last comprehensive immigration legislation was passed in 1986. Why? Because comprehensive immigration legislation has many parts, and members of Congress have deeply divided constituencies to satisfy. Members of Congress should not timidly try to please all constituencies. They should take a definitive stand, passing comprehensive immigration reform even if they have to answer for it to objecting constituencies. Federal employees are the true victims in this shutdown, so it’s up to our leaders to sacrifice for the greater American good, explaining their position on immigration reform to those disaffected by their decisions. As a former U.S. senator once exclaimed, in a campaign slogan that got him re-elected for more than 20 years, “To Hell With Politics — Just Do What’s Right.” President Trump and the Democratic leaders should compromise, both claim victory and return all government workers to their jobs. That’s what’s good for America — and for all Americans. Each side can then crow all about it. n George Nethercutt represented the 5th District of Washington state as a Republican in Congress from 1995-2005.

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FROM THE VAULT

With a settlement in sight, how much will Spokane Catholics have to pay? Story by Kevin Taylor

18

SKATING Who to watch, and what they’re doing 24

FOOD Orbiting one of Spokane’s best breakfasts 33

MUSIC Joseph Israel and Spokane’s reggae scene 43

JAN. 25, 2007: In a column, publisher Ted S. McGregor Jr. analyzed the field of candidates vying to succeed President George W. Bush: Rudy Guiliani (“I like his moderate positions, but I don’t see him surviving the microscope of Republican primaries”); Hillary Clinton (“too polarizing a figure for these times”); and Barack Obama (“He will offer hope. And that’s what we need most”).

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A JACK LUCAS Since 1987, Best of Broadway has been importing the sounds of New York to Spokane; now one of the architects of that cultural connection is retiring BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

A

s a fourth grader at the old Irving Elementary on Spokane’s lower South Hill, Best of Broadway’s outgoing president Jack Lucas, now 66, knew he wanted to be a music teacher. At Lewis and Clark, he was the guitar player and singer in a band — the Manchester Union. (His mom had to rent the U-Hauls for all of the gigs out of town, as he was too young.) From 1971-74, Lucas served on an aircraft carrier in the waters off Vietnam. After graduating Eastern Washington State College in three years, he landed that music teacher job in Davenport. To make extra cash, he was an usher at city-sponsored events at the Coliseum and Opera House, which led to quickly leaving teaching to become Spokane’s first-ever event supervisor. Don Barbieri noticed him and hired him to join his fledgling G&B Select-a-Seat (now TicketsWest). When G&B was approached about promoting Cats at the Spokane Opera House in 1987, the whole team was intimidated, but, as Lucas recalls, “Don Barbieri always said, ‘God hates a coward.’ And true to his word, we tried it.” Cats was a huge hit, and the annual series was born. On Feb. 3, when the final curtain falls on the third run of The Lion King in Spokane, it will also mark the end of Lucas’ run. INLANDER: The Lion King is a fitting end, as it’s first run [six weeks in 2005] blew away any notions of what kind of theater-going town Spokane is. LUCAS: If I had a show to go out on, The Lion King is that show. In the early years, I was on my hands and knees begging for shows to come here. Prior to the 1999-2000 season, we weren’t on anybody’s map. The watershed moment for us really was Miss Saigon, Phantom and Les Mis all in that same season. People were saying, “Lucas, you’re frickin’ crazy.” Then we had an amazing season — the community really supported us. After that, one friend in New York said, “Now I’m gonna call Spokane that little city that can.” You want to

know how we got The Lion King to come in 2005? It all started with that Y2K season. How do you measure the cultural impacts of bringing the arts to Spokane, beyond the economic impacts? I’m really proud of shows like Rent, which was considered really edgy when we brought it — some cities just would not play it. Kiss of the Spider Woman, that’s another. Wow. And The Color Purple… I know that’s a tough story, but what a story. The Color Purple might have been the best overall production we ever brought. Where would we be without Broadway, the Symphony and all our other nonprofits and arts groups? I firmly believe that our community is defined by the arts. I’m sure it’ll be tough when that final curtain falls… There comes a time when you have to make that decision. You have to say, “I think it’s time to turn this over to someone else.” You just know when the time is right. And there is kind of a cool bit of serendipity about your replacement, Justin Kobluk… Justin’s dad, Mike, he gave me my first job as event supervisor for the city of Spokane. But Justin’s been in the biz, at the Tacoma Dome, Key Arena, Northern Quest. He grew up around music, went to Ferris High School. It’s important to have a guy like Justin who is a Spokanite, who actually grew up attending our Broadway shows and who understands and is in touch with the community. It’s just a natural fit. So in the end, you did spend your life devoted to music… I always tell people I’m just a frustrated performerturned-businessman. n This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity. DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

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LIVapplaud AND LET LIVE Pastor Liv Larson Andrews opening her church to the homeless.

I

Really, really admirable. What really caught my attention was her words on Trump’s being a rapist and white supremacist. Such honesty. I’m not a Jesus admirer, yet when next in Spokane, I’m headed to Salem Lutheran Church. Ms. Andrews has a lot to say. Hallelujah to her truth. ELLEN SCHREIBER Ponderay, Idaho

SCHMICK’S SHTICK rom the recent article “Medical Experiment” (1/17/19), it is obvious that

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Rep. Joe Schmick does not understand the finances of health care. A government-run universal system would increase taxes, but because it would eliminate insurance premiums and deductibles, the vast majority of taxpayers would have more spendable income. Taxes are just an expense item, like a mortgage or utility bills, and you have to judge them by what you get for what you pay. Citizens in every other advanced country are happy to pay taxes so they don’t have to worry about health care expenses. He obviously has not asked his constituents the right question. DANIEL SCHAFFER, MD Spokane, Wash.

ADD THE WORDS, IDAHO am often asked why I serve in the Idaho Senate. Why, as a Democrat in

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Idaho, would I choose the Idaho Legislature? There are ways to see much faster progress on issues. So why do I serve? In January of 2015, the Idaho House State Affairs committee conducted a public hearing to add the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the Idaho Human Rights Act. Race is protected, gender is protected, religion is protected, age is protected, disability is protected. Everyone in Idaho enjoys protections except our LGBTQ family members, friends and LETTERS neighbors. Send comments to I listened to story after story editor@inlander.com. of people who had been fired, lost housing or had been denied service, simply because of who they are. I was awed by the courage it took for people without these protections to testify. They were risking their jobs, homes and well-being in order to convey the importance of equal treatment. After days of listening to this compelling, sometimes heart wrenching, testimony, only the four Democratic members of the committee voted to move the bill forward. All 13 of the other committee members voted against it. So now, four years after the hearing, there are still no protections. That is why I have introduced Senate Bill 1015, to add the words. With the co-sponsorship of many of my Democratic caucus colleagues, I hope to right the wrongs of the past. Our positions offer us the ability to continue the fight for equality until it is attained. And that is why I serve.

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JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 11


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DEVELOPMENT

‘GAME CHANGER’ What’s the deal with the Sportsplex going into downtown Spokane — and who’s paying for it?

Eric Sawyer, president and CEO of the Spokane Sports Commission, hopes a new Sportsplex will attract national events to Spokane. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

BY WILSON CRISCIONE

A

s president of the Spokane Sports Commission, Eric Sawyer understands Spokane’s place in the world of sports. Spokane will never host a Super Bowl, he admits. But Hoopfest, the largest 3-on-3 basketball tournament in the world? That’s the kind of thing Spokane can do as well as anyone. And sure, we probably won’t ever be chosen to host

the NCAA Final Four. But the first and second rounds of the NCAA tournament? We can sell as many tickets as any other city, Sawyer says. Still, the Sports Commission feels Spokane could be an even greater hub for sports. Years ago, it came up with a way the city could become that. The concept was for a Sportsplex, a large, multipurpose facility that could host sporting events of all kinds — volleyball, basketball,

wrestling, even track and field. Now, the idea for the Sportsplex is leaping over its final hurdles on the way to becoming reality. The bulk of the funding for the Sportsplex — to be located downtown by the Spokane Arena — has been approved and the city of Spokane agreed to kick in an extra $5 million last week. Construction should start sometime this year. ...continued on next page

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 13


NEWS | DEVELOPMENT

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For Sawyer, it’s a huge win and a chance for the city to transform a mostly unused piece of land into something that will attract economic development. “It’s a game changer,” Sawyer says. Yet many people, he realizes, are confused about who’s paying for it. The funding for the roughly $43 million Sportsplex came without a public vote. Adding to the confusion, it happens to be right next to the place where voters just rejected a downtown football stadium. The Sportsplex — or something like it — had been talked about on and off for 10 to 15 years, says Stephanie Curran, CEO for Spokane’s Public Facilities District (PFD). “The problem has always been financing,” Curran says.

WHO’S PAYING?

In years past, it seemed inevitable that in order to pay for a new Sportsplex, voters would have to approve a hike in taxes, says Rick Romero, a consultant with the city of Spokane who’s been involved with the Sportsplex project. “It was always envisioned that the Sportsplex would be funded by asking for a bond,” says Romero. It would have been similar to how voters ap-

proved a bond for schools and libraries last year. But Romero says the city and the PFD started looking at other ways to pay for the Sportsplex, thinking a public vote might not be the way to go. Then, in 2017, the state extended a sales tax rebate for PFDs in Washington. Spokane’s PFD manages the Spokane Arena, the Convention Center and the INB Performing LETTERS Arts Center. It Send comments to will manage the editor@inlander.com. Sportsplex, too. The state allows PFDs to impose a 0.033 percent sales tax to pay for regional centers that, if not used by the PFD, would be money that goes back to the state. By extending it, the PFD will get tens of millions of dollars for local projects. Spokane County will give the PFD $25 million for the project initially, raising the money by selling bonds to local investors. The PFD will then pay the county back using that sales tax rebate. That makes up the bulk of the funding. Then, around $10 million will come from PFD reserve funds, and the PFD will ask the state for a $3 million capital request this legislative session, Curran says.


The city chipped in $5 million more, coming from its Real Estate Excise Tax fund that can be only used for capital projects. The agreement last week was telegraphed in 2017, when the city adopted a long-term plan that supported the Sportsplex. But not all of the current City Council members support that decision. Kate Burke, who wasn’t on the council in 2017, says she would like to see the $5 million contribution from the city go towards anything else, like a new roof for the Martin Luther King Jr. Family Outreach Center. She voted against the money going toward the Sportsplex, but was outnumbered 6-1. “I am absolutely 100 percent against it,” Burke says. Burke doesn’t like the idea of giving a nonelected board like the PFD public money for facilities that they then turn around and charge citizens money to use. There are other capital projects that could benefit the public, she says. “It’s not a good use of public dollars because it’s not for the public good,” she says.

WHO’S USING IT?

Sawyer argues that all citizens of Spokane can benefit in one way or another from the Sportsplex. What will separate the facility from others is the 200-meter, six-lane hydraulic banked track than can be deployed by pressing a button on the wall. There are only nine such tracks on the West Coast, but there’s a need for more, Sawyer says. By building one, Sawyer thinks track athletes from all around the country will want to come to Spokane for professional track events.

“You can have the greatest venue on the planet and if they don’t operate it appropriately, it will fail.” Other cities are looking to build a similar facility with that kind of track, but Sawyer says Spokane is “ahead of the wave” with the upcoming Sportsplex construction. But that’s not the only reason Spokane stands out from others — the management of the PFD is important too, he says. The NCAA doesn’t bring back college basketball every year because the Spokane Arena is so great, he says. It’s because of the strong management. “The old story of ‘You build it and they will come’ is a myth,” he says. “You can have the greatest venue on the planet and if they don’t operate it appropriately, it will fail … we’ll have a great venue and an incredible team behind these events.” Between major events, the Sportsplex will likely be used by the city’s parks department to run local sports leagues, like an adult volleyball league. Plans call for the Sportsplex to fit up to 17 volleyball courts, up to 10 basketball courts, or 21 wrestling mats, plus an NHL-sized ice sheet if needed. “It will be a great facility for the local athletes to grow their skill sets but at the same time expose them to professional events,” Sawyer says. He argues it will benefit the economy, too, touting a Gonzaga University study saying the Sportsplex could bring more than $1 million in tax revenues to the area per year as it attracts thousands of people to Spokane where they will stay in hotels, eat at local restaurants and shop in the stores. Burke thinks those benefits are exaggerated, since some of that tax revenue is from the lodging tax that goes back into other promotions to attract tourism to the area. “That doesn’t really help us,” Burke says. Other elected local officials disagree. Spokane County Commissioner Al French says the Sportsplex will benefit the local economy and help liven downtown. “It’s another asset available to the community that will support not only community events, but it will be a good economic development tool,” French says. n wilsonc@inlander.com

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

ABOUT TIME Washington state Rep. Marcus Riccelli is proposing moving the state to DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME permanently. Yes, that would mean darker mornings. But it would also mean that it wouldn’t get dark at 4:30 pm during the depths of winter. It would mean you’d see more sunrises in the mornings. And it’s one of those little changes that might, literally, save lives. Still, even if Washington state passes it, they would still need federal approval. Last year, Florida and California passed similar measures — but without federal permission, they haven’t taken effect. (DANIEL WALTERS)

16 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

EARTH TO EARTH With a new push in Olympia, some hope to make Washington the first state to offer RECOMPOSITION — a process of naturally turning bodies into soil. With Senate Bill 5001, the state could also legalize another after-death option called alkaline hydrolysis, adding to the only two legal options that exist right now: cremation and burial. Proponents argue that recomposition in particular is more environmentally friendly and may be more affordable than other methods. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE Ami Strahan (above), the mother of Sam Strahan, the 15-yearold victim in the 2017 shooting at Freeman High School, south of Spokane, testified before state lawmakers on Jan. 21 in favor of legislation BANNING high-capacity magazines. In her testimony, she cited the weapons Sam’s killer used. “The shooter’s AR-15, equipped with a high-capacity magazine, jammed, meaning that he had to use a pistol instead,” she said. “If his rifle hadn’t jammed, just imagine the carnage that would have happened that day.” (Three other students were injured in the shooting.) The bill, alongside other legislation that would ban 3D-printed plastic guns, was requested by state Attorney General Bob Ferguson. (JOSH KELETY)


END OF AN ERA Mead School District Superintendent Tom Rockefeller (above) will RETIRE at the end of the school year. He has served as superintendent for 13 years. “I’ve got kids and family I need to spend time around,” Rockefeller says. Prior to taking the job at Mead, Rockefeller was superintendent in Pullman School District for six years until 2006. In a phone call with the Inlander, he expressed frustration that initial news stories of his retirement have linked his retirement to a scandal involving Wesley Perez, a Mead High School Spanish teacher charged with having a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old student. Rockefeller plans on staying in the Spokane area when his resignation goes into effect on Aug. 31. “I’m retiring,” he says, “because it’s time.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Four Simple Words The continued effort to “add the words” in Idaho

S

tate Sen. Maryanne Jordan can’t even remember off the top of her head how many times an “Add the Words” bill has been introduced and then failed in Idaho. The words, in this case, are “sexual orientation” and “gender identity.” Jordan, a Democrat, has introduced a new bill in the Idaho Legislature that would include those words in Idaho’s HUMAN RIGHTS ACT to prevent LGBTQ people from being discriminated against in employment, housing and other areas. Every time it’s been introduced in the last decade-plus, it’s failed. Does it have a chance this time? “It’s early, and we’ll see,” Jordan tells the Inlander. “It is my hope that we will get it through.” But she knows that will be a challenge. While more than a dozen cities in Idaho have passed local antidiscrimination ordinances, it is still perfectly legal in other parts of the state to fire someone or evict them from their home simply because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Jordan is mostly supported

by her Democratic colleagues in the Legislature, but it’s Republicans who will have the final say. Chelsea Gaona-Lincoln, chair of the nonprofit Add the Words Idaho, says there have been some indications from leadership that they are willing to have a discussion on adding the words. “I think it’s always going to be a journey because we’re dealing with a lot of folks unaware that gay and trans folks exist in their community,” Gaona-Lincoln says. Jordan says she’s optimistic Maryanne Jordan this will be the year the bill gets through. “I’m always optimistic about the nature of people wanting others to be treated well,” Jordan says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

HOUSING WHEN NO ONE IS HOME

As the government SHUTDOWN continues into its second month, it’s becoming clear that thousands of Inland Northwest families could be put in a precarious housing situation if federal funding isn’t provided by March. Spokane Housing Authority manages federal housing vouchers that cover an average of $435 per month for utilities and rent, helping about 14,000 people across six counties in Eastern Washington, says Pam Tietz, the authority’s executive director. While housing choice vouchers are funded through February, if March payments don’t come in, tenants in those 5,200 households will have to hope that their landlords will be understanding. Typically, those tenants pay 30 percent of their income for rent and utilities, with the authority’s payment covering the remainder, Tietz says. Housing authority staff will evaluate the shutdown situa-

tion the first week of February, she says, and they could send letters to every tenant and landlord asking them to work together to avoid evictions or other issues. “We will urge our landlords to be patient and to not evict people for the lack of housing assistance payments after the first of March,” Tietz says. “We’re relatively certain that once the government shutdown is ended, all of that will be funded and we’ll go back and pay our landlords what they’re due.” Meanwhile, other housing subsidies for low-income housing projects could also be impacted come March, leaving property owners without operating budgets to pay utilities, complete maintenance, and more. Some projects are also on hold: Spokane Housing Ventures, a nonprofit that owns and manages 36 housing properties across Washington, has been trying to obtain a 48-unit apartment complex to create additional senior housing in Medical Lake for years, says Fred Peck, the nonprofit’s executive director. Just as all the funding and paperwork was getting lined up in time for the property to get signed over, the shutdown started, Peck says. “We had high hopes of closing in late December,” Peck says, “but the project is on hold because the USDA staff in the Department of Rural Development are considered nonessential and have been off work since late December.” (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

THE MAXEY NAME

Despite community outcry, the University District Gateway Bridge didn’t get named after Spokane civil rights icon CARL MAXEY. But soon, another structure in East Central Spokane will be getting Maxey’s moniker. Sandy Williams, publisher of the Black Lens, a local African-American newspaper, has already managed to

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corral enough money together to purchase an old auto garage building and a parking lot near the East Central Fred Meyer. The plan is to create an African-American cultural center. It felt right: East Central — along with Hillyard — has among the highest concentration of African Americans in Spokane, Williams says. But when Williams was discussing how to name the cultural center, she said a friend suggested that, instead of highlighting a national figure, the group should pick a local civil rights figure to honor. “It was like a bat hit upside my head,” Williams says. “It was like, yeah, duh.” Maxey, the first black attorney in Spokane, was the man the New York Times credited with “virtually single-handedly desegregating much of the Inland Northwest.” Community members raised $90,000. A big name donor matched that with another $90,000. Combined with support from the city of Spokane and foundations, Williams’ Friends of the Black Lens nonprofit managed to raise $375,000 to purchase the building in November. “The level of support that we received when we started this thing exceeded our wildest imaginations,” Williams says. “Just that makes me really hopeful that our community recognizes how important this is to have a space like this.” The next step requires working with an architectural firm to draw up the plans for rehabbing the building. Right now, Williams envisions the building potentially including a coffee shop, a multimedia education center, office spaces for freelancers and a cultural library focused on African-American literature. Williams says she’s in communication with an African-American library on the west side about the possibility of that library including traveling exhibits. But that will require a new round of fundraising before the building can open. “I’m in the process of writing grants right now,” Williams says. “We’re aiming for 2020.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

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JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 19


NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE

New Joint The debate over whether to build a new jail in Spokane has been raging for years. Could consensus be reached in 2019? BY JOSH KELETY

I

n Spokane County, the debate over replacing the two regional jails almost seems as old as the aging facilities themselves. The towering county jail in Spokane was built in 1986 and overcrowded with inmates within 10 years, while Geiger Corrections Center — a former military barracks near the airport — began housing the overflow inmates in 1997. As early as 2006, local elected officials were discussing building a replacement jail. Later, in 2011, the Spokane County Board of Commissioners pushed a bond measure to finance a new correctional facility, only to have the effort flounder. Eight years and a whole lot of talk later, no new jails have been built. Now, some local officials say there is new momentum to get a concrete proposal drawn up. Stakeholders in the local criminal justice system have started meeting as a workgroup to develop plans to replace the county jail — with the potential goal of getting a bond measure put before voters in the fall of this year. But even with the supposed breakthrough, some are skeptical that agreement can be reached in a debate that has stalled repeatedly over the course of 10 or so years. “The can has been kicked down the road so long over the years that we can’t kick the can any more,” County Commissioner Al French tells the Inlander. “It [the county jail] is a functionally obsolescent building and we need to look at replacing it.” In theory, the workgroup will come up with a “philosophy” on who the county should actually be incarcerating by February. That regional vision will then inform

20 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

Geiger Corrections Center — a former military barracks near the airport — began housing inmates in 1997. designs, bed counts and cost estimates that the Facilities Committee of the Spokane Regional Law and Justice Council will eventually produce. After that, the council will explore potential financing options, including going to the voters for public funds later this year, according to French. “I anticipate this conversation going fairly quickly because we have a need in this community and it’s not being met,” he says. (French is also the chair of the Facilities Committee.) However, French is cagey on what any future financing proposal will look like. “Whether it’s going to require a ballot measure or funding it internally, we don’t know yet,” he says. “We’ll make that decision once we know what it is that the cost looks like.”

