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NEWS UPPING THE MINIMUM WAGE? 13 EDUCATION TESTING THE TEST 18 CULTURE PURSUIT OF BADASSDOM 27

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT’S THE WORST TEST-TAKING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE EVER HAD?

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That would have to be last spring. I took a tax accounting class, and there was a lot of material covered in the unit. And so I procrastinated and didn’t study until, like, the day before the test. And then I ended up getting, like, a 61 on the test, barely passing. The average was pretty low, but it was a learning experience for me.

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I have a lot of those... Probably sophomore year, anatomy and physiology. I went in and I was, like, super nervous and I have test anxiety. So my hands were sweaty and shaking, and in the middle of it I had to go to the bathroom. And it was one of those test where it’s, like, they pack it in so that you shouldn’t even finish in 50 minutes, and then if you go to the bathroom you’re for sure not going to.

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Sophomore year I missed a class before the test, so I didn’t know that there was a test. So, I walked in on that, and that was pretty bad. I got a D, so I didn’t know much.

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JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | IDAHO

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the governor announced daho’s 105 legislators are back in their he wanted to shoot the comfortable seats under the capitol dome first one. in Boise, intent on carrying out the state’s Idaho and its predaimportant and urgent business. tors caught the attention Well, maybe not so important. And maybe of the New York Times not so urgent. And maybe not even so comfortthis past December, able. when a planned coyote This year, you see, is an election year, and and wolf shoot-to-kill concern for primary elections trumps most everyderby was scheduled in thing for the Republicans, who are in charge. For Salmon. Organizers ofchomping at the bit back in the legislators’ home fered $2,000 to the pardistricts are even more conservative candidates, ticipants who killed the most animals. The event eager to run against any RINO (Republican In fell flat when no wolves and only 21 coyotes were Name Only) who shows a weakness for cooperbagged by the 230 registered contestants. ating with the moderate middle in order to get Not everyone is happy with Governor Otter’s things done. $2 million budget request to establish a special As always, the most important and largest bill wolf control board, separate from the Departthe legislature must pay will cover the cost of runment of Fish and Game. “Control” is another ning Idaho’s public schools. This responsibility word for “kill.” I, for one, would rather put the is required to assure Idaho’s 287,000 students are $2 million in the public school pot. getting off to an educated start in life. The Fish and Game Commission is already The schools have taken a hit ever since actively “controlling” wolves by hiring a lone the Great Recession messed up the economy, gunman to eliminate wolves in the 2,367-acre big time. In his budget presented to this year’s Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Legislature, Republican Governor Butch Otter The Idaho Conservation League has been resuggested the Legislature restore $35 million to markably tolerant on the wolf issue. But recently the public schools budget for the coming year. its Executive Director Rick Johnson asked, “ If This number still falls $60 million short of 2009 they can’t live in the backcountry, where can expenditures, without allowing for inflation. they live?” The Governor’s recommendation doesn’t When 35 gray wolves were released in censignal that a crusade has been launched to imtral Idaho in 1995, schoolchildren gave prove Idaho’s financial investment in them names and followed their radioits public schools: Idaho ranks 50th relayed paths through the wilderness. As in the amount of money it pays to Send comments to they thrived, their names disappeared educate its children. editor@inlander.com. and the wolves became numbers. As they The public school appropriation multiplied, they became pests. Wolves, is in the hands of the 20 members of like coyotes, have always been pests to Idaho JFAC, the Joint Finance and Appropriation Comranchers — and to the Idaho legislature. mittee. But the public school appropriation bill is almost the last bill the Legislature acts upon in t’s refreshing to learn about Oregon’s apany session, which, even in an election year, is a proach to a burgeoning wolf population. couple of months down the legislative calendar. Oregon has developed a policy that calls for Meanwhile, everybody agrees that Medicaid sheep and cattle outfits to use nonlethal methods expansion will not even be debated in the 2014 to prevent wolves from snatching baby animals, legislative session, which will leave 100,000 or especially lambs. These include simple measures more Idahoans without health insurance. The such as keeping herds away from known wolf state will walk away from $90 million in federal dens, employing loud noise alarms and scare defunds while keeping the wildly extravagant curvices, enlisting protective dogs and human herdrent indigent-care system in place at a cost of $60 ers, constructing barriers and building fences. million in state and county funds. This is inexcusSuch items add costs but also avoid conflicts. able, irresponsible behavior on the part of the Consumers could be wooed to pay a little bit state’s leaders. It’s a no-brainer gone sour. more for lambs raised in a certified, nonlethal-tof the education budget is in JFAC’s custody wolves environment. and Medicaid expansion is off the table, what The questions the reintroduction of wolves hot topics will the legislators address? My into Idaho has presented are worth pondering. prediction: Guns and wolves will attract a fair Do we believe game hunting should include amount of attention. animals that we don’t plan to eat? Is there room According to the Fish and Game Department, in our hearts, minds and geographical space for Idaho now has around 680 wolves throughout predators other than our own species? If so, are the state. In 2009, wolf hunting became legal, and we willing to cover their costs? 

LETTERS

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6 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Sidewalk Summit BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

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he weather is cold, and problems related to so-called “street kids” have faded. Last summer, perceptions were formed by breathless news reports warning of unprovoked violence; some business owners claimed they gave up because of too many menacing youths. The problem has not gone away; when the warm weather returns, it will, too. This is a compassionate community, but patience is wearing thin. As we decide what’s out of bounds on the sidewalks of downtown Spokane, here are a few guidelines for us all to keep in mind: KNOW THEIR NAMES: Every kid has a story, and when you hear them, it can feel like we’ve failed them. In October, we wrote about a 22-year-old who had fled home and was left to contemplate raising her unborn child on the streets. She has a name — Harleigh Coulter — and she is one of us. One local activist who helps young people like Coulter described them as “screaming for a purpose, for a place to belong, for a reason to be.” Knowing their names and their stories is where compassion starts — and compassion needs to be the foundation for our strategy. But firm discipline needs to be part of that strategy, too. REACH OUT: Once our rules and strategies are articulated and vetted — and this is happening — everyone needs to step up. Police, yes, but Downtown Spokane Partnership ambassadors, business owners and even the kids themselves may help enforce the rules. And instead of dropping change into an outstretched hand, citizens can send their spare change to Crosswalk or one of the many other great charities working our streets. One public safety official in Portland described their street-kid strategy as “talking them to exhaustion” — engaging them, constantly reminding them of what is out of bounds (absolute zero tolerance for violence or threats), and pointing out when they’re scaring people and hurting businesses. But also invite them to a forum on finding solutions, and introduce them — in person — to the people who want to help them. DON’T WAIT: With the hot weather a few months away and emotions still cooled off, now is the time to be having this conversation. Everyone needs to work from the same script with the same goals — and that will take sharing a vision and a plan with the community. We have a lot of hopes and dreams for Spokane, and a vibrant downtown is crucial to them all. We simply cannot allow our sidewalks and public spaces to be hijacked. But we have hopes and dreams for our kids, too. It’s not easy to confront both challenges, but right now, that’s where we are.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

What’s all the hoopla? The hoopla is all about music, movies, and TV shows streaming to you instantly – and for free – with your library card! Spokane County Library District, partnering with hoopla, offers thousands of titles. Enjoy hoopla remotely, wherever you have an internet connection, or in our libraries, using the “Digital Library” link. You can download the hoopla app and watch on the go, wherever you might be. If you have questions or want assistance, stop in one of our libraries anytime, our staff is happy to walk you through the process.

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Ice Age Floods and Wooly Mammoths • Spokane Tr T ibe of Indians • Julyamsh and Pow Wows • Bing Crosby and Mildred Bailey • Balazs and Kienholz • Spokane’ss Chinatown • Spokane’s ’ Kentuck cky k Derrby Winner • US Army and Ind dia ian Wa W rs • Stagecoaches and Combines • Natatorrium Park a k and St S reetca ars • Co oeur d’Allene T Trrib ibe e • Timber, r Wheat and Wine • Forts W Wa alla Walla a, Sp Spokan a e and d Geo eorge Wri W ight • Campbell, Cannon, Glover and James Chase • 100+ 0 Year-old Comp ompanies es • Kaliispe pel T Tri ribe b of In ndians • Inventors and Innovators • Victorian Fashion and Everyday Clothes • Chief Spokane Garry • Bloomsday and Commu mmun nity ty Gatherings he n s • Buffalo So Sold ldiers iers and Fairch child AFB • Wa W tering the West with Grand d Coulee Dam • Wome men n’’ss Sufffrage and Fa Fatthe herr’s Day a • Ms. Tok T ushima and Sister Cities • Silve lverr Valley y Mi M ne nes, s Rai aillro oads and Labo abor Unrest s • Confederated T Tribes of the Colville Reservations • Historic Davenport Hotel • Renovated Fox Theater OPENING O NI FEBRUARY E UA Y 2 22 22,, 20 2 2014 14 and The Bing • Miss Spokane Promotes the Inland Northwest • Jaco Finlay and Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture Spokane House • May Arkwright Hutton and Kirtland Cutter • Felts and Geiger Fields

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | LETTERS ON OUR FACEBOOK

Seahawks fans: How does it feel to be headed to the Super Bowl? GENI BECKHAM: FANTASTIC!!!!! JARA DEAUGUSTINO: Amazing!!! This town is going to go crazy. MACHELLE SMITH: Woo! Hoo! SARAH KAY GAITHER: It feels BEASTLY!!! ROAR!!! JAMES EARL: I am so excited!! I can’t wait!!

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HIGH FIVES ALL AROUND

You want a “High-Five Zone”? Awesome! Your 22 ideas for making the Inland Northwest better were great. (“The Ideas Issue,” 1/9/14.) That, coupled with the City of Spokane’s Link Spokane insert about viewing our streets in a 3-D way, made for a really convincing read that our city is capable of reaching new heights. Many of the homegrown, neighbor-centric ideas reminded me of the nonprofit, Strong Towns (check ’em out at strongtowns.org), which advocates for common sense strategies that focus on community and fiscal responsibility. Let’s show other cities how it’s done!

newspaper to sit down and read it. I especially like the news and political commentaries that you include and wish you had more. The only thing I do not like is the fluff pieces by George Nethercutt. To me it is a waste of paper and ink. I would rather you add the political viewpoints that are held by the local unions. It would help educate us and you would be serving the people of the Inland Northwest a lot better. I am sure if you talked to the Teamsters, Steelworkers or any of the unions that belong to the AFL-CIO; they would gladly point you in the right direction to those who could help you.

To me it is a waste of paper and ink.

MEREDITH NOBLE Spokane, Wash.

EXPLOITING CHIMPS ON FILM

LAWRENCE SCHUCHART Having noticed the great review for The Wolf of Wall Spokane, Wash. Street starring Leonardo DiCaprio, I ask that fans contact the star regarding the scenes where he is appearing with a live chimpanzee. Unfortunately, this chimpanzee, named “Chance,” is owned by the Rosaire-Zoppes, a cirSome will argue that the U.S. is a Christian nation, but cus company that is well known for mistreating chimps our Constitution states in (Article 6, Section 3) “no in its care. religious test shall ever be required as a qualification Chance, like all captive, performing chimps, was to any office or public trust under the United States.” pulled from his mother as an infant and likely has This gave equal citizenship to all, already suffered other abuse by his owners to make regardless of their beliefs. him perform on cue, and will be banished to a cage Our Founding Fathers wanted for life before he’s 8 years old, though he may live Send comments to to make sure that in our separation another 40 or 50 years. Seeing chimps in entertaineditor@inlander.com. from England, no religion could ment promotes the private ownership of these make the claim of being the endangered great apes, and creates misery and official, national religion of the U.S. Our Declaration danger for them and the public. of Independence speaks of the “Laws of Nature” and To help chimps, please contact ChimpSanctu“Nature’s God.” These beliefs came about during the aryNW.org. 17th century Age of Enlightenment. The belief was that reason and logical observation of nature are necessary KENNY CASEY to decide the existence of deity. Even though Thomas Spokane, Wash. Paine, who wrote “Common Sense” and “The Rights of Man,” was a deist, he was considered an atheist because of his attack on the Bible and Christianity. I have been picking up your newspaper since you have MAX TUGGLE been putting them out. When I go into a store to buy a Coeur d’Alene, Idaho good or service, I make sure to pick up a copy of your

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LETTERS

GIVE UNIONS A VOICE

ANNGELE VOSE: WOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! SCOTT JOHNSON: I am doing my happy jig right about now!!!! I love those moments in life when your team, in the heat of competition, wins! Ahhhhhh so good! Go Seahawks! JESSE CUMMINS: I’m not gonna lie. It feels pretty good. SHANE O’NEILL: Amazing! Other than the Zags we need a team we can all get behind and support their success. NANCY LAZARUS TAYLOR: Gosh, with Sherman’s classy post-game interview skills, think I’ll cheer for the Broncos. DIEGO DURDEN: Seahawks are going to the Super Bowl!!! Key word: GOING. They’ll never win against the Broncos. … Plus Seattle is a team with no class. TROY SANDERS: Long time coming! Great for the fans and the Northwest! CINDI MOORE ABBOTT: Amazing! We have such a GREAT team! FAN BROWN: Went to my first game this season. The shit they do moves me, man. BRENDA NELSON: Feels great. Too bad there had to be some uncalled for nastiness… AKA: ego. MARGARETIA JANE: If it’s measured by sportsman-like behavior, I’m embarrassed!!! AMY DOWNER: I have always been a Seahawk fan so this feels really good! P DIANE SCHNEIDER: Hope we don’t get ROBBED this time. 


JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 9


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10 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014


COMMENT | SATIRE

Ego-Related Delays A BY ANDY BOROWITZ

support group for mayors bullied by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie held its first meeting this week at the Prudential Center arena in Newark. Organizers of the gathering pronounced themselves pleased with the turnout, as bullied officeholders from all over the state filled the 18,000-seat venue. The support group was the brainchild of Carol Foyler, the bullied mayor of Sea Ridge, N.J. “All of these mayors have their own painful stories to share,” Mayor Foyler said. “We wanted to give them a safe space to do that.” The event was interrupted 15 minutes in, however, when power to the Prudential Center was abruptly cut off, plunging the arena into darkness. A spokesman from Gov. Christie’s office said that the sudden power outage was part of a routine

electricity study. Elsewhere, all lanes of traffic on the George Washington Bridge were blocked Monday by Gov. Christie’s ego, traffic reports said. A spokesman for the New York City Department of Transportation advised motorists to avoid the Governor’s ego by using the Lincoln and Holland tunnels “before Chris Christie remembers they’re there.” But the spokesman hinted that Christie’s towering ego might be yet another traffic inconvenience, like potholes and road construction, that area drivers should get used to: “It’s not getting smaller any time soon.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | POLITICS

Millionaires’ Club BY JIM HIGHTOWER

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he rich truly are different from you and me — they tend to become Congress critters. You don’t find many plumbers, mine workers, dirt farmers, Walmart associates, beauty parlor operators, taxi drivers or other “get-the-job-done” Americans among the 535 members of the U.S. House and Senate. What you do find is an oversupply of lawmakers drawn from a very thin strata of America’s population: millionaires. The Center for Responsive Politics reports that last year — for the first time in history — more than half of our Senators and House members are in the Millionaires Club. Indeed, the average net worth (the value of what they own minus what they owe) for all lawmakers now totals more than $7 million. The world in which our “representatives” live is light years from where the majority of people live, and the divide between the governors and the governed is especially stark for the 40 percent of people whose net worth is zero (or technically, less than zero, since their income and other assets are far exceeded by their debts). This widening chasm is not just a matter

of wealth, but most significantly a literal separation of the privileged few from the experiences, needs and aspirations of the many, who are struggling to make ends meet and worried that opportunities for their children to get ahead are no longer available to them. The harsh reality is that most Americans are no longer represented in Washington. Chances are that their own members of Congress don’t know any struggling and worried people, share nothing in common with them, and can’t relate to their real-life needs, Thus, Congress is content to play ideological games with such basics as health care, minimum wage, joblessness, food stamps and Social Security. America’s wealth divide has become a chasm, creating a looming social and political crisis for America that undermines any pretense that ours is a democratic society. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 11


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LABOR

Lifting All Boats? Washington has the highest statewide minimum wage in the nation — but what if we took it even higher? BY DANIEL WALTERS

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ike all minimum wage workers in Washington, Kierra Fitzpatrick got a very modest 13-cent-an-hour bump to her paycheck on

Jan. 1. “I honestly didn’t really notice it had increased,” says Fitzpatrick, a 19-year-old Eastern Washington University student who works at the McDonald’s on Third Avenue in Spokane. “Gas prices went up at the same time.” If Gov. Jay Inslee gets his way, a much larger raise may be coming her way. “In every community there are people who don’t share in our state’s prosperity, and we need to do something about that,” Inslee said in his State of the State speech last week. Since 1998, Washington’s minimum wage paychecks have kept pace with the cost of living,

but haven’t risen beyond that. Inslee called for increasing the state’s $9.32 minimum wage by up to $2.50. That’s not quite as high as SeaTac’s narrowly adopted $15 minimum wage, but considering Washington already has the nation’s highest state minimum wage, the proposal sent state think tanks into overdrive. An email from the conservative Washington Policy Center says studies tied minimum wage increases to job losses, while the more liberal Washington State Budget and Policy Center published a blog post arguing studies showed the opposite. They’re both right. In other words, this isn’t a topic like global warming, vaccinations or GMOs, where nearly all the academic research points to one conclusion. Instead, what seem like very simple questions — Does raising the minimum wage cost people jobs? Or does it lift people out of poverty? — have kept economists bickering for decades. Expect the debate to heat up once again. State Rep. Jessyn Farrell of Seattle is preparing to release a bill to gradually ratchet up the state’s minimum wage by several dollars over the next few years.

“This is the right time,” the Democrat says. “Inequality is at its highest since the onset of the Great Depression.”

WILL IT HURT BUSINESS?

If there’s any place that promises clarity, it’s the greatest state minimum wage disparity in the nation: the Idaho-Washington state line. Idaho, at $7.25, has the lowest minimum wage allowed by federal law. Work an eight-hour minimum-wage fast-food shift in Liberty Lake, in other words, and take home $16.56 more than working in Post Falls — enough for breakfast, lunch and dinner. If the much lower wage has been a boon for Coeur d’Alene during the recession, the stats don’t show it. Pre-recession, the unemployment rate in Kootenai County was about 1.5 percentage points lower than in Spokane County. But soon after the markets crashed, unemployment in Kootenai County soared. Today, the two have nearly identical levels of unemployment. Kootenai and Spokane counties aren’t perfect comparisons, but they fit the overall research: A 2010 Harvard and MIT study compared every single county bordering a county from another state and found that a higher minimum wage never significantly hurt employment in those counties. Some studies do show job losses after minimum wage increases, but those losses tend to be small. The bigger problems tend to be in the states that make sudden, large increases — at least one study found that New York’s 39 percent minimum wage increase over three years resulted in pronounced job losses for low-skilled, less-educated workers. “Predicatively, the more you raise the minimum wage, the greater the impact,” says Erin Shannon, ...continued on next page

McDonald’s cashier and EWU student Kierra Fitzpatrick says many of her co-workers would welcome an increase in the minimum wage. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 13


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NEWS | LABOR “LIFTING ALL BOATS?,” CONTINUED... director of WPC’s Center for Small Business. She agrees that minor yearly increases haven’t hurt Washington, but thinks a big jump might. Specific industries have even more challenges. Washington restaurants not only contend with a high minimum wage, they’re in a state without a “tip credit.” In Idaho, restaurants can legally pay servers as low as $2.13 an hour, as long as they make at least the minimum wage with tips. Washington restaurants can’t. “If minimum wage goes to $15 an hour, we’ll have some servers making $70 an hour when you figure in some of their tips,” says Marshall Powell, general manager for several Spokane restaurants including the Elk Public House and Geno’s. “I’m all for the minimum wage to go up, as long as they institute a tip credit.” Washington’s restaurant industry struggles. “We employ three fewer people per restaurant. Our average is 14. The national average is 17,” says Anthony Anton, president of the Washington Restaurant Association. “We have one of the highest teen unemployment rates in the country.” Anton says high labor costs have caused some Washington restaurants to ditch manpower-heavy tasks, like making soups or salad dressings entirely in-house. Preston Hawkins, coowner of three Sonic drive-in franchisees in Spokane and North Idaho, says his locations see one major difference between the two states. “[In Washington] we try to hire people who have already been trained,” Hawkins says. “We’re more inclined to hire untrained in Idaho, because of the training expense.” When wages are higher, giving untested workers a chance becomes a more expensive risk.

