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E

ven in our polarized world, there are certain statements that are neither liberal nor conservative, neither criticism nor compliment. They’re simply facts. Here’s one: No one knows exactly what a DONALD TRUMP presidency will look like. Not even the Donald himself. This is his first venture into government, and despite his desire to run it like a business, he’ll soon find out that’s not entirely possible. There are constitutional checks and balances, and he’ll face stiff opposition, even from the party to which he nominally belongs. There will also be Democrats, liberals and people around the globe who scrutinize his words, actions, proposals, tweets and, maybe one day, his tax returns. As Americans, people will try to root for him, knowing that their success is at least partially tied to his, but the challenge ahead of him is immense. Even if he didn’t collude with Russian hackers, he faces questions of legitimacy from Day One. Despite the overwhelming movement he supposedly created, he received nearly 3 million fewer votes than the world’s least-liked candidate, Hillary Clinton. Meanwhile, Trump’s people have repeatedly said that reporters shouldn’t take his statements literally — that he’s often making a point for effect — giving hope to some critics that his most regressive proposals are, innocently, campaign punchlines. Nevertheless, we will be here to keep tabs on him for the Inland Northwest, watching not through a conservative or liberal lens, but seeking those increasingly elusive facts. It’s a responsibility we take seriously, knowing that there’s no such thing as a free society without a free press. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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WHAT EXCITES/CONCERNS YOU ABOUT A DONALD TRUMP PRESIDENCY? ELIZABETH GEORGE

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COMMENT | THE PRESIDENCY

So Here We Are Here’s hoping the new president fills the office with the grace and sense of tradition it requires BY ROBERT HEROLD

D

onald Trump comes to the most powerful leadership position in the world lacking any governing experience, having put on display an astonishing level of self-serving cynicism, wrapped in narcissism and sustained by bullying. And then there are those nuclear weapons. How did this happen? Abraham Lincoln famously said that “You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.” Apologies to Abe, but he didn’t take into account something called the Electoral College — our antiquated and anti-democratic method of electing presidents that made it possible to lose the popular vote by nearly 2.9 million votes (more than the population of Chicago) and still win the election. Which brings us to the voters. Historian and author Alan Taylor wrote in the American Scholar that “the Founders warned that uneducated voters make us vulnerable to reckless demagogues.” It was no surprise that uneducated voters flocked to the demagogue Trump. Polls say they made the difference in the 2016 election. Why? Outrageous sells, and no one was more outrageous than Donald Trump. On to the Fourth Estate — the media — which failed us miserably. They went out of their way to trumpet Trump and keep him in the race as the ratings spiked. For these same news organizations he now threatens, Trump’s presidential campaign became an extension of The Apprentice — a form of reality TV, which sells big.

S

o here we are. Aside from the mounting evidence that Trump has broken laws, and that Putin has dirt on him, ready to drop if he falls out of line; aside from his childish midnight tweets, dumping even on Meryl Streep (?!); aside from his resorting to nepotism, on display in the form of his empty conflict-of-interest-avoidance strategy — aside from all this, I’m much disturbed by something that hasn’t yet been addressed: “Class,” as in “class act.” Disagree with him if you will, but Barack Obama, along with his family, personified the term “class act.” His farewell speech underscored what we all knew — how important simple grace is to the success of any president, and to the country. Obama’s farewell address will not go down in history as a great speech. It won’t be remembered alongside George Washington’s warning against foreign powers and “entangling alliances,” or Jackson’s address warning against “shadowy money power represented by banks and corporations,” or Eisenhower’s still much-quoted warning about the ever-growing “military-industrial complex.” This acknowledged, Obama did speak

6 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

to important matters: Our increasingly complex world, our interconnectedness, time and space having been reduced by science and technology. He denounced demagoguery in all forms. He urged fact-based debate. He challenged all Americans to rediscover the idea of “the civic” and reasserted that the public interest really does matter — that public involvement is a virtue. And he recognized the many challenges facing our younger generation, challenges not of their own making. With scars to show for his optimism of eight years ago, Obama was more circumspect; he finally showed awareness that Niebuhr’s Children of Light are too naive while the Children of Darkness lurk in the shadows. Overall, though, as he has done for the past eight years, he appealed to our better angels. Hope remains his theme.

B

ut now what do we see coming our way? Trump, pressing forward on any number of radical proposals, already has said that he will spend time in the White House only when Congress is in session, a symbolic move that reduces the People’s House to just another office. No sense of history. No ceremony. No interaction with the public. Forget the press corps, if at all possible. What’s worse, I doubt that Trump even gets why these positions are anathema to the ideals of America. And our new First Lady? She has chosen to continue living in Trump Tower. She will not be a daily presence in the nation’s capital. His daughter, apparently, will serve as the face of the First Family. All these are all dismal firsts. What seems clear, even before his inauguration, is that soon-to-be-President Trump is, well… who he has always been. Behind the braggadocio and bluster, it’s those garish “Look at me!” signs above buildings that bear his name that most clearly reveal him to be what he is. In his essay “Trumpitecture,” architect Doug Staker writes: “A Trump creation needs a sign, always prominently displaying the word ‘Trump.’ But the sign cannot be just any sign; it must be a big sign. One such sign was 2,800 square feet, larger than the average home in America.” Garish and self-indulgent, look no further than Trump’s signage preferences and envision what this says about the America he wishes upon all of us. “Mirror, mirror on the wall… ” n


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People of the Inland Northwest are invited to gather in Spokane and join communities nationwide on Saturday as part a day-long Women’s March, which will begin in Washington, D.C. Activities begin at 11 am with a rally at the Spokane Convention Center (334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.), featuring inspirational speakers from human rights, justice and women’s advocacy groups, as well as musical entertainment. A peaceful march begins at 1 pm, followed by a volunteer fair at the Convention Center.

PEOPLE RISE UP!

The Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane and partners host a free, all-ages grassroots festival on Saturday to sharpen activist skills. There will be music, poetry, speakers, an action bar, creative activities, a kids’ zone, and a free soup and bread potluck to warm up after the Women’s March. Free. At the Community Building, 35 W. Main, 2-5 pm.

NORTH IDAHO COMMUNITY MARCH

A nonpartisan, grassroots event serving as a call to get involved is scheduled for Saturday from 11 am to 1 pm. Various local organizations will share their missions and recruit volunteers to work in the areas of protecting the environment, human/women’s rights, economic/social justice and building a welcoming and charitable community. Open to all ages, genders and persuasions. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint.  Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com. JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | THE ARTS shape us. That’s perhaps best expressed in Sondheim’s song “Children Will Listen.” The song brings back a tune from earlier in the production about children revolting against their parents, but with a new, contrasting refrain: Careful the things you say Children will listen Careful the things you do Children will see and learn Children may not obey, but children will listen Children will look to you for which way to turn To learn what to be We tell stories not just in what we say, but in what we do — including whom we vote for and what we’re willing to fight for. The stories we tell through our actions can be even more powerful than those we tell through our words.

We tell stories not just in what we say, but in what we do — including whom we vote for and what we’re willing to fight for. But as Hamilton and Into the Woods prove, our words — particularly when transformed into lyrics and accompanied by compelling melodies — can also make a profound difference. Recently I’ve come to appreciate another important commonality between these two productions: Both feature strong, determined women. And one important story for us to be telling right now, through our words and actions, is the equal capacity and capabilities women bring to every aspect of our society. We can tell this story through our actions by supporting public policies that guarantee equal pay for equal work, combat violence against women, and protect women’s constitutional rights to make decisions regarding their health and bodies. At the same time, we must continue to tell these stories through books, art and music. One project deserving of attention is the recently launched Color with Luna, a coloring book “created to celebrate girls and empower the next generation of leaders through the power of words.” The book features girls from a broad range of backgrounds stepping out boldly into the world (colorwithluna.com). These are the kinds of stories we need to be telling, especially right now, whether at a march in Spokane or D.C., when we cast our votes, or through the coloring books we give our kids — because children will listen. 

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Children Will Listen How art speaks to life in this particular moment BY JOHN T. REUTER

F

or the last couple of months, I’ve been listening almost nonstop to the musical Hamilton. It’s a masterwork that simultaneously celebrates our nation’s origins and challenges us to be “young, scrappy and hungry” in building an ever more perfect union. This weekend, though, I turned to an older piece of musical theater that I’ve long loved and seemed equally important to the political moment in which we find ourselves. Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods retells classic fairy tales, brilliantly interwoven into a narrative that con-

cludes as the first act’s curtain falls with each character achieving his or her greatest wish. It’s in the second act, though, where things really get interesting. The world becomes chaotic with the entrance of a literal giant, and as fairy tales make way for the complexity of life — where there never is a “happily ever after.” Nor a final tragic ending; instead, just the mix of joys and sorrows that fill a continuing journey through the Woods. The arts are powerful tools to understand ourselves. Storytelling is how we make sense of our lives and each other. In many ways, both Hamilton and Into the Woods are both about this same basic truth: The stories we tell

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

GETaraBIG MONEY OUT Dowd, I have been reading and agreeing with your editorials in the

T

Inlander. Your sharp opinions are right on target. Although, I am of the opinion that the final paragraph in your Jan. 12 article (“The Landed and the White”) was somewhat fuzzy. According to the DVD What A Way to Go, a panorama of all we are losing as climate change coupled with greed destroy this planet, the narrator does expect that some humans will survive the holocaust, for what that is worth. Homo sapiens will not be extinct yet. I think of this when I read your final paragraph, “Indigenous people of America have been surviving presidents ... for 228 years.” Yikes. When I try to consider all the suffering, all the human cultures and languages that have been destroyed by colonialism and imperialism, all the squandered and wasted human resources represented by those innocents whose lives and minds have been hollowed out, if not extinguished, LETTERS before they could contribute all those Send comments to wonderful gifts that are the birthright editor@inlander.com. and potential of all spirits born... I find myself wondering if strength and resilience are the booby prize. Why can’t each individual be fully cherished and loved and nurtured, and their unique talents cherished? Some of us will survive, but at what cost? OK, enough with that. My primary reasons for writing you are, first, to say I am glad you are part of Spokane’s journalism scene. And secondly, to elaborate on your mention of getting big money out of politics. There is currently being brought before a number of state legislatures, including Washington’s, a bill to have a national meeting of state legislatures to draft a constitutional amendment [to get money out of our elections]. Several states have already passed such a bill. Olympia considered looking at it last year, but the Senate Republicans did a sort of pocket veto that killed it. It would be amazing if you could encourage your readers to talk to their own elected representatives in Olympia and pressure them to pass this bill. There are activists all over the state, including Spokane, who are already involved in this effort. The beauty of this method of changing the law of the land is that it bypasses the Beltway bubble. Local legislators are more responsive to their base. I suspect you might already be aware of this bill, this movement. Please help it happen by asking your readers to contact the state legislators who represent their districts. Stay strong girl. KATHERINE SHELLORNE Spokane, Wash.