C

ounty Commissioner Josh Kerns says he supports putting a bond measure before voters if the council eventually decides that more public financing is needed for a new jail. “Let’s be honest, a large facility like this is probably going to come with a very large price tag,” he says. “This decision should lie with the voters.” Potentially asking the voters for money for a new jail seemingly has Spokane Mayor David Condon’s support as well. “He will support the [Regional Law and Justice] Council’s recommendations for new investments, if any,” Marlene Feist, a city spokeswoman, says via email. As to the impetus behind this most recent attempt at tackling the jail issue, both French and Kerns say it is the natural next step in the county’s ongoing criminal justice reform efforts. Ozzie Knezovich, the county sheriff and longtime proponent of building a new jail, chalks it up to pressure from voters on the issue. “There are people, on both sides of the political spectrum, that were resistant to a new facility that are now going, ‘When are you going to build this new facility?’” he says. “The citizens want this to change and that’s what’s driving the boat here.” Breean Beggs, a city councilman and participant in the workgroup, says that the commissioners are largely pushing the initiative single-handedly. “There are people who would like to move it forward, but they currently don’t really have a majority of people with them,” he says. All stakeholders agree that the Spokane County Jail

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

is highly flawed. Its original capacity was 462 inmates yet it currently holds around 650 — many of whom are mentally ill, according to some estimates from officials. Inmates placed on suicide watch have routinely been held in their cells 24 hours a day; over the past year or so, eight inmates have died inside the aging facility. All the while, the number of incarcerated inmates has largely stayed stagnant despite recent efforts to reduce the overall jail population. (The average daily population across both county detention facilities has hovered around 950 inmates over the past two years.)

V

iewpoints diverge on what should be done about it. Beggs says the various participants are far apart on how the region should be thinking about incarceration. “There was no consensus at that point, even a consensus over what we were supposed to be doing,” he says of the work group’s first meeting. “Some people are like, ‘We don’t need to do a philosophy, we can just keep doing what we’ve been doing and not change anything.’ “There’s some people who say, ‘Oh, there could be something on the ballot in the fall.’ I don’t know how that’s going to happen,” he adds. “It’s going to be very challenging to get consensus.” Beggs argues that the region should focus on fully funding programs and services identified in the Blueprint for Reform, a document produced in 2013 that recommended orchestrating LETTERS a slew of alternaSend comments to tive criminal justice editor@inlander.com. programming — such as expanding pretrial services — before exploring constructing a new jail. “Before we spend significant money building something, we should implement all the programs you can do.” Knezovich argues that the county needs both programming and more jail beds. “They keep talking diversion, but we don’t have the resources,” he says. “If you’re not to build a robust programming arm, then you better build a bunch more beds.” Of the overall effort to jump-start the conversation on potentially building a new jail, Knezovich adds: “I’m hopeful, but I’m not holding my breath. I’ve been down this road too many times.” n joshk@inlander.com


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JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 21


ACT NOW! THE WORLD IS

ENDING Climate activists’ PR problem: How to scare people into action without making the fight seem totally hopeless BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

22 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019


GOOD NEWS

A full 70 percent of Americans agree that global warming is happening.

BAD NEWS

Only 41 percent believe global warming will harm them personally, even though 70 percent believe it will harm plants and animals and hurt future generations.

Maybe it’s universally recognized that a mother can face no greater loss than the death of a child. Or perhaps it’s because the image of a mother carrying around the dead body of her baby for weeks on end is especially haunting. Whatever the reason, Tahlequah’s public display of grief resonated with people, capturing attention and sympathy around the world. For 17 days this past summer, the killer whale swam more than 1,000 miles through the Salish Sea, pushing her dead calf just above the surface off the coast of Washington and British Columbia. Also known as J35, Tahlequah is a member of the endangered southern resident J Pod of orcas. Their numbers are dwindling, in large part due to a lack of salmon and diminishing habitat. In researchers’ August 2018 photos, the whale is captured delicately balancing her baby’s progressively discolored body as she moves through the sea in mourning. Weeks in, she finally lets go. Not long after, J50, another young orca in the pod, goes missing, apparently starved to death. For many, the orcas’ plight is much more than a devastating closeup look at the circle of life. It’s a grim warning sign, an indicator of what’s to come. Then came October, and the United Nations’ latest climate report that delivered less-than-cheerful news: The world has little more than a decade to band together  Orcas will mourn the loss of a and drastically reduce baby, scientists say. This is a 2010 greenhouse gas emissions photo of an orca carrying a dead if we are to avoid the most newborn, like Tahlequah did for devastating impacts. Then 17 days last summer. in November, the U.S. ROBIN W BAIRD/CASCADIA RESEARCH PHOTO released its own climate report, regionally showing which crops will suffer, which industries might fail. Interest spiked in climate change, with Google searches for the topic surging in the weeks the reports were released. The weight of the issue has certainly hit home for a

lot of people. Just after the U.N. report drops, 32-yearold Maria sums up for an Elle article why she, like many millennials, doesn’t plan to have kids, “If my hypothetical children were to ask me one day, ‘Why did you bring me onto the planet knowing what a dire situation it was in?’ there’s no reasonable answer I could give to justify my actions. There’s not much I can do as an individual to stop climate change, but I can do my part to not leave a future generation to suffer through global catastrophe.” Suddenly, climate is on the agenda, activists say. The new freshman class in Congress has come in excited about the idea of a Green New Deal that could drive jobs and push the country toward clean energy sources. At the state level, Gov. Jay Inslee has announced that he and Democrats will push an aggressive climate-conscious agenda to get the state to 100 percent renewable energy by 2045. It all seems to put climate activists in a unique position to make 2019 the year of the climate. But if climate fighters are going to capitalize on this moment, part of the challenge facing them is how to motivate people to tackle the systemic contributors to climate change without driving them to the point of despair. How do you make the stakes real without making people feel anything they could do is already too little too late? “The challenge,” says Jesse Piedfort, Washington chapter director for the Sierra Club, “is figuring out how to connect with people about the urgency of the problem in a way that inspires them instead of gets them to pull away.”

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he thing about climate change is it’s kind of the perfect threat, explains Dan Gardner, a journalist and author who literally wrote the book, called Risk, on how people analyze danger. “Climate change is — you couldn’t design a threat better in order to avoid our sense, our feeling of danger,” Gardner says. “It is extremely difficult for us to grasp on

an intuitive level, to feel it’s a threat.” Part of that’s due to how we’re hardwired, he says. Modern psychology theorizes that we basically have two systems for making decisions. System 1, he says, is our intuitive, quick-thinking, experiential system. “If you are out for a walk and a dog approaches you and the dog snarls, you instantly have the sense this is a threat,” Gardner says. “You didn’t engage in any conscious analysis. You didn’t look at the statistical prevalence of dog attacks. You knew it instantly.” That’s System 1, and for the vast majority of human existence, that’s what rules our decision making. System 2, on the other hand, manages our analytical, logical, scientific thought, Gardner says, and that’s the system that can grasp climate change. “System 2 can understand gradual increases in global temperatures, and increases of gas over decades and centuries,” Gardner says. “But System 2 … can’t ring the alarm bell. It can’t say, ‘This is huge! Be worried! You’ve gotta do something!’” Gardner says that’s why people overwhelmingly say in surveys that they agree that climate change is happening, that we’re influencing it, and that something should be done, “but if you look at their behavior, it doesn’t really reflect that, does it?” So how do you overcome that? Well, you have to make it real, which is why Gardner says he thinks science fiction writers will really be the ones to successfully drive home the reality of what climate change could bring, and inspire people to take action. “We know what science says about climate change,” Gardner says. “What we need are works of imagination that bring our feelings into alignment with what our brains know.” Obviously, for some people, like the millennials choosing not to have children due to climate change, the situation already feels real. To many of them, it’s purely ...continued on next page

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 23


CLIMATE CHANGE

“ACT NOW! THE WORLD IS ENDING,” CONTINUED... a numbers game: Having fewer children, or none at all, is the single largest thing someone can do to reduce their impacts. In fact, not having a kid can save as much carbon per year as more than 73 people going vegetarian or 22 people living car-free, according to a 2017 study on how government education sometimes misses talking about the most effective actions. But what about those who already have children? Grandchildren? What about those who understand the threat, but don’t want to think about it because it seems too depressing? What if it seems insurmountable? Generally, Gardner says he’s skeptical of the idea that people will give up in the face of a huge threat if you make it real. If you’re strapped to a chair and that snarling dog is coming for you, he says, you’re not going to put your feet up and wait for the inevitable. You’re going to fight. “My favorite illustration is in order to land on D-Day, there were five beaches at Normandy and no country

24 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

could do it by itself,” Gardner says. “The U.S. took two beaches, Britain took two beaches, and Canada took one beach. We worked together to figure out how we could beat the Nazis. If we could do that, we can do this.”

“T

he climate is indeed changing in ways that it has not changed in a long time,” retired climate scientist Steve Ghan tells a packed auditorium at Sandpoint High School last week. “The fact is, we are responsible for that. It’s not natural variations. It’s also serious. It has consequences for us, and for life on Earth. And the good news is we can indeed stop it without hurting the economy.” The audience listens quietly, though some shift uncomfortably in their chairs at the insistence that people are causing global warming. For years, Ghan worked as a climate scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the Tri-Cities, and he was among the hundreds of scientists who helped put together international reports on climate change for

the United Nations. It’s not that Ghan necessarily expects many of the people in the audience at this Citizens’ Climate Lobby event to be skeptics, but if the comments left by some Sandpoint neighbors on the group’s Facebook page are any indication, skepticism is alive and well in North Idaho. Ahead of the Jan. 16 event, commenters point to everything from chemtrails to an alleged conspiracy by Al Gore to get rich, with most commenters calling climate change B.S., a one-sided liberal conspiracy, or a waste of time to talk about. “Have you dumbasses considered mother nature, global warming and cooling are natural,” writes one man. “I’m sure you’ve heard, ‘It’s all natural cycles,’” Ghan continues during his presentation, noting that yes, there is a distinct cycle of cooling and warming that happens about every 100,000 years as the Earth orbits the sun. But then he shows a graph of every cycle for the last ...continued on page 26


WHAT THEY DO We asked environmentalists and climate scientists: What do you do to reduce your impacts on climate change on a daily basis? JERRY WHITE, Spokane Riverkeeper, says he lets his lawn go to brown in the summer, tries to bike or walk more often and is working to reduce his plastic consumption. “I come way off of the big picture in many ways and address the little picture,” White says. “Things like beginning to become hyper aware of your water consumption is a positive thing we can do in the face of a warming climate.” SAM MACE, Inland Northwest Director for Save Our Wild Salmon, says she tries to be mindful of how much she drives, which products she uses and how far away her food is coming from. “Those things make me feel a little better, but I’d also just encourage people, we have initiatives happening at the local level, at the city of Spokane and at the state level,” Mace says. “Individual engagement in that, talking to elected leaders … that can have real impacts. For my issue, this coming year is going to be a super critical one on the Snake River front with Gov. Inslee calling for studying dam removal.” JESSE PIEDFORT, Washington Chapter Director for the Sierra Club, says it’s important to remember you don’t have to do everything or be perfect to make an impact. He has eaten meat his whole life, but is now doing Meatless Mondays. To avoid single-use plastic, he brings jars and containers when shopping at the grocery store. Living in Seattle, he also walks and bikes rather than driving, but he understands some people need to drive and thinks it’s important not to shame people for that. “Not everybody is going to take cold showers and totally eliminate all plastic products and walk and bike everywhere. That’s not feasible for everybody,” Piedfort says. “But if you can maybe pick a couple of those things and make progress, that’s really good and empowering.”

This fall’s Camp Fire was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history, with more than 85 people killed and 14,000 residences destroyed. U.S. NATIONAL GUARD PHOTO PHOTO

GOOD NEWS

The ocean has helped reduce warming impacts — it’s absorbed 93 percent of the heat trapped by greenhouse gases, the New York Times reports.

BAD NEWS

The Times reports the ocean is also warming 40 percent faster than once thought, which is bad news for marine species.

STEVE GHAN, a retired climate scientist, says he and his wife decided to buy a hybrid when they recently upgraded their car. He also rides his bike, became a vegetarian a year ago, and the last two long trips he took were by train, including a jaunt to Washington, D.C., in December, which avoided the much larger impacts of a flight. He recognizes it’s hard for some people to get motivated, but points to the feasibility of solutions like a carbon fee and dividend and the benefits of a cleaner environment. “As a species, we’re just not wired to deal with a slow threat. We’re great at jumping when something sudden happens, but with a slow threat, we’re like the frog in the pot of water on the stove. Boy, it’s hard for us to get motivated to jump,” Ghan says. “That’s why we emphasize the health benefits and the economic benefits of action. And also just think about your grandchildren, what kind of world do you want to leave them?”

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CLIMATE CHANGE

GOOD NEWS

Wheat yields are expected to get better as the climate in the PNW continues to warm up, according to the Fourth National Climate Assessment.

“ACT NOW! THE WORLD IS ENDING,” CONTINUED... several hundred thousand years. At the far right of the graph, massive spikes in carbon dioxide and methane extend far above the highest peaks seen in any other cycle measured in ice cores. On the scale of time, the spikes have happened in the blink of an eye. A blink that started with the Industrial Age. Ghan says that part of what drives people to doubt climate scientists like him — to doubt the overwhelming consensus that humans’ dumping of pollutants into the atmosphere has drastically accelerated global warming — is a very sophisticated misinformation campaign. In front of the audience, he holds up a hefty, 900-

BAD NEWS mate Change. That’s the official report Anneli Wedemeyer, also a 16-yearThe heat won’t be as welcome funded by the United Nations and old junior, says she was most surprised for fruit crops, livestock or regularly compiled in collaboration with to learn about the negative impacts food fisheries. scientists around the world. waste has on the climate as it rots and Thing is, the Heartland Institute reemits gas. She also has a mixed outlook port cites real studies, including Ghan’s on the future. own work, but the information included is cherry picked, “The government should probably open their minds he says. It’s no better than other methods used to sow a little more and crack down on things,” like greenhouse doubt, Ghan says, such as making false dichotomies like, gas emissions and encourage transitions to hybrid ve“wildfires are either caused by climate change or by forest hicles, Wedemeyer says. “Some things have gone too far, management.” It doesn’t have to be one or the other, he but we can fix some things we’ve destroyed.” notes, it can be both. High school students o broaden their appeal, some climate-oriented who prepared presentations organizations are starting to shift the way they on climate change for the talk to people. event know the discord The Washington state chapter of the Sierra Club rewell. Some of their classcently hired someone to help with just that, says chapter mates don’t believe in clidirector Piedfort. mate change but completed “We just added a digital communications staff the assignment anyways. person,” he says. “They’re learning how to message our Others care about it a lot, issues and how to have a conversational tone on social and worry for the future. media. It’s something we struggle with every day, this “Personally, I’m very passionate about it,” says issue.” 16-year-old Jaize-mae Miller, a junior. “Our current politiThey point to examples where effects are already becal climate will have to change. With millennials being ing felt: decreased snowpack is leading to warmer streams conscious of it, it’s good, but personally it looks pretty and dryer seasons, which affects salmon, wildfire season, bleak.” orca health and ocean acidification, Piedfort says. Miller says she’s a vegetarian because she’s conscious “It’s actually here already, and people need to act on of the outsized impacts from eating meat, and she hopes it, and the longer people wait to act on it, the more difto study environmental engineering when she goes to ficult addressing it is gonna be,” Piedfort says. college. But there are also a lot of successes, he says. Solar

“I am pretty optimistic actually, ‘cause I think we do have a lot of successes that are out there right now.” page official-looking report on climate change. It was put together by the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change, a project of the Heartland Institute, a conservative think tank that previously worked on behalf of Big Tobacco to raise doubts about the dangers of smoking. It looks awfully similar, Ghan says holding up another nearly identical book-sized report, to the climate report put out by the Intergovernmental Panel on Cli-

26 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

T


and wind are getting cheaper and can now compete with natural gas and easily surpass coal. People are improving battery storage to address reliability of power when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining. And addressing climate change is wildly popular, even across the political spectrum — 77 percent of Americans believe carbon dioxide should be regulated as a pollutant, according to a 2018 Yale study. “I am pretty optimistic actually, ’cause I think we do have a lot of successes that are out there right now,” Piedfort says. “Maybe we need to do a better job talking about them.” For the people working in the field, the negative realities are front and center every day, and it can be hard even for them not to get discouraged. Sam Mace, the Inland Northwest Director of Save Our Wild Salmon, has been working for 30 years on conservation issues and at least 20 years on efforts to remove the four lower Snake River dams. What keeps her from throwing up her hands in defeat? “Admittedly, some days I feel discouraged,” Mace says by email. “But I’m lucky to work on behalf of a species that is incredibly resilient. Their life history is the paragon of resiliency. And how salmon hang on and manage to survive and even thrive in the face of all humans have done to alter river ecosystems is amazing.” Having lived in the Inland Northwest for a few decades, Mace says she already notices changes in the seasons. As a gardener, she’s had to shift her planting times as warm weather hits sooner. When walking her dog, milder winters stand out. The best way she can think to appeal to people is to get them motivated to engage in politics, where major actions will be necessary. “What I find most hopeful is that around the country and especially on the West Coast, we’re seeing real innovation and engagement on climate change at ...continued on next page

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Music & Art

SPOKANE STRING QUARTET with artwork projected on the big screen

3 P.M. SUNDAY, FEB. 3 MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX ALL SEATS GENERAL ADMISSION $20 ADULTS • $16 SENIORS • $12 STUDENTS

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UPCOMING SHOWS!