WILL IT HELP SOLVE POVERTY?

On her minimum wage salary, Fitzpatrick is trying to pay for living expenses and Eastern Washington Univer-


MINIMUM WAGE SINCE 1960

WA $9.32

In 1998, Washington voters approved Initiative 688, which requires that the minimum wage be updated each year based on the Consumer Price Index.

US $7.25

$4 $2

’60

’70

’80

’90

’00

’10

’14

BUYING POWER IN 2013 DOLLARS $10 $8

WA

The 1968 minimum wage of $1.60 is equivalent to $10.71 in 2013 dollars.

$6 $4

US

The buying power dropped in the ’80s because of inflation.

$2 Sources: U.S. Dept. of Labor; Washington State Dept. of Labor & Industries ’60

’70

’80

’90

’00

’10 ’13

sity tuition. “As a college student, it is hard to live off minimum wage when going to school,” she says. “Let’s say I’m fortunate enough to get 20 hours a week. Once you deduct car insurance and bills and rent, you don’t have much left over.” Teenagers like Fitzpatrick make up a much smaller slice of the labor force than they once did. Fitzpatrick says most of her coworkers at McDonald’s are in their late 20s and early 30s. Some of them are trying to support families on their salaries. Three are pregnant. A full-time minimum wage worker supporting a household of three falls below the poverty line in Washington state. Yet raising the minimum wage can be an inefficient solution: Not everyone in poverty receives a minimum wage; not everyone receiving a minimum wage is in poverty. Researchers from San Diego State and Cornell simulated increasing the federal minimum wage to $9.50 and found that only about 11 percent of the increase aided those below the poverty line. The middle class benefited far more. It’s why some pundits suggest boosting direct tax credits for the working poor instead. More radical wage increases promise bigger results: A University of Massachusetts-Amherst study suggested raising the national minimum wage to $10.10 would bring 4.6 million people out of poverty. But bigger increases risk possible side effects, like job losses or increased prices. Even minimum wage workers worry that larger paychecks would be eaten up by inflation. “I think if the minimum wage goes up, then the prices of my groceries and my gas would go up too,” says Larae Stotts, who works the front desk at the Hilton Garden Inn near Spokane International Airport. While the inflation caused by minimum wage increases is typically small, businesses also risk a flattened pay scale. They spend more to pay entry-level employees, and have less available to reward others with higher wages. That’s a concern of Kevin Parker, the Republican state representative who also owns all five of Spokane’s Dutch Bros. Coffee stands. “We had an employee that works with us,” Parker says. “She was a single mom, she was coming out of three or four generations of poverty, raising a kid all by herself. She wants to go to Stanford.” But Parker adds that if he had to pay everyone a higher minimum wage, he couldn’t afford to pay her as much as he wanted to. In other words, it’s an issue where the costs remain murky, and so do the benefits. Fitzpatrick says that for her coworkers, the promise of a minimum wage is clear. “It would enable them to have a more comfortable living,” she says. “To not only put money aside for the next rent, but also to be able to have groceries.” 

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

PHOTO EYE 4.39 SECONDS

An oil speculator police believe was involved in the murder of Doug Carlile on Spokane’s South Hill last month was arrested in North Dakota on federal firearm charges.

2.

The Whitman County prosecutor’s office says it doesn’t have enough evidence to bring charges against four people arrested last year in connection with an incident that left WSU instructor David Warner with brain injuries. Police say Warner attempted to break up a confrontation between a friend of his and the group of four when he was knocked to the ground.

3.

The 16-year-old driver involved in the October crash that killed two University High School students was charged this week with two counts of vehicular homicide.

4.

After a nail-biting win over the San Francisco 49ers, the Seattle Seahawks are headed to Super Bowl XLVIII in New Jersey on Feb. 2, where they’ll face the Denver Broncos.

5.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Dakota Beck, of Moses Lake, Wash., falls off 804 Mr. Buddy during the championship round of the Wrangler Professional Bull Riders Classic at the Spokane Arena on Saturday. The event was part of the Touring Pro Division, the minor league of Professional Bull Riders, Inc. Beck, who rode 4.39 seconds before falling off the bull, won the overall event with a score of 179 from the previous night.

ON INLANDER.com

DIGITS

1.7

$

While defending the need for surveillance, President Obama announced some significant changes to the way the government collects and uses phone records, including ending eavesdropping on allied countries’ leaders and requiring court approval for non-emergency access to phone records.

million

Amount the City of Spokane spent on three months of work to strengthen the Greene Street Bridge, which reopened last week.

10,000

$

What’s Creating Buzz Reward offered for 18-year-old Dylan Parker, who went missing after a party Saturday in Osburn, Idaho.

SPORTS: The Seahawks are going to the Super Bowl, which means at least two more weeks of hearing about them everywhere you go. Check Inlander.com for more about why this is such a big deal and which areas of the country are rooting for them.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

I’m Just a Bill

What lawmakers are talking about in Olympia; plus, SPD and race TALKING POINTS

LOCATION, LIBRARY, LOCATION

There hasn’t been much action on the House or Senate The downtown Spokane library has been in its location, floor this week, but state lawmakers in OLYMPIA have next to River Park Square, for more than 50 years. But been busy with full days of hearings on a hodgepodge of according to DOWNTOWN SPOKANE PARTNERissues, including medical pot, the dangers of ultraviolet SHIP President Mark Richard, there’s long been talk radiation, paternity testing and more. Here’s a round-up about whether the library could move, opening that space of some of the proposed legislation that had their first to retail. “Folks were having conversations about the public testimony: library without engaging the library,” Richard says.  House Bill 2409, introduced by Rep. Reuven So last year, he raised the question with new Library Carlyle, D-Seattle, would disqualify marijuana producers Director Andrew Chanse and drew comparisons to the from receiving agriculture tax breaks for 10 years. YMCA, which sold its dilapidated Riverfront Park prop Senate Bill 6065, introduced by Sen. erty and used the proceeds to improve its North Curtis King, R-Yakima, would ban minors Monroe facility. from using tanning beds. “It’s undeniable that the single largest cluster  Senate Bill 5997, introduced by Sen. Jan Send comments to of national-brand, successful retail happens to be Angel, R-Port Orchard, would allow a man editor@inlander.com. between Howard and Lincoln on Main,” Richto challenge his legal paternity if DNA testing ard says. Hypothetically, the library could sell proves he is not the child’s biological father. the valuable land, find a new central location  Senate Bill 6090, introduced by Sen. Mike Padden, and use the profits to build an even better building. R-Spokane, would make driving under the influence a The library, however, didn’t leap at the idea. Their felony if a driver is arrested for a fourth DUI charge. downtown location is thriving. “You need to keep our  Senate Bill 6178, introduced by Sen. Jeanne options open, but it’s not something we’re seriously lookKohl-Welles, D-Seattle, would align the recreational and ing at this point, no,” Chanse says. In other words, it’s an medical marijuana industries to protect patients’ access to idea unlikely to happen — and even if it were, it would be medical pot. a long way away. — DEANNA PAN Yet the desire underscores how, even as other areas

LETTERS

of downtown suffer lengthy vacancies, the lots right around the mall remain in heavy demand. But when the Inlander reported on this discussion last Friday, some were outraged even at the notion. “I think it’s a horrible idea. I don’t understand why people think that a retail shop is more deserving than a building open to all the public and serves our public,” says City Council President Ben Stuckart, the council liaison to the library board. “I’ve heard it about the STA Plaza and I’ve heard it about the library. … It’s a side conversation that needs to stop.” Stuckart says the city should instead be focusing on turning parking lots into new mixed-use buildings. Indeed, Richard adds, DSP has a variety of goals beyond just attracting retail, including seeking new incentives and tools for developers and making investments in Main. — DANIEL WALTERS

RACE DATA ROLLOUT

After some minor implementation delays, the SPOKANE POLICE DEPARTMENT expects to roll out its racial data tracking program in the next couple of weeks, using in-car computers to log race and incident statistics after citizen stops. Police officials had expected to start collecting data at the beginning of the year, but needed a few extra weeks to finalize policies and training. Program guidelines indicate the data will be used for officer counseling or training, but not for individual discipline. Ed Byrnes, an associate professor with Eastern Washington University assisting with the launch of the program, says he plans to audit the program in the early months to gauge reliability and officer compliance. He says police officials have committed to working with community leaders if they discover any unusual patterns. “I’m hoping those numbers will be a starting point for a conversation,” he says. — JACOB JONES

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NEWS | EDUCATION multiple-choice-only test to a test that is able to better measure our students and what they truly know and are able to do,” said Tom Luna, Superintendent of the Idaho Department of Education, at a Joint House and Senate Education Committee hearing last Wednesday. “We were trying to test a student’s writing skills by asking them to pick a, b, c or d. … Now we have a better measure. We will measure a student’s writing skills by having them write.” A decade ago when the Idaho Standards Achievement Test was developed, a multiple-choice test was all that Idaho could afford to create. But now, with costs being shared between more than two dozen states, Melissa McGrath, an Idaho Department of Education spokeswoman, says they can afford something better.

“We were trying to test a student’s writing skills by asking them to pick a, b, c or d. … Now we have a better measure.”

This is Only a Test Idaho and Washington students will spend hours taking a new, tougher standardized test this spring — but won’t find out their scores BY DANIEL WALTERS

B

ack in 2009, Washington Superintendent of Public and program effectiveness for Spokane Public Schools. Instruction candidate Randy Dorn campaigned on While the WASL and HSPE were designed to meathe promise to get rid of the Washington Assesssure whether students deserved a high school diploma, ment of Student Learning, the standardized test that had the new exams will test whether they’re ready for college. become a dirty word for many educators. When he was Washington is transitioning gradually. High school elected, he kept his promise. students still will take the HSPE as a requirement for Washington labored to create two new state tests graduation this year, but Spokane Public School students — the Measurement of Student Progress and the High at 28 elementary schools, four middle schools and Rogers School Proficiency Exam — that were shorter High School will try out the new test. and less writing-intensive. “We are going to venture into the dark, scary But where the WASL lasted for a dozen waters,” says Rogers Principal Lori Wyborney. Send comments to years, its replacements have barely lasted “We wanted a trial run.” editor@inlander.com. three. Already, a new standardized testing After all, it’s the first time Rogers students regimen has been introduced. will take their standardized tests online instead of It’s the most visible impact so far from the Common on paper. “When you put 600 kids on a wireless device Core, the controversial, state-led, federally supported at one time, it bogs it down,” Wyborney says. “We were movement to use the same academic standards across concerned about that.” the country. As districts rush to rewrite their curricula to y the fall of 2015, most of Washington’s English match the new standard, a consortium of 26 states and arts and math standardized tests will be completely territories, including Washington, Oregon and Idaho, replaced by either the Smarter Balanced test or have developed completely new standardized tests, the Common Core-based exit exams. Smarter Balanced Assessments. Idaho is ramping up even more rapidly: The state is Once the Smarter Balanced test scores begin being pushing every student in grades 3 through 11 at every released, it will be possible to directly compare the perforpublic Idaho school to take the Smarter Balanced test this mance of Rogers High School in Spokane with Lake City spring — though schools can choose to opt out of testing High School in Coeur d’Alene, Los Angeles Senior High 9th and 10th graders. The new and old tests make for a School in California or Casco Bay High School in Maine. vivid contrast. “You’re going to be expected to perform at higher “We are finally moving away from a stagnant, levels,” says Travis Schulhauser, director of assessment

LETTERS

B

18 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

The new tests will be longer. Where the ISAT lasted an average of 90 minutes, these could last up to seven or eight hours per student. The multiple-choice questions may have multiple correct answers, requiring students to select all answers that apply. They’ll be assigned “performance tasks,” where they might read an essay and then write about it, or watch a video in order to solve a math problem. In deeply conservative Idaho, however, the Smarter Balanced test has been sucked into the whirlpool of the debate over the Common Core, where a vocal contingent is fretting that the standards mean erosion of local control. It’s not just citizens at town hall meetings, either: Last week, Idaho Sen. Steven Thayn, a former Spanish teacher, sent out a press release calling for an alternative to the Smarter Balanced test, condemning the Smarter Balanced assessment as “extreme testing“ and spreading fears that Idaho “is not able to guarantee that pornographic passages or agenda-driven questions will not be on” the test. The Department of Education responded, disputing the accuracy of Thayn’s letter and noting that, unlike the SAT or ACT, Idaho has the chance to review all test questions.

F

or both Idaho and Washington, this spring is just the dress rehearsal: It’s a way to test the test, to spot problematic questions and calibrate the scores. For this first year, it won’t count. Students, teachers, schools and districts won’t know how to get any information on how they performed. “I think that’s odd,” Wyborney says. “I get it; they don’t want to spend the money [to score it]. But it still allows us to see it, to watch our kids interact with it. That was our thinking.” McGrath says the vast majority of Idaho educators believe it would have been pointless to give old tests that didn’t match new standards. Both states expect to see lower scores in 2015, the first year the test is scored. McGrath says Idaho expects to see the number of students passing its standardized test to plummet from around 80 percent to as low as 40 percent. That’s the price, she says, of raising the bar for education: At first, fewer people can clear it.  danielw@inlander.com


NEWS | OLYMPIA

Who’s Paying? Sen. Andy Billig’s new bill would keep “dark money” from infiltrating Washington state elections BY DEANNA PAN

F

our years after the Supreme Court’s controversial Citizens United rulings unleashed floods of cash into our political system by shadowy “dark money” groups vying to influence elections, Washington state’s own campaign finance disclosure laws may become more transparent under a new bill proposed by state Sen. Andy Billig, D-Spokane. Under current state law, certain nonprofit groups can spend unlimited amounts of money on Washington campaigns without revealing their funders because they’re outside the statutory definition of a “political committee,” says Lori Anderson of the Public Disclosure Commission. “If they don’t fall under that definition, like an organization that has money and incidentally decides that it wants to spend that money on the campaign … they don’t have a disclosure requirement,” she says. Billig’s proposal essentially broadens the definition of “political committee” by requiring Andy Billig all organizations, regardless of their incorporated status or primary purpose, to disclose their donors if they spend significantly in a Washington race: at least $100,000 in a statewide campaign or $20,000 in a local election. The bill, Billig says, would “even the playing field” between political committees and groups that aren’t currently bound by disclosure laws. So far, the legislation has garnered bipartisan support, with two Republican co-sponsors. “The reason we have disclosure and transparency is to reduce the opportunity of corruption and to help voters be informed,” Billig says. “That helps us to have a healthier democracy.” Billig says he started drafting the bill last year after watching outside spending by “dark money” groups skyrocket at the national level. Take the 2012 campaign cycle, the most expensive to date, with costs exceeding $7 billion: Political nonprofits spent more than $300 million — a roughly 350 percent increase from 2008 — without disclosing their donors. “In anticipation of nonprofit groups that may start to significantly participate in elections in Washington,” Billig says, “we wanted to proactively put a law into place to require disclosure for these kinds of groups.” His timing couldn’t be better. In Washington’s most recent election, two deep-pocketed groups were able to dodge — initially, at least — the state’s campaign finance disclosure laws. Attorney General Bob Ferguson is embroiled in litigation against the industry-backed Grocery Manufacturers Association, which collected $10.6 million from its members to oppose Initiative 522 for labeling genetically engineered food before Ferguson forced the group to reveal the names of its contributors. (GMA is now countersuing Ferguson, claiming the attorney general inappropriately applied Washington’s disclosure laws.) On the opposite side of the political spectrum, Working Washington, a pro-labor nonprofit that’s partially funded by the Service Employees International Union, donated nearly a quarter of a million dollars to SeaTac’s $15 minimum wage fight. Identifying the group’s mystery donors, however, is impossible. The economic stakes for these shadowy industry and union groups are “huge,” says Todd Donovan, a political science professor at Western Washington University. That’s why he expects that Washington’s dueling gun control initiatives — 594 and 591 — similarly will draw torrents of money into the 2014 election. “These national groups will spend a lot of money here,” Donovan says. “They’re looking toward the bigger agenda.” 

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JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 19


This year, the Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF) has brought in one of its best slates of films since the event’s inception. There are two Oscar-nominated foreign films, local projects, animation and a chance to discuss the craft of cinema with filmmakers. Here’s a rundown of everything playing this year — most of which our staff was able to see in advance — to give you a little idea of what you might want to check out.