Reactions to a blog post reporting that bills sent by Spokane police to all three presidential campaigns that made stops in Spokane last year (with Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders and Bill Clinton) remain unpaid:

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LANDON JOHNSTON: Next time tell them they’re not welcome. 

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A

ll eyes are on the presidential inauguration. A single presidential tweet can capture the heart or chill the bones of the entire nation. But even as attention, debate, and protest continues to center on national politics, the state legislature remains the place where many of the policies emerge that dramatically impact our lives. And Donald Trump won’t change that. Once again, the Washington State Legislature is overshadowed by McCleary, the state Supreme Court case concluding that the state had unconstitutionally underfunded basic education. This time, the debate over what to do about it has started to move from theory and philosophy to cold, hard numbers. So let’s check in with our governor and a few of our local legislators to find out their goals.

THE DEMOCRATS

GOV. JAY INSLEE: (FINALLY) FUND EDUCATION “Our state’s founders chose education as our paramount duty. Not roads or railroads. Not jails,” the governor said in his inaugural address this year. “They chose schools. So should we.” Before the election, Inslee was clear that he thought new revenue was needed to fund education, but he’d been famously unclear about where the new revenue would come from, other than closing a few unpopular tax loopholes. But after he won re-election, that clarity came quickly: A slew of tax increases, from capital gains taxes to carbon taxes to B&O taxes. His budget, however, also proposes reducing property taxes for 75 percent of individuals and businesses. SEN. ANDY BILLIG (3RD DISTRICT): UNTANGLE THE McCLEARY MESS AND SLOW DOWN OIL TRAINS Billig was on the education task force that spent months trying to solve McCleary, only to come to a stalemate. There’s a secret. It’s not so much that education is underfunded — though in some areas, like special education, Billig says it clearly is. It’s that the funding for basic education is happening at the local level, through levies, instead of at the state level, as the state constitution calls for. Democrats on the committee actually came up with a plan — different than the governor’s — to decrease class sizes, increase teacher salaries, and shift the burden away from local governments. Yes, it

POLITICS

The Other Washington Our local state representatives and senators gear up for another year of fights over education, taxes and crime BY DANIEL WALTERS

would cost $7.3 billion through 2021. But it was actually a specific plan. “Unfortunately, only the Democrats on the committee came up with recommendations,” Billig says. The Republicans didn’t offer anything other than a vague list of “guiding principles,” making negotiations impossible. Meanwhile, Billig is also pushing a bill that would allow individual cities or a state commission to reduce the speed limit on trains with dangerous cargo — like explosive oil. “I believe it’s compatible with federal law, and most importantly it’s essential to the safety of people in Spokane,” Billig says. “The magnitude of damage done for high speed versus the low speed is significantly different. A slow speed gives a train and engineers more reaction time to slow and stop the train if they’ve seen the hazard.” And that, Billig believes, could save lives. REP. MARCUS RICCELLI (3RD DISTRICT): NAME A HIGHWAY, TRACK CHILD FITNESS, AND ADDRESS INCOME DISCRIMINATION FOR RENTERS Riccelli has already pushed a bill to name Highway 395 after former U.S. Speaker of the House Tom Foley. He’s also introduced a bill to require school districts — already required to mandate 100 minutes of physical education a week in grades K-8 — to actually report details on how they’re doing it back to the state. But perhaps the heaviest lift is a tweak to laws regarding low-income housing. “I’ll be bringing forward a bill for anti-discrimination for income source,” Riccelli says. Some landlords require tenants to pay three months of rent up front — making it impossible for those who rely on monthly housing vouchers or unemployment checks to make rent. “Some folks are making judgments about folks because they’re on subsidized housing or unemployment,” Riccelli says. He wants to work with Republicans and the Washington Landlord Association to find a solution. REP. TIMM ORMSBY (3RD DISTRICT): FUND EDUCATION WITHOUT CUTTING SOCIAL SERVICES Ormsby has generally been slightly to the left of other Eastern Washington Democrats. So when he examines the state’s education funding crisis, he wants to make absolutely sure that the solution doesn’t mean slicing away at other important gov...continued on next page


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ernment functions. “We have moral obligations to maintain the safety net,” Ormsby says. “We’re not going to rob Peter to educate Paul. We are not going to decimate our social safety net structure, just to meet that one constitutional requirement.” He’s also looking at introducing a bill that would establish clear guidelines for exactly how much workers on public work projects should be paid. “Government should not use government resources to drive down the wages of taxpayers,” Ormsby says.

THE REPUBLICANS

SEN. MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER (6TH DISTRICT): CONTINUE TO FUND THE WSU MEDICAL SCHOOL AND PROTECT HIGHER EDUCATION “My goals are to fund the [new Washington State University] medical school and make sure we can protect higher education,” Baumgartner says. This week, he says he also plans to introduce

statewide “ban the box” legislation. “Banning the box” generally prevents most employers from immediately asking about criminal history on the first step of a job application — thereby making it easier for felons to find work and become productive members of society. REP. MIKE VOLZ (6TH DISTRICT): STOP TAX INCREASES AND HELP TREASURERS WORK TOGETHER The freshman Republican legislator landed on the Appropriations and Education committees, the two committees most involved with addressing education funding, which Volz calls the “800-pound gorilla in the room.” But he’s wary of the governor’s slate of proposed tax increases. “It appears there’s an appetite for tax increases,” Volz says in an email. “Many of these tax proposals stifle business growth.” Volz, who was Spokane County’s chief deputy treasurer, also says he plans to push bills to make it easier for county treasurers to partner

NEWS | IDAHO

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Lawmakers could consider expanding the state Tax Reimbursement Incentive program credited with generating an estimated 5,200 new jobs since it began in 2014. The program includes tax breaks for businesses that promise to create a specific number of jobs. Incentives have been awarded to 33 businesses throughout the state so far, bolstering growth in urban and rural areas. For smaller communities in North Idaho, such as Sandpoint, the incentive has already had an impact. Two Sandpoint companies to benefit from the tax reimbursements, Quest Aircraft and Kochava, agreed to bring in a total of nearly 400 jobs. The incentive has drawn criticism from existing businesses who complain that offering tax breaks to new businesses gives their competition an unfair advantage. Likewise, small businesses complain that the program’s requirement to generate a certain number of new jobs in order to qualify unfairly benefits large companies. Companies in larger cities must create 50 jobs, while those in rural areas must create 20. Idaho Department of Commerce Director Megan Ronk is considering proposing legislation that would expand the program for projects that create 10 high-paying jobs in smaller communities, according to the Spokesman-Review. Speaking to legislators earlier this month, Ronk said she expects about $2.3 billion in new wages coming to Idaho workers, and about $257 million in

direct revenue to the state, in exchange for $60 million in tax credits.

GOV. BUTCH OTTER AND CBD OIL

Cannabidiol oil, it appears, will remain illegal in Idaho despite the fact that all six states bordering Idaho have allowed it. Gov. Butch Otter vetoed a bill in 2015 that would have allowed cannabidiol, or CBD, oil often used as treatment for those who suffer from debilitating neurological disorders. The legislature could propose another bill this year, but OtIdaho Gov. Butch Otter ter says he hasn’t changed his mind on the issue. The three-term Republican remains the only governor in the country to have vetoed such legislation. Otter told reporters earlier this month that he wants to avoid the potential disaster he associates with medical and recreational marijuana. CBD oil, however, produces none of the psychoactive effects of marijuana, and has been shown to be an effective treatment for those who suffer from uncontrollable seizures. In vetoing the bill, Otter did, however, approved a limited “experimental” program


together. “Part of our job in Olympia is to make government more efficient and effective,” Volz says. “It would save money, be more efficient and just makes sense for certain, neighboring counties throughout our state.” SEN. MIKE PADDEN (4TH DISTRICT): INCREASE PUNISHMENT FOR REPEAT DRUNK DRIVERS AND PROPERTY CRIME OFFENDERS Padden, a former judge, heads up the Senate Law and Justice Committee. On five different occasions, he’s pushed a bill to make getting a fourth DUI a felony in Washington. “We have the weakest felony DUI law in the country,” Padden says. This year, he plans to push that bill again, and hopes that it doesn’t die in the House. He’ll also try to tackle Spokane’s serious property crime problem by increasing sentences on repeat property crime offenders who show little sign of reforming. He says he’s also supportive of a proposed pilot project to increase supervision — currently essentially nonexistent — for some property crime offenders in Spokane. “It’s still no guarantee, with all the demands on money,” he says. “[But] I doubt anybody is going to object to the policy.”  danielw@inlander.com

that allows a small number of children with treatment-resistant epilepsy to legally take oil extracted from the cannabis plant. The experiment has produced “sufficient relief in many cases,” he says. “I simply didn’t want to open that whole area of potential disaster,” Otter says.

LOSER-PAYS COURT SYSTEM

The Idaho Supreme Court recently ruled that if you sue someone and lose in the state of Idaho, you could be left paying their attorney’s fees. The court issued a ruling bolstering the state’s law known as “loser pays,” which gives lower courts much wider and undefined discretion in ordering the losing side to pay up “when justice so requires.” Justice Roger Burdick, in his dissent, writes: “I believe that the majority’s analysis will further inhibit access to justice and tilt the table even further toward moneyed interests in our courts.” The court’s ruling won’t officially take effect until March of this year, the Supreme Court decided, which gives the legislature a chance to enact a new law.

KICKED OFF WITH CONTROVERSY

Not even a week into this year’s legislative session, Rep. Heather Scott (R-Blanchard) was already stirring the pot. The ultra-conservative representative, who campaigned holding a Confederate flag, was removed from all of her committee assignments just three days after the start of the 2017 session after publicly suggesting that women in the legislature must trade sex for power. “I said legislators shouldn’t have to sleep around or spread their legs to advance,” Scott told KBOI Radio host Nate Shelman last week. “That’s the appearance from the outside.” Scott’s original comment referred to at least one alleged affair between a current member of the House and a divorced state senator and the marriage of two other House members last month. In an unusual move, House Speaker Scott Bedke (R-Oakley) removed Scott from her three committee assignments. That means Scott can still participate in House-wide votes, but is barred from the nitty-gritty committee work where bills are initially considered and voted on. Five House members have since requested to be removed from their committee assignments, in solidarity with Scott. But Bedke refused. Scott is part of a libertarian caucus focused on “lower taxes,” “less government” and “more transparency.”  mitchr@inlander.com

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The scene in Spokane during a Donald Trump campaign stop in May.