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Opportunity Presbyterian Church

28 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

CLIMATE CHANGE “ACT NOW! THE WORLD IS ENDING,” CONTINUED... the city levels,” Mace says. “A lot of good policies In one instance, the group was talking about for climate change are good fiscal policies, and I the misconception that current changes are just think it’s good where you can align those sort of part of the natural cycles in climate. One of issues, and not get wrapped around the action of the liberal members of the group said current debating climate science.” measurements show we’ve far surIndeed, the question of debatpassed anything in those previous GOOD NEWS ing climate science and how much cycles, Duebendorfer says. Wind is now competitive people contribute to global warm“Then, one of the ladies said, with natural gas. ing is a very real challenge for ‘I’m a creationist and I don’t environmentalists in North Idaho. believe the world was here 800,000 BAD NEWS Nancy Gerth, who is on years ago, but I still can take Even with new wind and the steering committee of 350 responsibility for taking care of solar projects open, U.S. Sandpoint, says she and others our Earth and our environment,’” carbon emissions went up have pretty well stopped arguing Duebendorfer says. “That came in 2018 for the first time whether or not things are happenout of the conversation we had rein a few years, putting ing, and tried to shift the conversaally honoring each other instead of places like Washington tion to solutions. bashing each other.” state farther from its “It’s always been the idea of Many conservatives don’t 2030 emissions goals. the corporations to try to get peowant to see the government grow, ple arguing whether it’s real or not Duebendorfer says, which is partly rather than looking at what the solutions are,” why she’s so motivated to share the solution Gerth says. “We said, at a certain point, ‘We’re being pushed by Citizens’ Climate Lobby nationnot even going to talk about that anymore.’” ally. The organization is pushing for a carbon fee By focusing instead on the real issues, such as and dividend that would put a price on carbon wildfires that ravaged the region in recent years, pollution, and return the proceeds to every citivolunteers were able to work with the timber zen via the dividend. industry and state, county and federal officials to “I know from everybody I talked with, talk about how they’re managing and addressing stewardship of the planet is hugely important fires. for conservatives,” Duebendorfer says. “That’s “I learned that just talking about a related where we can meet.” issue did promote discussion of climate change. The bipartisan solution wouldn’t require We didn’t even have to bring it up,” Gerth says. “That was an important lesson in how people think about these problems.” Gabrielle Duebendorfer, who helped found the Sandpoint chapter of much more administration than sending out Citizens’ Climate Lobby, says she’s looked to a Social Security checks, Duebendorfer says, and national model for polite conversation called Livimportantly, would reduce pollution without ing Room Conversations to host regular meetings pinching low and middle income families in with women in the area and bridge the divide. the pocketbook, as the dividend would offset “The purpose was to invite women from increased fees. opposing political spectrums to talk about issues “We’re asking the industries that pollute and that are important to all of us,” Duebendorfer have a huge social cost, we’re asking them to be says, “and understand more what our common accountable,” she says. values are and how we’re differing.” One of the things that maybe gets lost in the The political divide can be so extreme on overall discussion, Piedfort says, is that progress both sides, she says, that people struggle to really is good, even if the warming goals are missed. hear what the other side is saying, demonizing “It’s not like there’s necessarily a hard line them rather than trying to understand where where if we meet it, we’re totally safe, but if we they’re coming from. The group is meant to miss it by just a little bit, the planet is doomed,” push through that, finding humanity in the other Piedfort says. “There are actually degrees of members. Part of that is realizing that the other consequences, so everything we can do, every side isn’t stupid, Duebendorfer says, but they’re little piece we do makes the future consequences prioritizing other values that may still cover comthat we’re gonna have to deal with just a little bit mon ground. less extreme.” n

“That came out of the conversation we had really honoring each other instead of bashing each other.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Samantha Wohlfeil covers the environment, energy, climate changes and other issues for the Inlander. Before joining the paper in 2017, she worked as a political reporter at the Bellingham Herald. She can be reached at samanthaw@inlander.com or 325-0634 ext. 234.


PREVIOUSLY...

Miller Cane is in Spokane, visiting his sister Dena and checking on their ailing mother, who’s in a nursing home and losing her mind. Miller has also been taking care of an 8-year-old doll-making girl named Carleen while her mother, Lizzie, is in jail for shooting her estranged husband, Connor. Before all this, Miller had been on the road alone, traveling from mass shooting to mass shooting, comforting and conning survivors to make a buck. Now, with Carleen, he has a new plan: Take the girl on America’s open roads while he returns to an old writing gig penning biographies of historical figures under the heading, “Hero or Villain?”

CHAPTER 4, PART 5

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is mother recognized him immediately when he walked into her room at Fairhaven. “Miller Cane!” she said, wrapping her arms around him. “And who is this marvelous child?” “Carleen,” Miller said. “Lizzie’s girl. You saw her a few years ago at the house.” “I certainly did,” Miller’s mother said. “And she’s even more adorable now.” “She sure is,” Miller said. “Hi, Mrs. Cane,” Carleen said, placing her Barbie Care Clinic on the table. “Call me Noreen,” Miller’s mother said. She opened her arms which Carleen walked into, and after a hug, Carleen handed her a stuffed doll shaped like a bowling pin, with no arms and no legs and hair flowing from un-

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

der a paisley babushka, a pouch on her belly filled with three smaller dolls. “It’s for you,” Carleen said. “How wonderful,” Noreen said, putting a hand to her chest. “Thank you, dear.” “You’re welcome,” Carleen said. “Tammy’s her name.” “Lovely,” Noreen said, pulling bowling pin babies from the mother doll’s pouch. “The detail work on these faces is marvelous.” “It’s marker,” Carleen said. “Exquisite,” Noreen said. There were other dolls scattered around the room — a plastic infant on the couch, a Raggedy Ann on the table, others propped or dropped on shelves. Most of the women at Fairhaven had dolls, which moved from room to room, mother to mother. Miller often brought a new one when he visited. At first he wrote his mom’s name on them and tried to find them when they went missing. Then he realized it didn’t make any difference, as long as everybody had one to carry around and hold. “Remember your parrot?” Carleen said. “I certainly do,” Noreen said. “Whatever happened to that bird?” and Carleen said, “I think he went to a farm.” “Did he die?” Noreen asked Miller. “Bryce has him,” Miller said. “Bryce,” Noreen said. “Bryce Bell,” Miller said. “Remember? My old friend?” In high school Bryce had practically lived with them. His mother had died when he was 13 and he didn’t have siblings. Noreen took him on as a project, cooking for him, buying him clothes, mothering him, which neither Bryce nor Miller minded. “Bryce was a handsome boy,” Noreen said. “But bad.” “He wasn’t bad,” Miller said. “You loved Bryce. You

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went to his plays.” “His father was bad,” Noreen said. “I can tell you that much.” Miller hoped he wasn’t going to learn something awful about Bryce or his father. Noreen’s revelations were often disturbing. She’d fallen in love early in her tenure at Fairhaven with a man who died a few months later, who she promptly forgot. “A woman has needs,” she told Miller at the time, which Miller understood but didn’t want to hear from his mother. “Your father was very attentive in that regard,” she said, “one of his strong suits,” something else Miller didn’t want to know, though surely his mother and father’s intimacy had been a good thing. She’d started forgetting his father’s name from time to time only a year ago, but more often lately, forgetting him at Christmas for long stretches. “Barclay was funny,” Carleen said. “But possessive,” Noreen said. “Which was why Miller was jealous.” “I wasn’t jealous,” Miller said. “He bit me. He bit everyone.” “He didn’t bite me,” Carleen said. “Or me,” Noreen said. “Where is that bird?” “Bryce has him,” Miller said. “Who?” “Bryce. He has Barclay.” “A wonderful bird,” Noreen said. “Who’s your daddy,” Carleen squawked. “Oh, yes, he did say that.” “Nobody’s home,” Carleen squawked. “Go away!” “It’s as if he were here,” Noreen said. “What’s become of him?” “Bryce has him,” Miller said, wondering if Bryce had set the bird free by now. ...continued on next page

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JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 29


MILLER CANE: A TRUE AND EXACT HISTORY  Chapter 4, Part 5 continued... “Is this your child?” Noreen said, and Miller said, “This is Lizzie’s girl — Carleen,” and Noreen said, “Is Bryce her father?” “No,” Miller said, and Noreen said, “Lizzie,” and Miller said, “Lizzie James.” “I know a Zee James quite well,” his mother said. “We play duplicate bridge Thursdays.” “That was Lizzie’s aunt,” Miller said. “Was?” Noreen said. “She died,” Miller said. “A while ago. But you know Lizzie, too — Carleen’s mom?” “Of course I do,” Noreen said, and to Carleen: “How is your mother, dear?” “She’s in jail,” Carleen said. “Oh, my.” “But she’s okay,” Carleen said. “It’s just a misunderstanding.” “A tax thing,” Miller said. “We’re working on it. Lizzie’s going to be fine.” “Lizzie James,” Noreen said. “Yes,” Miller said, and Noreen said, “Is she your wife, Miller?” “No,” Miller said. “Did your wife die?” “My wife was — is — Georgie,” Miller said. “We split a while ago.” “I never like to hear that.” “I know. She has two children now.” “Yours?” “No.” “Is this one yours?” “No.” “I’ll be needing a shower.”

“I know,” Miller said. “But how about some music first?” “Wonderful!” Miller walked to his mother’s iPod, glued to the bookshelf, and started a Dean Martin mix Dena had made, which always seemed to comfort their mother, and often brought her back to the surface. “Ah,” Noreen said, and to Carleen: “Do you love these songs as much as I do?” “Yes,” Carleen said. “Did you know my husband, William?” Carleen looked at Miller, who shook his head. “No,” she said. “He loved Dean Martin,” Noreen said, “dragging me to Vegas when those ridiculous men were kings of that place. It could be so romantic though, especially before the president got shot, the women in pearls and gloves and evening gowns, the men in pressed suits. What did we know about nightclubs and cocktails? We thought the glamor would last forever. William loved to gamble, but he never lost a dime more than we could afford.” Miller had not heard her stay on topic this long in years. Maybe it was the new drug Dena had mentioned. Noreen nodded to the music and sang along: “Oh baby, obey me.” “He was a dancer,” she said. “Elegant. Graceful. A beautiful man. Slimmer than Miller. Do you know how to dance, dear?” “Sort of,” Carleen said. She started gyrating to Dean

Martin, her version of the twist. Noreen held out her hands. “Do you want to dance with me?” Carleen took her hands, and Noreen said, “I’ll teach you.” “I’m going to the nurses station for a second,” Miller said, watching Carleen to see if she felt comfortable being left alone with his mother. It could get pretty weird pretty fast here. Carleen seemed fine. “Are you good, Carleen?” he said, and she said, “I am,” and Miller’s mom said, “I’ll

What did we know about nightclubs and cocktails? We thought the glamor would last forever. be the man. You’re going to wrap this arm around my waist, like this. There you go. And then I’m going to put my hands here and here, and pull you in.” “Oh baby,” Dean Martin sang, “oh baby, obey me, do.” Miller left Carleen to his mother’s instruction and walked to the nurses station. What had they done to make her seem so almost fine was what he wanted to know. He was only gone for a few minutes, and when he returned everything had gotten weird, but not in the usual way. n

MILLER CANE CONTINUES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER

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CLASSIC(AL) ROCK

THEY WILL ROCK YOU

The Spokane Symphony taps into the Music of Queen

Freddie Mercury performing in 1977

BY DAN NAILEN

Q

ueen, you might have noticed, is having what some call “a moment.” This time, the resurgence of the theatrical, experimental British rockers is driven by Bohemian Rhapsody, the movie that’s made a big pile of money and won some awards for its telling of the band’s story. As in most things regarding Queen, most of the flick is focused on legendary frontman Freddie Mercury, he of the flamboyant stage presence, remarkable vocal range and dramatic overbite. The new spotlight on Queen also once again serves as a reminder of what remarkable musicians Mercury and his bandmates Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon were, and how willing they were to push their sound in directions few of their classic-rock peers would dare. That was the first thing Martin Herman noticed when he was introduced to Queen’s music as a kid. ...continued on next page

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | CLASSIC(AL) ROCK “THEY WILL ROCK YOU,” CONTINUED... “I was driving with my friend in a car that had a tape player, back in the days of cassettes,” recalls Herman, the conductor for this weekend’s Spokane Symphony performances of the Music of Queen. “He had this great car speaker system, and he played this phenomenal song and arrangement that just knocked my socks off. And of course it was ‘Bohemian Rhapsody.’ “I’m somebody who’d studied classical music, performed it, composed it and arranged it, and to hear this piece, this multi-sectional, quasi-operatic scope, I couldn’t believe what I was hearing.” He was hearing a song that would become Queen’s calling card for decades after its release. But it’s only one song in a sprawling catalog that’s as noteworthy for its sparse, soulful piano ballads as it is for its bombastic slabs of multi-movement prog-rock. Queen was a band capable of tackling any musical genre, and did so with style and flash, whether you’re talking rockabilly (“Crazy Little Thing Called Love”), metal (“Stone Cold Crazy”), funk (“Another One Bites the Dust”), pure pop (“Somebody To Love”) or the opera/pop/classical mashup of “Bohemian Rhapsody.” The hit movie is merely the latest reminder of Queen’s excellence. Despite Mercury’s death in 1991, their music has gotten renewed jolts of attention every few years beyond the constant presence of their hits on rock radio. May and Taylor spearheaded a rock musical, We Will

Rock You, that ran for nearly 15 years in London’s West End, and they’ve toured under the Queen banner with singers Paul Rodgers and Adam Lambert. And the Wayne’s World movie in 1992 featured a memorable scene soundtracked by “Bohemian Rhapsody” that drove the old hit, originally released in 1975, soaring up the charts. Since 2009, Windborne Music has put together symphonic tours of the Music of Queen, using charts written by Brent Havens, in which a touring rock band joins local symphonies in performing songs from a wide array of Queen albums. Herman says the arrangements make for an ideal melding of rock show and symphony performance. “They really take advantage of the color of the orchestra in a way that is expressive but not overbearing,” Herman says. “It compliments what the band is playing and what [singer] Brody [Dolyniuk] is singing really artistically and musically. The colors and the writing for the horns and the writing for the strings, they have their own identity. It’s not just a simple matter of laying down the chords and letting everything happen over them. They’re actually involved in the dialogue with the band and with Brody, there’s a full dimensionality.” Dolyniuk was working in the Las Vegas music scene when Windborne contacted him to audition for the Music of Queen show 10 years ago. And while he considers himself a pretty devout Queen fan “and a student of Freddie

FIVE SONGS WE WANT TO HEAR AT THE MUSIC OF QUEEN: “Fat Bottomed Girls” “Princes of the Universe” “Hammer To Fall” “Somebody To Love” “I Want To Break Free”

Mercury and his vocal stylings,” he says he was a little late to the Queen game growing up. “I didn’t have any older siblings, so I missed out on the benefit of having an older brother saying, ‘Here, take my record collection and check out [Queen’s 1976 album] A Night at the Opera,’” Dolyniuk says. “I was a little bit of a late bloomer to the early catalog. I remember hearing ‘Crazy Little Thing Called Love’ on the radio, that was the first thing I identified with them.” Now, of course, Dolyniuk knows much of the Queen catalog inside and out, and he appreciates the new urgency old songs get both when fans see them on the big screen in a new movie, and when they hear them in a symphonic arrangement when he’s on stage. Performing Queen’s songs with a symphony, Dolyniuk says, “the sonic palette is much bigger. Having the lush strings or big brass augmenting the songs brings new life into it. “It’s not just for Queen fans to come and enjoy the symphony,” he adds of the Music of Queen show. “It’s also for symphony fans to come and enjoy a catalog they probably don’t know that well.” n Spokane Symphony presents the Music of Queen: A Rock Symphony • Fri-Sat, Jan. 25-26, at 8 pm • $33-$75 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

James Lowe MUSIC DIRECTOR FINALIST

+ James Lowe, guest conductor • Haochen Zhang, piano

Now on Inlander.com: National and international stories from the New York Times to go with the fresh, local news we deliver every day

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Franz Liszt.....................................Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 Zhou Tian .............................Rise (2018) West Coast Premiere Franz Liszt............................... Piano Concert No. 2 in A Major Johannes Brahms ......................................... Symphony No. 4

Haochen Zhang Piano

Sponsored by: The Johnston-Fix Foundation and First Interstate Bank M ARTIN WOLDSO N THE ATER AT THE FOX TICKETS | 509 624 1200 | SpokaneSymphony.org

32 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019


CULTURE | DIGEST

JOIN THE CLUB Wyatt Russell, son of Kurt and Goldie Hawn, has made a name for himself the last few years in movies like Overlord and Everybody Wants Some!!, but he might have found his sweet spot in AMC series Lodge 49, which just started streaming on Hulu. Russell plays “Dud,” a snakebit (literally) surfer living the beach bum life after his dad’s death when he stumbles upon a quasi-religious lodge of memorable characters who help give him a purpose. The show is a nice mix of laughs and drama, and the lovable, spacey Dud is its beating heart — a combination of Kurt Russell cool and goofball charm a la The Big Lebowski’s “Dude.” (DAN NAILEN)

Five Rules for Online Recipe Writers BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

t’s the golden age for home cooking. The world may be burning, but our chicken cutlets remain moist and well-marinated. The days of needing to lug out some thick and dusty Betty Crocker cookbook every time you want to try some new dish are over. YouTube is boiling over with cooking tutorials, Pinterest is fully stocked with fancy pastry ideas, while cooking blogs of all sorts of flavors have decades of archives. You’ve got sites like allrecipes. com perfect for the beginning home chef, Serious Eats for the ambitious one, and New York Times Cooking for the people who can afford to still subscribe to New York Times Cooking. But here are a few things I want from my online recipes to kick things up a notch:

THE BUZZ BIN

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Jan. 25. To wit: BACKSTREET BOYS, DNA. Wait, what? Seriously? MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD, Stay Human Vol. II. Alternate titles considered: Staying Human. Stay More Human. Stay Human: The Humaning. Bumblebee. THE DANDY WARHOLS, Why You So Crazy? Look who’s asking! Oh, it’s Portland’s awesome purveyors of pop-rock. Carry on. RIVAL SONS, Feral Roots. Recorded by uber-producer Dave Cobb in Muscle Shoals, expectations are, as they say, high. (DAN NAILEN)

1. I get that you recipe writers want to include obscure or difficult to obtain ingredients, like aardvark tongue or melange or ectoplasmic powder so rich people can impress their fellow hedge fund managers at dinner parties. That’s fine. But for us plebes whose gourmet grocery options don’t get much fancier than the Chinese/Mexican aisle at Safeway, include some more plausible substitutions. Maybe you don’t need Pommery, when any whole-grain mustard will do. 2. Separate out each step with bullet points so I don’t miss a crucial step crammed in the middle of a paragraph. We live in the ADHD-addled age of Twitter. There’s no excuse for not dicing your recipe into bitesized chunks. For that matter, in the age of iPhones, there’s nothing stopping you from snapping a pic of every step, so we know exactly what, say, seared catfish is supposed to look like. 3. Don’t assume I know how to do anything. Does the recipe require a poached egg? Link me to a good video about egg poaching. Linking is free. And for that matter, on those videos? Include some text. I don’t want to have to rewatch the video 20 times while I’m cooking. 4. Stop lying to me about cooking times. Sure, a Top Chef Quickfire competitor can prep, dice and mince seven different types of veggies in five minutes. But me? Assume it will take at least three Netflix episodes. 5. Starting every recipe with an ode to how your dish recalls the sunlight streaming through the curtains when you were but a wide-eyed child visiting your nana in Tuscany just wears out my scroll wheel. Use your unlimited online word count to tell me why and how the dish works. Why do the ingredients work together? What’s the most important step? How did you screw up this dish the first three times you made it? n