AATSINKI

Sun, Jan. 26 at 4:15 pm and Thu, Jan. 30 at 6:45 pm; Magic Lantern, 84 minutes Aatsinki opens with men sitting around a campfire in rugged pants and jackets. Brothers Aarne and Lasse Aatsinki rub their hands together idly and laugh at someone’s remark. They are Arctic cowboys — the leaders of the collective that herds the last group of wild reindeer in the far north of Finland inside the Arctic Circle. In documenting a year in their lives, filmmaker Jessica Oreck mixed her interest in ethnobiology — how cultures interact with the environment — with a love of Hollywood westerns. This is not some romantic idyll untouched by modern technology — these cowboys make use of helicopters, ATVs and walkie-talkies. They smoke cigarettes,

snap photos with digital cameras and butcher reindeer in glistening white slaughterhouses. But their story is told without narration or background music, partly because Oreck was so struck by the area’s overpowering silence. “I’d spend whole days with my ears ringing because it was so quiet and there was nothing to interrupt that silence,” she told National Geographic. She lived with the family on and off for a year, staying in a small cabin without heat or hot water, and the result is a raw, contemplative look at life in the Arctic and the rhythmic contrast between action and quiet moments — the crackle of fire, the squeak of fresh snow. The film debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival last year and begins its wider theatrical release at the IFC Center in New York on Jan. 24. (LISA WAANANEN)

ANINA

Sun, Jan. 26 at 2 pm; Magic Lantern, 80 minutes This upbeat, animated film from Uruguay follows the spirited Anina Yatay Salas, a 10-year-old who hates that all three of her names are palindromes because the kids at school make fun of her for it. During recess at school one day, Anina gets into a fight with her arch-nemesis for exactly that reason; the result is what Anina describes as “the weirdest punishments in the history of weird punishments:” the near-impossible mission of holding onto a sealed envelope for a week without opening it, without knowing what’s inside. In the week that follows, Anina’s imagination takes her on an unforgettable journey as she also embarks on a few real-life adventures in her quest to figure what’s inside the envelope and what her punish-

ment really is. Bring the kids along for this one (if their reading skills are top-notch — the movie’s in Spanish with English subtitles). It’s jam-packed with life lessons about accepting and loving yourself for all your quirks and empathizing with others — even someone you think is your enemy. From her wild red hair to her triple palindrome name and her wild imagination, Anina is not like other kids, but she learns that that’s OK and makes a new friend because of it on the way. A feel-good movie for sure, Anina offers the reminder we all need: our differences are what make us special, and we should not let those differences — whether physical, mental or emotional — stop us from making connections and developing relationships with other people. (CLARKE HUMPHREY)

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BIBLE QUIZ

Sat, Jan. 25 at 11:30 am; Magic Lantern, 76 minutes The focus of this Washington-made documentary is on the kids in school who don’t do drugs or drink alcohol. Rather, they prefer to imbibe in Jesus. They’re not just filled with the Holy Spirit, but with a passion for winning the National Bible Quiz Championship. The competition is not for the weak, or people unable to memorize entire books of the Bible. As Tacoma Life Center church’s team captain J.P. O’Connor explains in Bible Quiz, “It’s do or die. Not even joking.” The film follows the team of three through a year of cramming, practicing, competing locally and eventually qualifying for the nationals in Green Bay, Wis. But it’s 17-year-old Mikayla Irle who is the heartbeat of the film. With a troubled home life, she finds solace in the inviting group dynamic, especially in O’Connor, who happens to be her crush. As our heroes advance to the final rounds, competition becomes so stressful you’re liable to get up and need a cigarette. Will they win or won’t they? The fact that you’ll care shows how much Bible Quiz achieves. Yet the film’s theme transcends more than just a competition. In the end, It’s about finding one’s true self-worth and a place in the world. Director Nicole Teeny is scheduled to attend this screening. (LAURA JOHNSON)

ANIMATION SHOWCASE 2014

Sat, Jan. 25 at 4:30 pm; Bing Crosby Theater The Spokane Film Festival’s Animation Showcase features genres from all across the spectrum, going deep into the weirdly abstract to resurface in the insanely hilarious. The short snippets of animation range from four to 13 minutes, but are still able to fit in incredible story lines. “El ruido del mundo” (directed by Coke Riobóo) is a foreign film about a composer who uses music to control a strange ailment, while “Gloria Victoria” (Theodore Ushev) features music over combat imagery from all over the world. “Impromptu” (Bruce Alcock) dazzles with a dinner party hosted by a slightly tipsy woman, and “It’s a Dog’s Life” (Nicolas Bianco-Levrin, Julie Rembauville) follows a pooch that just really wants to go to space. “Monkey Rag” (Joanna Davidovich) is a colorful explosion mirroring old-timey animation about Mitzi, a girl who creates her own disasters; “Mr. Hublot” (Laurent Witz) examines the difficulties of obsessive-compulsive disorder and a new pet. “The Rose of Turaida” (Ryan Grobins) dramatizes both adoption and sacrifice, as a young woman struggles to save herself, while “Boog” (Michael Nugent) features a young musician searching for the confidence to perform. “Subconscious Password” (Charles Landreth) illuminates the frustration of forgetting someone’s name, and “Virtuos Virtuell” (Thomas Stellmach) shows the growth of abstract pictures through their timid encounters using a classical soundtrack. (EMERA L. RILEY)

THE BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN

Fri, Jan. 24 at 8 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 112 minutes Here’s something I learned from this movie: people in countries other than this one listen to Americana music. Maybe everyone knew this, but I had to learn it from the excellent, heartbreaking Belgian film The Broken Circle Breakdown. Here, director Felix van Groeningen, adapting from a play of the same title, gives us the story of Didier, a bearded banjo player with an Americana obsession, and Elise, a tattoo artist, who fall in deeply in love. As a bonus, Elise has a killer voice and can join in Didier’s folk and bluegrass band. It’s a perfect fit. The film — nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at this year’s Academy Awards — jumps through time, so we soon see the cute-as-hell daughter who results from their union, but know immediately that something isn’t right. The little girl has cancer, and her parents are doing everything they can to keep the family together and their daughter healthy. Fair warning — watching the effects of chemotherapy on a young child like this is heartbreaking in and of itself. Van Groeningen masterfully presents the live music scenes, which come as an abrupt shift from both the hospital settings and rural home where the young family lives. They sing in perfect English, with just the right amount of Southern twang. The music is damn good, too. You’ll be tapping your toe to these tunes, but then you realize the weight of the story and it’s hard to be in a dancing mood. (MIKE BOOKEY)

CHILD’S POSE

Tue, Jan. 28 at 6:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 116 minutes Pay no attention to the misleading title; Child’s Pose has nothing to do with yoga. Instead, it’s about an extreme case of “mother knows best.” The Romanian drama centers on Cornelia Keneres, an affluent woman who will stop at nothing to protect her adult son Barbu from a prison sentence after he kills a child in a car accident. Mommy dearest is played by an utterly amazing Luminita Gheorghiu, who gives a performance so overbearing you’ll want to run away from her, too. As the film opens, Cornelia is complaining to her sister-in-law about how her son never calls or wants to spend time with her. She’s the only one in the film who doesn’t comprehend why that’s the case. Through many scenes of talking and smoking, director Calin Peter Netzer shows us the point of view of every character in the movie, weaving his camera in and out, often with an almost documentary-type feel. To the very end, it seems anything could happen. The movie won the 2013 Golden Bear (the best-film prize at the Berlin International Film Festival) and also was Romania’s official submission for the 2014 Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film. (LJ)

THE EMPTY HOURS

Sat, Jan. 25 at 7 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 100 minutes In Spanish with English subtitles, The Empty Hours tells a story of romance and coming of age. While managing his uncle’s payby-the-hour motel on the coast of Veracruz, Sebastián becomes familiar with Miranda, who spends many hours there waiting on fleeting meetings with her rich lover. Despite their difference in age (Sebastián is a few months shy of 18, Miranda is 35), they begin to form a tumultuous bond. (COLLEEN FOGERTY) ...continued on page 23

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 21


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spiff

Space Laughs

origin story is eerily similar to Back to the Future’s Marty McFly. The episode about the ship’s mercenary character Reginald Murdock (co-producer Clancy Bundy) spoofs fight scenes in films by director Guy Ritchie. Harum’s character, a psychokinetic named Samson, is explained in another short that plays off of sci-fi horror cinema and videogames. Transolar’s most recently created character origin story — and perhaps its most impressive cinematic endeavor thus far — focuses on pilot Charles Sang-Soo Yasaki, played by director of photography Jade Warpenburg. Filmed last August, the clip features elements of the Wolverine film franchise, Harum says. Premiering at SpIFF, the final character origin story reveals how Elliot “Remmington” Trigger, played by Isaac Joslin, came to be the Transolar’s captain. The five short films were created to fulfill the series’ Kickstarter incentive package, and since being released have only been available to watch by backers and fans who’ve subscribed to the show’s Legion fan club. After raising more than $30,000 through the crowdfunding campaign last year, the crew purchased new recording equipment, but has saved the rest of the money raised to produce Transolar’s second season this year. “We dubbed it as our year of Transolar,” Harum says. “We made these [origin] episodes with a limited budget, but with the equipment you got us, look how much we jumped up production-wise. Now imagine what we can do when we throw that money at season two. We’re pretty stoked.” 

The locally made sci-fi web series hits the big screen at a special SpIFF event BY CHEY SCOTT

A

dam Harum hasn’t been sleeping. The Spokane International Film Festival was approaching, and as director and visual effects editor of — in addition to writing and acting in — the local sci-fi web series Transolar Galactica, Harum has been working through the nights to edit content created specially for the event. This isn’t unusual for the 25-year-old filmmaker. Though Harum works a full-time gig at local company ILF Media, he still manages to squeeze in 150 hours or more of production work into each of the series’ episodes, each 5 to 7 minutes long. Harum and the series’ co-creators were asked to participate in the film festival just weeks ago, prompting a scramble to write, film and edit new, exclusive content for the “A Night of Transolar” screening at the Garland Theater on SpIFF’s first Saturday night, Jan. 25. While the majority of SpIFF’s schedule focuses on international cinema, the Transolar team is one of a few select local filmmakers being highlighted. This weekend also will be the first time the online-only series hosts a public screening, and Harum says he and fellow co-creators are excited to share their latest work with the local

film community. “People have to watch it on the Internet, so it will be fun to blow it up and see it how we designed it,” Harum says over the phone after his workday at ILF. When Harum describes Transolar Galactica to others, he usually refers to the series as sci-fi comedy, rather than label it a parody. But the series’ plot and main characters are indeed parodies of common sci-fi roles and tropes. There’s the brash, “get-’er-done” captain, the nerdy, self-doubting mechanic and the serious, matter-of-fact pilot. Fans of other popular sci-fi series and movies (Star Trek, Star Wars, Firefly, Battlestar Galactica, etc.) should immediately recognize elements and story lines adapted for Transolar and made comedic. During the upcoming screening, these plot familiarities should be even more apparent. Transolar’s exclusive SpIFF reel features the series’ “Origin Episodes,” telling the backstories of how each character in Transolar’s first season of 10 episodes came to be members of the ship’s crew. First there’s mechanic Martin Paul McCall III, played by producer/assistant director Adam Boyd, whose

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EVERGREEN: THE ROAD TO LEGALIZATION

Sat, Feb. 1 at 4:20 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 86 minutes You’ll go in thinking this is a film about marijuana, but just a few minutes in, you realize it’s much more a story about politics. Marijuana, and the legalization thereof, just happens to be the lens through which director Riley Morton and writer Nils Cowan inspect the modern political process in the state of Washington. Evergreen brings to mind other political documentaries, the easiest comparison being The War Room, but is nevertheless unique in its sober, linear approach toward explaining the way in which organizers were able to pass Initiative 502, making recreational marijuana usage and possession legal in the state of Washington. We know the outcome going in — weed becomes legal. What most viewers won’t know is what went on behind the scenes among both supporters and the opposition. What viewers likely will find the most surprising aspect of Evergreen is the fact that there was no opposition, at least no organized opposition, to the measure that was making the age-old “drugs are bad, m-kay” argument against marijuana. Rather, it was the medical marijuana community that rallied against the passing of the law, mostly focusing on the new DUI laws that would be put in place. It’s a fascinating dichotomy and makes for an outstanding, fascinating film. It’s not necessarily going to make you want to pack a fat bowl (not to say there isn’t a ton of grass smoked on-screen) while you watch. Rather, Evergreen might make you want to read up on future ballot measures, or maybe take a political science class. (MB)

FIND YOUR WAY: A BUSKER’S DOCUMENTARY

Saturday, Jan. 25 at 2:15 and Sunday, January 26, at noon; Magic Lantern, 95 minutes The magic of Seattle’s Pike Place Market goes beyond just lobbed fish and overcast skies. It’s a place where music happens. Some of it applause-worthy, some of it cringe-worthy, much of it weird, but no matter: it’s busker heaven. Director Brian Nunes’ Find Your Way follows seven Seattle street musicians, in their home life and their musical career. The overhanging question is whether

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Fri, Jan. 24 at 5:30 pm; Bing Crosby Theater SpIFF’s Best of the Northwest features outstanding shorts from our neck of the woods, with subjects including everything from Spokane’s very first axe murderer to a father and daughter who are slowly reconnecting. First in the lineup is “Chapters” (Shaun Springer), based on an entry in the Inlander’s short story contest last year and filmed as part of the 50 Hour Slam film festival. It follows a young man as he remembers a love lost. “Flow: “The Elements of Free Ride” (Oly Mingo) goes in a completely different direction: zooming with Rex Flake on an intense bike ride through the Cascades as he identifies flora, fauna, and geography of the region. Based on another Inlander winner’s tale of bathroom woe, “I Have To Go” (Sean Finley) taps into the awful nightmare of never, ever escaping the bathroom. “Real Change” (Adam Becker) emphasizes the important need to tell your story, no matter what. In a poignant moment between two people, 8-year-old Mia has no concept of her father Joe’s real-world concerns in “The Hero Pose” (Mischa Jakupcak). “The Park Bench” (Kendra Ann Sherrill) dives into everyone’s favorite romantic trope — the socially awkward love story — while sitting on a bench. “Sidney: Portrait of an Axe Murderer” (Nathan Brand) explores the life and subsequent death of Spokane’s first-ever killer who carried an axe. “Superb-Man” (David Helberg) reveals the uselessness a superhero might feel after conquering his arch-nemesis. What’s a guy to do when he’s just saved himself right out of a job? Winner of the 48 Hour Film Festival and shown on First Night, as well as closing this show, “Super-Duper-Friends” (Shaun Springer) follows a frequenter of comic-book shops who’s madly in love with an employee at his favorite haunt. Getting some help from his friends — his super-duper friends — might just give him the strength to save the day. (ER)

these street musicians can “make it,” and what, exactly, “making it” means. For some it’s landing an album deal. For others, it’s just making enough money playing to pay their bills or finding artistic validation. Spreading the camera time across seven different musicians means the movie never goes deep enough, even as it readily scampers down rabbit-trails, like the Washington Post experiment about a world-famous violinist playing in the metro to see if anyone would notice his talent. Instead, Find Your Way is best at raising issues begging to be explored further, like how do street musicians deal with harassment? What happens when there’s a fight between musicians over the corner? How does the Bohemian street musician lifestyle work for those trying to raise a family? At times, the shaggy, meandering just-jamming pace of the documentary feels frustrating. But then again, it fits perfectly with the subject matter. Watching Find Your Way is like strolling along a sidewalk, listening to a busker strum a guitar for a few minutes, and then moving on down the street. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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their own in their relationships with each other, with family members and with men. There also exists, in an overt way, commentary on the tendency of men to control women in the form of Natia’s parents’ relationship, Natia’s own experience with men and a friend whose husband kicks her out upon learning that she lost her virginity before marriage. Even with everything else that’s going on, it’s still very important to have those kinds of conversations so young girls like Eka and Natia don’t find themselves trapped in similar situations. The movie intricately weaves the lives of these young girls with their country’s post-independence turmoil in a way that illustrates no one is safe, and no one is exempt from deeply feeling everything that’s happening around them. One of Natia’s two suitors gives her a gun to protect herself. She and Eka share it, passing it between them as one or the other needs protecting. You can’t help but wonder when that pivotal moment — when one of them finally fires it — will come, and why. But it isn’t as simple as that. Instead, the movie closely follows characters as they learn about themselves and changes the way they see the world through their interactions with each other. (CH)

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Wed, Jan. 29 at 6:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 92 minutes As a young girl, Sarah thrives as a student at her Catholic orphanage in Belgium. Then one day a man claiming to be her father uproots her from the little stability she has. She is promised a trip to Paris, but she’s ultimately drugged and taken to a remote Moroccan village. As she grows into a young woman, she continues to stand out from the other Muslim girls in the village. While struggling with poverty and hunger, she is not concerned with finding a husband like the other girls, but rather dreams of returning to Belgium and continuing her education. (CF)

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Sat, Feb. 1 at 11:30 am; Magic Lantern, 75 minutes If you ever wanted to understand why a person would risk their lives climbing an 8,000-meter mountain, you’ve got your wish. This documentary follows a small group as they attempt the world’s most dangerous peak. Their attempt to summit K2 coincides with the 100-year anniversary of the Duke of Abruzzi’s landmark K2 expedition in 1909. Through the eyes of director Dave Ohlson, we get to take a look at the history and geography of the Karakoram mountains and really learn about the risks, rewards and personal gain that come with this kind of undertaking. (CH)

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Sat, Jan. 25 at noon and Tue, Jan. 28 at 6:45 pm; Magic Lantern, 80 minutes This has been dubbed “a love story” by its subtitle, so you’re probably expecting the typical boy meets girl, boy falls in love with girl, boy loses girl, boy wins girl back rom-com. But neither “typical” nor “rom-com” can adequately describe this documentary about a woman in Scotland who ties fishing flies. Megan Boyd was an amazing fly-maker who became so well known that even Prince Charles was one of her buyers. Though her flies are mainly used for their original purpose, some have been collected over the years as folk art pieces; her craftsmanship was just that exquisite. (CH)

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Sat, Feb. 1 at 7 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 87 minutes This subdued spin on Rain Man from Dutch director Diederik Ebbinge centers on Fred (Ton Kas), a prim Calvinist widower with all the amenability of a drill sergeant and a soft spot for Bach’s choral pieces. Within minutes of his first stiff-gaited appearance, he’s taken in Theo (René van ‘t Hof), a mentally handicapped man given to begging among the local villagers. Although it’s not readily apparent why this unlikeliest of samaritans would open his home to a disheveled stranger who communicates in monosyllables and animal noises, the complexity of Fred’s motives becomes clearer as his and Theo’s backstories are teased out. Loneliness, charity, rebellion and penance all play a part. There’s no small amount of absurd and understated humor throughout Matterhorn. Some of it comes from the film’s flirtation with queer and religious themes; more is at the expense of childlike Theo, who’s inclined to dress in bizarre outfits and invariably puts Fred in awkward situations among his scowling, black-suited peers. The pinpoint framing and meticulous backdrops of cinematographer Dennis Wielaert have a clinicality that mirrors Fred’s anal retentiveness and makes his increasing aberrations from routine all the more jarring. Other scenes, like the surreal slow-mo montage of Fred and Theo doing song-and-dance shticks for a children’s birthday party, call Wes Anderson to mind. As Matterhorn’s brisk pacing picks up speed, its lighter side gives way to some unexpected and exquisitely moving revelations. (E.J. IANNELLI)


EUGENE BALLET COMPANY

D E N N I S

MINOR DIFFERENCES

Fri, Jan. 31 at 5:30 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 77 minutes Spanning 18 years, this documentary tells the story of five boys at a maximum-security prison for juveniles in Chehalis, Wash., who grew up to be men struggling to overcome their childhoods and early incarceration. In getting to know these boys, director Heather Dew Oaksen realized — and will you see as well — that they weren’t so different from her own son, and yours. (CH)

ON THE JOB

Mon, Jan. 27 at 6:45 pm and Sat, Feb. 1 at noon; Magic Lantern, 121 minutes Fast-paced and action-packed, this crime drama goes where no other has gone before. When prison guards get orders from a mysterious “them” to have someone killed, the guards use prisoners to do it, and everyone else is none the wiser. But two agents are on the case, determined to expose the truth. (CH)

THE ROCKET

Thu, Jan. 23 at 7 pm; AMC River Park Square, 96 minutes Among certain ethnic groups of Laos, the birth of twins is an evil omen. This means Ahlo (Sitthiphon Disamoe) is considered cursed from the moment he arrives in the world. He survives — unlike his partner in the womb — only through the kindness of his mother Mali (Alice Keohavong), who resists the urgings of elder Taitok (Bunsri Yindi) to kill Ahlo and spare the family the inevitable misfortune he will bring. Taitok’s fears would seem to be warranted. Cut to a few short years later, when the family’s tribal village is slated to be flooded by a new dam. They’re forced to undertake a long, fateful relocation to an overhyped Shangri-La that proves to be little more than a shanty town. There the cheeky young Ahlo fails to win over the locals, but does befriend Kia (Loungnam Kaosainam), an orphan who lives with her eccentric uncle Purple, an ex-child soldier with a James Brown fetish. At night through the reedy walls of their huts they can see the illuminated windows of the buildings that house the Australian hydroelectric bigwigs, “selling electricity to all bloody Asia, with nothing left for us,” grumbles Purple. The disparity is indicative of the West’s most recent incursion into a country defiled by centuries of foreign imperialism and exploitation. When Ahlo’s actions result in the exile of his remaining family and friends from the camp, they wander in search of a new home. Their peregrinations take them to yet another unfriendly town, where a rocket festival might offer the ill-starred boy a shot at redemption. Written and directed with equal skill by Kim Mordaunt, The Rocket is intimately filmed while avoiding sentimentality — helped, no doubt, by Disamoe’s genuine charm. (EI)

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plus Melissa Bobick’s Idyll for Eight and Toni Pimble’s Two’s Company

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RIVER CHANGES COURSE

Sun, Jan. 26 at 4:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 83 minutes This award-winning documentary shines light on the pressure rapid development is putting on Cambodia and its citizens. Land availability is dropping while prices are rising, natural resources are being depleted and the lush forests many rural communities call home are being destroyed. With a lack of education and nowhere left to go, many are forced to break away from their families and head to industrialized Phnom Penh to search for factory jobs. This documentary provides an intimate look inside the strain that recent development is putting on Cambodia’s land, culture and people. (CF)