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POLITICS $100,000 is enough to pay the base salaries for two entry-level police officers. But last year, the Spokane Police Department spent more than that in overtime costs to help provide security for three presidential campaigns that held RALLIES in Spokane. Bill Clinton’s appearance on behalf of Hillary Clinton cost the city $2,793.28. Bernie Sanders’ multiple rallies cost $33,318.73. And Donald Trump? A whopping $65,124.69. In June, the Spokesman-Review reported that the Spokane Police Department billed all three candidates who held major rallies in Spokane, asking for reimbursement. But ultimately the Clinton, Sanders and Trump campaigns didn’t pay back a dime. Police spokeswoman Michele Anderson says that as far as the police department knows, none of the campaigns even responded. (DANIEL WALTERS)

PUBLIC HEALTH Spokane is in the middle of a mumps outbreak that just keeps getting worse. As of press time, 44 people in Spokane had mumps, according to the Spokane Regional Health District. But anti-vaxxers are questioning why 27 of those people with mumps actually had the MMR vaccine, wondering why the vaccine isn’t protecting those people. Well, it turns out, there’s an easy explanation. The vaccine is around 88 percent effective, for starters. And the reason there are more vaccinated people with mumps than unvaccinated people with mumps is because there are simply more vaccinated people in the population. That doesn’t change the fact the people are more likely to get mumps if they weren’t vaccinated. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

16 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

POLICE A man who confronted an officer with a knife and then led police on a foot chase on the lower South Hill was SHOT AND KILLED early Sunday morning. Neither the name of the Spokane police officer who fired the fatal shots nor the deceased man had been released as of press time Tuesday afternoon. Few details are yet available, but Spokane police say several officers surrounded the man at Fifth and Walnut and fired Tasers, which were ineffective. One officer fired, striking the man, who was pronounced dead at the scene. Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl told reporters Sunday that officers were wearing body cameras during the incident, but the footage had not yet been reviewed. The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the shooting. (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

CMR and MLK Congresswoman among community leaders responding to post-election racial slurs; plus, remembering Judge Sam Cozza BOOS, PRAISE FOR McMORRIS RODGERS

Remember the days when angry conservatives yelled at their representatives regarding Obamacare at town hall meetings? Now that the GOP is preparing to repeal Barack Obama’s health care reform, it’s Republican representatives facing disruption. U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ Martin Luther King Jr. Day speech Monday was interrupted by boos and chants of “liar” and calls for her to “save health care.” But McMorris Rodgers’ MLK Day was also defined by the first meeting of a group formed to respond to the racial slurs that had been written on the MLK Jr. Family Outreach Center and in the Logan neighborhood shortly after the election. Spokane NAACP President Phil Tyler says he received a personal phone call from McMorris Rodgers. “I was stunned, quite frankly,” Tyler says. “She called me and said she was outraged and appalled by it. She wanted to do something for the community, to say this is not who we are in Spokane.” As a result, Tyler asked McMorris Rodgers to join a group of around 15 community leaders, including Mayor David Condon, Life Center pastor Joe Wittwer, Black Lens publisher Sandy Williams, and Spokane’s police chief and sheriff for a “collaborative listening session.” The goal, Tyler says, was about finding common ground, even amid political differences. Tyler says he appreciates McMorris Rodgers keeping her promise to meet with him, and says the group will continue meeting to address poverty, racism and divisiveness within the community. He recognizes how tricky this can be, as minority groups like the NAACP have condemned the GOP leaders for their support of President Donald Trump’s agenda. “This is probably going to be one of the greatest challenges of my young leadership tenure,” Tyler says. (DANIEL WALTERS)

‘JUST CALL ME SAM’

Spokane Superior Court Judge Sam Cozza spent more than a year as the family law judge while one of his best friends, Art Hayashi, was a deputy prosecutor handling family law cases. During that time, Hayashi appeared in front of Cozza regularly. Not once, Hayashi says, did anyone challenge Cozza’s rulings on those cases. “I think that’s a strong testament to the faith that the bar had in him,” Hayashi says. “Even having his best friend in front of him didn’t affect his decisions or how he would rule.” Cozza, who most recently served as the presiding judge in Superior Court, died Saturday, Jan. 14. The 61-year-old suffered a heart attack last year and never fully recovered. Cozza is described by those in the legal community as a fair and balanced judge, who showed respect for every lawyer, victim and defendant who appeared in front of him. “Sam was a very caring, thoughtful individual,” says Jim Murphy, a retired Spokane Superior Court judge who spent time on the bench with Cozza. “He was impacted by the cases before him, expressing empathy for those he dealt with and sympathy for victims.” “He was truly a humble servant,” adds his widow, Megan Cozza. “He was unfailingly kind and always made you feel important.” People would approach him while they were out in the community, she says, and say “Hello, your honor.” Cozza would respond: “Oh, just call me Sam.” (MITCH RYALS)

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Whitworth students march to the university president’s office with a petition to declare the school a “sanctuary campus.”

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As local college students follow the national trend to demand “sanctuary” campuses, college officials are trying to determine exactly what that means BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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or a college campus in 2017, there was nothing particularly unusual about what happened at Whitworth University last Friday afternoon. There were 50 students marching toward the president’s office with a petition to make the college a sanctuary campus. There were a couple of counterprotesting Trump supporters dressed from head to toe in American flag apparel. And there was a college president, Beck Taylor, prepared to take on the challenge. “I wasn’t aware you were going to be here today,” Taylor told the students in his office. “Although I was expecting this at some point.” College students all over the country have been demanding that their schools be declared sanctuary campuses. They want to be assured that law enforcement will not be allowed onto school grounds to detain undocumented immigrants, and that the private information of these students won’t be shared without a warrant. Many undocumented students have been granted a temporary reprieve from the threat of deportation under Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, but students worry that President Donald Trump’s immigration policy will change that policy. It has spurred college students into action. “We felt like Whitworth needed to reinforce its values and protect a community that’s very much in fear,” says Catalina Corvalan, a Whitworth freshman who helped organize the march on Friday. For colleges, it’s not that easy. Schools want to protect their students, but actually declaring themselves “sanctuary campuses” could have unintended consequences, such as a potential loss of federal funding. Harvard University decided not to declare itself a sanctuary campus, with its president, Drew Faust, arguing that it might actually endanger students rather than protect them. Eastern Washington University’s board

of trustees declined to declare EWU a sanctuary campus last fall, but did reaffirm “its commitment to protecting the safety, security, and well-being of its students and staff, regardless of their immigration status, within the limits of the law.” Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies for the self-proclaimed “lowimmigration, pro-immigrant” Center for Immigration Studies, says that becoming a sanctuary campus wouldn’t actually help undocumented students in the Whitworth President Beck Taylor first place. “A lot of these declarations are purely symbolic, and do not do much more than declare that the campus is welcoming to all its students,” Vaughan says.

W

ith more than 1,000 signatures, including some from faculty and staff, it took more than a dozen Whitworth students to carry the giant petition across campus on Friday. The petition called for three things: A public statement declaring Whitworth a sanctuary campus, guaranteed privacy regarding immigration status, and a notification to local law enforcement that they cannot execute immigration enforcement operations on campus. “It’s important that Whitworth affirms that in no way, shape or form will deportation or apprehension operations ever occur on campus,” says Whitworth junior Kamau Chege. Chege, Corvalan and other Whitworth


students who delivered the petition are part of a local advocacy group called the Spokane Dream Project. Taylor, Whitworth’s president, said he stood in solidarity with the group of students and agreed to meet with them to work out the most appropriate response to the petition. He read a letter that he sent that day to U.S. Sens. Dick Durbin and Lindsey Graham in support of a proposed bill to protect the 750,000 DACA recipients. “I have tried to, at every turn, express my support for undocumented students, and I continue to do so,” Taylor said. But he did not give any indication as to how the school would respond to the student requests. Instead, he told the student leaders he was “on their side” but wants to gain a deeper understanding of the issue before making a decision, according to student Sara Trujillo. Across the country, this isn’t something that only students want. Many faculty members support the idea as well. Washington State University’s faculty senate discussed a proposal last week that would make WSU a sanctuary from “unfair deportations and intimidation.” Faculty Senate Chair A.G. Rud says he, personally, is interested in giving support to undocumented students in any way he can. He noted that WSU President Kirk Schulz wrote a letter to the campus late last year ensuring that the campus was open and hospitable to all students, though it did not use the word “sanctuary.” “I think the word ‘sanctuary’ is something that people are unclear what that exactly means,” Rud says.

“I have tried to, at every turn, express my support for undocumented students, and I continue to do so.”

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t’s exceedingly rare for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to raid a school. But if there ever were a scenario where ICE needed to do that, a sanctuary campus couldn’t stop them, says Vaughan, with the Center for Immigration Studies. If there was a threat to national security on campus, she argues, it wouldn’t make sense for a college or university to get in the way of that because of a blanket policy protecting undocumented students. “In the case of most of the colleges and universities looking at this, the administrators are just trying to pacify the faculty and the students that demand this, knowing full well that they cannot really prevent enforcement from happening, and probably wouldn’t want to, because of public safety implications and financial implications for the schools,” Vaughan says. Furthermore, they could be risking federal money. Trump promised to pull federal funding from sanctuary cities that made statements similar to what colleges are declaring. While that would require approval from Congress, it’s feasible to imagine that could impact sanctuary campuses as well, Vaughan says. But Jessica Hanson, with the immigration advocacy group National Immigration Law Center, says people can get the wrong impression when they hear the word “sanctuary,” mistaking it for “harboring” people. Hanson says what students are asking for is already practiced in many cases. Federal privacy laws already limit information colleges can share, and most campus police don’t ask about a student’s immigration status. “Colleges are not creating a new law by saying they’re not going to let [ICE] raids happen,” Hanson says. She says it’s still important to reinforce those laws for campus staff and police. Laying that out in a specific policy, she says, can be helpful for undocumented students who didn’t have to worry as much about potentially being deported in the past several years. “Even the thought that this could potentially change in the future,” Hanson says, “is something that is getting people energized.”  wilsonc@inlander.com

1 800 523-2464 CDACASINO.COM JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 19


Golden Boy The day few people predicted is nigh: Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as president of these United States of America on Friday, at 9 am PST. Even Trump aides have assured concerned Americans not to take his statements literally, so it’s impossible to predict with certainty what will happen next with Trump. Will Russia be unmasked as the ultimate puppetmaster? Will Trump secure health “insurance for everybody,” as he promised last week? Or will VP Mike Pence take over when the Donald holes up in Trump Tower? Stay tuned to find out!