EMOTIONAL EXPLORATION Gris is one of the most visually and emotionally beautiful video game experiences I’ve ever had. Released in December, Gris is the soothing and deeply artistic journey of a lone female protagonist as she seeks to recover from some unknown trauma or overcome a personal demon. As players gracefully move through her crumbling world, platforming and solving puzzles, bright colors and natural beauty slowly begin returning to the ruins. With no in-game enemies or traditional setbacks for failing other than getting back up and trying again, Gris focuses on players experiencing its breathtaking visuals, music and story. (CHEY SCOTT)

FORCED VACATIONS It’s no secret the Chinese government takes a no-tolerance approach to political dissent. Less known is that the Chinese state frequently forces political deviants to go on lavish vacations in order to pamper and pacify them. The practice is called bei lüyou, or “to be touristed.” Several friendly — but ever watchful — policeman will accompany the given dissident. As Jianying Zha, the Chinese-American journalist writes: the practice is illustrative of how the “Chinese police state can be at once harsh and accommodating, insidious and absurd.” Check out his story “China’s Bizarre Program to Keep Activists in Check” on newyorker.com. (JOSH KELETY)

BARF FEST If you’re about to watch Netflix’s Fyre Festival documentary, Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened, be warned: You may vomit your guts out. I was barfing in my mouth every time I heard the word “influencer,” or heard someone involved describe co-founder and fraudster Billy McFarland as a “great entrepreneur.” The whole thing is a depressing commentary on the facade of social media and marketing, a facade that can convince thousands of people to spend thousands of dollars on a music festival because some models promoted it on Instagram. It’s fascinating, even if it’s also sickening. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | IMPROV

I Saw Blue The Inlander’s missed connections come to life at the Blue Door Theatre BY QUINN WELSCH

T

here is a sort of running joke among Inlander staffers that goes something like this: “I love your newspaper! I read the I Saw Yous every week!” For all of our hard work compiling news and entertainment stories, a dedicated faction of our readers still pick up each new edition of the newspaper and head straight for the I Saw You/Cheers/Jeers section (on page 54 this week). That’s just fine with me, because each week at the Inlander I have the pleasure of personally selecting the various submissions for that section. When the Blue Door Theatre announced its latest edition of I Saw You! improv, I was naturally excited. In a way, the show is a reflection of my work, although I wouldn’t dare take ownership of the local phenomena that is the I Saw You section. It is a showcase of the best and worst that Spokane and the surrounding area has to offer. Love, death, heartbreak, politics, revenge, late-night trips to Walmart. You’ll find whatever you’re looking for in this section. The submissions are all vague enough that you can let your

34 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

If you read the I Saw Yous every week in the Inlander, the Blue Door Theatre has the show for you. imagination do most of the work. This is probably why they make for such great improv comedy. “We see stories in everything. Improvisers are people watchers,” says improv actor Frank Tano. “We make assumptions about things, whether or not they are true, for our own entertainment.” He’s been at the Blue Door Theatre for over 20 years and has been the comedy group’s artistic director since 2003. The idea for the I Saw You! show, Tano says, began at a local eatery in 2009 after the troupe finished a show. Someone picked up a copy of the Inlander and went to the I Saw Yous. “Two of our folk were reading these out loud and I was like, ‘Wow, there some good sources for scene work in those!’” Tano says. It works like this: Audience members cut out clips of their favorite I Saw Yous and submit them before the show starts. The clippings are taped to the wall behind the stage, but Tano and Co. don’t know what they are. Each skit begins with one of the actors reading the clippings to the audience. A skit called “Jerry the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle,” for instance, was born out of a Jeer to people who toss rocks and litter onto frozen Manito Park pond. Encouraged by a sage-like badger, Jerry began a Tolkien-esque journey to the surface, which ultimately resulted in violence. (You kinda had to be there.)

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Tano’s recent favorite opens with: “Like swirling clouds of gas at the edge of the solar system, there’s always something lonely about following the path designated by forces we don’t quite understand.” That submission wasn’t exactly a missed connection, nor was it a Cheer or Jeer, but it is definitely weird, and weird works. “If I don’t have 20 questions after reading an I Saw You, to me it’s not a good one,” Tano says. Not every skit is a winner. The Blue Door’s Liz Schroeder acknowledges this when she opens the show. Not everything is going to work. Some veer way off track. Others lose what initially made the I Saw You novel or funny to begin with. But it doesn’t really matter, because ultimately the show is mostly about a group of people doing goofy stuff on stage. Tano says he’s still waiting for an audience member to fess up to writing one of the I Saw Yous. “If I’m in the show, I’m stopping that show and then interviewing them to do scene work off that interview.” n

I SAW I SAW YOU YOU CHEERS JEERS

&

CHEERS JEERS

&

I Saw You! • Fridays; Jan. 25, Feb. 1, Feb. 8 at 7:30 pm • Blue Door Theatre • 815 W. Garland • $8 • All ages • 747-7045 • bluedoortheatre.com • Also: Maturethemed I Saw You! • Sat, Jan. 26 and Sat, Feb. 2, at 9:30 pm • $8


The Inland Northwest

Readers Poll Give Us Your Best! The Inlander’s Best of the Inland Northwest Readers Poll is back for its 26th year. Yep, we’re the original readers poll around here, celebrating all that’s awesome about living in the Spokane/Coeur d’Alene (and beyond) area. For 2019 we’ve got a great mix of classic questions — everything from Best Local Brewery to Best Athlete — and new ones — like Best Place to Paddle Board and Best Ramen.

We’ve also got special categories just for our readers in the Palouse and Sandpoint areas. Remember that this readers poll celebrates our LOCAL excellence, so please VOTE LOCAL. Got that? LOCAL, LOCAL LOCAL! This paper ballot must be postmarked by February 4th. Online balloting - at BestOf.Inlander.com - ends WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6.

* MUST ANSWER AT LEAST 36 QUESTIONS FOR YOUR BALLOT TO COUNT

RESULTS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN OUR BEST OF ISSUE ON MARCH 21 ST!

FOOD

Best Tacos

Best TV Weathercaster

Drink Local

Best Bar

Best TV Sportscaster

Best Local Winery

Best Restaurant

Best Elected Official

Best Local Brewery

Best Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt

Best Athlete

Best New Brewery (Opened in 2018-19)

MUSIC

SHOPPING

Best Beer Bar

Best Food Truck Best Burritos

Best Music Festival

Best Thai Food

Best Indoor Concert of 2018-19

The Essentials Best Burgers Best Pizza Best Bread (By The Loaf)

That Special Something

Best Beer Event/Festival

Best Toy Store

Best Local Distillery

Best Gifts

Best Local Cidery

Best Hotel

Best Craft Cocktails

Best Pet Boutique

Best Bartender (Name and Location)

Best Jewelry

Best Bloody Mary

Best Florist

Best Single-Location Coffee Shop

Best Spa

Best Coffee Roaster

People

Best Med Spa

Best Drive-Through Espresso

Best Vintage Decor Shop

Best Barista (Name and Location)

The Palouse

Best Local Celebrity

Best Tattoo Parlor

Best Local Hero

Best Retail Cannabis Shop

Best Community/Arts Event

Best Radio Dj Or Team

Best Budtender (Name and Shop)

Best Coffee Shop

Best TV Anchorperson

Best Breakfast

Best Outdoor Concert of 2018-19

Best Sushi

Best Touring Broadway Musical of 2018-19

Best Sandwiches

Best Hip-Hop Artist/Group

Best Pub Food

Best Singer/Songwriter

Best Vegetarian/Vegan Food Best Mexican Food Best Italian Food

Best Band Best Record Store

Best Farmers Market

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 35


Recreation

FOOD

Special Treats

SHOPPING

Nightlife

Ever yday Needs

Best Place To Paddle Board

Best Escape Room Best Fine Dining

Best Bank

Best Bakery

Best Furniture

Best Donuts

Best Organic/Natural Foods

Best Hiking Trail

Best Place To Dance

Best Fly Fishing (River Or Stream)

Best Casino

Best Outdoor Rec Supplies

Best Sports Bar Best Ice Cream

Best Barber Shop

Best Yoga Studio

Best Trivia Host (Name And Location) Best Steaks

Best Hair Salon

Best Seafood

Best Womens Boutique

Best Brunch

Best Eyeglasses

Best Running Event

Best Live Music Venue

Best Health Club

Best New Nightspot (Opened In 2018-19)

Best Personal Trainer

Best Movie Theater Best Ramen

Best Credit Union

Best Bike Shop

Best Bowling Center Best Cupcakes

Best Used Car Lot

Best Milkshake

Best New Car Dealership

Best Chef (Name and Restaurant)

Romance

Next Year

SANDPOINT

Best Place For A Cheap First Date

Best Question to Ask Next Year

Best Community/Arts Event

Best Place To Pop The Question

Best Coffee Shop

Best Place For A Wedding Reception

Best Sushi

Best Wedding Band

Best Bar

Best Baby Doctor (Ob/Gyn or Pediatrician)

Best Ski/Snowboard Shop

Best Local Comedian

Best Place To Snowboard Best Place To Ski

The Arts

Best New Restaurant (Opened In 2017-18)

Best Memorable Place To Make Out

Best Author Best Bookstore Best Local Instagram Best Arts Festival

* MUST ANSWER AT LEAST 36 QUESTIONS FOR YOUR BALLOT TO COUNT

Best First Friday/Artwalk Venue Best Restaurant Best Charity Event Best Burger Best Open Mic Poetry Event Best Mural

POSTMARK BY FEBRUARY 4TH

NAME

REQUIRED

Best Parade EMAIL

Best Local Play Or Musical Of 2018-19

Vote at

BestOf.Inlander.com

REQUIRED (only 1 ballot per email allowed)

MAIL THIS BALLOT TO:

The Inlander 1227 W Summit Parkway Spokane, WA 99201


CULTURE | COMEDY

21 ST ANNUAL SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

February 1-8, 2019 SEE WHAT’S NEXT

Yes, And…

Improv masters (includling Greg Proops, far left), not the new cast of a Mad Men reboot.

Whose Live Anyway? regular Greg Proops talks about the joys and implicit dangers of improv comedy BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

here are countless pitfalls in improvisational comedy. Something could go wrong at any moment, and the entire scene could be derailed, in front of a room full of people. That’s part of the challenge, and also part of the appeal. Greg Proops, a cast member of the improv quartet starring in the touring Whose Live Anyway?, has seen it all. At a recent show in Orlando, for instance, a drunk audience member tried to ply the performers with shots of alcohol in the middle of a scene. “Normally we would have,” Proops says, “but we were a little bit busy.” But that’s all par for the course, and it’s kind of what attracted Proops to improv in the first place. “I love the spontaneity of it, and the danger,” Proops says. “There’s always failure, but the truth is failing funny is really important. It’s a really important part of the game, and knowing that the audience is always on your side.” Whose Live Anyway? has its roots in the TV series Whose Line Is It Anyway?, an adaptation of a BBC radio program that features four performers going through various improv games in front of a studio audience. Proops has been a Whose Line regular for nearly 30 years, first appearing on the origi-

nal British show and again on the hugely popular American version. That ran for eight seasons and was successfully revived in 2013 with a majority of the same cast. “I think every high school and college in the country has got an improv group, and that’s kind of because of us,” Proops says. “Improv’s a great way to start if you’re trying to learn theater. It’s a good skill to have as an actor, it’s a good skill to have as a comedian. It worked for me.” When Whose Live hits Spokane, Proops will be joined on stage by Dave Foley of the influential sketch troupe Kids in the Hall, actor Joel Murray and fellow Whose Line regular Jeff B. Davis. He’s also still performing often with his former Whose Line co-stars, including Ryan Stiles, Colin Mochrie, Wayne Brady and Drew Carey, professional relationships that, in some cases, date back several decades. “We still find each other funny,” Proops says. “We don’t hate each other. We break bread before the shows, which I think is really important, and we drink after together. We’re not like the Who — we don’t all get into four separate cars.” Proops also keeps busy as a stand-up comic — he released an album called The Resistance in October — and hosts the popular podcast The Smartest Man in the World. He’s

also got an impressive resume as a voice actor: He played Bob the Builder for several years, and has had roles in The Nightmare Before Christmas and several Star Wars properties, including The Phantom Menace. But it’s improv that has given him the largest audience, and he estimates that he and the Whose Live crew perform at least 70 dates a year. “We hit the stage running,” Proops says. “There’s a lot of singing and jumping around, and we include the audience in a bunch of bits with us.” Fans of the Whose Line TV series will already be familiar with some of the improv games in the stage show: There’s Moving Bodies, in which the performers have to stand still during a scene while audience members move their limbs around, and Sound Effects, which involves audience members adding their own noises to a scene. As for the Hoedown, the singing challenge that ends many a Whose Line episode, don’t get your hopes up. “You can yell ‘Hoedown’ all you like,” Proops says. “We do sing, though.” Proops has had the format described to him as “a bunch of assholes playing charades,” and that’s where a lot of Whose Line (and its live stage counterpart) gets a lot of its low-key charm. There’s an intimacy between the performers and the audience, he says, not just because they interact but because even when they’re in character, they’re basically still playing themselves. Just don’t try and make them do shots on stage. n Whose Live Anyway? • Thu, Jan. 31 at 8 pm • $35-$52 • All ages • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

Don’t Miss...

Opening Night! -featuring-

Northwest’s

Best!

February 1, 2019 5:30pm Bing Crosby Theater spokanefilmfestival.org

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 37


Fery Haghighi has been cooking for Spokanites since 1980.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

PROFILE

Empire Builder Since fleeing Iran for Spokane four decades ago, Fery Haghighi has found region-wide success with her catering business BY CHEY SCOTT

A

s work in the kitchen begins to wind down on a Friday afternoon, Fery Haghighi pauses to greet each customer stopping by her downtown Spokane catering business for a late lunch or snack. Of them is a pair of women from Orofino, Idaho, a three-hour drive away, who remind her they always stop by Fery’s Catering and Take-Out while in Spokane, and tell all of their friends at home to go as well. “They bring me herbs, and I put [them] in my garden every year,” Haghighi notes. “We have lots of those kind of people who are so kind and so friendly and beautiful.” After nearly 40 years of cooking in Spokane, these familiar faces have become extended family to the

38 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

Iranian-born cook and business owner who’s operated Fery’s Catering since 1995, and before that, Spokane’s first traditional French-style bakery, Au Croissant. “She really does this because she loves people and she loves the loyalty of people coming back and wanting her food,” notes Haghighi’s daughter, Nelou Fennessy. It’s been a long journey, however, for Haghighi and her family to get this far, becoming an established and well-loved local food purveyor. After fleeing their home in Tehran during the 1979 Iranian Revolution, when the country’s last shah was ousted by Ayatollah Khomeini, the Haghighis sought political asylum in Spokane. Fery’s brother was living here, and she recalls then-Democratic

Speaker of the House Tom Foley writing a letter to help them gain entry to the United States. “We are very lucky, but you know, they say here is a place of opportunity. If you work hard and are honest, you can really climb up. Not in other countries,” Haghighi reflects. Adjusting to life in Spokane wasn’t easy in the beginning. Haghighi’s family was part of Tehran’s wealthy upper class — they had cooks, chauffeurs, nannies and other hired help — and now had to start over in a new and unfamiliar city that felt incredibly small to them. “A friend of ours told me ‘Now you need a job… why don’t you go and take classes and become a ca-


shier?’” Haghighi remembers. “When they left, I started crying. For me, putting an apron on and working wasn’t very pleasant.” Yet throughout their upheaval, one thing hadn’t changed for Haghighi: Her love of cooking. Not long after settling in Spokane, she and her husband Ahmad, a geologist, opened Au Croissant in downtown Spokane. It was there they introduced Spokane to traditional French pastries and espresso coffee, which were mostly unfamiliar to the city at the time. Haghighi, who’s both self and professionally taught, traveled to refine her cooking skills at Le Cordon Bleu and La Varenne in Paris. Au Croissant, on Howard Street just north of Riverfront Park, became so popular that customers would form lines down the block to get fresh-baked bread and pastries before the day’s supply sold out, sometimes as early as 10 am. “Now, I am so proud,” Haghighi reflects. “At a jewelry store, a guy said to me, ‘Oh, those are working hands.’ Now I am stronger and liberated. I am a working woman and I am proud of that. And I think every day when I cook, I make so many people happy.” At one point, the Haghighis owned three locations of Au Croissant and a production bakery in Spokane Valley where they made bread and other wholesale goods for many local restaurants. In the evenings, the downtown cafe would transition to a formal white-linen restaurant serving French-inspired Mediterranean fare. Some of the dishes Haghighi served there are still part of Fery’s Catering’s menus, like her Middle Eastern kabobs and rice. Although the family closed Au Croissant in 1995, in part due to negative reports discouraging consumption of cholesterol, butter and eggs that caused business to drop off, Fery’s Catering was the phoenix born from its ashes.

F

or most of its life, and the past two decades, Fery’s Catering and Take-Out has operated in a small, house-size building at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Cowley Street, sandwiched between the freeway and Sacred Heart Medical Center. While the bulk of Fery’s business comes from its catering services for meetings, funerals, weddings, office lunches, parties and other events, Haghighi’s Persian-influenced food is highly sought by walk-in customers like the loyal fans stopping in before Friday’s closing. Those famil-

iar with the menu know the caterer’s unassuming facade and a tiny seating area (hence the take-out focus) belie the rich, layered flavors of its food. “I’m a cook, I’m not a chef,” Haghighi says. “I like to make tasty food, and I have my own Iranian accent on it and a lot of French accents.” The spice rack inside her kitchen is thusly filled with traditional Persian herbs and spices: cumin, fenugreek, turmeric, coriander, sumac, saffron, dried limes and more. “When I came here, none of them existed,” she says. “Now, when a cook wants to make it a little exotic, they put those things in there.” While dishes available for catering vary from what’s served daily for takeout customers, customer favorites include her pomegranate and walnut chicken, traditional Middle Eastern-style kabobs, a rhubarb and mint lamb stew and “celebration rice,” a Persian rice with nuts, orange peel and carrots. The cold case just inside the front door is filled with big serving bowls of Haghighi’s most loved dishes, like her famous chicken and spinach pasta salad with a creamy, peppery dressing. Her spicy chicken curry, hummus spreads, layered cheese terrine, house cobb salad and a rotating selection of richly flavored pasta, rice and legume salads are also constant choices. Cookies and cakes fill the case, too, including French pastries and sweets. Some cakes from Fery’s kitchen are also sold at My Fresh Basket and Huckleberry’s Natural Market. By all appearances, Haghighi, 76, isn’t slowing down yet. She’s begun delegating more work to her small, steadfast team, including longtime manager Melissa Larson, who’s been working with Haghighi for 21 years. It’s still rare, however, to stop in and not find Haghighi behind the counter overseeing the kitchen. Fennessy says her mother also continues to work on some of the restaurant’s Sundays off. When a longtime client requests her food, Haghighi usually can’t say no. “My hope is that I can stay as long as I can, because it makes me happy when I’m here,” she says. “I had a customer who comes regularly, she said, ‘Everytime I walk in, you have a smile.’ I’m not very smiley when I’m cooking — I’m concentrating and busy. But when I see people, I’m very happy.” n cheys@inlander.com Fery’s Catering and Take-Out • 421 S. Cowley St. • Open Mon-Fri 9 am-6 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm • feryscatering.com • 458-5234

TH NE UR XT SD AY !

Presents

First Bite

FOR SECOND HARVEST

Get the first taste of what’s on the menu this year during Inlander Restaurant Week, accompanied by artisan cheese and wine from Washington.

Featuring Samples From:

Darigold, Ferndale Farmstead, Downriver Grill, Palouse Bar and Grill, Timber Gastro Pub, Safari Room, Honey Eatery and Social Club, Max at Mirabeau, Palm Court Grill, and Charley’s Grill and Spirits.