UPRISING

Sat, Feb. 1 at 2 pm; Magic Lantern, 85 minutes The revolution in Egypt’s Tahrir Square was the first one that began with a simple Facebook event, but that’s not the only way it made history. Comprising interviews with diplomats, academics and journalists, coupled with footage from people who were there, this documentary shares the story of Egypt’s revolution from the perspective of the people who organized it and united citizens in one common cause. (CH) 

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 25


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A Long Time Coming More than three years after being filmed in Spokane, Knights of Badassdom makes it to theaters BY CHEY SCOTT

I

t’s finally happening. Local film industry professionals and actors, extras on set and LARPers (live action role players) near and far are rejoicing this weekend as the fantastical comedy horror film Knights of Badassdom hits theater screens. Starting with a couple of sold-out showings at River Park Square’s AMC cineplex, the film is also set to open at the Magic Lantern Theater this Friday. Several delays in production and distribution have

kept the Spokane-made film, shot during the summer of 2010, from a more timely public release. After landing distribution rights through international distributor Entertainment One last summer, the long-anticipated film was finally on its way to a limited theater and video-ondemand release. The film focuses on three best friends, two of whom, Eric and Hung, respectively played by Steve Zahn (Treme) and Peter Dinklage (Game of Thrones), are very active

in the LARPing community. LARPing is essentially “Dungeons and Dragons” taken to a fully immersive level of dress, speech and acting, with fake weaponry and a scoring system. After their friend and roommate Joe goes through a bad breakup, Eric and Hung haul the non-LARPer, played by Ryan Kwanten (True Blood), to a multi-day LARPing festival called the Battle of Evermore, set in Riverside State Park. There the group accidentally ...continued on next page

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 27


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summons a succubus, aka a blood-sucking demon, which takes the form of Joe’s ex-girlfriend. Joined by Summer Glau (Firefly) as the hot, kick-ass LARPer girl Gwen, and her cousin Gunther, Joe, Eric and Hung must figure out how to defeat the evil monster as it devours their friends and fellow LARPers. Spokanites involved in the project — from executive producer Rich Cowan at North by Northwest studios to local Renaissance and medieval enthusiast Alex Mickschl, a film extra and costuming contributor — couldn’t be more excited to finally see Knights on the big screen. “It was a long wait to be sure and a lot of us, you know, were thinking that it would either never see the light of day, or be a really bad, direct-to-DVD kind of movie that no one would watch,” Mickschl says. Though Knights of Badassdom has been long awaited by locals who worked on set, and equally so by sci-fi fans, its message may be lost on others. Aside from being a goofy comedy, Knights also attempts to glorify geek culture, while at the same time parodying the slasher film genre. Director Joe Lynch is a die-hard horror fanatic; viewers unfamiliar with his repertoire or horror comedy in general should expect to see some gore.

M

ickschl is a firefighter with the Spokane Fire Department, but during his free time he transforms into a chivalrous Renaissance-era knight, decked out in full body armor atop his armored steed Percival. Mickschl’s role in Knights began with a producer’s scouting call to the Spokane Tandy Leather store, where he frequently buys supplies to make medieval armor and accessories for himself and his wife Tara, as well as friends. Producers invited him to work as an extra in the film after learning Mickschl is also active in the Spokane Renaissance Faire. He was also hired to contribute some costumes and props used in the film, including pieces worn by its leading actors. On the phone during a break from his post at Spokane Fire Station No. 16, Mickschl excitedly explains that one of the leather arm braces he fashioned for Dinklage is being given away through an online fan contest. But the item Mickschl made that he’s most excited to see on the big screen is the leather satchel used by Zahn’s wizard character to tote around a book of spells. It plays a critical role in the film, since one of the spells it contains conjures the evil demon succubus. Mickschl also made some of the leather armor worn by Glau. “It was pretty amazing for me, being able to physically work with these sci-fi icons,” Mickschl says. “The actors were very friendly, normal people, so it made it easy to work with them.” Aside from its stars, the film’s cast and crew list on IMDb. com reads almost like a who’s who of Spokane film professionals. About 100 Spokane-based crew members and local actors worked on the project, says co-producer Cowan. “I’m thrilled it’s coming out,” he says. “I saw an earlier cut in L.A. in postproduction and I was pretty happy with it. I think it’s going to be kind of a sleeper hit — it’s a fun film to watch.”  Knights of Badassdom screens at the Magic Lantern beginning Fri, Jan. 24.


CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER LITTLE WOMEN O

n the bookshelf that holds the span of novels that would make questionable musicals, surely Little Women has a place. Louisa May Alcott’s semiautobiographical story of four sisters from a penniless family finding their respective paths into adulthood — incredibly popular when it was published in 1868 and no less so today — wouldn’t seem to lend itself to gleaming Broadway grins and belted notes at first glance. Or at a second. Or even a third. Roused by the challenge, or just entertaining hopes of mainstreaming the success of Little Women’s 1998 operatic incarnation, Jason Howland (music), Mindi Dickstein (lyrics) and Allan Knee (book) set about adapting the novel nevertheless. Their Little Women: The Musical, which debuted on Broadway in 2005, is more like the CliffsNotes version of Alcott’s book — if, that is, CliffsNotes read like parodies of the text they were meant to summarize and also were able to break into song. The characters are so absurdly over the top, the lyrics such wearying restatements of the obvious, that there seems to be very little difference between the musical’s cheerful recreations of protagonist Jo March’s melodramatic fiction and the larger narrative of love, loss and individuality. Though underserved by the musical itself, the Lake City Playhouse cast and orchestra still give fine performances. As the impetuous, idealistic March sister, Bethany Smith is impressively charismatic and sings with precision as well as gusto; for better or worse, her Jo is true to the spirit of this musical. She’s joined by Christine Mullaly (as eldest sister and homebody Meg), Marta Myers (sober Beth) and Caitlin Duffey (status-seeking Amy). All three are well cast, with Mullaly — one of several regular Lake

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48

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Classic literature becomes a musical at Lake City Playhouse. City actors to appear in this production — quite at home in a more prominent supporting role. Little Women’s live orchestra does well under Zack Baker’s baton. The musicians’ position behind the stage has never been optimal, but the audio has more depth than in past productions, thanks to a relocated sound booth. The set, however, isn’t the venue’s finest hour. Instead of depicting an all-purpose interior location or something abstract but thematically apt, designer and director George Green has opted instead for a messy hybrid of the two. Given its billboard-style take-home messages and turgid characters, this is a safe, anodyne bet for family entertainment, even if the musical doesn’t really succeed as a stand-alone work. — E.J. IANNELLI Little Women: The Musical • Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm; through Feb. 1 • $13.75-$19.75 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse.org • (208) 667-1323

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TV | Ten years ago, I read a Rolling Stone article about a tiny Canadian island where for the past 300 years, people have been digging for what some believe is the world’s greatest collection of treasure. In that time, no one has found any treasure on Oak Island, but several have mysteriously perished. Now, the History Channel is taking us into the depths with THE CURSE OF OAK ISLAND (Sundays, 10 pm), a reality show about two rich brothers who have bought most of the island and get down and dirty to solve this thing once and for all. The show can be desperately corny, but the subject matter is too intriguing to turn it off.

BEER | The Seattle Seahawks are your region’s football team. Don’t give me any of that “but I’ve always been a Broncos fan even though I’ve never been to Denver” crap. A team from the Northwest is playing for a professional title, and you should savor that. You should also drink like a fan with THE 12TH CAN, a pale ale from Hilliard’s Beer in Seattle. The 16-oz. can is adorned in Hawks colors, and classily so, making for a perfect beverage to bring to what will likely be the most epic Super Bowl party you’ve ever attended. And it’s smooth and tasty, like a Russell Wilson deep ball.

BOOK | Chuck Klosterman has made a career out of analyzing pop culture with a wit and style that blends even complicated social questions into easily digestible essays. His latest book, I WEAR THE BLACK HAT examines what it means to be a bad guy. The collection of original essays is more focused than his previous books — and at times it’s as if Klosterman himself is genuinely concerned that he might be a villain. He writes, often hilariously, about why we hate some people who do bad things (Hitler) yet seem to love others (D.B. Cooper) while never actually rationalizing these judgments.

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JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | POETRY

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Spokane poets are trading microphones for laptops in a new online open mic forum BY LEAH SOTTILE

M

ark Anderson holds up a glass cup to the camera. “It’s not wine,” he says. “It’s coffee.” Anderson, best known as the Spokane poet who hosted the popular downtown Broken Mic poetry reading for the past three years, is sitting on his bed leaning against his bedroom wall — which is wallpapered in a print of towering bamboo stalks. His laptop sits on his lap, and he’s talking into the camera. “One thing that’s weird about being alone in my room is that I’m speaking to people through a webcam. Like I’m pretending to speak to people… does that make sense?” he says. But no one responds… because he’s alone. He holds up a puppet to the camera. “I have a guest host with me here. It’s Howdy Doody.” The puppet’s jaw moves in silent laughter. What Anderson is doing is something new for the poetry community in Spokane and far beyond. It’s an online poetry open mic called URIRL — one hosted by Anderson from his bedroom in Spokane, but that attracts poets from Houston, Boise, Seattle and, on this particular evening, Golden, Colo. The concept is based on a Google Hangout format: with URIRL — which stands for “you are in real life” — Anderson establishes a page where people can sign up to read live poetry over their webcam. Others just drop in to watch. Tonight, a pair of male poets from Seattle drink tall cans of Rainier as they read. A girl wrapped in a blue blanket reads her poetry into the camera, having to raise her voice at one point to be heard over her dogs, who’ve exploded in a frenzy of barks when her mom arrives home from work somewhere in the background. Instead of clapping between poets, observers type “CLAP CLAP” and “snaps” to show their support. With URIRL, Anderson is not only trying to bring together scribes from around the world, he’s trying to personalize the online poetry community — the people who blog or post poems on sites like Tumblr.

“There’s a lot of communities and groups of people sharing poetry online, but not being face to face — always being via text,” he says. “That makes it a little less real-life feeling. Even though you are online, you are in real life. This is part of real life, and thinking of it like that, and actually being face-to-face with each other, even though we’re a thousand miles away, is really cool.” It also takes away some of the fear associated with standing at a microphone in front of a room full of eyes. At URIRL, there aren’t any shaking hands — people are reading their work off of their computers and phones, and from journals. “I think it can be a little less intimidating. It still feels a little more anonymous than a live reading is going to be, even though it’s not anonymous,” Anderson says. “Your face is on there, you’re reading your poetry.” Anderson admits that Broken Mic has become a rousing success — with recent events drawing more than 30 readers. He says that part of Broken Mic’s success in Spokane is that it’s such a positive, welcoming community. “I think it becomes people’s way of connecting. People have said it’s word church,” he says. “I think what they really mean is that this is their weekly check-in with their humanity. ‘What does it mean that I’m alive? I will check in with that once a week with a bunch of other people.’” That’s what Anderson hopes to replicate with URIRL: a positive, energetic community comprised of every kind of poet: slammers and academics; young, old and in between. And with this format, there’s no reason for people to have to miss out on that. You don’t need a car or bus fare to be there. You don’t need money or friends to sit with you while you wait for your turn. You can be in an airport and join in. You can wear your pajamas. It’s a safe space. All you need is a computer and a poem.  URIRL • Every Tuesday at 6 pm • Streaming at urinreallife.tumblr.com


The Chinese like their New Year food with a side of good fortune BY JO MILLER

A

Lucky Eats Food from Canaan Buffet, along with the traditional envelopes used to gift money. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

t some Chinese New Year company parties, a chicken is served with the head still attached. If it happens to be staring at your seat, it means you have been fired. That’s one tradition Ho Lan remembers hearing about when she was a child growing up in Taiwan. But other Chinese New Year food traditions aren’t nearly as depressing as getting canned via a cooked chicken. In fact, several of the foods eaten during the month-long festivities are meant to give good luck. Many families will put out tangerines because the Chinese word for tangerine sounds like “lucky,” says Lan, who owns the Ho Ho Teriyaki Chicken restaurant in the Flour Mill with her husband, Danny Chang. “They like to use the sounds,” Lan says. “If you don’t know you’ll think it’s just fruit, but it’s meant to bring you luck.” The Chinese word for fish resembles a word meaning leftover or abundance. Dinner often ends with a whole fish being brought out, but you can’t partake. “If you are invited to a Chinese family [dinner] for New Year’s, don’t eat the fish,” Lan says. At least not until the next day, because having just the bone left is not a good sign on New Year’s Eve, she adds. Where the fish head points is significant in this instance, too. The fish head faces the most important person at the table and the person at the tail has to raise a glass to him or her, says Sam Song, vice president of the Spokane Chinese Association. Then, the indicated important person gets to eat the fish eyeball, a “very respectful item,” Song says. Song grew up in China and lived there until he was 26. He recalls celebrating Chinese New Year with his family in a tiny village. His father and brother lit up fireworks outside with the rest of the village, and as the sound of fireworks echoed until 5 am, his parents began cooking dumplings. The dumplings — a staple for Chinese families — could be filled with pork and cabbage, egg and Chinese leek, beef and celery, or shrimp and fish. But the difference between an everyday dumpling and a New Year dumpling lies at the center. “If in your filling you have a coin inside, that means this year you’re ...continued on next page

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 31


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FOOD | TRADITION “LUCKY EATS,” CONTINUED... going to make a fortune,” Song says. “And if you have tofu inside it means you will be lucky, because the ‘fu’ has the same meaning of lucky in the Chinese language. If you have a date, that means you have to get out and work hard this year, because ‘date’ in Chinese has the same pronunciation as getting up early. If you have a candy, it means this year is going to be sweet.” A good New Year meal consisted of different meats: pork, beef, lamb and chicken, Song says. His family snacked on appetizers like boiled or fried peanuts and pickled vegetables before the main course, while the men drank 60-proof liquor at their table. Everyone donned new clothes and walked around to visit neighbors, who put out oranges, candies, sunflower seeds, cigarettes and liquor on their tables, Song says. Sweet foods also accompanied the celebration, like deep-fried yams dipped in sugar and tangyuan rice flour balls filled with sesame seeds and sugar for the Lantern Festival. Lan remembers her family making sweet rice cakes using a stone grinder. “Every family has their own different style,” Song says. “Like here, some people eat ham, some people eat turkey during Christmas. In China, really it’s up to your family’s taste what you want to cook. Of course, our Chinese food is so diversified.” This year the Chinese New Year, the year of the horse, falls on Jan. 31, and the Spokane Chinese Association will host a celebration on Feb. 1. The festivities will feature a culture fair and stage performance. Afterward, people will be referred to Canaan Buffet, Hong Kong Buffet and Peking Palace for dinner, Song says. At Canaan, they plan to serve traditional Chinese New Year dishes, such as whole fish, for the celebration. n Chinese New Year Celebration • Sat, Feb. 1 • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene • $6-$10 • spokanechinese. org • 720-8825

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River City Brewing manager Emily Schwartz gives a tour of the brewery. MEGHAN KIRK PHOTO

Beer Vision River City’s tap room offers something for everyone, provided they’d like a pint BY LISA WAANANEN

W

hen River City Brewing opened a little less than a year ago, co-owner Gage Stromberg wanted to focus only on the beer. During his days at Coeur d’Alene Brewing Company, he’d seen how running brewpubs with a full menu becomes a completely different business, and that’s not what River City was meant to be. But as kegs started rolling out to restaurants and bars around town, people kept asking about how to taste the whole lineup. Around the same time, visitors started traveling around town with their Ale Trail maps. So, when a space opened up adjacent to the brewery’s space in the Eldridge building at First Avenue and Cedar Street, it was too perfect to pass up. “I was hesitant, but I am really happy to be open now,” Stromberg says. “I think it’s done exactly what we wanted it to do, which is help us grow a relationship with people who are interested in beer.” The tap room keeps all the River City standards on tap, including the flagship River City Red and popular Huckleberry Ale and VB Stout from the Coeur d’Alene Brewing days. The brewery is making a seasonal higher-alcohol beer each quarter — the Deep Thaw Winter Warmer just replaced the Midnight Marmot Imperial Stout. (An imperial pilsner is up next, come April.) The tap room also lets the brewery try new ideas in smaller quantities, like a double dry-hopped Experimental IPA. Beer is served as pints ($4), half-pints ($2), tasters ($1), and growlers and kegs. The tap room offers only pretzels as a snack, but outside food is allowed. So are kids — they can even sit at the bar since the beer taps are on the back wall — and Stromberg believes that’s important for a family-owned brewery founded on the idea that craft beer is about quality, not quantity. “I think part of the tap room experience should be having a family approach to it,” he says. “Whether it’s your grandparents or your kids, everyone’s welcome to sit down.” For kids — and adults who don’t feel like beer — River City makes root beer served on tap. n River City Brewing • 121 S. Cedar • Thu-Sat, 3-9 pm; Sun-Wed, 3-8 pm • rivercityred.blogspt.com • 413-2388

PRESENTS

RESTAURANT WEEK

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

February 21 - March 2 2014

2013 Restaurant Week Diner “For me, going to a restaurant is a bit like going to a concert. The Pinot turned out to be an inspired choice as the ideal partner for the steak. Sometimes we play an Encore in our concerts – our musical version of a dessert. It needs to be short and well-known, and should be at least on the same musical level as the main course.”

- Eckart Preu Music Director, Spokane Symphony

Pick up the official guide in the February 20TH issue of the Inlander

InlanderRestaurantWeek.com Menus debut online January 30th

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 33


FOOD | OPENING

On The Tracks That big orange train sitting on Sprague Avenue is now a pizza place SAVE DURING HOLLAND AMERICA MONTH

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BY JO MILLER

Y

ou can sit in the bright orange engineer’s seat right next to all the doodads and shiny levers. You’re up high, overlooking Sprague Avenue and, seemingly, the yonder hills. You can even blow the train’s horn. That’s one reason Carlos Fuentes decided to open Choo-Choo Pizza in a train he found on Craigslist — he thought kids would like it. They can explore the front of the engine and families can sit at tables in the room below the engineer’s chairs. There’s a big TV, basketball hoop and other toys for kids to play with. Fuentes says the engine room can be used for parties any day and the whole train can be reserved for parties on Sundays. The train, labeled “Spokane International Railroad,” sits on tracks facing the road and has been at that spot in Spokane Valley for more than 25 years. The three orange rail cars previously served as a dentist’s office, then sat empty for a few years until Fuentes opened Choo-Choo in September. In the main dining room, vintage-looking railroad signs — “Seaboard Railroad,” “L & N,” “Western Pacific” — line the wall above the series of red-framed windows. The tables take up only

one wall, so there’s plenty of walking room. The menu lists seven pizzas: Hawaiian, vegetarian, garlic chicken, barbeque chicken, meat lovers, cheese and pepperoni (large 18-inch, $12$16; medium 12-inch, $10-$14). Of course, you can build your own pizza too, Fuentes says. We tried the garlic chicken, a not-too-thin, nottoo-thick pie spread with butter garlic sauce and ricotta, mozzarella and Parmesan cheese, sprinkled with modest toppings of cubed chicken and tomato basil bruschetta. You can also order a calzone ($9) or sides such as cheesy bread ($5), hot wings ($3.50), garden salad ($5), onion rings ($3) or hashbrowns ($1). Wash it down with a $1 soda or a Corona, Budweiser or Bud Light ($2.50). For the kids, there’s a plate-size pizza and drink for $2.50. That’s the menu Choo-Choo is starting out with, but Fuentes says he plans to eventually expand the menu to include hamburgers, hot dogs and French fries.  Choo-Choo Pizza • 11027 E. Sprague Ave. • Open Mon-Fri, 11 am-9 pm; Saturday, 10 am-9 pm • 868-5067

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FOOD | SAMPLER

BEST F’N BURGER IN TOWN

VEGGIE-FRIENDLY BAEK CHUN SUSHIYAMA 1321 W. Third | 624-5553 A sushi chef can have his fish sent from Seattle or Sydney or wherever. He can have it overnighted to his doorstep. But that’s not good enough for Charlie Yamamoto. To make sure he’s offering the freshest fish, he drives to Seattle every week to personally examine every fish he buys. Yamamoto’s menu isn’t all fish, though. He can accomodate vegetarians, too.