20 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017


Rich Man, Poor Men Can the wealthiest U.S. president ever help the poorest U.S. citizens? BY DANIEL WALTERS

D

onald Trump is a very rich man, one who was born to a very rich father and lives in a tower of riches where the furniture is gilded in gold. And yet, he ran a campaign that managed to leverage the fears of the not-so-rich — about job loss, about the dying manufacturing sector, about corrupt elites who rigged the financial system. Somehow, it worked, as Trump managed to best Hillary Clinton in rust-belt states that Republicans had long thought lost to Democrats. But now that he’s been elected, this very rich man — who has assembled the wealthiest Cabinet in American history — will have a profound impact on the poorest. And there lies the uncertainty. Trump neither ran with George W. Bush’s rhetoric of “compassionate conservative,” nor with Mitt Romney’s rhetoric of “takers vs. makers.” Instead, his shoot-from-the-hip populist rhetoric often flatly contradicted the policies proclaimed by his team of more traditional conservatives. So it’s unclear exactly which Trump will take office: Trump the populist or Trump the Republican. For the poor, the homeless, and the sick, the difference is crucial.

THE 1 PERCENT

When Stephanie Cates, chair of the Spokane County GOP, considers the impact of Trump’s policies on Spokane’s low-income residents, she sees, well, hope and change. “He knows how to grow the economy and grow jobs,” Cates says. “When you do that, it will benefit the poor and the low income and the nonprofits that serve them.” Cates looks at Trump’s promises to hack away at regulations and believes that doing so will create an economic surge that will lift more boats. If businesses and employees have more money, she believes, they’ll be able to donate more to nonprofits to help the poor. Many of those involved with local nonprofits in Spokane don’t share that kind of optimism. In particular, they zero in on a campaign promise: Trump promises a huge tax cut, one disproportionately advantageous to the very wealthy. To help start paying for it, he proposes to cut 1 percent of the non-defense discretionary budget every year. “That’s definitely a primary fear,” says Kay Murano, executive director of the Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium. Of course, nobody knows exactly which programs would be cut. But Murano looks at federal funding for programs that provide rental assistance, or help cities build low-income housing, and worries about the consequences. “Nobody’s rents are going down by 1 percent a year,” Murano says. “Instead, we’re cutting the revenue available.” The choice to tap neurosurgeon Ben Carson

— who explicitly said last month that he was not qualified to lead a federal agency — to lead the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development did not inspire confidence. HUD is the agency that provides cities and nonprofits with funding to help address homelessness. “What knowledge does he need to have?” Murano wonders. “What is going to be overlooked? When are cuts going to be made?” Her one hope is that low-income housing might be included in Trump’s proposed infrastructure package. Then there are the bevy of other possible programs that Republicans have proposed cutting for being inefficient, from Medicaid to food stamps to college loan subsidies. Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s “Better Way” poverty-fighting plan proposes to concentrate on getting those in poverty back to work — increasing both job training and work requirements. Critics worry that his plan would privatize Medicare and shunt more tax revenue from the poor to the rich.

“How do you prioritize whether to keep the heat on or feed yourself?” Julie Honekamp is CEO of Spokane Neighborhood Action Partners, a nonprofit that works on everything from heating assistance to financial education. She says SNAP is budgeting more conservatively this year, anticipating a possible reduction in federal spending. Even if spending cuts target just one area of the social safety net, it can put a strain on all the other areas. “There’s a ripple effect. When there are less food subsidies, you can’t pay the rent or the power bill or put gas in the tank,” Honekamp says. “How do you prioritize whether to keep the heat on or feed yourself or pay for your meds?” That last one is a big one, because it has to do with Obama’s biggest domestic legacy.

CAMPAIGN PROMISE

By February of last year, Republicans in the House of Representatives had tried to repeal all or part of President Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act — Obamacare — 63 times. Now, nobody is standing in their way. “The ‘Unaffordable’ Care Act will soon be

history!” Trump enthused on Twitter last Friday. For six years, Republicans lambasted the mandate that all people buy health insurance or be fined. They pointed to rising premiums and insurance companies dropping out of national exchanges as proof that the law was failing. “Most of us who had a good health plan felt like we were lied to, that we weren’t able to keep our doctors,” Cates says. But Bob Crittenden, special assistant for health reform to Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, sends over all sorts of charts and stats that make the prospect of repealing Obamacare — especially by getting rid of taxes on the wealthy — look like an absolute disaster for a low-income people in Washington. “The Inland Northwest has benefited the most from the Affordable Care Act,” Crittenden says. “In [U.S. Rep.] Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ district, there are close to 80,000 people who have gotten coverage.” Before Obamacare, sick people often couldn’t get insurance because of their preexisting conditions. Crittenden predicts that the uninsured rate in Washington will more than double if it’s repealed. Before Obamacare, the sick could be denied coverage for pre-existing conditions. Washingtonians, much less lowincome state residents, couldn’t even buy insurance that covered pharmacies on the individual market. Crittenden even has charts showing that the growth of premiums has actually slowed in Washington since the act was adopted. Crittenden worries that could all be lost. McMorris Rodgers has promised that these sorts of fears are misplaced, and the Republican replacement will be better. “No one who has coverage because of Obamacare today will lose that coverage,” McMorris Rodgers says. “We aren’t going to pull the rug out from anyone.” But, as Crittenden knows, Washington state history provides a cautionary tale. In 1993, the state tried a very similar plan to Obamacare. But when the backlash to the law allowed Republicans to seize control of the legislature two years later, they nixed the mandate to buy insurance. Without enough healthy patients in the market, the system completely collapsed. “We didn’t have any individual market for a few years,” Crittenden says. Ultimately, that sort of risk — and the ensuing anger from voters — may be the one thing that stops Trump from fulfilling certain campaign promises. After all, he’s made other campaign promises as well. Earlier this month, Sen. Bernie Sanders printed out a giant Trump tweet and brought it to the floor. “I was the first & only potential GOP candidate to state there will be no cuts to Social Security, Medicare & Medicaid,” Trump tweeted in May of 2015. “Huckabee copied me.”  danielw@inlander.com

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 21


OPPOSITION

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

FROM LEFT: Filmmaker Michael Moore, Washington Sen. Patty Murray, local activists Taylor Weech and Liz Moore.

La Résistance Michael Moore, Congressional Democrats and local progressives: How they are resisting Donald Trump's agenda BY MITCH RYALS

M

ichael Moore knew that this was going to happen. Last July, the filmmaker and activist predicted that Donald Trump was going to be the next leader of the free world, and he was right. Since the election, Moore has announced “100 Days of Resistance,” beginning the day after the inauguration with the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. “We have to throw everything at this,” Moore said earlier this month on MSNBC’s The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell. “This man is slightly unhinged, if I can say that. And he’s a malignant narcissist. He cares very much about what people think of him, he wants to be the popular guy, and he’s going to be very upset if there’s a lot of people there.” Beyond the march (there’s a Spokane/North Idaho march set for the same day, starting at the Spokane Convention Center), political commentator and former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich has an agenda for the first 100 days of resistance on his website. The list includes efforts to boycott Trump’s brand (hotels, stores, merchandise), donate to opposition groups (ACLU, Southern Poverty Law Center, MoveOn, Economic Policy Institute, etc.), engage independents and Trump supporters, and call senators and representatives, expressing disapproval of Trump’s cabinet nominees and campaign promises.

PROTECT AMERICAN FAMILIES

Sen. Patty Murray (and other U.S. Senate Democrats) introduced a bill that would (and we can’t believe we’re saying this) block a federal registry based on religion, ethnicity, race, age, gender, national origin, nationality or citizenship. Murray, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Education Committee, also called to postpone the confirmation hearing for Betsy DeVos, Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education. Murray’s demand came after the Office of Government Ethics said it had not yet completed its review of DeVos’ financial disclosures (she’s a billionaire) and ethics review.

22 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

6TH DISTRICT DEMOCRATS

Mary Wissink, chair of the Democratic Party in the 6th Legislative District, has been inundated with emails and phone calls since the election. On the other end of those communications are people who listened to Trump talk about repealing the Affordable Care Act, brag about groping women without their consent and propose a ban on people coming into the country based on religion. People want to know how they can get involved, how they can help, how they can resist. In response, Wissink says, she’s looking to launch a local version of the effort known as “Indivisible,” a nationwide grassroots movement to resist the Trump agenda. Former congressional staffers have assembled a step-bystep guide for how to make current members of Congress listen to their constituents’ concerns. The guide is modeled after the small but powerful influence of the conservative Tea Party, according to the group’s website. “I’ve never had so many people call me asking what they can do, how they can get involved,” Wissink says. “They want to be part of the change and hold Trump accountable. People are really scared of what’s going to happen.” Wissink says the group’s first meeting will be March 7, from 6 to 8 pm, at the Shadle branch of the Spokane Public Library.

ACLU: READY AND WAITING

Immediately after Trump was elected president, the American Civil Liberties Union planted its flag firmly in the “we’re watching you” camp. The nonprofit legal organization called several of Trump’s campaign promises “un-American,” “wrongheaded” “unlawful” and “unconstitutional.” It vowed to file lawsuits challenging actions that violate basic human rights. Since November, the ACLU has gained at least $7.2 million in donations and tens of thousands of new members in Washington and nationwide. As its attorneys wait to see how Trump’s administration will

LOUD AND CLEAR

Local organizers of the Women’s March on Spokane are expecting a huge turnout on Saturday as they (peacefully) demand protection of women’s rights and make their voices heard. The local event is one of 300 “sister marches” to the Women’s March on Washington, and at least 500,000 people are expected to participate in all 50 states and 55 international cities, bringing attention to sexual assault, reproductive rights, workplace discrimination and more. Celebrities including America Ferrera, Cher and Scarlett Johansson will either attend the march or show solidarity in another way. Spokane’s march begins with a rally at 11 am, featuring speakers from human rights, justice, and women’s advocacy groups, and musical entertainment at the Spokane Convention Center. The march follows at 1 pm. It’ll be chilly, so don’t forget your “Nasty Woman” sweaters and the “pussy hats” you’ve been knitting. There’s a volunteer fair right afterward, ending around 3 pm. Though national and local organizers cite the election rhetoric that “insulted, demonized, and threatened” women as a catalyst for the worldwide march, D.C. organizer Fontaine Pearson points out that “this march is not a protest against Trump or the legitimacy of the election,” but a positive, forward-looking movement that people of all genders, races, religions and sexual orientations can support. — RAVEN HAYNES


HUMOR impact civil liberties, the organization is already taking action in the form of “Know Your Rights” presentations, says ACLU of Washington spokesman Doug Honig. “We’re starting to give workshops on free speech and protest rights,” he says, adding that the organization is working on printing up wallet-sized cards explaining free speech and protest rights, similar to the ones about interacting with police.