Live Music:

From Singer/Songwriter Kyle Richard

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31 BARRISTER WINERY

TICKETS $31 • ON SALE NOW InlanderRestaurantWeek.com

All proceeds benefit Second Harvest Food Bank

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 39


FOOD | COOKING

Hearty Pumpkin Soup for the Soul Make this homemade soup and bread combo for gray winter days BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

40 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019


I

f you’ve walked through a Target or scrolled through the internet for any amount of time this winter, you’ve probably come across the concept of hygge — the cozy, comforting, warm fuzzy feeling that Danish culture finds so defining there’s a unique word for it. While I can’t help you get the perfect balance of potted plants and cozy socks to reach peak hygge in your home design, I can offer the next best thing to warm your soul on a chilly day: a hearty bowl of soup and hot-from-the-oven homemade bread. This pumpkin, carrot and sweet potato soup comes with an extra kick of heat from the cayenne pepper, and it’s especially tasty and filling with spicy sausage (totally optional for the vegetarians or vegans out there). And luckily for those intimidated by the idea of breadmaking, it’s actually super simple to make a perfectly crusty loaf without kneading the dough at all. You’ll just need a Dutch oven and some time. Throw the ingredients in a bowl before leaving for work, the yeast will spend the next several hours working its magic, leaving the dough ready to bake by the time you’re making dinner.

Wkly Dinner Specials after 4pm Fr Spumoni Ice Cream wi Dinner

$

3022 N. Division St. • 325-7443 Ferrarosfamilyitalian.com •

7.95

Monday - Friday 11am-2pm

7

PUMPKIN CARROT SOUP WITH SPICY SAUSAGE

2-3 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium yellow onion 3 large carrots, peeled 1 sweet potato, peeled 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic salt Leaves from one sprig fresh rosemary Leaves from two sprigs fresh sage 29-ounce can pumpkin puree 2 quarts chicken broth 1 pound spicy ground sausage Salt and pepper to taste 1. Heat large pot over medium heat and coat the bottom with olive oil. Dice the onion, carrot and sweet potato and add to the pot once the oil starts to shimmer. 2. Cook vegetables until starting to soften, stirring frequently. After about five minutes, add cayenne, garlic salt, rosemary and sage and cook for another two minutes or so. 3. Add the pumpkin and chicken broth to the pot, stirring well. Reduce heat to simmer and cook for 30-45 minutes until vegetables are soft. 4. Carefully transfer the mix to a blender in batches to puree until smooth, or use an immersion blender. Return mixture to pot and keep at a simmer. 5. Brown the ground sausage in another pan, drain the oil, then add to the soup and serve.

NO-KNEAD ROSEMARY GARLIC BREAD

1-1/2 cups warm water 3/4 teaspoon active dry yeast 1 teaspoon honey 1-1/2 teaspoons salt 3 cups flour 1 head of garlic cloves, peeled Leaves from 1-2 sprigs of fresh rosemary 1. In a large bowl, combine the water, honey and yeast and let sit until bubbles start to form on the surface. 2. Add the salt and stir, then only partially mix in the flour. Sprinkle the whole garlic cloves and rosemary into the bowl, then finish mixing until everything is well combined. 3. Cover with plastic wrap or a towel and let sit at room temperature for at least 12 hours. 4. Put Dutch oven with the lid on in the oven and preheat to 425 degrees. Once the oven reaches temperature, flour a cutting board and your hands and carefully remove the dough from the bowl, shaping it into a round loaf. Cut a slash or two on top, and carefully put it into the Dutch oven. Bake with the lid on for 30 minutes, then carefully remove the lid and bake for another 10-20 minutes until the loaf is golden brown. Cool, slice and serve with butter. n samanthaw@inlander.com

Soup, Salad & Bread

8

DON’T FORGET TO VOTE

SWEETO BURRITO

BEST BURRITO 2019!

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CATERING ORDERS: (509) 499-9519

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ONLINE ORDERING: sweetoburrito.com

High Heels AND Hard Hats WE INVITE YOU TO CELEBRATE WITH US AT OUR

15th Annual Fundraiser! TO BENEFIT MELODY’S HOUSE OF HOPE

SAVE

THE DATE

Sat, February 23 • Spokane Convention Center

Tickets: becausethereishope.org/events JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 41


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

Indian Trail Tap House Opens Plus, a new bagel spot in Sandpoint and upcoming craft beer events

A

fter a soft opening, HAPPY TRAILS TO BREWS in Spokane’s Indian Trail Neighborhood is ready to officially open its doors. A grand opening celebration starts Friday, Jan. 25, at 5 pm and goes to midnight Saturday, Jan. 26. The party features a special craft beer lineup, including multiple limited offerings from Fremont Brewing, like the newly released Sky Kraken hazy pale ale, and the 2017 vintage of B-Bomb, a bourbon barrel-aged imperial winter ale. It may be their first venture into the beer business, but owners Bill and Danielle Reeve have a longstanding passion for the Spokane craft beer scene. Their new watering hole features 16 taps of beer and cider with a focus on regional breweries. Happy Trails to Brews, located at 9025 N. Indian Trail Rd. in the Sundance Plaza, also offers a selection of packaged drinks in the cooler, so you can pop a cold one at the bar or take your favorite six pack home. For more details and hours, check Happy Trails to Brews’ Facebook page. (DEREK HARRISON)

SANDPOINT’S NEW BAGEL EATERY

If you build it, they will come. That was the plan for Marcy Timblin and Angelina Henry, who figured Sandpoint was due for a bagel

42 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

Happy Trails to Brews offers a variety of craft beer and cider. shop, so they created UPTOWN BAGEL CO. next to the Pend d’Oreille Winery in the former Tierra Madre juice bar space. And rather than try to recreate a true East Coast bagel — some declare it’s the water that makes bagels from the Big Apple so distinct — the duo use New Yorker Bagels from Queens in a range of flavors, including blueberry, sesame, rye and “everything.” Go the sweet route with the BananaWhama, a French toast bagel with Nutella, banana, honey and frischkäse, a softer, more spreadable version of cream cheese ($6.50). For savory, try the Stallone, a garlic bagel with salami, ham, roast beef, provolone, red onion, banana peppers and roasted red pepper frischkäse ($9). From the clever menu to the

RadioSpokane_1035TheGame_012419_8H_KS.pdf


bright, funky décor, Uptown’s mission, according to its owners, is to “make more happy people by 2 pm every day with our deliciously addictive hot bagelwiches, outstanding customer experience and ’80s vibe.” (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

TASTY UPCOMING BEER EVENTS

On the evening of Friday, Feb. 1, BELLWETHER BREWING CO. is hosting its third annual GruitFest celebration timed with International Gruit Day, and featuring plenty of gruit-style beers — that’s beer made with blends of herbs and spices and usually without hops — from local craft breweries. This year’s participants include Mountain Lakes, Whistle Punk, Republic, Bardic, Genus, the Grain Shed and Young Buck breweries, along with R E S TA U R A N T Hierophant Meadery and the FINDER Inland Brewers Unite Spokane Looking for a new place to Homebrew Club. Brewers from eat? Search the region’s some of those establishments most comprehensive bar have also teamed up to create and restaurant guide at a Nordic-style fir sahti made Inlander.com/places. with juniper, fir and herbs. Bellwether co-owner Thomas Croskrey says the fir used for the gruit came from the taproom’s own Christmas tree. Check out the GruitFest 2019 event page on Facebook for more details as the event approaches. Also early next month, MOBIUS SCIENCE CENTER is hosting the next installment of its next Nerd Night series, “For the Love of Beer and Science,” on Friday, Feb. 8. Tickets to the 21-and-up event are $25 each, and seats are limited (purchase at mobiusspokane.org). The program offers a peek into the science of brewing with co-hosts Mountain Lakes Brewing and Eastern Washington University, along with beer samples and snacks. Admission also includes access to the center’s current exhibits and activities, and additional pints beyond what’s included with each ticket will be available for purchase. (CHEY SCOTT)

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JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 43


THIEVES LIKE US Lost souls form a family in the great Japanese drama Shoplifters

I

n the films of Hirokazu Kore-eda, it’s the things that aren’t said that resonate loudest. They’re about feelings left unexpressed, about the past regrets that still gnaw away at the conscience. The emotional heft of his stories come not from incident or contrivance, but from small, sometimes imperceptible gestures between two people. Consider the opening scene of his latest film Shoplifters, which won the prestigious Palme d’Or at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. In only a matter of minutes — and in few words — it beautifully sets up the strange world of its main characters. A man and a preteen boy are in a grocery store. They’re communicating through hand signals, not unlike baseball coach shorthand. We come to realize we’re looking at a complicated choreography: The man moves so that the boy is shielded from the prying eyes of the store clerks, allowing him to take products off the shelves and shove them into his backpack undetected. They’ve obviously done this before. They’re good at it. We end up back at their cramped Tokyo apartment, where the man and boy live with three women, though the movie isn’t explicit about how they’re all related to one another. The man has injured himself, so he’s on hiatus from his construction job. His wife works in a laundromat; a younger woman moonlights at a gentlemen’s club. There’s also an elderly matriarch, who cooks up the food that the man and boy have stolen for them.

44 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER A few nights later, they encounter a little girl who lives down the street, and whose parents abuse and neglect her. They take her home, feed and bathe her, and give her a place to sleep for an evening. There’s talk about taking her back to her parents, or turning her SHOPLIFTERS in to the authorities, but it’s Rated R brushed off. She’s now their Directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda child. Starring Lily Franky, Sakura Andô, They’ve also done this Mayu Matsuoka, Jyo Kairi before. Because these people interact like a family, we immediately assume they are a family. And yet a sense of doubt begins to creep in. Why does the boy have such a difficult time referring to the man as “Dad”? When the missing girl appears on the news, why do they change her name, cut and color her hair and start to teach her those hand signals? And why does the oldest woman regularly visit her stepson, who keeps giving her money? We do eventually learn what has brought these characters together, and what we find out is difficult to reconcile with the people we’ve come to know — or think we’ve come to know. It’s a powerful revelation, but it doesn’t play out like a cheap plot twist or a dramatic manipulation. Kore-eda is too refined of a storyteller for that; it complicates our feelings, but it also, in a strange way, deepens them.

Kore-eda is one of the finest film artists currently working in Japan, and his movies tend to be meditative and Zen-like, reserved studies of loss, grief and the unspoken familial resentments that can echo through generations. Shoplifters is one of his more narratively straightforward efforts — it would actually make a terrific entry point into his filmography — and it recalls his great 2004 feature Nobody Knows, about a 12-year-old boy looking after his younger siblings when their mother walks out on them. Like that earlier film, Shoplifters views the alien world of grown-ups through the innocent eyes of children, and shows how adults can manipulate a kid’s naivete for their own benefit. When the man ropes the boy into smashing a car window and nabbing a purse, an act that violates the family’s ethos about stealing, it snaps him back into the reality that his own childhood has been something of a lie. I’m realizing now that Shoplifters is a difficult movie to describe, not only because its impact is tied up in discoveries that I don’t want to divulge, but because it earns its final emotional wallops through tender, intimate moments that you simply have to see for yourself. Many of the film’s conflicts are resolved in silence, or when characters are alone, so that only we know what they’re thinking and feeling. In that sense, Kore-eda is among the most perceptive of contemporary filmmakers, and also one of the most compassionate. n


VOTE NOW!

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE FINAL WISH

In what is definitely not another Insidious sequel, a spooky old house produces some kind of demon that haunts a guy and his widowed mom. Starring Lin Shaye from, uh, Insidious. (NW) Not Rated

THE KID WHO WOULD BE KING

From Attack the Block director Joe Cornish, a family fable that finds 21stcentury British kids stumbling into King Arthur territory. (JB) Rated PG

SERENITY

A neo-noir involving a fishing boat captain, his devious ex-wife and the new husband she wants dead. Mat-

The Kid Who Would Be King

thew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway star. (NW) Rated R

SHOPLIFTERS

A strange, moving drama about a surrogate family of petty thieves and the dark secret that unites them. One of Japanese master Hirokazu Kore-eda’s best films. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

STAN & OLLIE

Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly play legendary comedy duo Laurel and Hardy in the twilight years of their long career, in a gentle biopic that’s a bit cheesy but still enjoyable to watch. (JB) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING AQUAMAN

The half-man, half-fish superhero gets his own vehicle, in which he inherits the Atlantean throne and fights with his evil brother. It’s got some crazy visuals and hammy performances but still manages to be kind of a slog. (JB) Rated PG-13

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

The band Queen and late frontman Freddie Mercury (played by Rami Malek) get the biopic treatment, and the results won’t exactly rock you. It takes a disappointingly conventional approach to a wildly unconventional figure. (JB) Rated PG-13

BUMBLEBEE

A surprisingly fun Transformers origin story, with the yellow Autobot coming to Earth in the ’80s and befriending a teenage outcast (Hailee Steinfeld). Unlike its Michael Bay-directed prede-

cessors, it coasts by on low-key charm. (NW) Rated PG-13

A DOG’S WAY HOME

A plucky canine is separated from its owner, and makes a dangerous crosscountry trek to get back to him. If you saw the trailer, you’ve basically seen the whole movie. (NW) Rated PG

ESCAPE ROOM

In this Saw/Cube hybrid, a group of strangers are drawn to an escape room that promises a reward to whoever can get out. No surprise — it turns out to be deadly. About two-thirds of a compelling thriller. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE FAVOURITE

In 18th-century England, two women jockey for a position of power within the coterie of an ailing Queen Anne. A lacerating, cutthroat dark comedy with ...continued on next page

Best OF The Inland Northwest

Readers Poll Vote Online! Bestof.Inlander.com Turn to page 35 for the Official Ballot

VOTERS ARE ENTERED TO WIN AN INLANDER PRIZE PACK JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 45


NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, JAN 25TH – THURS, JAN 31ST TICKETS: $9

NOW PLAYING: GREEN BOOK, THE FAVOURITE, FREE SOLO, ROMA, SHOPLIFTERS COMING SOON: SPIFF, COLD WAR, OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS For Movie Times, Visit:

MagicLanternOnMain.com 25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING great performances from Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone. (SS) Rated R

GLASS

M. Night Shyamalan continues his Unbreakable saga, with the indestructible Bruce Willis returning to fight supervillains Samuel L. Jackson and James McAvoy. It’s got some intriguing ideas, but the payoff is meager. (NW) Rated PG-13

GREEN BOOK

A white driver (Viggo Mortensen) ferries a black jazz pianist (Mahershala Ali) through the American South in the 1960s. Its racial politics are undoubtedly simplistic, but its central performances more than make up for it. At the Magic Lantern. (MJ) Rated PG-13

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

with Broad Comedy

January 26, 2019 8:00 p.m.–10:00p.m. Bing Crosby Theater

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK VARIETY (LOS ANGELES) TIMES

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

THE FAVOURITE

91

GLASS

42

GREEN BOOK

70

ROMA

96

SHOPLIFTERS

93

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

87

VICE

61

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

ers. A brilliant and funny animated feature that looks and feels like a comic book come to life. (SS) Rated PG

A STAR IS BORN

Barry Jenkins’ follow-up to Moonlight is a tender adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel, a touching drama about a young couple separated by imprisonment as they prepare to welcome a baby. It balances artistry and activism in its exploration of the black experience in America. (JB) Rated R

This third remake of the classic ragsto-riches story finds a booze-soaked musician (Bradley Cooper) eclipsed by his protege and lover (Lady Gaga, who can really act). An engaging rock melodrama that offers both the glitter of escapism and the grit of serious issues. (EB) Rated R

MARY POPPINS RETURNS

A remake of the French hit The In-

THE UPSIDE

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

touchables, with Bryan Cranston as a paralyzed millionaire and Kevin Hart as the troubled man who becomes his caretaker. It thinks it’s a feel-good drama, but it’s actually manipulative trash. (ES) Rated PG-13

VICE

Adam McKay’s follow-up to The Big Short is another experimental dark comedy, this one following the career of Dick Cheney (an unrecognizable Christian Bale). The gimmicks and gags feel limp and unfocused this time around. (JB) Rated R n

In this long-awaited sequel to the Disney classic, the magical nanny lands again in London to again help out the Banks children, now adults and with kids of their own. A slab of candy-coated excess that laboriously tries to copy the original’s charm. (JB) Rated PG

THE MULE

Get tickets at: bit.ly/broadspokane19

Clint Eastwood squints and scowls his way through this thriller, inspired by the true story of a WWII veteran transporting cocaine for a Mexican drug cartel. (NW) Rated R

Help Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho give care. No matter what.

After the success of the documentary RBG, we now get the Hollywood dramatization of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s trailblazing legal career. It’s well intentioned, but it’s also pretty forgettable and clumsily told. (JB) Rated PG-13

ON THE BASIS OF SEX

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET

This animated sequel finds Wreck-It Ralph exploring the vast unknown of the internet in an attempt to stop the shutdown of his friend’s video game. When it isn’t retreading the original, it relies on pop culture references that already feel dated. (JB) Rated PG

ROMA

The best film of 2018 is finally hitting the big screen in Spokane, and it’s worth a trip to the theater. Alfonso Cuarón’s black-and-white epic is sweeping yet intimate, a powerful study of class divide in 1970s Mexico. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

Spider-Men from various dimensions converge in the world of a teen web slinger, and they help him find his pow-

46 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

NOW STREAMING EIGHTH GRADE (AMAZON PRIME)

Bo Burnham’s directorial debut is a smart, incisive coming-of-age comedy following awkward 13-year-old Kayla (a believable, vulnerable Elsie Fisher) as she navigates puberty and the perils of social media in her final week of middle school. Josh Hamilton gives a warm supporting performance as a well-meaning but clueless single father. (NW) Rated R


FILM | REVIEW

Birds of a feather: John C. Reilly (left) is Oliver Hardy and Steve Coogan is Stan Laurel in a loving tribute to the slapstick pioneers.