EL QUE 141 S. Cannon | 624-5412 Don’t be fooled by the crosses, Catholic saint candles and sometimes-creepy pictures of the Virgin Mary, because this is a tequila bar. The intimate brick nook, attached to the back of the Elk in Browne’s Addition, serves hand-held Mexican food, Mexican beer and unique bottles of liquor. Enjoy a Pabst Blue Ribbon tallboy or a shot of ghostpepper tequila.

BANGKOK THAI 1325 S. Grand | 838-8424 Bangkok Thai serves up authentic, gourmet Thai food in an atmosphere to match. With curry, duck, chicken, veggies and seafood all on the menu, Bangkok Thai has anything you could want from a Thai restaurant. They are exceptionally veggie-friendly, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention the pineapple chicken, served in a half pineapple shell with breaded chicken and sautéed pineapple chunks, onion, cashew nuts and bell peppers. A little bit pricey, but totally worth it.

MIZUNA 214 N. Howard | 747-2004 Originally a vegetarian restaurant, Mizuna expanded its menu over the years to meet the needs of ominvores as well. Rest assured, vegans and vegetarians — your offerings are still prepared on a separate workspace and grill. Mizuna’s menu changes to showcase fresh, locally sourced ingredients. A great wine selection, dim lighting and elegant decor make this one of Spokane’s most romantic restaurants. Sit in the alley in the summer and pretend you’ve been transported to a quaint European city. 

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JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 35


To-Watch List The movies you’ll be waiting for in 2014 BY MARYANN JOHANSON

Y

ou may find this hard to believe, but there are a few films opening in 2014 that are not sequels, not remakes, not reboots and not based on stage shows, the Bible (there’s more than one of these coming our way), young-adult novels, comic books, cartoons, or — someone make it stop — toy lines. Good luck finding anything currently scheduled for wide release in June or December that’s actually original, but here’s what you might want to keep an eye out for during the rest of the year.

MOST ANTICIPATED

The Grand Budapest Hotel (March 7, limited): Wes Anderson is back with what looks like another delightful faux-retro jape, this one about a “legendary” hotel concierge played by Ralph Fiennes; the chance to see the legendarily serious actor explore his comic chops has me agog with hoped-for joy. Only Lovers Left Alive (April 11, limited): Yes, it’s a vampire movie, but Jim Jarmusch and his stars — Tilda Swinton and everybody’s new crush, Tom Hiddleston — blow away cliché and all your expectations. (I’ve seen this already. It’s beyond fab.)

36 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

Jupiter Ascending (July 18): The Wachowskis brew up another hero’s journey... except this time the hero’s a she. Is Mila Kunis the One? Is Earth merely a backwater in a galactic civilization? I can’t wait to find out. Interstellar (Nov. 7): This could be a sci-fi epic from Christopher Nolan. We don’t know much about it yet (something to do with wormholes) but that’s what makes the anticipation so delicious. Nolan’s mojo plus his all-star cast — including Matthew McConaughey, Jessica Chastain, Michael Caine, Ellen Burstyn and John Lithgow — has put this at the top of many a film geek’s must-see list for 2014.

LOTS OF PROMISE

Bad Words (March 14 limited; March 28 wide release): Jason Bateman directs and stars in a mean comedy about a jerk who finds a loophole in the rules and enters a junior-high spelling-bee tournament. Let the misanthropy begin. St. Vincent De Van Nuys (April 11): Another misanthropic, funny (hopefully) flick, in which comedic genius Bill Murray plays a very bad influence on his child neighbor.

Wes Anderson gives us another visual treat with Grand Budapest Hotel. Jane Got a Gun (Aug. 29): Natalie Portman might be badass here as a woman who has to save her outlaw husband from villains who want to kill him. Joel Edgerton is the ex-lover she turns to for help. Ewan McGregor is here, too, and it’s from director Gavin O’Connor, who made the very good Pride and Glory and Miracle, the fantastic Olympic hockey movie. The hoped-for level of awesome is high with this one. The Interview (Oct. 10): Filmmakers Evan Goldberg and Seth Rogen give us Rogen and James Franco as TV journalists assigned by the CIA to kill North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un. If this is anything close to their raucously funny This Is the End, this could be absolutely hilarious.

LOOKS FAMILIAR, BUT WE’VE GOT OUR FINGERS CROSSED

Welcome to Yesterday (Feb. 28): A found-footage exploration of what happens when you start fooling around with a time machine. Transcendence (April 18): Johnny Depp uploads his brain into a computer, and then goes crazy. It could work. Earth to Echo (April 25): A bunch of kids find some sort of alien in the backyard. Kinda E.T.-ish, at least at first glance. but it’s nice to see a movie about gradeschool kids that isn’t Harry Potter. The Quiet Ones (April 25): Here’s a tale about an experiment to create a poltergeist. Presumably, the experiment goes bad. Hopefully, the movie doesn’t. A Million Ways to Die in the West (May 30): Something something something cowardly gunslinger. Something something something Seth MacFarlane. Something something something new Blazing Saddles. 


FILM | SHORTS

OTHER OPENING FILMS KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM

Spokane is finally getting its chance to see this sci-fi/horror comedy film shot here more than three years ago. Prepare to learn all about the intricacies of LARPing — live action role playing, that is. Knights takes viewers on a crazy LARPing adventure with friends Eric (Steve Zahn), Hung (Peter Dinklage) and their nonLARPing roomie, Joe (Ryan Kwanten). But when a supposedly fake spell goes wrong, the trio accidentally summon a blood-sucking demon and they’ve got to stop it before everyone dies. Joining them is hot girl Gwen (Summer Glau) as they traverse the battlefield of Evermore to right their deadly mistake. At Magic Lantern (CS) Rated R

I, FRANKENSTEIN

Dr. Frankenstein’s immortal creation is resurfacing some 200 years after its inception. Based on Kevin Grevioux’s novel, this film shows the captivating creature, Adam, as he discovers the fate of humanity lies in his hand. This action film will take you through the all-out war that is sweeping through the dystopian society as Adam engages in battle with supernatural gargoyles and demons. (CF) PG-13

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

Charles Dickens was the man behind so many timeless stories, but now it is his own story being told. Memories of his mistress, Nelly, take us back in time to the days of their tumultuous relationship. When bonded through their connections to the theater, the married mother falls for the emotionally isolated author and becomes his muse. With so much to lose, Dickens and Nelly put secrecy as the top priority in their passionate relationship, leaving Nelly with a life as an invisible woman. (CF) Rated R

AMERICAN HUSTLE

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES

In their 2004 masterpiece Anchorman, Adam McKay and Will Ferrell captivated audiences with his uncompromising profile of legendary San Diego anchorman Ron Burgundy. He brought his lens to bear not just on the cutthroat atmosphere of internal and external news rivalries, but on the entire 1970s zeitgeist — gender equality, male ego. (DW) PG-13

AUGUST: ORANGE COUNTY

With snappy, southern drawls and huge screaming fiascos, August: Orange County delves into a family feud that has been going on for years. Brought together because of a missing patriarch, three sisters (Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis and Julianne Nicholson) are once again subjected to their vicious, pill-popping mother’s (Meryl Streep,) verbal abuse. (ER) Rated R RETURNING

BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To

A

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

GIMME SHELTER

When Apple (Vanessa Hudgens) finally breaks away from her abusive mother (Rosario Dawson), she sets out to find her father. When she finds him, she moves in with him and his family but is soon forced to leave when she realizes she is pregnant. But a chance turn of events leads her to Father McCarthy (James Earl Jones), who watches over her and lets her stay at a shelter for pregnant teens where she’ll find the family she always needed. (CF) PG-13

NOW PLAYING Coming off the splendid Silver Linings Playbook, director David O. Russell is back, bringing the stars of that film, Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, along. This time, the subject matter is a little more intense: He takes us back to the glittery 1970s for a crime drama about a group of corrupt politicians living the high life in New Jersey. (MB) Rated R

DATE NIGHT T!

TINA FEY’S HILARIOUS DEBUT SCREENPLAY STARRING LINDSAY LOHAN, RACHEL MCADAMS, AMY POEHLER AND AMANDA SEYFRIED RATED PG-13

Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. In Blue Jasmine, writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the havenots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. (ES) Rated PG-13

DEVIL’S DUE

When a newlywed couple is surprised with a pregnancy, they believe the surprises will end there. Unfortunately, they don’t. As months pass, the husband notices increasingly dark and disturbing changes in his wife. When these changes become horrifically dismaying, questions begin to arise about what his wife is carrying inside. (CF) Rated R

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS

Set in 1965 Spokane, this locally produced film tells the true story of Lyle Hatcher (who co-wrote and co-directed the film with Don Caron), who befriended a wheelchair-bound boy at his school ...continued on next page

THURS. FEB. 13 THE BING $ 4 MOVIE $4 PINTS BEER FLOWS: 7 PM MOVIE: 8 PM

BREWING CO.

POST FALLS inlander.com

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 37


FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

WEEK OF JANUARY 24th THRU JANUARY 30th

NOW PLAYING

$1

WEDNESDAYS

4

$ 50 BEER & DINNER IN THEATER!

suffering from muscular dystrophy. The film tells the story of how Hatcher, full of copious amounts of energy, tried to teach his friend to run as the two became inseparable, getting into no shortage of trouble along the way. At AMC only. (MB) Rated PG

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

Walking with Dinosaurs

Fri 5:00, Sat-Mon 12:30, 5:00, Tues-Thurs 5:00

FROZEN

Captain Philips PG-13

Fri 7:00, Sat-Mon 2:15, 7:00, Wed-Thurs 7:00

Paranormal Activity:

The Marked Ones Fri 9:45pm, Sun-Mon 9:45pm Tues 9:00pm, Wed-Thurs 9:45pm

Mean Girls Tues 7:00pm

PG-13

Transolar Galactica

Presented by SpIFF Sat 9:30 | Tickets $5

Spokane International Film Festival The Broken Circle Breakdown, SpIFF 2014

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

Frozen is a princess story; Disney is doubling down on the princesses — there’s two of ’em here. But Disney is also doubling down on the hints of nascent feminism Brave hinted at, the sort of barebones feminism which accepts that girls and women might possibly want more out of life than to get married. The princesses are sisters — the elder Elsa (the voice of Idina Menzel) and the younger Anna (the voice of Kristen Bell) — and this is mostly the story of their troubled relationship because Elsa is known to turn things into ice with her magical powers. (MJ) Rated PG

HER

In a near-future Los Angeles, Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) earns a paycheck by penning intimate correspondence for those who don’t possess his way with words, but is soon left by his frustrated wife (Rooney Mara). Writer-director Spike Jonze allows his introverted sad sack to find companionship in the form of the world’s first artificially intelligent operating system. (CW) Rated R

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

16th Annual Festival

Jan 23 –Feb 1 AMC, Bing, Magic Lantern, and Garland Theatres

Festival Opening Party Friday January 24! Ana Hopkins Photography

3318 W Northwest Blvd 509-327-8277 www.theflyinggoat.com FlyingGoatPub The Flying Goat

38 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

www. spokane filmfestival .org

Splitting up a novel into three movies might seem like a bad idea, but most audience members will be still trying to keep track of all the names in this fantasy flick based on the Tolkien classic. (Smaug? Biblo? Erebor? Come on, now.) This second chunk features the majority of the action as Biblo Baggins (Martin Freeman) journeys with Wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellan) and 13 dwarves to save the dwarf kingdom of Erebor. (ER) PG-13

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

Almost a year after surviving The Hunger Games, victors Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) live torn between the bourgeois control of the Capitol and the serfdom of their home, District 12. A cloud of tension hovers over their relationship in the wake of Katniss faking a romance with Peeta in order to survive the Games, while she actually pines for Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth). (SS) Rated PG-13

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

Joel and Ethan Coen, following their own footsteps of filling a film with music, as they did in O Brother, Where Art Thou?, this time take on the early ’60s Greenwich Village folk scene. The title character (Oscar Isaac) is a multi-talented folkie who has no people skills and is likely ahead of his time. The people around him seem to cause nothing but crises, but the determined Llewyn sings on, against all odds. Not always a good idea in a Coen Brothers film. At AMC (ES) Rated R

JACK RYAN SHADOW RECRUIT

While working for a billionaire in Moscow, Jack Ryan unearths a plan to take down the U.S. economy. Now he is the only one with the brains and bravery to stop this collapse. This film follows Ryan on his action-packed mission to clear his name, protect his loved ones, and save his country. Based on a character created by author Tom Clancy, Jack Ryan is played by Chris Pine, who is supported by Keira Knightley and Kevin Costner. (CF) PG-13

LONE SURVIVOR

Grab your tissue box and prepare to bawl out your eyes in the movie adaption of one soldier’s true story of survival. As the title reveals, four Navy Seals go on a mission to neutralize a high-level Taliban operative and are ambushed by enemy forces and, tragically, only one returns. The story though, is not only about survival, but also about the ties of brotherhood, and the consequences of choices made seemingly for the greater good. (ER) Rated R

NEBRASKA

Finding a Publishers Clearing House envelope stating that he’s won a million bucks, Woody Grant, a reckless, lonely boozer played by 77-year-old Bruce Dern, heads out from Montana to Nebraska to claim his fortune. He takes along his skeptical son (Will Forte), who’s humoring him, as Woody tells everyone he knows that he’s become a millionaire, gathering clingy new money-hungry friends along the way. Payne (Sideways, The Descendants, Election) shot the film in black and white, adding its already present sense of despair. At Magic Lantern (MB) R

THE NUT JOB

This animated feature begins with cute little animals who are worried about starving, introduces a group of violenceminded bank robbers, sets up a confusing message about the differences (or is it the similarities) between selfishness and heroism, and features bland voice performances that go with a bunch of unappealing characters. (ES) PG

PHILOMENA

Philomena Lee, an elderly British woman, confides in her daughter that she gave birth to a son in Ireland 50 years earlier. Unwed at the time, she was forced to give him up for adoption. Martin, a former government adviser and journalist out of a job, is looking for a story idea to bring to his editor. At a party, he hears of Philomena. Together, he and Philomena investigate the life of her lost son and find themselves exploring America looking for answers. At Magic Lantern (KS) Rated R

RIDE ALONG

Ice Cube and Kevin Hart team up in this action-packed comedy to deliver plenty of thrills and laughs. When Ben (Hart) is finally accepted into the police academy, he sets out to impress his girlfriend’s brother, decorated Atlanta Police Department detective James (Cube). But when James sets up a ride-along to test Ben, the night turns out to be crazier than expected, forcing them to team up to defeat the city’s most dangerous criminal. (CF) PG-13

SAVING MR. BANKS

Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) has a 20-year promise hanging over his head. After his daughters ask for their beloved Mary Poppins to be turned into a movie, Disney begins a quest to gain the rights from stubborn P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson). Refusing him time and time again for fear Walt has a two-week window where she will listen to his proposal, and hopefully let him make his movie. (ER) PG-13

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Martin Scorsese’s satirical adaptation of a memoir by Jordan Belfort, who rose from Long Island penny stock swindler to shady Wall Street power player, is so over the top that it risks becoming what it sets out to mock. But it’s a spectacle of opulence that demands to be seen. The film is all about Jordan Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) pursuit of more: more money, more stocks, more vulgarity, more power, more excess, more sex and more drugs. (SS) Rated R.

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Inside Llewyn Davis

94

Her

91

American Hustle

89

Wolf of Wall Street

75

Hunger Games 2

73

Lone Survivor

59

Ride Along

41

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT


FILM | REVIEW

Cube and Hart are Chan and Tucker of 2014.

Badge Buddies

Ride Along is not the best example of the cop buddy flick BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN

Times For 1/24 - 1/30

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 I, FRANKENSTEIN

T

his rote buddy-cop action comedy is way to dissuade Ben from police work, causing instantly forgettable. We’ve seen it all Angela to lose her respect for him, James has Ben before, and worse than that, we’ve seen ride along with him for a day on patrol — a day it done far better in films ranging from last year’s that he makes sure is filled with gnarly incidents. The Heat to ’80s classics like Midnight Run and Hart does his best to enliven the film with a Lethal Weapon. Most of all, Ride Along seems struck motor-mouth routine that’s bound to land some from the same template that produced the Rush hits along with the misses. The only original Hour series, which paired an all-business Jackie element of the film (which had a committee of Chan with the live-wire Chris Tucker writers) comes from Ben’s deep for comic effect. Substitute Ice Cube involvement in videogaming, RIDE ALONG and Kevin Hart and you have the which affords him some specialized Rated PG-13 hoped-for birth of a new franchise: knowledge in the heat of battle — Directed by Tim Story Ride Alo-o-o-o-ng. though he’s a nincompoop when it Starring Ice Cube, Kevin Hart James (Cube) is an undercover comes to handling a real gun with detective in the Atlanta Police Delive ammo. partment who wears a permanent scowl. His Tim Story previously directed Cube in lieutenant (Bruce McGill) gives him grief about Barbershop and Hart in Think Like a Man — both his fruitless pursuit of a phantom criminal named enormous successes. If he was hoping to double Omar, and his sister Angela (Tika Sumpter) — his the success by partnering up these two, he’s only living relative — wants to marry Ben (Hart), bound to be disappointed. Ride Along may post a videogame-playing joker he disapproves of. Ben strong numbers during its initial release on this works as a high school security guard but wants holiday weekend, but it’s likely to run out of gas to become a police officer. Thinking it a sure before long. 

PG-13 Daily (3:10) 7:20 9:25 In 2D Daily (5:15) Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:00)

NUT JOB

PG Daily 8:30 In 2D Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:40 Sat-Sun (10:50) (12:50)

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT

Call Movie Theater for listings or visit

inlander.com

PG-13 Daily (2:30) (4:40) 7:00 9:15 Sat-Sun (12:15)

RIDE ALONG

PG-13 Daily (2:50) (5:00) 7:10 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:40)

DEVIL’S DUE

R Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:50 9:00

SAVING MR. BANKS

PG-13 Daily (3:40) 6:30 9:20

THE LEGEND OF HERCULES PG-13 Daily (2:45) (5:00) 7:20 9:35

LONE SURVIVOR

R Daily (2:15) (4:45) 7:15 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:45)

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG PG-13 Daily (3:00) 6:10 9:25 Sat-Sun (11:40)

FROZEN

PG Daily (3:50) 6:15 8:35 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:30)

Wandermere 12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

!

I, FRANKENSTEIN

PG-13 Daily (3:10) 7:20 9:25 In 2D Daily (1:00) (5:15) Fri-Sun (11:00)

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

R Daily (2:20) (4:00) 6:45 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:45)

NUT JOB

PG Daily 8:30 In 2D Daily (12:50) (2:50) (4:50) 6:40 Fri-Sun (10:50)

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT

MORNING BRIEFING

PG-13 Daily (2:30) (4:40) 7:00 9:15 Fri-Sun (12:15)

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI JAN 24TH - THUR JAN 30TH

*opening!

KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM (85 MIN- R) Fri: 1:45, 8:30, 10:15, Sat: 4:30, 8:30, 10:15, Sun: 8:15, Mon-Thurs: 2:00, 9:15

on the

BIG SCREEN

FE

B

2

nd at the Garland Theater! Doors @ 2pm Kickoff @ 3:30

5

$

10

$

food/drink voucher gets you in the door.

reserved VIP seating available

NEBRASKA (121 MIN -R)

Fri: 3:45, 6:15, Sat: 6:15, Sun: 6:45, Mon-Thurs: 3:45

PHILOMENA (96 MIN PG-13)

Fri: 2:00, 4:00, 8:00, Sat: 4:45, 6:45, Sun: 6:30, Mon-Thurs: 4:15

BLUE JASMINE (96- PG 13)

Fri: 6:00, Sat: 8:35, Mon-Thurs: 2:15 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

RIDE ALONG

PG-13 Daily (12:40) (2:50) (5:00) 7:10 9:20

DEVIL’S DUE

R Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:50 9:00

LONE SURVIVOR

R Daily (2:15) (4:45) 7:15 9:45 Fri-Sun (11:45)

SAVING MR. BANKS

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:25 9:15 Fri, Mon-Thu (12:30)

AMERICAN HUSTLE

R Daily (12:40) (3:40) 6:30 9:20

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG PG-13 Daily (3:00) 6:10 9:25 Fri (11:40)

PHILOMENA

PG-13 Daily (1:15) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:10)

FROZEN

PG Daily (1:30) (3:50) 6:15 8:35 Fri-Sun (11:00)

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE PG-13 Daily (2:50) 6:20 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:45)

THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY

Fresh News, Every Morning. Only on Inlander.com

PG Daily (2:10) 7:00 Fri (11:35)

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES PG-13 Daily (4:35) 9:30

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 1/24/14-1/30/14

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 39


Jan 23rd - 29th

THURS

412 W. Sprague Ave. 509.747.2302

SHOTS POWER HOURS

9PM-11PM

Any drink - $6!

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

LET THE PARTIES BEGIN!!

FIREBALL FRIDAY $3 POWER HOUR

11PM-12AM

Any drink - $6!

PARTY ALL WEEKEND AT

&

Dueling DJ’s 2 Dance Floors/3 Bars

40 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

SUN

HOSPITALITY NIGHT

WED TUES MON

LIVE MUSIC 7-11

CLOSED

Industry Specials All Night Long / DJ ONE

HOSPITALITY NIGHT $1 PBR LADIES NIGHT ALL NIGHT

$5 Double Martinis


Wild Mannered

Cold Blooded is made up of totally agreeable, artistically minded guys, but that doesn’t mean their music won’t blow your brains out BY JORDAN SATTERFIELD

A

t 6 pm in a perfectly innocuous suburban home, the lead singer of a thrash metal band is having me remove my footwear. “You’ll have to take your shoes off before we go up to the living room,” says Ethan Kennedy, frontman for local metal act Cold Blooded. Tonight, he’s cordial and respectful as he takes his own shoes off. The last time I saw Kennedy, he was spilling beer down my shirt and screaming in my face. The living room in question belongs to Cold Blooded drummer Curt Bytnar, and it’s as warm and pleasant as a homestead can be. I recall that the last time I saw Bytnar he was pummeling away at an insanely complicated drum kit as if he were wielding two defibrillators on a 20-piece heart. Rob Bosaaen, one of the group’s guitarists, removes his shoes at the door and leads me upstairs. He introduces me to the other guitarist, Chris Williams, a man of few words. Bassist Nick Boege is the only member missing. It’s a shock to be in the presence of such a brutal musical force and find out that, offstage, they’re all exceedingly

mild-mannered. It’s almost as shocking as seeing the group perform live. Almost. While some may be quick to judge what a metal band can be capable of in a live setting, a Cold Blooded performance shatters those notions. Like the best thrash and death metal bands before them, they carefully calculate the crucial balance between searing technicality and engaging simplicity. “One of the main concepts of the band has always been, ‘Keep it simple, stupid,’” explains Bosaaen. Perhaps he’s being too humble — the man can absolutely destroy a guitar — but his attitude towards songcraft is both genuine and, unfortunately, rare. The five-piece, which has only been together this side of 10 months, would probably tell you that its confident sound is a happy accident. Cold Blooded is still very much in its infancy, but the chemistry between members, both on and off the stage, is remarkable. And while they’ve only been playing under the name Cold Blooded for a ...continued on next page

STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | METAL “MILD MANNERED,” CONTINUED... short time, many of the members have years of experience playing with each other in other projects. The group also seems uncomfortable treading the same ground for too long, which is particularly apparent on their recent debut EP Into the Abyss, recorded masterfully by Bill Nieman at Rainbow Trout Studios. The seven songs that make up the recording were obviously written at different stages of the band’s young life, as the newest material easily sounds the most fresh. Standard industrial breakdowns have made way for a more cathartic and natural-sounding hardcore crossover. “We’re getting to the point where we can start to cut and paste set lists,” says Bosaaen. “And we can say, ‘Hey let’s not do this one tonight,’ or, ‘Let’s bring this one

back.’” Just to be clear, that doesn’t mean the band has gotten any slower — or any less pissed off. “Most people have their own personal demons,” Kennedy says. “And we have a fair share of our own. But how you tackle them doesn’t need to be destructive.” While various critics and dissenters have decried heavy metal music as an ostensibly destructive form of music, Kennedy has gotten down an airtight explanation of why he thinks it is just the opposite. “When it comes to those personal demons, you can try to banish them entirely,” Kennedy explains. “Or you can let them control you. But people forget that you can channel that negative energy into something positive.

And that’s what we’re trying to do.” So yes, it’s shocking when a band as heavy-hitting as Cold Blooded turns out to be made up of totally agreeable, artistically minded guys. But it’s also undeniably refreshing, especially when the group hits the stage with total explosive force. Just be glad the venues don’t make you take your shoes off. You’re going to need them.  Locals Live feat. Cold Blooded with the Persevering Promise, the Ongoing Concept and Skies Burn Black • Sat, Jan. 25, at 8 pm • $5 under 21/Free 21+ • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com

Jan 31st - Feb 9th, 2014 Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday

Jan. 31 12pm to 8pm Feb. 1 10am to 8pm Feb. 2 10am to 3pm * Feb. 3 12pm to 8pm Feb. 4 12pm to 8pm

Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

Feb. 5 Feb. 6 Feb. 7 Feb. 8 Feb. 9

12pm to 8pm 12pm to 8pm 12pm to 8pm 12pm to 8pm 10am to 3pm*

FREE PARKING / $10 Adults / $5 ages 12-17 / 12 & Under FREE *$5 Admission Sundays!

Spokane Fair & Expo Center | SpokaneBoatShow.com Sponsored by the Spokane Yacht Club

42 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014


MUSIC | HIP-HOP

ING BRIEFIN N R G MO

Fresh News, Every Morning. Only on Inlander.com

!

The Nappy Roots are back at Red Room Lounge for the first time since August.

Reality Rap

Nappy Roots’ Kentucky-fried hip-hop is still going strong BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

here’s something about the combination of substance-induced partying and late-night study sessions in college that can ignite a passion for music. For decades, bands have formed and separated in dorms and pigsty apartments, and in the mid-’90s at Western Kentucky University, Nappy Roots — six rappers who liked to get down and wanted to pursue music — found one another. The songs were perfect for the collegeaged set. The music was full of feel-good party anthems, but heavy rhymes spoke of the harsh realities of living on a budget. No matter how much people listened, the odds were still stacked against them. No hip-hop act from Kentucky had made it big. Atlantic Records came calling in the late ’90s, but their first album was shelved. Humbled, the crew bucked up, dug deep and created Watermelon, Chicken & Gritz, an album that received two Grammy nominations in 2003. Today, they are four — B. Stille, Skinny DeVille, Ron Clutch and Fish Scales. It’s been several years since they parted ways with Atlantic

and went independent, three since they released their most recent album, Nappy Dot Org. But they persevere (as a group and various solo projects), playing to audiences all across the country that may not even dig their genre. “Most rap is rich rap. Us, we’re hard to classify as urban artists,” Fish Scales explained in an interview with Complex magazine. “We hit the same markets as country artists. We hear this a lot: ‘I don’t listen to rap. But I like y’all.’” Unlike the whiny mainstream crunk coming from much of the Southern rappers in the early 2000s, Nappy Roots’ brand of hip-hop holds up today. Their uplifting hits “Po’ Folks” and “Good Day” feel as fresh as the day they were released. Nappy Roots will always be country boys, ready to party hard and talk straight with their fans.  lauraj@inlander.com Nappy Roots with Q Dot, Tope, Jaeda, IMperfect Cody • Wed, Jan. 29, at 8 pm • $10/$12 day of • 21+ • Red Room Lounge • 521 W. Sprague • holdmyticket.com • 838-7613

Great New Menu!

GLOBAL EDUCATION, GLOBAL CELEBRATION. Saturday, January 25 is the day for Zag fans to celebrate all things Gonzaga – especially the global aspects of the Gonzaga Experience. We hope you’ll join the festivities. » Wear your Gonzaga gear » Rally your friends and family to cheer on the women’s (at Pepperdine) and men’s (BYU) basketball teams » Tell us how you are celebrating for a chance to win a Kindle Fire or other prizes » Watch a special halftime presentation live on the web (approx. 8 p.m.) Find more ways to celebrate and learn more at:

NationalGonzagaDay.org

Every Weekend JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 43


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

AMERICANA THE DEVIL MAKES THREE

L

overs of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey will understand where the Devil Makes Three is coming from with their song “Old Number Seven.” Here, the band pens the perfect ode to the classic rock ‘n’ roll beverage. That theme of drinkin’ and livin’ life to the fullest appears in nearly all of the band’s work. The Santa Cruz, Calif., trio plays a brand of alt-country that almost never strays from a moderate tempo; the music swirls and bumps along but keeps your interest at all times. No matter what tune the Americana act plays Sunday at the Knitting Factory, The Devil Makes Three’s set will cause you to sway your hips and probably toss back a little whiskey. — LAURA JOHNSON The Devil Makes Three with the Brothers Comatose • Sun, Jan. 26, at 8:30 pm • $15 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/23

J THE BARTLETT, Disappears, Dead Serious Lovers BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, DJ Yasmine BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister THE CELLAR, Robby French COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny FEDORA PUB, CdA Charter Academy Jazz Jam FORZA COFFEE (535-7179), Maxie Ray Mills HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (7473946), Floating Crowbar J THE HIVE EVENT CENTER (208290-3048), Moon Taxi, Miah Kohal Band J THE HOP!, Exhumed, Rutah, Xingaia, Losing Skin JOHN’S ALLEY, Cody Canada and the Departed JONES RADIATOR, Casey Rogers, Jeff Nehus and Jimmy Nuge J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, Dionvox, Tone Collaborative, Moksha, Bodhi Drip, Joshua Belliardo THE VAULT, DJ Seli ZOLA, Fus Bol

Friday, 01/24

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Darin Schaffer J ANGEL GALLERY OF FINE ARTS & ANTIQUES (208-665-7232), Andy Day BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BLIND BUCK (290-6229), DJ Mayhem BOLO’S, Bruiser THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser J CHAIRS COFFEE, Open Mic of Open-ness

44 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

ROCK KING WASHINGTON

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et’s just forget about that thing that happened in the 2000s, when emotional rock became “emo” and that music inspired grown men to cram their legs into too-small girl pants. Because when I say that King Washington is emotional rock, I really don’t want you to be thinking about that, OK? Los Angeles’ King Washington makes beautiful, swelling, emotional rock ‘n’ roll — the stuff that, if you close your eyes, makes you think of the wind whipping through an open car window on a blue-sky summer day. A little bit Beatles, a little bit Grizzly Bear, King Washington is raucous and optimistic: intermingling wailing guitars with sing-along harmonies that rise and fall like waves in the ocean. This is a band that will give you the shivers. — LEAH SOTTILE King Washington with the Janks and Flying Mammals • Fri, Jan. 24, at 9 pm • $5 • 21+ • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Harmony Clayton COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, One Street Over THE COUNTRY CLUB, Doolin Run Band J CRICKETS DOWNTOWN BAR & GRILL (208-765-1990), Riverboat Dave and the Fur Traders CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Strange in The Northwest feat. Kutt Calhoun, Knothead, Saint Warhead, Dirty Savage, The Krisis, Enfeeble Ataxia, K Deazy, King Scrub, Jennifer K., Lei Majors IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR, The Hitmen JOHN’S ALLEY, Left Coast Country JONES RADIATOR, Left Over Soul J KNITTING FACTORY, Hopsin, Dizzy Wright, DJ Hoppa, Wildcard, Illest

Uminati J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Pamela Benton MAX AT MIRABEAU, Jesse Weston Trio J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Dennis Smith J MOOTSY’S, King Washington (See story above), The Janks, Flying Mammals NYNE, The Divine Jewels O’SHAY’S, Wee Whiskey PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, The Causeway J THE PHAT HOUSE, Ragtime Steve, Weary Traveler and Friends ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Texas Twister SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Daniel Mills J STUDIO 107 (208-664-1201), Lyle Morse J SWAXX (703-7474), Ying Yang Twins, Whurlwind Ent, Marc P, Coaster & Darez

TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY (241-3697), Maxie Ray Mills WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (474-9040), Mike Morris ZOLA, Raggs & Bush Doktor

Saturday, 01/25

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Bill Bozly BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BLIND BUCK (290-6229), DJ Daethstar BOLO’S, Bruiser THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston J CHECKERBOARD BAR, Jordan Collins, Sweet Rebel D, Chelsey Heidenreich, Gardening Angel and more COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Harmony Clayton COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Keith Milligan COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Scott Reid

THE COUNTRY CLUB, Doolin Run Band CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho THE FLAME, DJ Wesone J THE HOP!, Damn the Sun, In Denial, Evolved, Undercard J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET (624-1349), The Converters IRON HORSE BAR, The Hitmen JOHN’S ALLEY, Left Coast Country J JONES RADIATOR, Death By Pirates, The Finns J KNITTING FACTORY, Locals Live feat. The Persevering Promise, The Ongoing Concept, Skies Burn Black, Cold Blooded (See story on page 41) THE LARIAT (466-9918), Texas Twister LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Truck Mills MAX AT MIRABEAU, Jesse Weston Trio J NYNE, Cameros, Cursive Wires, and DJ C-Mad J THE PHAT HOUSE, Paul Abner RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris


Rieser & Snap the Nerve  REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Indie Rock Extravaganza feat. King Washington, The Janks, The Lucky Lonely  REVEL 77 (280-0518), Wayward Too ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), DJ Sonny SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Ed Graves  THE SHOP, Dave McRae WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (474-9040), Mike Morris ZOLA, Hot Club of Spokane

Sunday, 01/26

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  THE HOP!, Grandhorse, The Finns, Lavoy, Stone Cold Slumber Party, Noise Toys  KNITTING FACTORY, The Devil Makes Three (See story on facing page), The Brothers Comatose MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus

Monday, 01/27

 THE BARTLETT, DTCV, Normal Babies BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ (3217480), Open mic  CALYPSOS, Open Mic  THE HOP!, The Toasters, Gorilla, Chicken and Rabbit, Laylah’s Drink,

Defeatist JOHN’S ALLEY, Sphynx  RICO’S, Open mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander & Friends

Tuesday, 01/28

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub  THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn CARR’S CORNER, KTFO Rap Battle THE CELLAR, Max Daniels FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, EDM Generation JOHN’S ALLEY, Sophistafunk JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Openess  KNITTING FACTORY, The Expendables, Stick Figure, Seedless, DJ Beauflexx LION’S LAIR (456-5678), DJs Nobe and MJ  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Local Artis Forum (Open Mic)  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Will Fontaine  RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO. (3217935), Open mic THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Open mic with Frank Clark SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Q ZOLA, Dan Conrad & the Urban Achievers

Wednesday, 01/29  BABY BAR, Robert Meade & Anthony McCarthy

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn CARR’S CORNER, Red City Radio, Elway, Direct Hit!, Oh Snap! THE CELLAR, Riverboat Dave  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz THE DISTRICT BAR (244-3279), Likes Girls FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Jazz Jam with the Bob Beadling Group  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Evan Denlinger  MOOTSY’S, Yardsss & Southerly, Teen Blonde  THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic  RED ROOM LOUNGE, Nappy Roots (See story on 43), Q Dot, Tope, Jaeda, IMperfect Cody SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SWAXX, Layzie Bone of Bone ThugsN-Harmony, Mo Thugs, Wildcard, Cordell, Downlow, IMperfect Cody, Soundcast & Tyler Denbeigh THE VAULT, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared ZOLA, The Bucket List

Coming Up ...

THE BARTLETT, Dresses + Cumulus, Scott Ryan, Jan. 30 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Scott Pemberton Trio, Lavoy, Jan. 30 BABY BAR, Cosmonauts, Mirror Mirror, Clusterf**k?!, Jan. 30 KNITTING FACTORY, Acidic, Thirty Three, Dig the Kid, Evolved, Feb. 1

MUSIC | VENUES

Thursday Jan 23rd Casey Mf’n Rogers w/ Jeff Nehus the One Man Train Wreck & Jimmy Nuge Friday Jan 24th

Left Over Soul Saturday Jan 25th

Death By Pirates w/ The Finns Sunday FUN DAY! Jan 26th

Happy Time Sunday

w/ Movies to Snuggle up to!

Monday Jan 27th

TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm Tuesday Jan 28th OPEN MIC of OPEN-NESS Hosted by Lucas Wednesday Jan 29th

WHISKEY WEDNESDAY & Sally Bop Jazz

25 Craft Beers & Craft Cocktails 120 E. Sprague Ave.

L I O N E L H A M P TO N J A Z Z F E S T I VA L

THURS

SAT & FRI

at IRV’s @ 9pm

Dance your ASS off until 4am all weekend!