AFTER THE MARCH

Following the Women’s March in Spokane, organizers for the Peace and Justice Action League are planning a eventful day. Their event — People Rise Up! A Community Invitation to Action (Jan. 21 from 2-5 pm at the Community Building, 35 W. Main) — will feature an “Action Bar” with postcards, petitions and contact information for local elected officials. The postcards are intended for Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, both Democrats, to encourage their efforts to actively oppose Trump’s agenda, says PJALS director Liz Moore. The petitions are for local elected officials, encouraging them to support immigrant communities, especially considering the upcoming vote on Initiative 2015-1 in the city of Spokane. The initiative, on the ballot this coming November, would erase language from city law that prohibits Spokane police, and any other city employees, from asking people about their immigration status. The initiative also seeks to remove the provision that prevents SPD from detaining an individual based solely on their immigration status. “So someone walking into City Hall to pay bills or get a permit could be harassed because they seem like they don’t belong,” Moore says. The contact sheets are meant to encourage people to call the state legislature hotline. No call to action opposing Trump would be complete without a “tweet table.” If you don’t have an account, PJALS will help you create one. Or they’ll let you tweet from their account. “The whole idea is that we have to move into motion now,” Moore says. The event will also feature speakers, and a kids table with supplies to make costumes, coloring sheets of famous peacemaking figures, and a screening of the 1992 movie FernGully: The Last Rainforest.

LOVE AND OUTRAGE

Spokane is no exception to the rule that art flourishes in times of turmoil. That notion is perhaps most apparent in the Love and Outrage Collective — a group dedicated to amplifying local voices on issues from police misconduct to gender equality and, most recently, government and accountability. The idea is to provide an outlet for creative types to express their frustration in ways other than marching, rallying or showing up for protests. The group, founded by local activist Taylor Weech, publishes a quarterly zine with poetry and prose from local writers. They host a reading at Boots Bakery & Lounge ahead of each issue. The Government Issue is slated to be released later this month, with a reading scheduled at Boots (24 W. Main) on Jan. 27 at 6:30 pm. Writing not your thing? Love and Outrage has also started a choir that performs in public. Look them up on Facebook (Love & Outrage) or email loveandoutrage@ gmail.com to get involved. “A lot of people feel like now is the time to express what they’ve been feeling for a long time, but also want to do something fun,” Weech says. “It feeds them. It can be really draining to be only fighting all the time.” n

Bemused detachment (and a Meryl flick) might be good ways to survive Inauguration Day.

Must-See TV? Alternatives to the inauguration (and how to make watching more fun if you have to) BY DAN NAILEN

S

ome will be thrilled to tune in to the country’s handoff of power between Obama and Trump, elated by our new president’s potential. Some will hate-watch like it’s a new Kardashians series, thumbs at the ready for pithy Twitter salvos. And some will try to come up with something — anything — else to do. I briefly considered getting a second vasectomy during the ceremony, just to take my mind off the horror. Some options for what might be the first day of the end of the American Empire:

1.

Turn the underwhelming musical lineup into a trivia game for your friends! • Jackie Evancho — classical-pop singer or Sopranos hitman? • Which one is Big, and which one is Rich? • Not counting the woman who quit rather than perform at the inauguration after comparing singing for Trump to “throwing roses to Hitler,” how many people are in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir?

2.

Start a Super Bowl-style betting pool on whether Joanie loves Chachi enough to join him at an inaugural ball.

3.

Drink your way through, preferably with a few “Nyet My President” cocktails as described on Twitter by @sippey: a White Russian served beneath a

thin orange skin and fake gold-leaf garnish.

4.

One of the inauguration’s planners suggested it would have a “soft sensuality.” Test whether that’s true by simulcasting Trump’s speech with any Cinemax After Dark feature. If it syncs up perfectly, à la The Wizard of Oz and Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, you’ve reached true soft sensuality.

5.

Watch one of Meryl Streep’s flicks. She stars in the 2004 reimagining of The Manchurian Candidate, but that might be a little traumatic given our new president’s puppet-like bouncing on Putin’s strings.

6. fany?

Turn viewing the inauguration into your own Where’s Waldo? with the Trump kids: Where’s Tif-

7.

Read George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and contemplate how the coming years maybe (hopefully? possibly?) won’t be similar to novel’s dystopian vision. Do it before reading is considered thoughtcrime.

8.

Host a screening of the 1983 TV movie The Day After, in which a Russia/U.S. showdown over contested European real estate escalates into nuclear warfare. Seems ripe for a timely remake, and Steve Guttenberg is probably very available for reprising his role. If he’s not playing wingman for Chachi in D.C. n

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 23


THE SPECTACLE

The Radio City Rockettes salute our next commander in chief.

RADIO CITY ENTERTAINMENT PHOTO

Viewers' Guide The inauguration that hopes to Trump them all

I

t’s here, it’s real, it’s happening: Donald J. Trump is set to be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States of America. Here is your guide to the huge day. When: Trump is scheduled to take the oath on Friday, Jan. 20, at 9 am PST; tune in a couple of hours earlier for commentary and performances. Where: West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol. The Magic Words: “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.” With these 35 words, Trump is officially president No. 45. (Note: Mike Pence will be sworn in as VP shortly before Trump; don’t miss it.) Watch Out For: Trump said he didn’t want any “A-list celebrities” at his inauguration, and his wish will be granted. Though numerous performers were namedropped by the Trump transition team — Andrea Bocelli, Garth Brooks, Cèline Dion and KISS — all ultimately declined. There was the vehement “Incorrect. He will NOT be performing.” from Elton John’s publicist, after a Trump transition team member said he’d appear, and Levels of Dissent

BY RAVEN HAYNES

some celebs just didn’t want to face the backlash. Regardless, the show goes on, and it will feature: The Mormon Tabernacle Choir* in what you may call tradition, this being its sixth presidential inauguration appearance. Its 360 members have previously sung for Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, both Bushes (sorry, Jeb), and Ronald Reagan, who dubbed them “America’s Choir.” The Radio City Rockettes**, the iconic, eye-high-kicking female dance troupe, will bring lots of synchronization, old-fashioned glamour and cool ballet-tap-jazz dancing. “The Star-Spangled Banner” will be sung by 16-year-old soprano Jackie Evancho*** of America’s Got Talent. Evancho, who has performed for both President Obama and Trump multiple times in the past few years, will close the ceremony. Crowds: 800,000 people are projected to fill the streets surrounding the U.S. Capitol for the big event. By comparison, a record 1.8 million people packed the National Mall in 2009 to watch Obama’s first swearingin; before that, Lyndon B. Johnson held the title with 1.2 million in 1965. Trump’s numbers are looking more like Bill Clinton’s at the moment, but higher than George W. Bush’s peak 400,000 attendees. (There’s also the question

of whether that 800,000 figure may be padded slightly, due to the Women’s March on Washington the very next day, which may see as many as 200,000 people marching from the Lincoln Memorial to the White House.) Weather: Remember the chilly 28-degree day of Obama’s 2009 swearing-in that people still swear was “colder than you think”? That was actually one of the five coldest inaugurations in history, though attendees at Ulysses S. Grant’s 16-degree day and Ronald Reagan’s 7-degree ceremony might beg to differ. The D.C. forecast calls for temperatures in the mid-40s to low 50s when Trump takes the oath, actually putting him in the running for one of the five warmest inaugurations. Weather matters. President William Henry Harrison famously wore no coat or hat during his 1841 inaugural address, which went on for nearly two hours, and died a month later of pneumonia. ‘I Have the Best Words’: Inaugural speeches have given us “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself” (Franklin D. Roosevelt) and “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country” (John F. Kennedy). Most addresses clock in around 2,400 words. Or, in Trump terms, 90 tweets. n

* A bit: Member Jan Chamberlin quit the choir on Dec. 29 after “searching [her] soul.” ** A lot: On Dec. 22, Rockettes dancer Phoebe Pearl said online that she and others were “embarrassed and disappointed” to find they were required to perform at the inauguration, according to a union email. Their union, the American Guild of Variety Artists, later made a rare exception, allowing both half- and full-time dancers to opt out. *** None: Evancho was honored to accept. Now in the spotlight, she and her transgender sister, Juliet, are trying to keep the political out of the personal. They said they just want everyone to be accepted, whether they’re LGBTQ or singing for their country.

24 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017


ANALYSIS

The Watch List You'll learn a lot by watching some key people who could make or break Trump's presidency BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

ANGELA MERKEL

While Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump and Nigel Farage represent a new nationalist, xenophobic wave among developed nations, Angela Merkel remains among the last of the unabashedly liberal democrats. When Germany votes later this year, it will be a bellwether election. Will more nations follow America’s new direction, or will the tide start to turn?

CATHY MCMORRIS RODGERS

Our own 5th District representative was left at the altar by Trump — unceremoniously dumped as Secretary of the Interior in favor of one of his sons’ hunting buddies. That had to sting — and offer McMorris Rodgers an insight to what working with Trump will be like. The House will generally have more tolerance toward Trump’s antics than the Senate, but if you start to detect that Rodgers is creating space between herself and Trump, it could be a sign of tough sledding ahead for the new president.

DEM-TO-BE-NAMED-LATER

Look around the Democratic Party. Who will be the leader of the opposition for the Trump years? Can’t name that person? That’s because it’s not clear who will emerge. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (pictured)? Too nice. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (above)? Too far left. Both will be important voices to be sure, but they can be too easily defined as Washington insiders. It could be someone new, with fresh, pithy arguments to draw the media’s attention. Like a trade for a prospect in baseball, in two years there could be people in the starting rotation of Dem opposition we haven’t even heard of yet. And if they don’t develop new talent, the Democratic Party will struggle to take on the challenges ahead.

MIKE PENCE

British online gambling markets are taking bets that Trump won’t finish his first term. The odds are 3/2 that he will not. Add to that the fact that the 25th Amendment to the Constitution allows for a president to be removed by the consent of the vice president and a majority of his Cabinet — kind of like a quickie divorce. So watch how much leadership Pence takes on, how often his positions vary from those of his boss, and how often he is sought out by congressional leaders for answers. If for whatever reason the GOP’s quarterback does get benched, Pence had better be ready.