The Show Must Go On Stan & Ollie pays tribute to a comedy duo’s twilight years BY JOSH BELL

W

hen the title characters of Stan & Ollie check into a shabby motel early in the movie, they entertain the clerk with one of their classic routines, as Oliver Hardy (John C. Reilly) becomes increasingly exasperated with his bumbling partner Stan Laurel (Steve Coogan) dropping luggage and banging on the call bell. The clerk is delighted, in awe of these film legends recreating movie history for her own personal enjoyment. Later in the film, as Stan waits for a meeting with a movie producer who’s been dodging his calls, he attempts the same tactic with the producer’s secretary, but she remains stone-faced as he runs through an old vaudeville comedy bit. The contrast between the two scenes encapsulates what director Jon S. Baird and screenwriter Jeff Pope are exploring with Stan & Ollie, a portrait of the iconic comedy duo in their later years, on a hastily arranged 1953 tour of music halls in the U.K. Far from the height of their 1930s popularity at the box office and with their longtime partnership slightly

strained, Stan and Ollie are just aiming to remind audiences that they’re still around, running through their greatest hits onstage in the hopes of drumming up interest for a new movie, a parody of the Robin Hood story. Baird and Pope take some liberties with the duo’s career timeline (the Robin Hood movie was actually being developed years earlier) in order to generate a bit of conflict, but the pleasures of the film come mainly from its gentler moments, as Coogan and Reilly expertly re-enact the dynamic between the two veteran performers. The fat suit and layers of prosthetics on Reilly are sometimes distracting, but the two actors have wonderful chemistry, demonstrating the rapport that made Stan and Ollie the most famous comedians in the world for a period of time. The movie gets an extra boost when Stan’s stern Russian wife Ida (Nina Arianda) and Ollie’s gentle, encouraging wife Lucille (Shirley Henderson) travel from the U.S. to join their husbands. Ida and Lucille clearly despise each other, but their comic banter is just as amusing as

some of their husbands’ famous routines. The arguments that crop up between Stan and Ollie later in the movie, mainly related to a long-ago contract dispute that briefly led to Ollie working on a movie without Stan, are less compelling and often feel like they’ve been contrived for the sake of drama. Those contrivances really aren’t necessary, though, and there’s enough dramatic tension in the tour itself, booked by a shady local promoter who initially can barely sell any tickets. The feel-good triumph of Stan and Ollie (along with some bittersweet notes about the toll that showbiz takes on performers) as they slowly rebuild their following may be predictable STAN & OLLIE and a little cheesy, but it’s still enjoyable to watch. Rated PG That applies to the movie Directed by Jon S. Baird Starring Steve Coogan, John C. as a whole, which works more as a loving tribute act Reilly, Shirley Henderson than an engrossing biopic. Aside from a prologue set during the ’30s (depicting that long-ago contract negotiation), the movie remains focused on the tour, in which Stan and Ollie are sort of paying tribute to themselves. It’s clear that everyone involved in the movie has great respect and appreciation for the duo’s body of work, and even though watching Coogan and Reilly is no substitute for seeing an actual Laurel and Hardy movie, Stan & Ollie can serve as an effective gateway for appreciating the art of classic physical comedy. In that way, it accomplishes the same thing that the actual performers set out to achieve with their tour. n

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 47


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48 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019


DOO-WOP

AT THE HOP

ALYSSE GAFKJEN PHOTO

Get to know Shannon and the Clams through these five essential songs BY C.A. COYLE

H

earing the Penguins’ hit “Earth Angel” or Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers’ classic “Why Do Fools Fall in Love” won’t likely awaken any sort of punk-rock spirit that hibernates in your soul. Yet there is an unspoken phenomenon that surrounds Oakland’s Shannon and the Clams that has struck a chord with punks, hipsters, beatniks and weirdos. For more than a decade, the seemingly always-touring combo has revamped and redefined the genre of doowop: Think of something along the lines of soul singer Carla Thomas, with the Fabulous Wailers serving as a backing band. A year after releasing Onion, the group’s fifth fulllength album on Dan Auerbach’s Easy Eye Sound label, the Clams are performing four North American dates in January before heading to Australia. To prepare yourself for Friday’s show at the Observatory, here are five essential songs from the band’s ever-growing catalog. 5. “DID YOU LOVE ME” (FROM 2018’S ONION) Bassist and vocalist Shannon Shaw’s lyrics never fail to gush emotionally raw and honest stories and depictions. “Did You Love Me,” a warm ballad right out of a 1960

high school dance, finds Shaw pleading for clarity in the aftermath of a breakup: “But I had lied, I’m made of glass / Brittle and cracked / Not many do last.” 4. “THE BOG” (FROM 2015’S GONE BY THE DAWN) Guitarist and co-vocalist Cody Blanchard taps into a Gypsy-like motif with jangly, Eastern-sounding string work on “The Bog.” MORE EVENTS Backed by a chattering Visit Inlander.com for high-hat and tradicomplete listings of tional, thumping bass local events. line, both Shaw and Blanchard share chilling harmonies that provide imagery of witches dancing in fog and “ape men” crawling up from mud. 3. “OZMA” (FROM 2013’S DREAMS IN THE RAT HOUSE) If you’ve ever lost a pet, particularly a dog, “Ozma” may very well jerk plenty of tears from your eyes. The beautiful tribute to Shaw’s late dog Ozma imagines the pup “sniffing flowers all day long and laying in the sun.” The lyrics reveal the constant battle Shaw has with herself —

happy for Ozma’s eternal happiness yet devastated by the dog’s absence. 2. “MAMA” (FROM 2014’S SPLIT 7-INCH WITH GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH) “Mama” showcases the Clams’ knack for enriching a traditional pop structure. A jazzy, stop-and-go beat loosely contains the emotion during the verses before Shaw blasts out a hearty chorus. Additionally, Shaw’s soulful vocals get a touch of fuzz bringing a stark contrast to the clean, reverb-happy guitar. 1. “LOVE STRIKE” (FROM 2018’S ONION) Doo-wop shifts over to a support role for many of the songs on 2018’s Onion. One such example is “Love Strike,” when the band injects the swing of rockabilly and the quirkiness of ’60s mod into the normal repertoire. It is a blend that validates the bands’ multidimensional songwriting and composition capabilities. n Shannon and the Clams with Fun Ladies • Fri, Jan. 25 at 9 pm • SOLD OUT • 21+ • The Observatory • 15 S. Howard • observatoryspokane.com • 381-5498

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

POP THE POSIES

T

he Posies are Pacific Northwest powerpop legends, breaking out during the grunge era and specializing in songs that are catchy as an ad jingle and sweet as spun sugar. The band played a sold-out show at the Bartlett last summer, and Ken Stringfellow and Jon Auer, the Posies’ primary songwriters and vocalists, are returning to Spokane with a more intimate concert that features just the two of them. Anyone who missed that June show shouldn’t sit this one out: It’s a chance to be up close and personal with two of the guys responsible for some of the best alt-pop songs of the ’90s. — NATHAN WEINBENDER The Posies Duo with Sarah Berentson • Sat, Jan. 26 at 8 pm • $25 advance, $30 day of • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/24

BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Open Mic J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CRUISERS, Open Jam Night FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Country Dance THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary and the Songsmith Series J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Benny Baker MOON TIME, Larry Myer NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Logan Wall; PJ Destiny O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, O’Pen Mic Thursdays POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Kyle Swaffard THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, Music Challenge ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 01/25

219 LOUNGE, Bright Moments ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Larry Myer J J THE BARTLETT, Atari Ferrari, BaLonely, Ataurus Minor J THE BIG DIPPER, Soultree EP Release Party with Haley and the HitchHikers, Tyler Alai, Quaggadog, Jonny Myles THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave BIGFOOT PUB, NightShift BOLO’S, Rewind BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Ron Greene THE BULL HEAD, Jesse Quandt & Rudy Kuebler

50 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

COUNTRY DIERKS BENTLEY

“W

hat Was I Thinkin’” was the name of Dierks Bentley’s very first single, but in spite of that title, it sailed right to the top of the country charts. He’s released several No. 1 hits since, including “Feel That Fire,” “Home” and “Somewhere on a Beach,” and he’s done it all with a public image of modest, down-home charm. His 2018 album The Mountain was another chart topper, and amidst its laid-back vibes and appearances by the Brothers Osborne and Brandi Carlile is a record inspired by the natural beauty of Colorado. It’s a confident LP that suggests Bentley will continue to produce hits. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Dierks Bentley with Jon Pardi, Tenille Townes and Hot Country Knights • Thu, Jan. 31 at 7 pm • $34.75-$69.75 • All ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena.com • 279-7000

CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Samuel Richardson CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Gemini Dei CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Dangerous Type DOWNDRAFT BREWING, Andy Crateau J EMMAUS CHURCH, Perry Street Concert Series feat. Heat Speak & The Eyer Family Band FREDNECK’S, Just Plain Darin HOGFISH, Dodgy Mountain Men IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Ron Kieper Jazz Trio IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dallas Kay THE JACKSON ST., The Kenny James Miller Band JOHN’S ALLEY, Jim Basnight J KNITTING FACTORY, Hell’s Belles with Elephant Gun Riot, Fury 500 LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kori Ailene MARYHILL WINERY, Christy Lee

MAX AT MIRABEAU, Kosta La Vista MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Harold’s IGA MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Pat Coast NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Logan Wall J THE OBSERVATORY, Shannon and the Clams (see page 49), Fun Ladies J OUTLAW BBQ & CATERING MARKET, Songsmith Series PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Scott Taylor J THE PIN, Amigo the Devil, Harley Poe, Blacktracks, Robbers Roost THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Son of Brad (at Noah’s) SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Honky Tonk A-Go-Go

THE VIKING, David Raitt and the Baja Boogie Band ZOLA, Pastiche

Saturday, 01/26

219 LOUNGE, Moneypenny ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, One Street Over BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Jan Harrsion Blues Experience J J THE BARTLETT, The Posies Duo (see above), Sarah Berentson J THE BIG DIPPER, Winter Meltdown with Over Sea Under Stone, Tap Wielding Heathens, The Groove Black, in-flux BIGFOOT PUB, NightShift BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, The Shuffle Dawgs J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Jon & Rand CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Larry Mooney

COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Pat Coast CURLEY’S, Dangerous Type DAN & JO’S, Usual Suspects FLAME & CORK, Echo Elysium FREDNECK’S, Gil Rivas HOGFISH, Echo Elsyium J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Into the Drift IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Truck Mills IRON GOAT BREWING CO., BG3 THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, DJ Miles LAUGHING DOG BREWING, Jake Robin LION’S LAIR, Hip-Hop Showcase Hosted by Willie Woo Styx & DJ Sassy MARYHILL WINERY, The Ronaldos MAX AT MIRABEAU, Kosta La Vista MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Mostly Harmless MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Son of Brad


NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Logan Wall ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, Kori Ailene PACIFIC PIZZA, Cris Lucas J PANIDA THEATER, Baja Boogie Band feat. Peter Rivera & David Raitt PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Mike Wagoner and Utah John J THE PIN, Waiting on Weedstock feat. Cameron of Free the Jester, CBB Krew, Dirty Savage, Beauflexx & Royal T Sama J POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Just Plain Darin RED ROOM LOUNGE, Slap Frost Tour feat. Casual, Z-Man, DJ True Justice, Vocab Slick, Save1, Swelly & more THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, ‘80s Party with DJ LG SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Kyle Swaffard (at Noah’s) STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke THE VIKING, Random Generation

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WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Maxie Ray Mills ZOLA, Pastiche

Sunday, 01/27

J THE BARTLETT, The Movement, KBong THE BLIND BUCK, Show Tune SingAlong Sundays DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church of Blues Jam GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Scott, Kevin & Craig LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY, JoLynn NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Logan Wall PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with Annie Welle J THE PIN, Zaq Flanary, Aleisha Maureen & Wyatt Wood J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 01/28

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, X-Raided with CCB Krew, Reality, Rez4Life & more CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Jam with Truck Mills LAUGHING DOG BREWING, John Hastings RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 01/29

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of Nashville BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke KAIJU SUSHI & SPIRITS, Jan Harrison and Don Chilcott LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday J THE OBSERVATORY, Choir Boy, Pit, Telepathic Station Nine RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing THE ROXIE, Open Mic/Jam SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT AND TAP HOUSE, Sam Leyde THE VIKING, Local Lounge Night ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites with Greg Mahugh

Wednesday, 01/30

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills & Bruce Bishop J THE BARTLETT, Mozes and The Firstborn, The Parrots, Billy Changer CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night Hosted by The Jam Band GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Open Jam IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Gil Rivas THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, X-Raided LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 MILLWOOD BREWING COMPANY, Kori Ailene THE PIN, Local Hip-Hop Showcase J POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), Just Plain Darin J RED DRAGON CHINESE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, Darren Eldridge SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J KNITTING FACTORY, The Green with Eli-Mac & Fia, Jan. 31 THE OBSERVATORY, Daniel Champagne, Bossame, Jan. 31 J J SPOKANE ARENA, Dierks Bentley (see facing page), Jon Pardi, Tenille Townes, Hot Country Knights, Jan. 31 J THE BARTLETT, Naked Giants, Feb. 1 J THE BIG DIPPER, Sol Seed, Jus Wright, Feb. 1 J KNITTING FACTORY, Whitey Morgan, Alex Williams, Feb. 2 J SPOKANE ARENA, KISS, Feb. 4 J THE BARTLETT, Broncho, Pinky Pinky, Feb. 6

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR • 4720 Ferrel, CdA • 208-274-0486 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 381-5489 OMEGA EVENT CENTER • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 51


COMEDY LAUGHS FOR A CAUSE

Traveling internationally with their scathing satire aimed toward politics, parenting and sex, Katie Goodman’s Broad Comedy is landing in Spokane once again. The all-women musical-comedy group performs “Laugh. No Matter What.” at the Bing to benefit Planned Parenthood, for which they’ve raised over $1 million so far. Self-described as a lovechild between SNL and Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, and babysat by Aussie comedian Tim Minchin, the show is sure to be a memorable night out on the town, especially with some of the troupe’s classic numbers: “MILF” and “I.C.E. I.C.E. Baby.” Catch the feisty and racy women’s comedy company Saturday night. — ARCELIA MARTIN “Laugh. No Matter What” • Sat, Jan. 26 at 8 pm • $24 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

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52 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

WORDS SUPER GIRLS

VISUAL ARTS SEEKING SAFETY

Meet Ms. Marvel: G. Willow Wilson • Tue, Jan. 29 from 7-9 pm • Free • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene St. • facebook.com/SpokaneCC • 533-7000

Push Factors: Guatemalan Migration in Perspective • Through Feb. 24; Tue-Sat from 10 am-8 pm; Sun from 10 am-6 pm • Free admission • Prichard Art Gallery • 414 S. Main St., Moscow • prichardart.org

Meet the creative force behind Marvel Comics’ first Muslim character with her own solo series, Ms. Marvel. As a special guest of Spokane Community College’s Hagan Foundation Center for the Humanities, writer, artist and journalist G. Willow Wilson shares how her own experience as a young Muslim comic book fan in Egypt led her down a path that eventually resulted in a reinvention of Ms. Marvel (otherwise known as Kamala Khan) as a MuslimAmerican teen living in New Jersey who becomes endowed with superpowers similar to those of her idol, Carol Danvers, aka Captain Marvel. Wilson’s reimagining of Ms. Marvel debuted in 2014 and was honored with a prestigious Hugo Award for best graphic story in 2015. — CHEY SCOTT

Through its current exhibition, the University of Idaho’s Prichard Art Gallery seeks to elicit compassion toward the plight of Guatemalan refugees abandoning everything in search of a better life. Push Factors, organized by Curators Without Borders, features the work of award-winning photographers and photojournalists Rodrigo Abd, James Rodríguez and William B. Plowman, as well as written accounts from Guatemalan migrant youth. In a statement for the show, gallery director Richard Rowley writes: “Being responsive to a rapidly changing world and meeting important issues of the day has long been a hallmark of our gallery. Push Factors helps bring depth and understanding to people simply seeking a better life.” — CHEY SCOTT


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THEATER OLD SCHOOL

Some plays prove timeless no matter how much the world changes, and so it is with You Can’t Take It With You, a broad farce about class and family that won the 1937 Pulitzer Prize and was later adapted into a Frank Caprahelmed Best Picture Academy Award winner. The action all takes place in the New York City family house where a tax-dodging grandpa presides over generations of memorable characters including a fireworks maker, xylophone player and ballerina with two left feet. When Alice, the only “normal” family member, brings home a date and his family for dinner, things don’t go well. As in, there are explosions, FBI raids and humiliated potential in-laws to sort out before Alice can have her happy ending. — DAN NAILEN You Can’t Take It With You • Jan. 25-Feb. 17; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $29; $27 seniors, military, students • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.org • 325-2507

FILM SCREEN HERITAGE

You can count on the Spokane Jewish Cultural Film Festival for programming thought-provoking features that explore the Jewish experience both in America and abroad. This year’s trio of films begins with the documentary Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel (Jan. 24 at 7 pm), which chronicles Israel’s national baseball team participating in an international tournament. Set in 1946, Bye Bye Germany (Jan. 26 at 7 pm) is a bittersweet comedy-drama about Holocaust survivors living in Frankfurt following WWII. And Shoelaces (Jan. 27 at 2 pm) is an Israeli drama about the moral conflict that arises when a man with special needs wants to donate a kidney to his ill father. A pass for all three movies will run you $28 and individual tickets are just $10; discounts are available for students and senior citizens. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Spokane Jewish Cultural Film Festival • Thu, Jan. 24 and Sat-Sun, Jan. 26-27 • $18-$28/festival passes; $7-$10/individual tickets • Gonzaga University, Wolff Auditorium • 502 E. Boone • sajfs.org • 747-7394

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 53


W I SAW YOU CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU LABORATORY HOTTIE I see you tall, auburn hair. I see you read the I Saw You in the Inlander. Your smile can light up a room. You are so kind you make my day. I know you are married. I hope your man appreciates how lucky he is to have such a beautiful woman. YO MCFLY ANYONE HOME IN THEIR? Binkstar to Yoda: I don't know really what to think. Are you on my side or against me and watching, waiting for me to fall? I've been to the bottom of that mountain after climbing it to the top. I was so close to the peak I thought. Then bam! Just like that I sabotaged the whole voyage because nobody was there to guide me through the fog of it all. Where I am now is far enough up not to see through the clouds enough to see the bottom of that same daunting mountain. This time I won't fall off of it. I'm going to keep going and not look behind me or down at the ground below. All I need is a steady guide to help me when I get lost in the fog. I want that to be you, but I just don't know if you feel the same way or if I should stop looking for you somewhere up here on the side

ADULTS AT GU BASKETBALL I saw 6,000 adults at the Jan 17 Men's Basketball Game without hearing protection. Using the Decibel X app, the measured average noise level was 98dB over the course of 2+ hours. The maximum daily exposure for that noise level is 20 minutes. The big announcements and super music ran over 103dB with a maximum exposure of 7 minutes. If you left the game with ears ringing, you just lost some hearing. Perhaps GU could provide free GU earplugs instead of towels and T-shirts. HIGHBRIDGE PARK I saw you at that Park. We met and exchanged stories about our adventures and as we sat there and talked and had a couple of drinks and then got up to leave and that's when it started to rain and then you gave me a kiss and that was our first kiss of many since then..

CHEERS SPOKANE TRANSIT (STA) Thank You Spokane Transit (STA) for making the holiday season brighter for many families in our community. Sincerely, TO THANK YOU! Thank you so much to the cab driver that gave me a jump at Shadle and the wonderful woman that let me borrow her cables! You're both angels! I've learned my lesson and will buy my own cables and a new battery. Thank you both so much, you two

They shook hands and they went to their respective seats. In our era of hate, fear and insults, a wonderful gesture.

saved the day. KINDNESS ISN'T DEAD My wife and I noticed a older man who appeared to be homeless enter the food court at River Park Square around noon on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. He was carrying a blanket that he neatly folded and placed on a chair. A younger man looking to be in his early to mid twenty's and appeared to be a body builder was sitting nearby. Moments later the younger man who had been eating lunch with a young lady, approached the man and said something. They walked to a lunch counter and the older man ordered lunch. I watched as they waited and talked. When the older man got his food, the younger man paid. They shook hands and they went to their respective seats. In our era of hate, fear and insults, a wonderful gesture. THANK YOU WASHINGTON I don't even think I caught your name but our conversation home was as beautiful as the falling snow and as warming as your mighty gentle strength of you holding me steady over that sheet of thick ice to my doorway. Thank you Spokane for sending me an Angel to deliver me home safely after a phenomenal time in your beautiful city. Thank you for the charm and the

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

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of this mountain. By the way it's no mole hill it really is my mount Everest. I probably spelled that wrong... Peace be with you and may the force carry you through a happy and safe climb. See you at the top any way.