Presented by Frontier Communications –

PALMEIRI

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

at Club Red 6pm-10pm

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

MON

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

TUES

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

WED

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

LE GIRLS

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR

at Club Red @ 10pm 415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450

YELLOW

SUN

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

EDDIE

Jan 23rd - Jan 29th

Presented by Alaska Airlines

JACKETS

February 19 - 22, 2014

Tickets on Sale Now! www.uidaho.edu/ticketoffice

208-885-7212 or 1-88-88UIDAHO

Other Artists include: Benny Golson, René Marie, Ken Peplowski, Grace Kelly and more…

www.uidaho.edu/jazzfest

|

(208) 885-5900

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 45


THEATER MIGHTY MATCHMAKER

Emmy Award-winning actress Sally Struthers is stopping in Spokane next week with the cast of Hello, Dolly!, one of Broadway’s most enduring classics. Struthers plays matchmaker Dolly, who travels to Yonkers, N.Y. to make one of her toughest matches yet. With a timeless story and unforgettable songs, the show is one the whole family can enjoy as you sing along to “Hello, Dolly!,” “Put on Your Sunday Clothes” and “Before the Parade Passes By,” and revel in the wonder that is this charming 10-time Tony Award-winning musical. — CLARKE HUMPHREY Hello, Dolly! • Jan. 30-Feb. 2, showtimes vary • $32.50$72.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • bestofbroadwayspokane.com • 279-7000

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

46 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

WORDS LUNCHTIME LITERATURE

If you have a flair for words, or if you simply enjoy being in the presence of literary greatness, then EWU’s Naked Lunch Break is calling your name. At this literary open mic event, guests can share up to three minutes of poetry, fiction or nonfiction. Additionally, Naked Lunch Break features at least one local literary celebrity each week. This Thursday, come soak in the talent of local writer Cynthia Schoch; upcoming featured guests include Shawn Vestal, Thom Caraway, Chris Cook and others. Make sure to arrive early — signup begins at 11:30 am and there’s free pizza while it lasts. — COLLEEN FOGERTY Naked Lunch Break • Through March 13, Thursdays at noon • Free • EWU Riverpoint Campus • 688 N. Riverpoint Blvd. • facebook. com/riverpoint.nlb • 368-6557

WORDS WORKIN’ WRITERS

Winning Gonzaga its first National Endowment of the Arts grant, the annual Visiting Writers Series features discussions led by authors from different academic fields. This week, Marshall Boswell, an author and English professor at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tenn., hosts. His fiction works include Trouble with Girls, a series of short stories about a boy with good intentions and the women he falls in and out of love with, and Alternative Atlanta, a novel about growing out of complacency with the help of family and women. — EMERA L. RILEY Visiting Writers Series: Marshall Boswell • Wed, Jan. 29, at 7:30 pm • Free • Gonzaga University • 502 E. Boone • Cataldo Hall Globe Room • gonzaga.edu/english • 313-6681


FOOD FIVE COURSES, FIVE BEERS

There are now more small breweries in America than any time since Prohibition, and San Diego-based Stone Brewing Co. — founded in 1996 — is one of the original West Coast craft breweries to lead that resurgence. Five of their beers are in the spotlight at the first Connoisseur’s Club beer dinner of 2014, presented with the guidance of cicerone “Dr.” Bill Sysak, known as a master pairer and all-around nice guy. (He got the “Dr.” nickname as an Army medic.) The meal begins with Thai fried oysters with spicy carrot-ginger puree and herb mix, paired with Stone’s Levitation Ale, and the courses and beers only get bigger from there. — LISA WAANANEN The Connoisseur’s Club Stone Beer Dinner • Fri, Jan. 24, at 6 pm • $55 • The Lincoln Center • 1316 N. Lincoln • thelincolncenterspokane.com • 327-8000

NOW OPEN ARTS CULTIVATE AND CREATE

Come get loud with us.

With new director Shannon Roach Halberstadt taking the helm last fall, the Spokane Arts Fund gradually has gained traction toward a brighter, more active future as the city’s arts organization. One of the latest ways the Arts Fund is reaching out to the community for constructive input is through a new, informal monthly meetup series, intended to bring movers and shakers in the arts community together in one room, to “share, learn and connect.” Each meeting also is set to include a TED Talk-style presentation by a guest speaker. Dr. Jody Graves, an internationally recognized pianist and performing artist, is set to lead the inaugural meetup. — CHEY SCOTT

FOR MORE INFO

Cultivate Spokane Salon Series • Tue, Jan. 28, from 6-7:30 pm; to be held the last Tuesday of the month • Free • All-ages • Boots Bakery & Lounge • 24 W. Main • facebook.com/SpokaneArts

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BUNCO: ROLL TO RIDE Fundraiser tournament to benefit Debbie (Orchard) Jacobs to ride in the Police Unity Tour, a 4-day bike ride during national Police Week. Jacobs is riding in memory of her dad, Spokane Police Detective Brian Orchard, end of watch 1983. Jan. 25, 1 pm. $25 individual; $75 groups of 4; $225 groups of 12. Eagle’s Lodge, 6410 N. Lidgerwood. (208-596-5264) KPBX RECORDINGS & VIDEOS SALE Spokane Public Radio is accepting donations of reusable CDs, DVDs, record albums, 45s and audio equipment for its annual fundraiser sale. Drop of donations Mon-Fri from 9 am-5 pm through Feb. 5. Special R&V donation day Jan. 25 from 10 am-2pm. Sale is

set for Feb. 15-16. Spokane Public Radio, 2319 N. Monroe St. spokanepublicradio.org (328-5729) WILD SALMON FEAST & AUCTION 6th annual event to benefit Family Promise of North Idaho, including a social hour, live music, silent auctions, dinner and a wild dessert auction. Jan. 25, 5:30 pm. $35. Trinity Lutheran, 812 N. Fifth, CdA. familypromiseni.org (208-777-4190) LEADERSHIP SPOKANE GALA “Leadership Lights the Way” annual semiformal awards gala and auction. Jan. 31, 6-9 pm. $55/person. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. leadershipspokane.org (321-3639)

R ighting WRongs • R ebuilding l ives

Sunday, Jan 26th The Sky’s the Limit

ATTORNEY AT L AW | since 1984

When Kwai Chang Caine meets Chicken Little

James R. Sweetser Former Elected Spokane Prosecutor

seRious PeRsonAl inJuRY Call:

509-328-0678

sweetserlawoffice.com

1020 N Washington, Spokane, WA 99201

Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, Minister

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess WeirdinG BellS Are rinGinG

AMY ALKON

I am a bridesmaid in a wedding in four months and haven’t been able to think of a guy to be my date. I recently met a guy at a party. He is the friend of a friend and is cute and funny and seemed really nice. He lives two hours away, so it isn’t easy to meet for coffee or something, but I thought I could ask him to be my date for this wedding and see where things go from there. —Single Bridesmaid

Taking a guy to a wedding on the first date is like taking a cow sightseeing at a slaughterhouse. On a first date, the only person asking “So, are you two next?” should be a counterperson at Starbucks. The commitment-ganza first date also goes against the three things I always say first dates should be: cheap, short, and local. That way, even if you and a guy hit it off like the Israelis and the Palestinians, you can probably stick it out for a polite 59 minutes of happy-hour drinks and then bail — in a way you can’t if you’ve signed up for a wedding ceremony, a four-course sit-down dinner, and people you don’t know crying on your sleeve and throwing up on your shoes. Beyond this being the wrong venue for a first date, inviting a near stranger four months in advance has to come off weird and desperate. This far ahead, a guy has to wonder why there isn’t another male soul in your life you could ask — and wonder who’s next on your list if he says no, the wino living under the bus shelter? (On a positive note, that guy would especially appreciate the open bar.) Also consider that there’s a reason this guy hasn’t asked you out, and it’s probably that he isn’t interested or isn’t interested enough to date a woman he has to travel two hours to see. (A guy who’d date the 7 who lives around the block would probably need her to be a sexually gifted 11.5 to make up for the two-hour drive.) But there is an upside in the rubble of all these downsides. If you can accept that you won’t have a date for the wedding, you might find a date at the wedding by turning it into an opportunity to strike up conversations with interesting and possibly handsome strangers. Who knows, you might even meet a really great guy for you — one who gets that glimmer in his eye, realizing there’s no better woman to invite on a first date to either his nephew’s circumcision or his grandma’s funeral.

Pottery Will Get you noWhere

My boyfriend and I are attending a wedding next month, and he wants to buy the bride and groom a gift from their registry. However, I recently got into handmade pottery and thought it would be much more special to make a personalized gift — something totally unique, like a ceramic honey pot. Besides displaying our creativity more, it’d be cheaper, and there would be no shipping charges. —Crafty A handmade ceramic honey pot seems like the obvious best gift — if the happy couple are Martha Stewart and Winnie-the-Pooh. I, too, used to turn my nose up at gift registries, which I thought were a tool for the lazy and uncreative. It does seem that being a truly caring friend means putting real effort into gift giving, like by spending six months crocheting a couple an afghan out of cat hair rather than just rolling out of bed and mouse-clicking on something they’ve registered for at Bed Bath & Be-yawned. But two business school professors, Francesca Gino and Francis Flynn, did a series of experiments to find out whether this is true. Lo and behold, they learned that gift recipients actually preferred the gifts they’d registered for, appreciating them more and finding them more thoughtful and even more personal. (Gift givers assumed the opposite to be true.) The gift givers’ mistaken assumption seems to stem from what another researcher, Adam Grant, describes in his terrific book, “Give and Take,” as a “perspective gap.” We tend to interpret what another person would want by asking “What would I want?” rather than what would get us to the right answer: “What would THEY want?” In other words, though your pottery efforts may far surpass the artfulness of my macaroni assemblages, your boyfriend is probably on the right track in sticking with the registry. So, keep on potting, but get them that monogrammed garlic press they say they want instead of what you want them to want: for you to save money on a gift and not have to pay for shipping. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

ALL-AGES COMEDY OPEN MIC Held on the second and fourth Thursday of the month at 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. (703-7223) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch and improv. Every other Thurs at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. See weekly schedule online. Thurs, 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market. uncledscomedy.com (483-7300) CHOOSE TO LOSE! Live improv comedy show performed in the style of a game show. Fridays at 8 pm through Jan. 31. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045)

COMMUNITY

GIRL SCOUT LEADERSHIP BREAKFAST The annual event features guest speaker First Lady of Idaho, Lori Otter. RSVP required, guests are asked to make a $100 donation per person to support Girl Scouts of E. Wash. and N. Idaho. Jan. 23, 7:30 am. CdA Resort, 115 S. 2nd. tinyurl. com/lad4dwn (747-8091 x 204) COMMUNITY DANCE USA Dance of Sandpoint celebrates its 13th Anniversary, hosting a dance with a Salsa lesson (7-8 pm) followed by general dancing and refreshments. Jan. 25, 7-10 pm. $5-$9. Sandpoint Community Hall, 204 S. First. usadancesandpoint.org (208-699-0421) FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE Used library materials for sale, including a $2 bag sale. Jan. 25, 9 am-3 pm. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org (893-8400) DEER PARK KIWANIS WINTERFEST Community festival featuring the 5K Frostbite race, snow softball tournament, arts and crafts vendors, outhouse races, dog pulls, square dancing, live music, fireworks and more. Full schedule online. Jan. 25, 8:30 am-8 pm. Deer Park HS, 800 S. Weber Rd. cityofdeerparkwa.com (464-5900) NATIONAL GONZAGA DAY The 2nd annual day is themed “Global Education, Global Celebration,” and includes alumni association events worldwide, rallying around that evening’s Men’s Basketball game at 7 pm. Jan. 25. nationalgonzagaday.org (313-6132) SPOKANE CHINESE ASSOC. NEW YEAR FEST Families are invited to explore Chinese culture and the Chinese New Year celebration, through food, clothing, activities and more. Jan. 25, 2 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (444-5390) LEGO LEAGUE COMPETITIONS The Nature’s Fury Regional Qualifier features 45 FLL teams, of approx. 400 students ages 9-14, who have built and programed LEGO Mindstorms robots to interact with models on a mission board. Jan. 26, 12-3:30 pm. Free. Lewis & Clark HS, 521 W. Fourth. (354-7330) SPOKANE LILAC FESTIVAL CORONATION Crowning of this year’s 7 youth ambassador Lilac Princesses as part of the Lilac Royalty Program. Jan. 26, 3:30 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanelilacfestival.org (535-4554) SUNDAY TEA DANCE Dance music

provided by Variety Pak; also hors d’oeuvres and door prizes. Jan. 26, 5:30-8:30 pm. $9-$10. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th. sssac.org (535-0803) CATHOLIC CHARITIES VOLUNTEER INFO Learn about various volunteer opportunities available through the local social service nonprofit. Jan. 28, 10-11:15 am. Catholic Charities Family Service, 12 E. Fifth. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (358-4270) CULTIVATE SPOKANE SALON SERIES Inaugural event in a series of informal monthly meetings for those active in Spokane’s arts, culture and creative industries to meet, share, learn and connect. Jan. 28, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. spokanearts.org LOCAL RADIO RESOURCES Introductory workshop on how to promote, coordinate and advertise events with local radio station listeners. RSVP by Jan. 27, space is limited to 80 participants. Jan. 29, 4:30-6 pm. Free. Moscow City Hall, 206 E. Third. (208-883-7036) PAC-CON PALOUSE First annual Palouse comic convention, featuring comic book artists, vendors, special guests, costume contests, games and more. Feb. 1. $15$20. Schweitzer Event Center (SEL), 1825 Schweitzer Dr. facebook.com/PACPalouse (208-329-4042)

FILM

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Screening of films in this year’s world tour of winter sport and outdoor films. Full schedule of festival online, different films are screened each day. Jan. 23-25 at 7 pm each night. $14-$15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191) THE BOOK THIEF Film based on the book of the same name, rated PG-13. Jan. 23-26, show times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) DIFFERENT DRUMMERS Screening of the locally produced movie about true events in Spokane in 1965. Starring Brayden Tucker (Spokane) and Ethan Reed McKay (Portland); written and directed by Don Caron and Lyle Hatcher. Through Jan. 30. $6.50-$10.50. AMC River Park Square 20, 808 W. Main. (216-2098) SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FEST The 16th annual film festival features screenings of features, documentaries and short films made around the world over the past two years, not commercially released for wide distribution. The festival also hosts filmmakers receptions, forums and more. See full events schedule and purchase tickets at SpIFF’s site. Jan. 23-Feb. 1. $5-$150 (festival pass). spokanefilmfestival.org (720-7743) WSU SEB FILMS CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Action/thriller. Jan. 24-26, Fri-Sat at 6 pm and 9 pm, Sun at 4 pm and 7 pm. Students/free, guests/$2. WSU Pullman campus. (335-3503) A NIGHT OF TRANSOLAR GALACTICA Special screening as part of SpIFF of the locally-produced and award-winning web series’ “Origin Episodes,” also feat. a documentary featurette on the series. Jan. 25, 9:30 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. transolargalactica.com (327-1050) WONDER WOMAN! THE UNTOLD STORY OF AMERICAN SUPERHEROINES Film exploring how popular representations of powerful women reflect society’s anxieties about strong and

healthy women, hosted by the EWU Women’s Studies Center. 55 min. film. Jan. 28, noon. Free. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth, Cheney. (359-2898) ABOUT MEN Feature-length documentary film following a North Idaho men’s group. Jan. 31, 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. (208-263-9191)

FOOD

VINO! WINE TASTING Friday tasting features Pernod Ricard Import Selections from 3-6:30 pm ($10). Saturday features “Plunder from Down Under” from 2-4:30 pm. ($5). $5-$10. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) WINES OF SOUTH AMERICA Sample some of the best wines from Chile and Argentina, including Cabernet, Malbec and Carmenere. Jan. 24, 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) WINTER BEER DINNER Five-course dinner hosted by Stone Brewing Co., each course is paired with a beer from the brewery. Jan. 24, 6-10 pm. $55. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000) IPA CHALLENGE Featuring IPAs from America’s top breweries, in an East vs. West taste-off. Jan. 25, 7 pm. $20, reservations requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. (343-2253) 5TH ANNUAL GU IRON CHEF Cultural and educational cooking battle featuring GU community members sharing cultural dishes. In the Cataldo Hall Globe Room. Jan. 26, 3-4:30 pm. $1. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. (313-5836) HAND-ROLLED TRUFFLES Participants will make heart-shaped dark chocolate truffles in a two-hour class, and truffle ingredients to take home. Jan. 28, 6-8 pm. $55. Chocolate Myracles, 11616 E. Montgomery. chocolatemyracles.com (922-6353) CUPCAKES TAKE THE CAKE Sweet Frostings’ pastry chef Joslynn Lende leads a class on working with a frosting bag, sparkling sugar and more. Jan. 29, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA) at SCC. (279-6030) GIRLS PINT OUT Attendees receive one sample paddle to try a variety of beer and a raffle ticket to win a Girls Pint Out T-Shirt. Jan. 31, 6-8 pm. $15. Selkirk Abbey Brewing, 6180 E. Seltice Way. girlspintout.com (208-991-0040)

MUSIC

COEUR D’ALENE MUSIC WALK Downtown businesses host local musicians for this monthly winter event. Jan. 24, 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown CdA. artsincda.org (208-415-0116) CDA SYMPHONY BLACK & WHITE BALL Formal fundraiser event featuring dancing and a live orchestra. Jan. 25, 7-9 pm. $25. Best Western Coeur d’Alene, 506 W. Appleway. cdasymphony.org (208-7653833) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics series: “Music of the Americas” featuring works by New World composers and music from “West Side Story.” Jan. 25 at 8 pm, Jan. 26 at 3 pm. $15 and up. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony. org (624-1200) WHITWORTH CHAMBER RECITAL Hear the student-led chamber perform at the Music Building Recital Hall. Jan. 26, 7 pm. Free. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3280)


THE CHIARA STRING QUARTET Concert as part of the Auditorium Chamber Music Series featuring the renowned quartet, currently based at Harvard University. Jan. 30, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. University of Idaho Admin. Building, 851 Campus Dr., Moscow. auditoriumchambermusic.org

of call and response singing is part of the Bhakti Yoga tradition of India. This event features music by Shambhava Bhakti Band. Jan. 25, 7-9 pm. By donation. South Perry Yoga, 915 S. Perry. southperryoga.com (443-6241) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. the Tri-City Americans. Jan. 25, 7:05 pm. $10-$20. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com (279-7000) GONZAGA VS. SAN DIEGO Doors open FUTSAL FEST TOURNAMENT Four-onat 6 pm to watch the men’s basketball four competition, with men’s, women’s game on the Garland’s big screen. Jan. and coed team divisions. Jan. 26, 8 am-7 23, 7 pm. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. pm. $175/team. HUB Sports Center, 19619 Garland Ave. (327-1050) E. Cataldo. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602) INLAND NW RV SHOW & SALE RV and SPOKANE CANOE & KAYAK CLUB The camping expo and vendor show. Jan. 23club’s January presentation by Debbie 26, Thurs 12-8 pm, Fri-Sat 10 am-8 pm, Pierce features highlights of her kayak Sun 10 am-4 pm. Spokane County Fair & trip in Utah’s Canyonlands National Park. Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. (927-9000) Jan. 27, 7-8 pm. Mountain Gear Corporate 2014 USA BOXING NATL. CHAMPIONOffices, 6021 E. Mansfield. (487-7085) SHIPS Elite boxing featuring top male SPOKANE MOUNTAINEERS MEETand female competitors in all weight diviING Member Jane Schelly sions from around the US. shows slides of her backJan. 20-25; full schedule of pack trips in the Caucasus events TBA. Events at HUB of northern Georgia. Jan. Visit Inlander.com for Sports Center from Jan. 2027, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 23; at Northern Quest Jan. complete listings of local N. Monroe. spokanemoun24-25. $5-$40. Northern events. taineers.org (838-4974) Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. GSL BASKETBALL RUB(242-7000) BER CHICKEN Rivalry basketball game, FOURTH FRIDAY PUB PEDDLERS Meets Lewis & Clark vs. Ferris High School. Jan. the fourth Friday (Jan. 24) of the month 28, 5:30 pm. $6. Spokane Arena, 720 W. at 7 pm, departs at 8 pm. Swamp Tavern, Mallon. spokanearena.com (279-7000) 1904 W. Fifth. (922-3312) GSL BASKETBALL GROOVY SHOES RiSPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. the valry basketball game, Shadle Park vs. Moose Jaw Warriors; also Indians Night North Central. Jan. 29, 3:45 pm. $6. Spoat the Chiefs, allowing current Spokane kane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. (279-7000) Indians ticket package holders to two RIVERSIDE STATE PARK FOUNDATION comp. tickets to the game. Jan. 24, 7:05 The inaugural annual meeting of the founpm. $10-$20. Spokane Arena, 720 W. dation features a presentation from state Mallon Ave. (279-7000) parks staff and local mountain climber KIRTAN AT THE BUDDHIO Kirtan, a form

SPORTS

MORE EVENTS

John Roskelley Jan. 29, 6 pm. Free. Mountain Gear, 2002 N. Division. riversidestatepark.org (570-2763)

local and national playwrights. Jan. 31-Feb. 1 at 7:30 pm. $5. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org (838-9727)