JOHN MCCAIN

If Congress takes its role as a check and balance on the executive branch seriously, it will come from the Senate, where support for Trump has been notably tepid. Plenty of other GOP senators who have been belittled by Trump (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio) could join in open revolt, but if things go south for the new president, watch for McCain to lead the internal opposition.

BARACK OBAMA

It’s traditional for former presidents to fade into the background — building houses for charity like Jimmy Carter, giving six-figure speeches like Bill Clinton or painting Putin’s portrait like George W. Bush. Nobody wants the last guy running around telling the new guy how it’s done. But President Obama campaigned more than perhaps any outgoing president before him — and he leaves office with a 55 percent approval rating, while Trump limps into office with a 37 percent mark, according to a recent Quinnipiac University poll. That’s as unpopular as George W. Bush was as his second term imploded; Obama was at 68 percent when he took office. Watch whether Obama chimes in on policy; he would be a powerful critic, but he could also tarnish his own legacy. America might need him to stay only semi-retired — maybe like a president emeritus.

BILL O'REILLY

Donald Trump has fully co-opted FOX News, with Sean Hannity name-checked by the candidate at a debate and Trump bullying victim Megyn Kelly fleeing for NBC. Even though he apparently just had a sexual harassment suit settled on his behalf, O’Reilly remains the big dog at FOX, and Trump simply cannot afford to lose his support. Watch to see if O’Reilly lays off the softballs and starts questioning the Trump presidency. That could mark the beginning of the end. n

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 25


CHINA help bring them together,” Inslee said. Sullivan, who advocates to the federal government on behalf of REC Silicon, says the Obama administration tried to resolve the issue, but “unfortunately we haven’t gotten there yet.” REC Silicon pursued other markets for solar panels, before ultimately cutting the 70 Moses Lake employees late last year. Hopefully, Sullivan says, Trump will share concern about the lost jobs and his administration can reach a solution. Hamilton suggests that’s unlikely. “There seems to be no sign of a resolution,” he says. “And if things get worse in terms of the relationship with China, it’s unlikely we would see that situation improve.”

W

A trade squabble with China cost 70 workers their jobs at the REC Silicon facility in Moses Lake.

REC SILICON PHOTO

Trading Places If Trump gets into a trade war with China, Washington state workers may suffer the most BY WILSON CRISCIONE

U

ntil a trade war, China used to be REC Silicon’s best customer. The facility lighting up the city of Moses Lake, producing polysilicon made into solar panels, exported 80 percent of its product to China. Then, starting in 2011, the company was caught in the middle of a years-long trade dispute. The end result was a 57 percent tariff on U.S. exports of polysilicon used in solar cells. All of those exports that used to go to China stopped, says Francine Sullivan, the company’s vice president of business development. The plant had to temporarily shut down its Moses Lake operations. By November 2016, REC Silicon announced that the trade war would cost 70 employees their good-paying jobs. Sullivan directly blames the tariffs. “If we can have those tariffs resolved, those jobs will be back,” she says. But for Washington businesses depending on trade with China, the future under President Donald Trump is uncertain. China is Washington’s largest trade partner, with more than 22 percent of Washington goods destined for China, and 21 percent of the state’s imports coming from China in 2015, according to the World Institute for Strategic Economic Research. Roughly one in three Washington jobs are tied to trade, says the Washington State Department of Commerce. So when Trump talks about getting tough on China

26 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

to cut the U.S. trade deficit and bring jobs back to America, many Washington state business owners get nervous. They fear that Chinese retaliation could begin a more widespread trade war, causing profits to dwindle and jobs to be lost — what happened to REC Silicon. “I think there’s more difficulty on the horizon than there is a possibility for good news for the state of Washington,” says Robert Hamilton, Gov. Jay Inslee’s advisor for trade policy.

T

he first sign of trouble for REC Silicon came in 2011. An Oregon solar panel maker, SolarWorld Industries, led a coalition that accused China of “dumping” solar panels in the United States for less than it cost to manufacture and ship them. The U.S. imposed tariffs on China, but China responded in 2013 by placing tariffs on polysilicon made in the U.S. That meant if Chinese producers wanted to buy from REC Silicon, they would have had to pay a 57 percent import duty. That caused REC Silicon to shut down its 400-employee Moses Lake facility for four months, starting in February 2016. Inslee pushed for a resolution. “I and my administration have been engaging with the highest levels in both [the U.S. and Chinese] governments, and directly with the industries involved, to try to

hat happened to REC Silicon is only a taste of the potential consequences should Trump follow through on his campaign promises to impose further tariffs on China and, even more drastically, declare China a currency manipulator, Hamilton says. China has, in the past, manipulated the value of the yuan downward, making American exports to China more expensive and China’s imports cheaper. But that has not been the case recently. Instead, it’s gone in the other direction. And China has already hinted at retaliation that could have a significant impact on Washington state. The Global Times newspaper, published by China’s ruling Communist Party’s People’s Daily, wrote that China will take a “tit-for-tat approach” if tariffs are imposed, including that “a batch of Boeing orders” will be “replaced by Airbus.” Local businesses say any kind of trade war with China would impact them negatively. “It’s got me nervous, yeah,” says Mike Gilmartin, coowner of Spokane-based Commercial Creamery, which makes cheese powders that are exported to Asia. Any tariffs or sanctions against China would inevitably cause the Chinese to fire back and hurt a major American industry, Gilmartin says. Mike Senske, president and CEO of Spokane-based Pearson Packaging, says he doesn’t see any barriers to trade as a good thing for his business. Pearson Packaging produces packaging equipment, exported globally. Senske says Pearson Packaging may not be impacted by a trade war with China the same way as REC Silicon was, but it would still impact the bottom line. He estimates that exports to China represent about 10 percent of his business. “Any rhetoric or saber-rattling that leads down that path does concern us,” Senske says. Pete Johnstone, owner of pea, lentil and garbanzo bean producer Spokane Seed, says that a trade war would impact his business, even though he currently doesn’t do too much business directly with China. His goal, however, is to have Chinese customers become a better partner in the future. “China, specifically, is kind of a market that you can’t ignore,” Johnstone says. To improve trade relations, the Washington Council on International Trade says the government needs to make sure it’s “just as easy for U.S. businesses to succeed in China as it is for Chinese businesses to do business here.” The council suggests enforcement of current trade policies, as well as protecting the U.S. from theft of its companies’ intellectual property. But Hamilton warns that the enforcement policies Trump has proposed could have a significant negative impact on the Washington economy. Will Trump follow through on his campaign promises? “That’s the million-dollar question,” Hamilton says. n wilsonc@inlander.com


Nigel Williams-Goss (left), Jordan Mathews (center) and Johnathan Williams are all making big waves in their first season at Gonzaga. AUSTIN ILG PHOTOS

THE NEWCOMERS Gonzaga has hit gold in the transfer market this season BY WILL MAUPIN

P

roximity to nature and a low cost of living draw plenty of people to Spokane. Basketball has also brought some highly sought talent to the Lilac City. Over the two decades that Gonzaga has been nationally relevant in college basketball, head coach Mark Few and his staff have gone to the transfer market over and over again looking for talent. That’s where, back in the early 2000s, they found Tony Skinner and J.P. Batista. As the second decade

of the millennium approached, players like Ira Brown and Marquise Carter would follow. They were players who spent their first two years at junior colleges before finding their way onto a Division I roster here in Spokane. Today’s transfers are a different breed entirely, and they’ve helped Gonzaga to an undefeated season thus far, including a convincing 79-56 win over No. 21 Saint Mary’s on Saturday night. This year, there’s no Batista, no one from Barton ...continued on next page

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 27


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Nigel Williams-Goss transfered to Gonzaga from UW. He scored 23 points against his former school back on Dec. 7. AUSTIN ILG PHOTO

“THE NEWCOMERS,” CONTINUED... County Community College in desolate Great Bend, Kansas. Rather, there’s Jordan Mathews, a Los Angeles kid with a degree from Berkeley. There’s no Ira Brown, who headed to a two-year college after spending five years bouncing around minor league baseball (including a season with the Spokane Indians). Instead, there’s a highly touted player in Nigel Williams-Goss, a high school all-American who spent two seasons at UW in cosmopolitan Seattle. Mathews and Williams-Goss, along with Missouri transfer Johnathan Williams and Rice transfer Jeremy Jones, found their way to Spokane for one reason. “We knew we were coming here for basketball,” Williams-Goss says. “I wasn’t too into the extra stuff that the city or the school had to offer. I was just strictly trying to make the best basketball decision.” Three of the four transfers on this year’s roster were known commodities in the basketball world. Only Jones, who doubled up on football and basketball in his one season at Rice, could be considered similar to the transfers of old — a player who was unproven at this level. Williams-Goss was an all-Pac-12 performer at Washington. Mathews started on the Cal team that made the NCAA Tournament last season. And after announcing he would leave Missouri, Williams was courted by Tom Izzo’s Michigan State Spartans. Gonzaga knew about these guys, and these guys knew about Gonzaga as a program. But did they have any feeling for the city they would be calling home for the 2016-17 season? “Not too much,” Williams-Goss says. “I didn’t really know much about it.” But Williams-Goss did have a basketball connection with Spokane that went beyond just the Bulldogs: Hoopfest. “I had only been here when I was younger, for Hoopfest,” Williams-Goss says. “I think I was

like 10 or 11 and we won the championship. It was fun, it was a good time.” Mathews and his Golden Bears played an NCAA Tournament game at Spokane Arena last March. While most of fans at that game were rooting for underdog Hawai’i, the crowd’s response should’ve given him some idea what kind of support this city can give. “Because there’s no Seahawks, there’s no Mariners, there’s no Blazers, you know there’s no pro team here in the city, everyone kind of rallies around Gonzaga basketball,” Williams-Goss says. “We’ve kind of got more of a spotlight on us, with no pro athletes in the city.” For Williams, the connection was more personal. His older brother, former George Mason forward Johnny Williams, works here in town. There are many ways a city can market itself to draw talented individuals. Seattle can lean on its progressive, urban culture. Los Angeles can point to a palm tree and the Hollywood sign. Spokane often uses its proximity to nature. But all this group of talented individuals needed to see was that this is a committed basketball community. Williams-Goss was the first academic all-American in UW men’s basketball history. Mathews graduated early from Berkeley. These are hard-working guys who knew what they wanted in a place. “We just wanted to acclimate ourselves to our team and our system,” Williams-Goss says. “That was pretty cool, coming to such a basketball hotbed.” For these guys, the “near nature, near perfect” slogan might not have influenced them at all. With an above-average snowfall in this hilly city, had they even bothered to take a spin on a sled? “No, I haven’t,” Williams-Goss says. “My nephew is coming up for the [Saint Mary’s] game, so maybe I’ll go with him.” 