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54 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

911 E Marietta Ave • Spokane WA

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1610 N. MONROE ST . 509.325.1914

steady hands. Always thankful for caring people and workers of love. ~ The girl just a state away

JEERS I 90 WESTBOUND FED UP Let's start with the westbound BROADWAY exit... be polite and WAIT for the merging ARGONNE traffic before you get in the BROADWAY exit lane which is at least 1/2 a mile, and now to those exiting at HAMILTON... Your exit lane is AFTER the SECOND AVE exit. Those of you using this lane are causing unneeded stress for drivers merging at ALTAMONT and those of us exiting at 2nd Ave. You have a quarter mile to get in that exit lane, so get out of the 2nd ave exit lane. SHUTDOWN Enough with the government shut down, enough with people working without getting paid. Someone — President Trump — should start a GoFundMe page for "the wall" and then let everyone get back to work. Those that support the wall, can pay for it since Mexico won't. JEERS TO A SIGN STORE Just for the record, the public street parking in front of your store is for anyone to park in whenever they want to. It's not pri-

vately marked for your customers only, so you don't get to walk up and verbally assault people for parking there. For all you knew, I was walking across the street to grab a coffee and then go shopping down the street to your store and others, which I have done many times. You know what they say about assumptions you POS. Good luck running a successful business when you treat potential would-be customers like that. I will never visit your shop, and will be sure that nobody else does either. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS M I A T A S

A R T H R O

T E L E T U B B I E S

S I S W I I L S C C A O U C S B L I A D E F C I M A D T V O C H R E W E L L S

A M A Z E

Y O M A M A

S P O R T S S C T L A O A S P I T I D N D E O L W I N A

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I N N O C P E A N S T T C H A U R E I V N O G S

F A R I N A E L E N A

P E J O R A T I V E L S A T

S H A W P O C H A N K Y Z A D A L I B P R E G H T I A L F I N D E M O A M A N A G E L E W E D S

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BENEFIT RECEPTION FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKING AWARENESS MONTH Twenty percent of the sales of original art, prints and greeting cards during this reception support Lutheran Community Services to aid victims of human trafficking. Jan. 25, 5:30-7:30 pm. Avenue West Gallery, 907 W. Boone Ave. (838-4999) SPARK SALON WITH SARAH VOWELL, SANDY WILLIAMS, JESS WALTER A night of entertainment and giving as bestselling author Jess Walter banters with author, journalist and social commentator Sarah Vowell and Black Lens founder and journalist Sandy Williams about how they found the path to their creative passion. Younger stars of the evening include a smashing Girls Rock Lab band and inquisitive journalists from Spark Central’s West Central Express newspaper program. Jan. 25, 6-9 pm. $75. The McGinnity Room, 116 W. Pacific. themcginnityroom.com (509-321-1859) GET OUT & PLAY! A community fundraiser hosted by the Active Minds student chapter at the University of Idaho and the Palouse Advocacy League. In addition to Zeppoz in Pullman, activities take place at Wild at Art Ceramics in Moscow and PLAYlive Nation gaming lounge. Jan. 26. varies. Zeppoz, 780 SE Bishop Blvd. zeppoz.com (592-5626) GOWNS GALORE FASHION SHOW The Royal Closet assists high school students attending school dances with high quality formal wear free of charge. Local students, including the Ronald McDonald House Teen Board, models these gowns at this event. All proceeds support Daybreak Youth Services. Includes dessert before dinner and a hot chocolate bar. Jan. 27, 4-5:30 pm. $25. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. bit.ly/2satTC8 THE LION SINGS TONIGHT FEAT. CAST OF DISNEY’S THE LION KING Spokane AIDS Network (SAN) and the cast the of Disney’s The Lion King host an evening of song and dance. Jan. 28, 7-9 pm. $20-$35. nYne, 232 W. Sprague Ave. bit. ly/2TCdHp1 (509-474-1621) 4TH ANNUAL FUNDRAISER FOR SPOKANE ARTS Join Uptic Studios, Ten Capital Wealth Advisors and Spokane Arts for an evening with local artists Neicy Frey, Jodie Stejer, Brad McDonald and guitarist Steven King. Proceeds from drinks and art sold support Spokane Arts’ efforts to encourage and support local artists. Alcoholic/non-alcoholic drinks available. Jan. 29, 5:30 pm. Indaba Coffee Roasters, 518 W. Riverside. bit.ly/2CBWncR CUISINE FOR CRITTERS Buffalo Wild Wings at Northtown is hosting a benefit day for SpokAnimal. Make sure you print the flyer and bring with you to the restaurant or show your server the flyer on your phone for SpokAnimal to get the credit for your visit. Jan. 30, 11 am. Northtown Mall, 4750 N. Division. (482-0209) PAIRING WITH PARASPORT The 2019 event features a new venue, new look, new tastes and more. A full dinner, silent auction and paddle raise comprise the schedule of events. Feb. 2, 5:30-8 pm. $50/person; $350/table. Felts Field, 6105 E. Rutter Rd. (850-6858) POTTER POP-UP TRIVIA EVENT Due to such high demand for the last event, Get Lit! Programs is hosting a one-day, all-day Harry Potter themed trivia event, with three sessions at 1:30, 4:30 and 7:30 pm. Open to teams of up to four. Individual tickets required. Feb. 3, 1:30 pm.

$7.50. Iron Goat Brewing, 1302 W. Second. bit.ly/2sGKQEz SOUPER BOWL Spend the day playing in the snow while supporting the Women and Children’s Free Restaurant & Community Kitchen. This year’s theme is Hawaiian. Includes free lunch in the Selkirk Lodge provided by the Women & Children’s Free Restaurant & Community Kitchen. Feb. 3, 8:30 am-1 pm. $35$45. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. souperbowlspokane.com

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) BOB SAGET The Grammy-nominated comedian comes to Spokane for a twonight engagement. Jan. 25 and Jan. 26. SOLD OUT. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com I SAW YOU! Join the BDT Players as they pull the comedy from the weekly readersubmitted section of the Inlander. Guests are encouraged to bring their favorite (family friendly) posting to the show. Fridays at 7:30 pm through Feb. 8. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LATE LAUGHS An improvised comedy show featuring a mix of experiments in improv, duos, teams, sketch and more. First and last Friday of the month at 9:30 pm. Rated for mature audiences. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com AFTER DARK A mature-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday show; on the first and last Saturday of the month, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com LAUGH. NO MATTER WHAT. Join fellow Planned Parenthood supporters to welcome Katie Goodman’s Broad Comedy, which has been producing snarky, provocative and loveable all-women’s comedy and musical-satire since 2001. Jan. 26, 8-10 pm. $24. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com SAFARI The BDT’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced short-form improv show that’s generally game based and relies on audience suggestions. Ages 16+. Saturdays at 7:30 pm through March 30. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com THE DOPE SHOW! A comedy showcase where comedians joke, then toke, the joke some more! Presented by Tyler Smith, featuring nationally touring comedians with various tolerances to marijuana. Last Sunday of the month at 8 pm. $8-$14. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com (509-822-7938) OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open

at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com JASON MEWES & HIS A-MEWES-ING STORIES The indie film icon is perhaps best known as the vocal half of the onscreen comedic duo, Jay and Silent Bob. Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 at 7:30 pm. $25-$50. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com REAL COMEDIANS OF SOCIAL MEDIA Hosted by Tahir Moore, with performances by Tony Baker and headlined by KevOnStage. Jan. 31, 7-9 pm. $12-$25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (509-534-5805) WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY? Ninety minutes of improvised comedy and song all based on audience suggestions, performed by cast members Greg Proops, Jeff B. Davis, Dave Foley and Joel Murray. Jan. 31, 8 pm. $35-$52. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) IMPROV The Fire Brigade serves up buckets of laughter with their familyfriendly shows based off of audience suggestions. First Saturday of the month at 7:30 pm. $5. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. (795-0004)

COMMUNITY

MAKERTOTS A class for kids ages 4-6 to gain experience using tools to assemble and finish projects. Gizmo is a place where tools are safely demonstrated and used by young children. Thursdays from 9:30-11:30 am, Jan. 24-Feb. 14. $50. Gizmo-Cda, 1000 W. Garden Ave., Hedlund Building, Suite 142. gizmo-cda.org THE MYTH OF MERITOCRACY What is meritocracy? How is the word defined and what are some common myths around the subject matter? Join us as we learn and conduct a small exercise on the subject matter. In SFCC Bldg. 17, Room 102 (Lounge A). Jan. 24, 11:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-4331) SHOWING UP FOR RACIAL JUSTICE Join PJALS and members of the community to continue our work fighting white supremacy, supporting racial justice organizing led by people of color, and deepening our understanding of race locally. Meets second and fourth Thursday of the month, from 5:30-7 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. pjals.org THURSDAY EVENING SWING Learn how to swing dance in 2019 at classes/dances each Thursday night at 7 pm. $35/$40 per class. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com DROP IN & RPG If you’ve ever been curious about role-playing games, join us to experience this unique form of game-playing, and build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination, and rich social interaction. Priority seating provided for participants age 17 or younger. Second and fourth Friday of the month, from 4-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) RANDOM FANDOM TRIVIA NIGHT: STUDIO GHIBLI Trivia nights take on the biggest realms of fandom at the Spokane Valley Library. Bring your knowledge and your own eats (or have food delivered). Costumes and cosplayers are welcome. Jan. 25, 6:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org ANNIVERSARY DANCE USA Dance celebrates 17 years of ballroom dancing in Sandpoint. The dance begins with a nightclub two-step lesson from 7-8 pm,

followed by general dancing, refreshments, mixers, door prizes, and a drawing for free dance lessons. Singles, couples and all levels of dancers welcome. Jan. 26, 7 pm. $5-$9. Sandpoint Community Hall, 204 S. First. (208-699-0421) EASTERN WASHINGTON LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE Under the theme of “Inform, Inspire, Involve,” faith and nonprofit leaders address health care, the environment, gun safety, immigration, taxes, homelessness, and tools for effective advocacy in workshops and other presentations. Lunch and snacks provided. Also includes a resource fair of community agencies. Jan. 26, 9 am-3 pm. $15-$20. Spokane Valley United Methodist Church, 115 N. Raymond Rd. thefigtree.org (509-535-4112) COMIC WRITER G. WILLOW WILSON Wilson is a Muslim and writes Ms. Marvel, a comic series starring 16-year-old Muslim shapeshifter superhero Kamala Khan. Jan. 29 at 7 pm and Jan. 30 at 10 am. Jan. 29, 7-9 pm and Jan. 30, 10 am-noon. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. scc.spokane.edu (533-7363) DOLLARS & SENSE: GIVE YOURSELF A RAISE Discover how to succeed with your budget and avoid money troubles in this workshop from SNAP Spokane. Learn how to take control of your money, make achievable goals, and recognize predators. Jan. 29 from 6-8 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org (509-893-8400) FUTURE ADA MEET & GREET Come meet the Future Ada board of directors and volunteers. Share your stories, tell us what you are working on, ask us questions, brainstorm ideas for programs and events for this year. Members share plans for the year and where to take Future Ada as we move forward and keep growing. Jan. 29, 6-8 pm. Free. Saranac Public House, 21 W. Main. facebook.com/ futureada/ (509-473-9455) SCIENCE CAFE: SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER Learn about Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) from clinical psychologist Mark Hurst, who brings humor and tried-and-true solutions for this serious condition. Come early for food and drinks and bring your questions. Organized by the Inland Northwest Concerned Scientists. Jan. 29, 7-8 pm. Free. Lindaman’s, 1235 S. Grand Blvd. (706-461-1627) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 30, 4-5 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org LEVEL UP CREATIVITY Join Spark for daily activities to ignite your creativity, innovation and imagination with science, writing and art projects. Wednesdays at 3:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS Join us for pizza, a free credit report, loan prequalification and details about zero down payment programs. RSVP at link. Jan. 31, 6-7 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. bit.ly/2FzxJh5 THURSDAY EVENING SWING: “FROZEN” THEME NIGHT A night of swing dancing for Strictly Swing Spokane’s “Frozen” night. Beginner lesson at 7 pm, swing dance and frozen desserts from 8-10 pm. Jan. 31. $10/adults, $5/ages 15 and under. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com UNCONSCIOUS BIAS WORKSHOP What is unconscious or conscious bias? How

does it impact our lives? Join us as we have a discussion and workshop on the subject matter. In SFCC Bldg. 17, Room 102 (Lounge A). Jan. 31, 11:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-4331) FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK Learn easy circle, line, folk dances and contras at this monthly event. No experience or partner needed. All dances taught by Susan Dankovich, with live music by Whirl’d Peas. First Friday of the month from 6:30-8 pm. Donations accepted. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th. (533-9955)

FILM

GREEN BOOK A working-class ItalianAmerican bouncer (Viggo Mortensen) becomes the driver of an African-American classical pianist (Mahershala Ali) on a tour of venues through 1960’s American South. PG-13. Showing Jan. 24-27 and Jan. 31-Feb. 3; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org SPOKANE JEWISH CULTURAL FILM FESTIVAL With the recent uptick in anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. and specifically in the Inland Northwest, organizers have chosen a slate of uplifting and inspiring films: “Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel,” “Bye Bye Germany,” and “Shoelaces” all showcase, in markedly different ways, compelling themes of Jewish resilience, perseverance in the face of great challenges, and overcoming long odds. Jan. 24 and 26 from 7-9 pm and Jan. 27 from 2-4 pm. $7-$10. Gonzaga University Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone Ave. sajfs.org (747-7394) A STAR IS BORN Seasoned musician Jackson Maine discovers and falls in love with struggling artist Ally who's just about given up on her dream to make it big. Jan. 24-26; times vary. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org WHO WILL WRITE OUR HISTORY Join our International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust global screening event. In November 1940, days after the Nazis sealed 450,000 Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto, a secret band of journalists, scholars and community leaders decided to fight back. Led by historian Emanuel Ringelblum and known by the code name Oyneg Shabes, this clandestine group vowed to defeat Nazi lies and propaganda not with guns or fists but with pen and paper. Now, for the first time, their story is told as a feature documentary. Jan. 27, 3:30 & 7 pm. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) A SILENT VOICE Based on Yoshitoki Oima’s manga of the same name is this animated film about a deaf girl. Jan. 28 at 7 pm (subtitles) and Jan. 31 at 7 pm (dubbed) at Regal Northtown and Riverstone. $13. fathomevents.com RELUCTANT RADICAL A film following activist Ken Ward as he confronts his fears and puts himself in the direct path of the fossil fuel industry to combat climate change. Ken breaks the law as a last resort, to fulfill what he sees as his personal obligation to future generations. Jan. 29, 6-8 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. (995-2264) THE FAVOURITE In early 18th century, England is at war with the French. A frail Queen Anne occupies the throne and her close friend governs the country on her behalf. When a new servant arrives, her charm endears her to Lady Sarah. Rated R. Jan. 31-Feb. 3; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. panida.org

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CBD

Cream of the Crop Research, breakthroughs and other CBD-related news BY TUCK CLARRY

A

recent study by the University of Rio Grande do Sol in Brazil found that rats given an application of CBD-infused lotion had a decrease in inflammation and acceleration in the healing process of wounds. This could lead to CBD lotion being the new Neosporin, but also an option for body modification industries like tattoo artists. “As your skin experiences severe trauma during the tattoo process, having a product which reduces these symptoms is vital,” Elisha Belden writes on tattoo.com. And CBD lotion application is lauded for chronic pain and muscle aches and fatigue. Having back pain or a pulled muscle can make it hard to sleep, and having a nonaddictive, nonpsychoactive option for discomfort could be a breakthrough for those who don’t have the time or resources to visit a physician.

WHAT’S IN THE BOX!?

56 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

One major concern for potential users of CBDs is knowing what potential side effects may be found in taking the relatively new additive. But so far there have been little to no detrimental side effects found in patients who are taking CBD oil. The side effects that have been recorded seem relatively minor (sleepiness, unsteadiness, changes in blood pressure, dehydrated mouth, according to news reports), especially when considering the side effects of pharmaceuticals that patients could be replacing with the oil. The real concern with the glut of CBD options is the regulation of the products and lack of thorough verification. Not all states demand processors and manufacturers to label their products with all of the used ingredients. “People who are buying [them] on Amazon, or at their local health food store, are really working without a [safety] net,” Michael Blackes, author of Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana, tells the Oakland Press. A 2017 study by University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine found that almost 70 percent of CBD products analyzed were mislabeled, with approximately 40 percent of the goods containing significantly more CBD than the packaging indicated. Further complicating the matter is the FDA’s rigid stance on how CBD companies are allowed to market and label their products. Due to the FDA’s hardline stance against CBD being sold as a medicine rather than supplement, companies are not allowed to print recommended doses on their packaging. n


NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 57


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EVENTS | CALENDAR THE RELUCTANT RADICAL A film following activist Ken Ward as he confronts his fears and puts himself in the direct path of the fossil fuel industry to combat climate change. Ken breaks the law as a last resort, to fulfill what he sees as his personal obligation to future generations. Jan. 31, 6:30-8:45 pm. Free. Rockwood Retirement Community, 221 E. Rockwood Blvd. (995-2264) WINTER WILDLANDS ALLIANCE BACKCOUNTRY FILM FEST The 14th annual festival benefits the Spokane Mountaineers Foundation. The lineup of award-winning films includes adventure, environment and climate, youth outdoors and ski culture. Doors open at 6 pm for pre-show event. Jan. 31, 6-9 pm. $12. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. winterwildlands.org (720-373-0795) OTIS ORCHARDS 21502 E GILBERT RD OTIS ORCHARDS, WA

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FOOD

ROBERT BURNS SCOTCH WHISKY DINNER The second annual event honoring Scottish poet Robert Burns includes high-end scotches, a fivecourse Scottish meal, poetry, prizes and more. Jan. 24, 6 pm. $50; reservations required. 315 Martinis & Tapas, 315 Wallace Ave. 315martinisandtapas.com SCOTCH & CIGARS Select a flight of whiskey, scotch or bourbon paired with a recommended cigar during an event on the outdoor patio. Thursdays, from 6-10 pm. $15-$25. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. (474-9040) 49° NORTH ICE LOUNGE HAPPY HOUR Participants (ages 21+) receive one free raffle ticket with every happy hour drink purchased, with two winners each week receiving a pair of 49° North lift tickets. Winners do not have to be present to claim their prize. Fridays from 5-8 pm through Feb. 22. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (625-6600) HANDMADE PASTA: ORRECHIETTE Learn how to make infused pastas, particularly the orrechiette, in this handson cooking class. Class culminates in a family-style meal inside the historic Estate’s main venue. Jan. 25, 6-9 pm. $50. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (509-466-0667) WINE TASTING Taste the wines of Copper Cane: Quilt, Belle Glos, Elouan. Includes cheese and crackers. Jan. 25, 3-6:30 pm. $15. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com GNOCCHI COOKING CLASS The estate’s first ever large-format, hands-on cooking class for the public, concluded with a meal. Jan. 26, 4-7 pm. $40. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (466-0667) WINE TASTING This week’s theme is Argentina v. Washington! Includes cheese and crackers. Jan. 26, 3-6:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com CHINESE DUMPLINGS FROM SCRATCH In celebration of the Chinese New Year, the Year of the Pig, Shadle’s own Juan Juan and Ming team up to teach how to make Chinese dumplings from scratch. Jan. 27, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. spokanelibrary.org (444-5300) COMMUNITY COOKING CLASSES The Kitchen at Second Harvest provides nutrition information, scratch cooking skills, budgeting, and more. Free hands-on cooking classes in the kitchen teach low-income families how to prepare nutritious meals while making op-

timal use of their limited resources. See website for dates and times; typically meets Tue and Wed from 5:30-7 pm. Free. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org INSTALUCK An InstantPot-themed potluck. Bring a classic pressure-cooker friendly dish and recipe to share with others, or an empty pot to learn how to use this trending kitchen device. Jan. 30, 6-8 pm. Free. Gizmo-Cda, 1000 W. Garden Ave., Hedlund Building, Suite 142. gizmo-cda.org (208-929-4029) FIRST BITE FOR SECOND HARVEST Get a first taste of Inlander Restaurant Week 2019 at the second annual preview event benefiting Second Harvest, presented by Dairy Farmers of Washington. Sample featured IRW entrees, along with samples from Washington state-based creameries and artisan cheesemakers. Also pick up the 2019 event guide early. Ages 21+. Jan. 31, 6-8 pm. $31. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. inlanderrestaurantweek.com GRUITFEST 2019 The third annual beer festival showcases an ancient style of beer infused with herbs and spices (and no hops!). The event features historicalinspired and modern takes on gruit beers from local breweries, a collaborative beer and more. See link for full list of featured breweries and details. Feb. 1, 5-10 pm. Free admission. Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe. bit. ly/2sGJJ7R (509-280-8345)