THEATER

VISUAL ARTS

CRAZY FOR YOU Tap-dancing musical comedy. Through Feb. 9, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) GOOD PEOPLE Tony-nominated drama Jan. 23-Feb. 8, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, except: Fri, Jan. 31 at 6:30 pm, Sat. matinees Feb. 1 and 8 at 2 pm. $12$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529) LITTLE WOMEN THE MUSICAL Musical stage adaptation of the novel by Louisa May Alcott. Through Feb. 1, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) PERFECT WEDDING Romantic comedy performed by StageWest Community Theater. Jan. 24-Feb. 9, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. Dinner theater Feb. 1 at 6 pm ($25). $10-$12. Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 639 Elm St, Cheney. (235-2441) THE FANTASTICKS Musical performed by the Nebraska Theatre Caravan. Jan. 25 at 2 pm and 7:30 pm. Jan. 25. $11-$22. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman. performingarts.wsu.edu (335-8522) HELLO DOLLY! Award-winning Broadway musical starring Sally Struthers. Jan. 30-Feb. 2, show times vary. $32.50$72.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bestofbroadwayspokane.com (509-279-7000) FAST & FURIOUS Stage Left hosts its first annual staged reading of short plays, featuring new comedies and dramas by 60+

CREATE: ART BY ARTISTS OUTSIDE THE MAINSTREAM A nationally traveling exhibition of work by artists with developmental disabilities, featured at the Museum of Art/WSU from Jan. 23-April 5; public reception Jan. 30 from 6-8 pm. WSU Pullman. (335-6282) PRICHARD INVITATIONAL & ART AUCTION At the end of the invitational exhibition (Jan. 24-Feb. 8), featuring work by 65+ local and regional artists, a live art auction is to be held, on Feb. 8, at 7 pm. $15/auction admission. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main, Moscow. uidaho.edu/ caa/prichardartgallery (208-885-3586) AMY SKAER Painted long boards and canvases by the local artist on display. Through Feb. 19. South Perry Pizza, 1011 S. Perry St. (290-6047)

WORDS

CDA IN THE 20TH CENTURY This 12-month lecture series hosted by the library and the Museum of North Idaho is presented by regional historian Robert Singletary, and examines history from 1900-2000. Held on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 pm (except Nov. and Dec.). Free. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) NAKED LUNCH BREAK LITERARY OPEN MIC Weekly lunchtime open mic and reading series, featuring local writers, free pizza (while it lasts), and an open mic. Free. EWU Riverpoint Campus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (368-6557)

AUTHOR PATRICK DOUGHERTY Reading and signing of “Do You Want to Get Better: The Future of Health Care” by the Spokane-based chiropractor. Jan. 25, 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) CHILDREN’S AUTHOR KRISTIN JORDAN Signing of “The Lonely Chicken,” based on a story told by the author’s son. Jan. 25, noon. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) AUTHOR BRYCE ANDREWS Presentation and signing of the NW author’s book “Badluck Way: A Year on the Ragged Edge of the West” about his experiences as a Montana ranch hand. Jan. 26, 4 pm. Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main, Moscow. STORYCATCHER WORKSHOPS Focusing on interviewing, recording and editing oral histories. Jan. 27 and 29 from 6-8 pm. Free, registration suggested. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front. cdalibrary. org (208-769-2380) GONZAGA VISITING WRITERS SERIES Presentation by author Marshall Boswell. Jan. 29 at 7:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu (313-6681)

ETC.

SPOKANE/CDA RURAL ROOTS Meeting to explore starting a local chapter of Rural Roots, a Moscow, Idaho-based nonprofit food and farming organization for small-acreage/family farmers, ranchers, market gardeners, chefs, educators and consumers. Jan. 27, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free, RSVP requested. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. ruralroots.org (208-883-3462) INTRO TO 3D PRINTING Class on 3D printing using SketchUp. Jan. 29, 6:307:30 pm. Free, registration required. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. tinyurl.com/lhxgtxy (893-8400) n

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10. Grier of “The L Word” 11. A man ____ men 12. PlayStation maker 13. Like bueno but not buena: Abbr. 18. Aussie hopper

19. K followers 24. Dear, to Donizetti 25. Riots 26. Unit indicated by “ 27. Still in bed

THIS 30. HDTV feature, often 31. “Take on Me” band ANSW WEEK’S 32. Mineo of “Giant” I SAW ERS ON 33. Garbage YOUS 35. From ____ Z 36. Army doc 38. Do something wrong 39. Do something totally right 40. Radio unit: Abbr. 42. Stead 43. Bills, e.g. 48. Goes back to sea? 50. Jazz lover, in old slang 51. Brown shade 52. Telly watchers 53. Millionaire’s boat, perhaps 54. No-frills bed 55. Pretzels, basically 56. “Snowy” bird 57. Word before pain or treatment 58. Antioxidant berry 59. “Melts in your mouth” candy 63. Emu’s extinct cousin 64. Michael Jordan left it after his jr. year 65. Rock’s ____ Fighters 66. Parseghian of Notre Dame

JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 51


Someone cut you off?

Time to let off some steam. You can really let them have it. Place a FREE ad in the Jeers section. I Saw You • You Saw Me • Cheers & Jeers • ISawYou@Inlander.com

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1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Lowe’s I see you at least twice a week in the A.M. You: tall, dark hair pulled up with crazy braids sticking out of it. I dig it. You work at a retirement community on the south hill. White van. Couple tattoos. Best smile I have ever seen. I get the feeling you don’t know it, but woman, you are so beautiful it’s filthy.

laughed about running into each other again. I would like to take you out. Interested?

thing called life.Thanks for all the cheerers...and for all the jeerers I leave you one thought... Pronoia is a neologism that is defined as the opposite state of mind to paranoia: having the sense that there is a conspiracy that exists to help the person. It is also used to describe a philosophy that the world is set up to secretly benefit people. Keep up the good work Spokane! P.s. Thanks to the tow guy who helped with my jammed door..You rock!

Pullman Highway Thursday, January 16th. We exchanged a glance as I drove past while you were waiting to pull onto Highway 195 at the Spangle turn-off. You in a blue vehicle, me in a gray Corolla. We passed each other a couple times and exchanged glances again before we both exited at the Maple St. off-ramp. You are so beautiful. Care for coffee? Iw84yu@hotmail. com. Deer Park Chevron You: Chevy truck, filing your gas tank. Me: Ford Escape. You smiled at me before leaving. I only get gas at this station every Friday, same time. Hope to see you again. Albertsons On Nevada, Thursday, January 16th. You: very tall, very handsome, wearing jeans and a leather coat. Me: brunette, wearing scrubs. We were both at the meat counter waiting for help. You were buying steaks, I was buying chicken. Are you cooking for someone or just for yourself? I was going to my parents to cook them dinner. If you’re single and want to do some cooking together, let me know.

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Downtown Library I saw you Wednesday, January 15th, arriving at the library on your bike. Way cool protecting our environment even in the winter. You had a nicely groomed beard and jeans that fit very nice. We entered the library together and we talked about the weather and the dangers of riding a bike in the winter. Me: the talkative redhead. Dog Walker I saw you Saturday, January 18th up north walking your German Shephard. I was driving a black Ford F150 truck checking you out, you were definitely looking at me. Single? I have room for both you and your dog. Starbucks There you were, sitting in your car at the Shadle Starbucks busy talking on the phone. I don’t think you saw me, but I saw you get out of your car. You, a beautiful blonde with dangerous curves driving a Lexus. Do you think we could meet for a cup of coffee, or ? Coincidence I bumped into you at the northside Costco a month ago and then at Target last week. We

Trader Joes I said hello to you a week or so ago as we were checking out their selection of wines. I told you what a wonderful smile you have. You were flattered and came to find me before you left. I should have given you my number or business card. Wish I had done that. I find myself wanting to go wander the wine isles again at Trader Joes. Safeway Shopper You: beautiful brunette in the checkout line in front of me. Me: shaved head and wearing slacks and a Gonzaga shirt. It was Monday the 20th around 7:00pm, at the Safeway near Gonzaga. Our groceries got missed together and you almost

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” got charged for some of my stuff. I wanted to ask you out, but every time we made eye contact my brain turned to mush! It’s those eyes of yours! So adventurous. Even now I can’t get the words out. Let me buy you dinner, let me make you dinner, let’s go for a bike ride, let’s just sit and talk.

Cheers My Cadillac Cheers to best boyfriend a girl could ask for being there for me through the hardest time of my life and being the best father my little girls deserve. I’m so lucky to have you in my life. I can only imagine where I would be without you. I love you with all my heart Spo-Can Cheers to fellow Spokanites and Idahoans that help influence the greater good in the Spokane area!! For all those buying the person behind you their coffee, helping someone who broke down, giving that guy an extra $5 (even if later you find out it’s a scam), SMILING, volunteering at a local organization, guys who open the door..not just for cute girls but for everyone, telling that person at the gym..or that art class.. or at work to keep up the hard work, forgiving that jerk driver.. simply because we all have off days, and for people who pay it forward. Thanks for slowing down to enjoy the beauty of the moment, for doing everything with love, for appreciating and making the most out of this great beautiful

Boots I Saw You, yet even aligned stars failed to illuminate “me” in your eyes. That’s OK, You Saw Me again, and your minor jealousy worked in my favor. We’ve spent LOTS of time, mending each others hurts of the....brain. You thought I was going to type, heart. Hearts circulate blood, the brain is where the action is! It’s turned out exactly how you did NOT want; yet you’re as happy as I! Sox (sic) continues to frustrate and confuse your.....brain. You thought I was going to type heart, again, didn’t you? I have to keep you on your..... Strength Watching you strive for success after everything you’ve been able to overcome has been one of the most astounding things I’ve ever witnessed. Your strength, determination, and grace under immense stress and growth is something I remind myself of often to emulate. Your ability to persevere inspires me daily and I’m so happy to have found someone in possession of unimaginable strength and wisdom to share my life with. I love you. jj Happy Birthday! Daddy. All of your three girls appreciate all that you do for us and the lessons that you have shown us. You are a hard worker and all of our neighbors love you too! Wow! Turning 50. Have a great day daddy. Love your three Angels. Hang In There Lisa, I know it hasn’t been easy for you since your divorce, but I wanted to tell you that you are doing a great job, working and raising your two boys. The road ahead may seen tough, but I know you can handle anything life throws your way. Love, Kay

Cheers your little sister. My Love Thomas. I realize that I don’t say it enough, but I love you a lot more than you realize. I find myself loving you more and more with each day that passes. Love your sweetie. Valley Hospital Saturday, January 11th. We were both waiting in the ER, I had brougt my roommate who had broken her ankle tripping over her bookbag. You were waiting to been seen about your headache. I felt a connection, did you? Seattle Seahawks Cheers to a great team and an exciting win! You showed the forty-whiners that we are a super bowl team. Mom and Dad Thank you for everything you have done for me and my son. Thank you both for helping me throughout all of my obstacles. Dad, thank you for being such a great role model for your grandson. Mom, thank you for being a second mom and for never giving up on me. I love you, your little girl. My Hero Tommy, you have made me smile every day since the day you came back into my life, something I didn’t think would ever happen. My heart has always belonged to you from day one. I love you and am so glad we will be together again. Until then, I miss you and will dream about you everynight until you come home from Boot Camp. Thank You Cheers to the delivery guy at Thomas Hammer for buying drinks for the people in line. What a nice thing to do. I hope your day was as wonderful as you made mine. Thank you. Charlie It seems like forever that we have been together. if this is how great six months feels, I can’t wait to feel forever with you. Thank you for always taking me as I am and loving me unconditionally. You are the most amazing man that I have ever known and I love you with all of my heart. I will love you forever and ever. Sara

I Love You Laura. It is impossible to put into words how I feel about you. I want to spend the rest of my life with you, exploring and Laura H. is this week’s winner finding new adventures. When we graduate from of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! Eastern this summer, let’s Send in your CHEERS so travel to Italy and eat, drink you too can be enand make happy memories. tered to win 1 dozen Forever, JT

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Nellie Happy 32nd Birthday! You are the best sister and friend. Love

“Cheers” cupcakes at Celebrations Sweet Boutique.

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


Feel the

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of your donation

Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

Compassion To the people who look down when they see my sign for food, I love you. I understand your fear. For those that gave, Thank You! You kept me warm in the cold, you gave me light in the dark.

the two whole dollars I had in there. Also, have fun trying to use my cancelled debit card. I want to thank you for my upcoming work of putting a new wallet back together. You are an ass. Great a job!

better with clothes that are about 2 sizes bigger.

Jeers Impatient Driver Jeers to the driver behind me as I waited (briefly) for a break in traffic before turning left at the bottom of the old Sunset hill. I’m not going to put other drivers at risk (especially when road conditions are icy) and blast through on-coming traffic because your knickers are in a knot. Get up earlier if you’re in such a hurry. Or better yet... get some therapy girl. Customer Service When a customer complains about their food and asks for a substitution, and you tell me that it is a bad night in the kitchen, but you can’t make a substitution, I don’t care - I just want a decent meal. I won’t be back. Fog Lights Seriously! What is it with you and fog lights? When it’s not foggy you’re making it hard for me to see the road. Texting Girls - doesn’t it frustrate you when you’re happily in love and your boyfriend is texting girls who know about you and him, but are still texting him. Manager I thought you were a responsible business owner. Shame on you. I was in your store the other day trying to shop and you were yelling at some of the girls behind the counter. That is a non-professional way to behave in front of paying customers, espcially since a lot of your staff have been there as long as I have been shopping there and are always extremely helpful. I guess I will do my shopping elsewhere. Wallet Thief To the scum that stole my wallet. I hope you really enjoy

South Hill Speedster Why do you insist on driving up our street every night, revving your engines as loud as possible? Are you really that rude and obnoxious? I have a feeling you’re just over compensating. Cell Phone Users To all you people on your cell phones every second of your miserable lives hang up and live!!!! I saw a stupid woman more concerned with her f#$@#%* text than with the fact that her little girl was about to get hit by a car backing out slowly and she couldn’t see the little girl. When I told the woman, “Ma’am your daughter is going to get hit” I was told to “Mind my own business” and flipped off. Really?!!! You care so little about your own kid?!!! I have people yak on those damn things when I go to ring them up at the store, people still use them while they drive (Where’s that law in action?), The moral kids, if you can’t go 5 minutes without your damn phone or being plugged in some how, you are a F@#$%^& loser. Bike Thief You crept down my driveway in the middle of the night to steal my only mode of transportation. Can I accoommade you any further? I’m Walking Here! I was the woman in the purple coat with a black scarf crossing Augusta and Monroe Monday night. You weren’t going to stop for me. That is a crosswalk and you were legally suppose to stop. I wish I had gotten your license plate. Look In The Mirror To the people who have gained weight, but are still wearing their clothes from when they were skinny, it looks horrible. Stop it. There’s nothing wrong with a little extra meat, it’s just that you would look so much

’S THIS WEEK! S R E W S AN

Friends? Here’s to all the people who through my life have insulted me, put me down, “taxed me”, fooled me and lied. How can I ever thank you especially while my husband layed dying, you just couldn’t wait to take advantage of me and him. And now that you have had to physically beat me because I am stupid, I hope that your life continues to get better. I am sorry that you had to waste your time on me. By the way, yes, I am a female combat vet. You should have had more respect. Vigilante Honker How are you any better than the people talking on the cell phone while driving? Why would you want to scare other people by piously honking your horn. Maybe you should pay less attention to what others are doing in their car and focus on the road.

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Cell Phone Drivers It’s rude, It’s illegal, and you are endangering yourself and everyone around you. So from here on out while you’re on your cell phone, I’m on my horn. Hopefully, this will make your conversation much more pleasant.

PICK IT UP FEBRUARY 13TH

Jeers to the Jerks Who dropped off the little kitty & left it in the cold about a week ago in my neighborhood! The poor little kitty was terrified & alone & hungry. These babies have feelings too & how could you do this after the 8 years of life & love this one gave you? This little one couldn’t understand why suddenly this happened to her, or what she may have done wrong all of a sudden! She did NOT deserve this! YOU creeps NEVER deserved her! I hope you are forever haunted by this, & by her sweet little face and big eyes! I hope you see your judgment day harshly!

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JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 53


LEFT: Lee Smith, Kay Yates and Roy Colver at last week’s meeting. TOP RIGHT: Vaughn Overly; BOTTOM RIGHT: Shianne Veltri, left, and Jennilyn Weight.

Tell Me a Story

The Spokane Storytelling League carries on a century-old mission to entertain and educate through the spoken word BY CHEY SCOTT

A

ndy Shields goes first, recalling the first winter he worked as a kids’ ski instructor. Lee Smith, a petite, white-haired woman in a plum sweater, then animatedly tells a Native American lore-inspired tale of how the Great Spirit created the owl and the rabbit. Next up is semi-retired math professor Roy Colver, who recounts the story of the “foxy boxer,” a feisty, stubborn student who sidelined as a bikini bar fighter. Seated in an array of mismatched chairs around two tables — one square and one round — in the basement of the Corbin Senior Center on a foggy Tuesday night, members of the Spokane Storytelling League take turns weaving yarns both factual and imaginary. At the end of each story, the group claps politely. A few then ask the storyteller questions. When did that happen? How old were you? Almost all of the league’s members are well into their mid- to late-70s. Shianne Veltri — a bright-eyed 12-year-old

54 INLANDER JANUARY 23, 2014

who tells a story about a prank on her older brother gone wrong — is the youngest person there by many decades. She started attending the monthly meetings with her grandmother Kay Veltri, who’s 79. Tonight is Shianne’s fourth visit to the group. “It just kind of interests me because I love to tell stories and I love to hear stories,” Shianne says. The age gap between Shianne and her grandmother’s peers is a striking sign of the Spokane Storytelling League’s future. Without more young people, storytelling leagues could soon fade away. The Spokane league and 11 other groups like it in the U.S., including another Washingtonbased group in Tacoma, are shrinking every year. The first storytelling league was officially founded in 1903, by a Tennessee literature professor. Local league president Jennilyn Weight says at the height of storytelling leagues’ reach, during the 1940s,

more than 5,000 members were registered with the National Storytellers League. That number has dwindled to around 400. Spokane alone was once home to five separate neighborhood storytelling groups, which eventually merged to form a single entity. Now, around 15 people regularly attend the monthly meetups. “As time has gone on and age has eroded the [league’s] membership, TV has taken over for entertainment, and the number has shrunk,” Weight says.

S

everal members seated around the two tables last Tuesday evening have been longtime storytellers. Hobbyist film critic Vaughn Overly launches into a retelling of a Bollywood film called Lagaan. Overly, a balding man in a burgundy turtleneck with a deep, projecting voice, stands up from his chair to speak. He gestures wildly with his hands as he talks, changing the timbre of his voice to become characters in the

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

film. His one-man reenactment of the three-hour film brings on several bouts of laughter from the group. Overly’s story is a stark contrast to Barbara Brown, 77, who recounts a vivid childhood memory of traveling on a train full of World War II troops with her mother, to join her father who’d gone ahead of them to find a job in Spokane. “At that time we couldn’t buy candy or treats or anything, just military could. So these guys would go out and come back with bags like this,” Brown says, stretching her arms out wide. “I was sick by the time I got to Spokane,” she laughs. Brown isn’t alone in recounting a fond memory of days past. Herb Bradshaw, tall and soft-spoken with a gray mustache and matching bushy eyebrows, reads a story about a summer when he worked at a grain elevator in Downs, Wash. Then he moves onto a poem he discovered many years later. Though not his own words, Bradshaw’s voice wavers ever so slightly and fills with nostalgia as he reaches its final lines: “From the fencepost the lark, as though he had waited for just a moment, sings, letting each liquid song seep into the dry ground.”  Spokane Storytelling League • Meets monthly on the second Tuesday, from 7-8:30 pm • Free to attend • Corbin Senior Center • 827 W. Cleveland • 467-5703


JANUARY 23, 2014 INLANDER 55


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Inlander 01/23/2014