CULTURE | DIGEST

BOOK HOP KING L

ike a lot of craft beer enthusiasts, I appreciate the hops that go into the brews I drink, and am proud to know that a lot of the hops I consume are grown in my home state. So picking up a book about the early days of hop farming in Washington wasn’t a tough sell. But with Hop King: Ezra Meeker’s Boom Years, you get a lot more than a blow-by-blow history of how hop fields came to the state, although you get that, too. The book, by historian Dennis M. Larsen and available now from WSU Press, sheds light on one of the most colorful and accomplished men from the early days of the Washington Territory, and the subsequent infancy of our state. He was like the Evergreen State’s Forrest Gump — seemingly a part of every big moment in our early history. Meeker came to the area on the Oregon Trail. He was unsuccessful initially as a farmer and also failed in other business ventures before obtaining some hop roots from the United Kingdom. He planted the crops on his farm in Puyallup and oversaw a booming enterprise, serving as the supplier for legendary Portland brewer Henry Weinhard. When a global hops shortage struck, Meeker thrived on the high prices that resulted, amassing sub-

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY RAVEN HAYNES

stantial wealth and becoming an evangelist for the hop industry, which was thriving in the Puget Sound area. You won’t find many hop farms on that side of the state these days, mostly due to the aphid infestation that knocked out the crop and ended Meeker’s hop empire. But his influence led to the boom of hop growing in the Yakima Valley — the world’s most prolific hop-growing region. Meeker would go on to have a few more outlandish chapters in his life, including during the Klondike gold rush, which Larsen describes in his earlier book, Slick as a Mitten: Ezra Meeker’s Klondike Enterprise. Larsen’s history is colorful but also deeply investigated and researched. He paints a picture of an early Washington full of wide-eyed folks like Meeker who were intoxicated by the possibility found in the new corner of the country. The section about Meeker’s efforts to bring women’s suffrage to Washington is both fascinating and inspiring. If you go into this book hoping to gain some knowledge to enlighten your drinking buddies, you’re going to find what you need. But be sure to drink up the rest of the Meeker story while you’re at it. — MIKE BOOKEY

SPORTS BEAU BALDWIN’S INEVITABLE MOVE Given the level of success that head football coach Beau Baldwin enjoyed in his nine seasons at Eastern Washington — including a national championship in 2010, several conference titles and one of the most prolific offenses in the country year after year — it was only a matter of time before a bigger school came calling with a deal too good to refuse. That offer came this week, and Baldwin is heading to Cal to take over offensive coordinator duties. “These things happen really fast,” Baldwin said at a Monday news conference. “As hard as it is to leave — and I want it to be hard, because if it’s hard, it means something — this one is right.” The Eagles are searching for his replacement.

WEB SERIES Join Nemo Hoes, Snoop Dogg’s news anchor persona, for a joint (pun intended) smoke session and interview with guests including Seth Rogen, Larry King and G-Unit on the DOUBLE G NEWS NETWORK, the number one source for “hood news.” Nemo and his guests share hilarious stories and videos, freestyle and play “finish this sentence,” right next to some real discussions about the entertainment industry. GGN features beautiful moments like Rogen rolling Nemo a cross joint (which they smoke to celebratory music) and A$AP Rocky struggling to narrate a green-screen journey to space. BOARD GAME Take one strategy game and one game of chance, have them fall in love and create one boardand-card-game child, and you have SEQUENCE. It’s like Connect Four, but you connect five chips, and only place chips on the board based on cards you randomly draw. Also, depending on how many eyes a Jack has, they can inspire the same rage as receiving a Draw Four card in Uno or the same joy as a Wild card. Put it this way: a 12-year-old and 9-year-old who didn’t care about winning beat two teams of adults who did, and we’ve never forgotten it. VIDEO GAME In OVERCOOKED, a couch co-op cooking game (you and your friends play on the same device), the team that works together, gets three stars together. After all, what better team-building exercise is there than four people making fish ’n’ chips on an iceberg? Keep the soup, hamburgers and more going out on time to advance to the next world. For foodies, there’s plenty of chopping and frying, and a chance to “work” in a real restaurant (lots of yelling and scrambling). It’s also the perfect game for that person in your life who claims they’d dominate on Hell’s Kitchen or Chopped. If there’s no one in your life like that, it’s you. 

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JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | PUBLIC ART

Melissa Huggins joined Spokane Arts last month as the city-funded nonprofit’s executive director. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Creative Focus

she became the director of Get Lit!, the university’s literary festival, and has collaborated in that capacity with Spokane Arts in the past. In the past, Spokane Arts has been responsible for public art installations, a mural project throughout downtown and the opportunity for young artists to create art on the city’s traffic signal lights on the side of the road, among other efforts. Now, Spokane Arts is in the process of handing out Spokane Arts Grant Awards (SAGA). The events, concerts, movies and other artistic group says the grants are meant to “serve events — to go to Spokane Arts. Estimates as a catalyst, fostering a robust, healthy arts show the organization could get anywhere community where individual artists, creative from $100,000 to $250,000 of the total industries, and nonprofit arts and culture admission tax collections. organizations, thrive.” Huggins, who testified for the allocation Applications for the first round of grants at a city council meeting last year while still — which add up to $85,000 total — are due serving as the executive director of Get Lit!, on Feb. 1. Huggins sees the grant program EWU’s literary festival, says the admissions as a way for Spokane Arts to support artists tax will continue to be a and organizations that boon for Spokane Arts need a leg up in getting to work as a vehicle to going, or perhaps the support artistic efforts in resources to take the next the city. step. She also stresses that “We are so happy the grants are not just for and proud that the Before you apply for a SAGA, head to spo- visual artists, but creative council did take such types of all stripes. kanearts.org/awards and read the guidean active role in mak“The grants program lines for the awards. Then, to take the next ing the admissions tax is going to have a trestep, you’re invited to a grant application ordinance happen,” says workshop on Wednesday, Jan. 25, from 4 mendous effect not only Huggins. “Because it is to 5:30 pm. The workshop is free, but you in helping artists have a a percentage, there is need to preregister at brownpapertickets. basic level of support, but opportunity as the pot it can also benefit in so com. Search “Spokane Arts.” grows, ideally with our many other ways,” says help drawing in more tourists and helping Huggins. “It can help legitimize artists or to build up the local arts economy, that our arts organizations by making them eligible percentage of those funds will increase every for other grants and opportunities.” year.” This year also finds Spokane Arts, with Huggins is originally from Spokane and the guidance of Program Director Ellen went to public schools here. She returned Picken, installing pieces of art at the new after college and working for nonprofits wastewater tanks that are currently being in Tacoma to Spokane to enroll in Eastern installed in the city. Spokane Arts is also inWashington University’s MFA creative volved in the public art that will be featured writing program. After earning the degree, in the redesigned Riverfront Park. n

With a new leader and funding source, Spokane Arts continues its march to make the city more creative BY MIKE BOOKEY

P

art of Melissa Huggins’ new job is explaining what exactly Spokane Arts is and what it does. That can be tricky, because the organization that Huggins is now director of is not actually a city agency, but it does receive funding and additional support from Spokane. In other ways, it’s very much an independent nonprofit organization with a board to answer to, as well as oversight from the Spokane Arts Commission. Huggins took over the top job at the arts advocacy group in early December, and finds herself at the helm of an organization that recently secured additional city funding and is planning a new grants program at a time when she says the arts are taking off in Spokane. On the other hand, she is Spokane Arts’ fourth director (including an interim leader) since it broke off from the city in 2012, with Laura Becker stepping down this past fall to take an arts administration job in Santa Monica, California. Huggins says those personnel changes weren’t a sign of dysfunction, even if they didn’t necessarily provide the best optics. Spokane Arts in 2017, she says, is as strong as ever. “It feels like a young nonprofit that feels like it’s on the verge of being something really big,” she says. In March, the Spokane City Council voted to allocate money from the city’s admission tax — fees tacked onto sporting

30 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

WANT TO APPLY FOR A SPOKANE ARTS GRANT AWARD?


EATING ON THE MOUNTAIN With all the food venues available to Schweitzer Mountain Resort visitors, it’s a good thing that skiing and snowboarding burns so many calories. Start your day on the mountain with a cup of joe in Schweitzer Village at Cabinet Mt. Coffee in the Lakeview Lodge or Mojo Coyote Cafe in the Selkirk Lodge. Stock up on gourmet snack items — cured meats, artisan cheese, wine and beer — at Gourmandie in the White Pine Lodge, or enjoy a light bite such as the Brie panini with smoked turkey and apple ($11). Between runs, grab a burger inside the Lakeview Lodge Cafe or snag a slice of pizza at Powder Hound Pizza ($3.50$4.50). Feed your crowd with a whole pie, like the Thor’s Hammer with red sauce, mozzarella, Canadian and traditional bacon, sausage, and pepperoni ($21/$29). You can get pizza by the slice ($5-$6) or a whole pie ($16$30) from Sam’s Alley at Taps inside Lakeview Lodge. A hot spot for good-natured shenanigans like trivia night and ski and board parties, Taps features a popular deck with a commanding view of the village, as well as hearty pub food like sweet potato fries ($11) and barbecued pork rib tips ($15). Located inside White Pine Lodge, Pucci’s Pub is a favorite for Idaho “gnar gnar” Nachos: cheese-covered tater tots with beans, salsa and sour cream ($13.50 or $17.50 with added meat). Chimney Rock Grill inside the Selkirk Lodge is the mountain’s fine dining option. Try steamer clams cooked in fennel and beer ($10), the maple bourbon braised pork with smoked Gouda ($13) or one of many dinner entrées, such as grilled steelhead ($20). With its cozy fireplace and classic lodge décor, it’s also a nice spot to relax and have a glass of port and chocolate mousse cake ($7) by the fire. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

Topping Out Schweitzer Mountain Resort takes fine dining to the mountaintop BY CARRIE SCOZZARO Eating at the Sky House means a meal at 6,375 feet above sea level.