MUSIC

AUDITORIUM CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: THE JACK QUARTET Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year performs as part of the latest performance of the ACMS 2018-19 season. The JACK Quartet, comprised of two violinists, a violist and a cellist, collaborates with upcoming composers and performs contemporary string chamber music worldwide. Jan. 24, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. University of Idaho Administration Building, 851 Campus Dr. auditoriumseries.org (888-884-3246) GONZAGA FACULTY CELLO RECITAL: KEVIN HEKMATPANAH & DEBORAH RAMBO SINN: Featuring music by Ludwig van Beethoven, Claude Debussy and Frédéric Chopin. Jan. 26, 4-5 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu/music KPBX KIDS’ CONCERT: SPOKANE BRITISH BRASS BAND Join host Verne Windham and the Spokane British Brass Band on a musical journey through the British Isles. The vibrant and exuberant soundscape of a large brass ensemble will fill the cathedral. Jan. 26, 1-2 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. spokanepublicradio.org WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE The Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the band Crooked Kilt and caller Nancy Staub. No experience necessary; beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Snack at Break. For more info: myspokanefolklore@gmail.com. Jan. 30, 7:309:30 pm. $5/$7. Women’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth. spokanefolklore.org CYT NORTH IDAHO FUNDRAISER: SOUTH PACIFIC IN CONCERT Wear your favorite Hawaiian apparel to hear this classic in concert. The evening includes a dessert assortment, Polynesian dance lessons along with games and prizes. Feb. 2, 6-9 pm. $30/person; $200/table. Candlelight Christian Fellowship, 5725 N. Pioneer Dr. cytnorthi-

daho.org/shows/South-Pacific/7 GIRLS ROCK LAB JAM SESSION Kids of all musical abilities are invited to jam with their friends and experiment with sound in an encouraging environment. Sign up online. Grades 3-7. Feb. 2, 10 am-noon. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org THE GREAT FOLK SCARE: AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC REVIVAL, 1958–65 Explore the folk singers and songwriters of the late ’50s and ’60s who rediscovered artists and songs from the 1920s– 30s that they then reintroduced to national audiences. Brad Keeler and Linda Parman perform music celebrating this watershed moment in American cultural history. Feb. 2, 2-3 pm. Free. Medical Lake Library, 3212 Herb St. scld.org SPOKANE STRING QUARTET: MUSIC & ART A program of music by Mozart, Debussy, and Ciurlionis with art projected on the big screen. Take a glimpse into the mind of Lithuanian composer and painter Mikalojus Ciurlionis, 18751911, considered one of the pioneers of European abstract art, as the SSQ performs his string quartet, reminiscent of Dvorak and Smetana, while his hauntingly beautiful paintings are projected above. Feb. 3, 3-5 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

ICE SKATING LESSONS Join instructor Valerie Anderson for beginning ice skating lessons. Developed for guests over five years old, skaters learn basic skating skills and develop the ABC’s of movement, agility, balance and coordination. Thursdays from 6-7 pm; Sat-Sun from 11:30 am-1 pm through Feb. 24. Register in the Sky Ribbon Cafe (15 guests/30 min. session) Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (625-6600) THURSDAY THEME NIGHT Come dressed to impress in themed attire for a $1 discount off admission; includes food specials, music and more. Thursdays, from 5-9 pm through Feb. 28. See link for details. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. (625-6600) MONSTER JAM TRIPLE THREAT SERIES The four-wheel show features six different competitions of speed, racing and freestyle stunts. Jan. 25-26 at 7 pm; Jan. 26-27 at 1 pm. Kids under age 2 free. $21-$41. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com 50TH ANNIVERSARY SNOWSHOE SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT A game of softball on snowshoes began as a challenge between the younger and older men of the Priest Lake community in 1969 with four teams. Jan. 19-20 and 26-27. Hill’s Resort, 4777 W. Lakeshore Rd. hillsresort.com (509-435-2920) CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON Learn to cross country ski and tour the trails of 49 Degrees North Nordic Area. Includes equipment, trail pass, instruction, and transportation. Bring a lunch and water. Ages 13+. Jan. 26 and Feb. 3 from 8 am-4 pm. $49. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd. spokaneparks.org SNOWSHOE TOUR MT. SPOKANE Learn the basics of snowshoeing during a guided hike around Mt. Spokane. Includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation. Ages 13+. Jan. 26, 10 am-2 pm. $29. spokaneparks.org (755-2489)

JANUARY 24, 2019 INLANDER 59


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess AREOLA 51

A lot of women are posting pix of themselves on Instagram in very skimpy attire. I don’t feel comfortable doing that (though I’m in great shape), because I’m single and I’m afraid men would think I’m “easy.” Am I right in thinking men don’t take you seriously as relationship material if you post this type of pix? Or am I prudish and out of touch? —Curious

AMY ALKON

Ideally, if you tell somebody you have a few more weeks out on disability, they don’t immediately assume it’s because you got really bad friction burns working the pole. Evolutionary psychologist Cari Goetz and her colleagues note — not surprisingly — that men see skimpy attire on a woman as a signal that they can manipulate her into casual sex. (Women in their research also understood that men perceive skimpy attire this way.) But who actually ends up manipulating whom? Just like in the advertising world, in the natural world, there are many, shall we say, less-than-truthful messages — from humans, animals, and even some nasty little con artists of the plant world. Take the flower Ophrys apifera, aka the bee orchid. The bee orchid puts out fake female bee scent, and it’s got markings and a slight coating of “fur” like female bees. The poor little sex-mad male bees try to hump the bee orchids and, in the process, pick up orchid pollen that they end up transferring when they try their luck with the next orchid in a lady bee suit. Goetz and her team speculate that some women — especially those who perceive themselves to be “low in mate value” — use revealing attire to advertise what seems to be their hookupability and other “exploitability cues.” However, these seemingly poor, defenseless sex bunnies may actually be looking to “advance their own mating and relationship goals.” As for how this might work, if a man likes the casual sex and keeps coming back for more, maybe, just maybe, she can draw him into a relationship. (Hookupily ever after?) However, this approach is a risky strategy because, as Goetz and her colleagues point out, “men found women displaying cues to sexual exploitability to be attractive as short-term mates, but, importantly, not attractive as long-term mates.” As for what you might make of all this, it’s best to avoid clothes with coverage just this side of G-strings and nipple tassels, as well as overtly sexual poses (like sucking on a finger...subtle!). However, you can take advantage of evolutionary psychology research that finds that men are drawn to women with an hourglass figure (as well as...heh...women who use deceptive undergarments to fake having one). In short, your best bet is posting shots of yourself looking classysexual. This means wearing clothes that reveal your curves to a man — but not your medical history: “I don’t know her name yet, dude, but I can tell you that she had her gallbladder removed.”

A CZAR IS BORN

I love my girlfriend, but she has some weird rules about her place: no shoes inside, cabinets can’t be left open, etc. We’ve gotten in fights when I’ve forgotten to do this stuff and then mentioned how ridiculous I find it. Should I have to do things I think are stupid? —Besieged Your girlfriend reminds you of a well-known television star. Unfortunately, it’s Judge Judy. You, like many people in relationships, have the expectation that your partner’s requests should make sense. This is where you go wrong. To be human is to be kind of an idiot. We’re all idiots on some level — meaning that we all say and do things that make sense to us but that others would reasonably find utterly idiotic. That said, our idiocy is not without benefits. Economist Robert H. Frank observes that we evolved to sometimes behave in “seemingly irrational” ways that actually serve our interests. An example would be acting out in ways that test others’ commitment to us (though, typically, we don’t see it that way and may not even intend to do that). So, though your girlfriend would probably list reasons for each of her rules — reasons you might find silly — what isn’t silly is her caring about your following them or at least caring enough to try. In short, you don’t have to endorse her ideas to try to act in accordance with them and to treat her kindly when she gets upset that you’ve forgotten. (For example, you could say: “I’m sorry. I know it’s important to you that I do this.”) This would be a signal that you care deeply about her — that you love her enough to do ridiculous things just to make her happy...maybe even to the point of handing her a shopping bag: “Look, honey! There was a sale at Prada on surgical shoe covers!” n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER JANUARY 24, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR BARKERBEINER SKIJOR RACE The second annual skijor race features Nordic skiing humans being pulled by their four-legged partners. Jan. 27, 11 am-4 pm. $20. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic. org/barkerbeiner SUPER STORIES: TALES FROM OUR SUPER BOWL CHAMPIONS An evening with Spokane-native Super Bowl Champions Mark Rypien and Jerry Kramer. Jan. 28, 7 pm. $7-$70. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) YUKON RIVER TRIP PRESENTATION Spokane Canoe and Kayak Club member Janet Breuer describes her trip on the Yukon River. Light refreshments served. Jan. 28, 7-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Mountain Gear Offices, 6021 E. Mansfield Ave. sckc.ws FLY FISHING FILM TOUR With an emphasis on the people, places, and fisheries that make up the vast world of fly fishing, the 2019 tour takes audiences from Alaska to Florida, South Dakota to French Polynesia, British Columbia to the coast of Australia and more. Jan. 29, 7 pm. $15-$18. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. PORTLAND WINTERHAWKS Featured promo is the TicketsWest player magnet giveaway. Jan. 30, 7:05 pm. $11-$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. KELOWNA ROCKETS Promo night is the White Claw Viva Las Vegas trip giveaway. Feb. 1, 7:05 pm. $11-$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com PRIEST LAKE SLED DOG RACE The 49th annual race is sponsored by the Inland Empire Sled Dog Association, and administered under permit with the US Forest Service. Events include multi-dog sled team sprints, a mid-distance 20 mile race, skijoring, PeeWee and Teddy Bear. Feb. 2-3 at 9 am. Free ($5 parking). Priest Lake, Idaho. iesda. org (991-4488)

THEATER

DISNEY’S THE LION KING The winner of six Tony Awards, including Best Musical, returns to Spokane with its story filled with hope and adventure set against an amazing backdrop of stunning visuals. Jan. 23-Feb. 3; times vary. $28-$147.50. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (509-279-7000) THE MEMORY OF WATER Three sisters gather for their mother’s funeral. Each has her own memories of her childhood and this creates conflict, which is, by turns, angry, desperate, poignant and wildly funny. Through Feb. 10; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. $14-$27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) SHE LOVES ME A warm romantic comedy with an endearing innocence and a touch of old world elegance. Through Jan. 27; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $23-$25. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. facebook.com/lakecityplayhouse/ (208-673-7529) AUREUM An adventure tale told through aerial routines and acrobatics. A time traveler meets the beautiful defender of nature’s power, only to find that power threatened by dark forces. Jan. 25, 7:30 pm. $25-$50. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org

THE CONTROVERSY AT VALLADOLID A courtroom drama with a decidedly different spin… imagine a time when the Catholic Church had the right to determine whether or not you were human. Through Jan. 27; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org (838-9727) YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU The play follows the engagement of Tony and Alice, and what happens when they introduce their very opposite families to one another. While Alice hopes for harmony, what she gets is hilarity. Will the union end happily? Jan. 25-Feb. 17; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $27-$29. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com UP CHIMACUM CREEK Presented by U of I Theatre Arts is this coming of age story about life, love and loss in the Pacific Northwest. Written by Ben Gonzales, directed by Justin Cerne. Contains adult language and content. Free for U of I students; matinees are “pay what you can.” Jan. 30-Feb. 2 at 7:30 pm; Feb. 2-3 at 2 pm. $10-$15. The Forge Theater, 404 Sweet Ave. uidaho.edu/ class/theatre (208-885-6465) CLOSING IT UP Stage Left Theater Resident Playwright Molly Allen’s latest original work has been selected to be a part of the AACT-American Association of Community Theatre Festival. Two performances for local audiences serve as a fundraiser to help with Festival attendance costs. Feb. 2, 2-3:30 & 7-8:30 pm. $24.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanestageleft.org MET LIVE IN HD: CARMEN Clémentine Margaine is opera’s ultimate seductress, opposite Roberto Alagna, who captivated Live in HD audiences as Don José in 2010. Feb. 2, 9:45 am. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

VISUAL ARTS

FRONTERA An exhibition of prints by 27 artists. Jan. 24-Feb. 28; Mon-Fri 9 am-5 pm. Opening reception Jan. 23 at noon in the EWU Gallery of Art, located in the Art Building on the EWU campus in Cheney. Free. EWU Gallery of Art, 140 Art Bldg. ewu.edu/cale/programs/art/ gallery (359-2494) THE INLAND NW & THE GREAT WAR: A CENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION OF WORLD WAR I This exhibit features artifacts and photographs from the MAC’s collection as well as special programs to mark the centennial of The Armistice. Through Jan. 27; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; third Thu until 8 pm. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org MODERN MASTERS: GROUP F/64 Nearly 50 works from five of Group f/64’s members, now known as some of the most influential artists of the twentieth century: Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Willard Van Dyke, Brett Weston and Edward Weston. Through Feb. 3; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; until 8 pm third Thu. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org PUSH FACTORS: PERSPECTIVES ON GUATEMALAN MIGRATION An exhibit of provocative photography that explores the factors driving residents of Guatemala from their homes in search of a better life. The show features work by award-winning photographers and

photojournalists Rodrigo Abd, James Rodríguez and William B. Plowman, along with written accounts from migrant youth. Through Feb. 24; Tue-Sat 10 am-8 pm, Sun 10 am-6 pm. Gallery talk with James Rodriguez Jan. 24 at noon. Free admission. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St. prichardgallery.org SCRUTINEARSIGHTED Richard Smolinski’s art responds to the current wave of “Toxic White Masculinity” evident in the Trump administration, the UK’s accidental “Brexit” referendum and the deluge of sexual misconduct revelations that inspired the #MeToo movement. Thu-Sat from 6-8 pm through Jan. 26. Free admission. Terrain, 304 W. Pacific. bit.ly/2RrbRe1 SOCIAL SPACE Featuring the work of four renowned American artists: Mark Bradford, Leonardo Drew, Julie Mehretu, and Wangechi Mutu. The artists share a commitment to abstraction, not only as a means of powerful image making, but also as a politically conscious act. Through March 16; Tue-Sat 10 am-4 pm. Tues.-Sat.. through March 16. Free. Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, 1535 NE Wilson Rd. museum. wsu.edu GONZAGA UNIVERSITY ART DEPARTMENT FACULTY EXHIBITION The Jundt features the work of full-time Gonzaga art department faculty Mary Farrell, Matt McCormick, Mat Rude and Laura Truitt. A diverse show in terms of content as well as materials, works include printmaking, ceramics and sculpture, painting and drawing, photography and video. Jan. 26-May 11; Mon-Sat 10 am-4 pm. Artist reception Feb. 1 from 4-9 pm. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet. gonzaga.edu/jundt (313-6613) FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host receptions to showcase new displays of art. Feb. 1, from 5-8 pm. Details at firstfridayspokane.org.

WORDS

INLAND NORTHWEST MILESTONES A lecture series based on material researched for Robert Singletary’s upcoming book, “Coeur d’Alene: Beautiful and Progressive, 1878-1990.” The book and series gives an overview of Coeur d’Alene’s major economic, political, social/cultural developments and the people that that made it happen. Jan. 24, at 7pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org THE PUNDERGROUND The series kicks off the new year at a new venue; the downtown public library. Sign-ups (12 spots) start at 7 pm; competition at 7:30 pm. Jan. 24, 7-10 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. facebook.com/thepunderground/ WINTER WRITING WORKSHOP A fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction workshop and reading with Jonathan Johnson. Jan. 25 from 5-8 pm and Jan. 26 from 10 am-4:30 pm; followed by a reading from Johnson’s recently released poetry collection, “May Is an Island.” Sandpoint Library, 1407 Cedar St. losthorsepress.org DROP IN & WRITE Aspiring writers are invited to be a part of Spark’s supportive local writing community. Bring works in progress to share, get inspired with creative prompts and spend some focused time writing. Tuesdays from 5-6:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org n


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COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

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Make the most of winter terrain while snowshoeing the panhandle

T

he weather in Idaho is the stuff of legends; if you don’t like it, wait 10 minutes. Don’t wait for a fresh batch of snow, however; there’s plenty in varied elevations where skiing and boarding aren’t the only way to experience nature. Here’s our guide to local snowshoeing. Celebrate the season at FOURTH OF JULY PASS , where a parking permit from Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation gets you numerous trails for all abilities. Visit Panhandle Nordic Club’s website for maps and info. Or check out conditions down low on the TRAIL OF THE COEUR D’ALENES for more than 70 miles of nearly flat terrain. Some trail etiquette: keep to the sides of the trail as you walk so as not to impact the portions groomed for Nordic skiers).

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There’s plenty of room for nordic skiers and snowshoers, as well, at FARRAGUT STATE PARK , about 20 miles north of Coeur d’Alene. Choose from routes that span from 1.5 to up to 10 kilometers. The terrain is mostly flat, making it a great destination for more inexperienced snowshoers or for families. All will enjoy the beautiful views of the park and the magestic mountains surrounding Lake Pend Oreille. Snow conditions do vary due to the low elevation of the park, so

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call 208-683-2425 to check conditions before heading out. At SILVER MOUNTAIN , you can board, ski and tube the day away. Snowshoers can grab a lift ticket to the top (ages 19-61, $19; ages 4-17, $15; ages 2-3, $7) and stop into Silver Mountain Sports Rental for trail info and snowshoe rental ($15). Head north to SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN where you can explore on your own or take advantage of several hosted hikes through Hermit’s Hollow or to the summit ($25, including snowshoe rental). Mark your calendar for the last moonlit hosted snowshoe hike of the season, Feb. 18, which includes snowshoe rental, headlamp and a light snack at Gourmandie on the mountain ($40). Visit schweitzer.com/play/snowshoeing for info. Are you more of a solo SNOWSHOE EXPLORER ? Schweitzer snowshoe trail fees are just $17 for adults, $14 for kids, with rentals available at the Schweitzer Ski & Ride Center from $15-20. In Coeur d’Alene, rent snowshoes from VERTICAL EARTH ($20/day, verticalearth.com) or TRI-STATE OUTFITTERS ($15/day, t-state. com) and hear from local experts about where to go.


C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events She Loves Me JANUARY 24-27

Head to Lake City Playhouse for this warm, romantic comedy with an endearing innocence and a touch of Old World elegance. $23-25; Thu-Sat 7:30 pm, Sun 2

pm; Lake City Playhouse.

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Your Everyday Getaway Escape to Coeur d’Alene this week and find live music, boat cruises, ski hills, hundreds of shops... and that’s on Wednesday! Check out our online calendar and plan your Tuesday or Wednesday or any day! There’s always something fun going on.

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Scenic Hot Cocoa Cruise JANUARY 25-27

Warm up this winter on Lake Coeur d’Alene with a toasty hot cup of cocoa in your hands. Sit back and enjoy the 90-minute scenic tour of the lake. A hot cocoa bar will be available on-board for purchases. $10-15; 11:30 am and

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There’s fun to be had for adults and kids at Lookout Pass’ Bavarian Brewfest. Compete as a family in the snow bowling event (where kids on saucers act as the ball) and then enjoy brats and brews on the deck afterward.

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