I

f you’re looking for the highest place to get a good meal in all of Idaho, you might just find it atop Schweitzer Mountain. Located 6,375 feet up and between the Great Escape and Snow Ghost runs, Sky House replaced the rustic Wang Shack. The former spot was “an old shed held together by duct tape and spoiled beer,” jokes Schweitzer Mountain Resort marketing manager Dig Chrismer, “yet it held a special charm and our local skiers loved it.” In its place, Sky House offers sit-down and to-go dining, much-needed bathrooms and a ski patrol station. In a rush to get back to the slopes? The Red Hawk offers

snacks you can eat on-site or take with: fruit ($1.50), homemade organic cookies ($5) a fresh salad ($7), or a beverage, including juice, coffee and beer ($2.50-$7). For a more leisurely pace, unpeel some of the layers and grab a seat inside the Nest, either along the bar or at the nearly floor-to-ceiling front windows (the wraparound deck, where seating for 90 beckons, is best left for warmer weather). You can also order from the Nest bar and take your beverage into the spacious dining area with killer views of Lake Pend Oreille to the southeast, and both the Cabinet and Bitterroot mountain ranges. The Nest menu is mostly small plates, ideal for shar-

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

ing, with nothing too heavy to slow your mountain mojo. Have a bowl of baked onion soup ($12) or New England clam chowder ($9) or nibble on marinated mushroom and tomato bruschetta with seasoned ricotta ($10). Baked spaghetti has a bright, scratch-made sauce, served alongside toasted bread with a tangy balsamic drizzle ($10). Nestled in a small cast iron pan and topped with tart cornichon pickles, Raclette potatoes is a Swiss-German dish of crispy potato and bacon, dill and the melted cheese for which the dish is named ($13). A key factor in the design of the menu, says executive ...continued on next page

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 31


FOOD | ADVENTURE “TOPPING OUT,” CONTINUED... chef Peter Tobin, is transportation. They haul everything up to the summit and back down again in a snow cat twice a week, so food service is on real dishes, using flatware and linens to minimize disposables, and all food is prepared fresh. “Our menu has to warrant every ingredient,” says Tobin, whose accomplishments include receiving numerous American Culinary Federation awards and mentoring countless future chefs in more than 20 years as chef instructor at Spokane Community College’s Inland Northwest Culinary Academy. That means a menu with some crossover, like the spicy chili sauce, which covers the Firework Shrimp ($13) and reappears in the Vietnamese spring rolls ($11), while chopped walnuts are used to garnish the roasted curried cauliflower ($10) and the risotto ($12). Sky House isn’t just for skiers and snowboarders. Backcountry snowmobilers can access the lodge from the Priest Lake side of the mountain on designated trails or through a guided trip with Selkirk Powder Company, says Chrismer. Pedestrians are welcome as well; purchase a $20 lift ticket in the Village and earn a $10 discount on your Sky House meal or beverage. The view alone is worth it. Warm-weather plans for Sky House range from catered weddings to special events, including wine dinners. Specific details, including the cost of the lift ticket, are still evolving, but one thing that won’t change is feeling like you’re at the top of the world. n Sky House • Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Road, Sandpoint • Open Sun-Sat, 10:30 am-sunset • schweitzer.com • 208-263-9555

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FOOD | INDUSTRY

When One Door Closes Chef Adam Hegsted has closed the Cellar, but has other irons in the fire BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

F

riday will be the end of something special for many in the Inland Northwest. The Cellar’s chef/owner Adam Hegsted recently announced that the Coeur d’Alene restaurant would unexpectedly close, and that the business and building were up for sale. They were unable to secure a hard liquor license, explains Hegsted, whose Adam Hegsted YOUNG KWAK PHOTO accolades include cooking at the prestigious James Beard Foundation in 2012, which named him a regional semifinalist for Best Northwest Chef in 2016. He’s also the owner of the Yards Bruncheon and the Wandering Table in Spokane’s Kendall Yards neighborhood, as well as the Gilded Unicorn in downtown Spokane and the Eat Good Café in Liberty Lake. “We did some estimations and without a significant increase in business, which is unlikely, the restaurant is

not sustainable,” says Hegsted, who notes that liquor licenses cost $300,000 and are difficult to obtain in Idaho. The Cellar occupies two floors — about 11,000 square feet — of a 100-year-old Sherman Avenue building owned by Patricia and Tom Power. The Powers purchased the restaurant in 2010 from longtime restaurateur Jim Duncan, shortened its name from the Wine Cellar to the Cellar, and moved it a few doors up the street in 2013. Hegsted took it over in 2014. “We will help all employees find new work and offer as many jobs as we can,” says Hegsted. Even as he laments the closure of the Cellar, Hegsted is busy on several new projects. He’s been working with the Inland Northwest Food Network, for which he has helped fundraise in the past, as well as on a potential partnership in the Sandpoint area. He’s also working on a four-day food and drink festival in Spokane Valley called Crave, slated for June, and implementing a Cellar-like wine club at his Wandering Table restaurant. Hegsted says he’d consider a return to Coeur d’Alene, possibly with something similar to the concept found at the Yards. n


FOOD | BEER

A Big Move Badass Backyard Brewing is now pouring in Spokane Valley BY DAN NAILEN

I

f there’s any downside to the new location of Spokane Valley’s Badass Backyard Brewing, it’s the loss of the namesake backyard where owner Charlene Honcik and head brewer Kendra Wiiest established their brewing acumen back in the summer of 2015. The trade-off with the move to their new spot, though, means more parking spaces, a bigger taproom and a walk-in cooler with room to store a lot more beer than the old spot. Regulars followed the Badass brewers the scant few blocks they moved to a high-visibility strip mall on Argonne Road, but Honcik admits that some of the folks do miss the old lawn space since they moved in October. “They do say they miss the old backyard,” Honcik says of the visitors who drop by to sip signature brews from their half-barrel system, like the Adrenaline Seeker IPA and Big Air Black Stout. “It was so homey back there.” The former shoe store where they now pour is pretty homey, too, albeit completely indoors. The beers are still brewed in the old home that housed the former taproom, but the backyard’s wood fence planks now line part of one wall, and an old bell rung for tips that originated

Badass Backyard Brewing owner Charlene Honcik (left) and head brewer Kendra Wiiest in the brewery’s new location. DEREK HARRISON PHOTO from Honcik’s grandparents’ horse farm hangs from a wall, behind the bar that now can seat a dozen or so guests instead of the four or five who could belly up at the old spot. A few barrels-turned-tables made the move as well. Besides the obvious benefits of a larger taproom and more parking, the real benefit for Badass is behind the scenes, with the giant cooler the pair built to house their kegs. “Having the cold room with handles in the wall is really great,” Honcik says.

One of those handles is dedicated to a home brew; Honcik and Wiiest got their start brewing at home and only recently quit their day jobs as 911 operators to do Badass full time. “We’re all about building from the ground up,” Honcik says. That ground just got bigger and better, even if there’s no grass in the Backyard anymore.  Badass Backyard Brewing • 1415 N. Argonne Rd., Spokane Valley • Open Wed-Sat, 2-9 pm; Sun, noon-7 pm • badassbackyardbeer.com • 242-3225

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20th Century Women offers a compassionate take on generational shifts BY SCOTT RENSHAW

I

f you were given just a thumbnail description of the plot of writer/director Mike Mills’ 20th Century Women, you might think you’d know what to expect from the character of Dorothea Fields (Annette Bening). The 55-year-old single mother of a 15-year-old son, Jamie (Lucas Jade Zumann), in 1979 Santa Barbara, Dorothea struggles with the confidence that she can provide everything Jamie needs to grow up emotionally healthy. So she turns to two younger women for additional support: 24-year-old photographer Abbie (Greta Gerwig), one of the boarders in their house, and 17-year-old Julie (Elle Fanning), their sexually precocious neighbor. Cue the baffled resistance of child-of-the-Depression Dorothea to anything these crazy kids might have to teach her son. Right? Not quite. Dorothea, it turns out, is something of a trailblazer herself — a woman who went to flight school for a chance to fight in World War II, and a trained architect. When Abbie plays a punk record for Jamie, Dorothea’s curious enough to try to understand the appeal rather than dismissing it; when Jamie gets in trouble at school for cutting class, she supports his desire for occasional extracurricular exploration. Bening’s performances are almost invariably lovely in their subtlety, but here she’s playing a particularly fascinating sort of character. Dorothea is a progressive who wants to keep up with the pace of the modern world, but isn’t quite sure that she can. That dynamic — and Mills’ warm, compassionate

take on it — energizes much of 20th Century Women, even Coming-of-Age Story, and Things Were Never the Same as he navigates through several other relationships in this After That Important Year. strange makeshift family. Jamie harbors an unrequited The center is strong, however, and it’s strongest when crush on Julie, who sneaks in through his bedroom the women are working through the generation gaps that window so that he can be her platonic confidante. Abbie divide them. Best of all is a wonderful scene set at one begins a fling with Dorothea’s other boarder, hippie of Dorothea’s dinner parties, where Dorothea and her mechanic William (Billy Crudup), even as she awaits guests shift uncomfortably over Abbie’s insistence on news on whether she’s healthy after a bout with cervical normalizing the word “menstruation,” and Julie reveals a cancer. bit too much-information about the loss of her virginity. Mills navigates through all these characters deftly, There’s not much in the way of laugh-out-loud comedy, stopping occasionally to provide backstory about the cirbut Mills finds gentle humor, as well as drama, in the way cumstances that shaped them (and, perhaps more surpristhat their individual sense of age-appropriate instruction ing, to have them narrate what becomes of them after the creates bumps in the plan to serve as Jamie’s assistant life events portrayed here). His affection for these characters mentors. is evident, but he’s not always effective at shaping 20th At its heart, though, this is Dorothea’s story more Century Women’s many episodes into a cohesive narrative. than that of the other characters, and Bening brings a At times he seems distracted by punching hard on the hisgrace to the role that’s beautiful to watch. She gets miles torical specificity of his setting out of the eye shift indicating her shock — the pop-music needle-drops, at realizing that the family car — and by 20TH CENTURY WOMEN on-screen captions explaining obvious extension, herself — has gotten Rated R the seminal texts the characters old. It’s even more heartbreaking obWritten and directed by Mike Mills are reading, or the pessimistic serving her attempts to understand her Starring Annette Bening, Greta Gerwig, Elle Fanning “crisis of confidence” speech son better, while resisting opening her by President Jimmy Carter own fears and anxieties up to him in rethat seemed to doom his chance for a second term — to a turn. Portraits of a parent don’t get much more multilaypoint where it seems that nothing could have been quite ered than this one, in its respect for a woman willing to so difficult as growing up in this particular place at this push herself into uncomfortable places and keep learning particular time. Indeed, there are moments when Mills all about the world, all to do the best possible job at making but puts a caption on the screen to tell us that This Is a her son a person who won’t need her any more. n


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE FOUNDER

Ray Kroc, McDonald’s innovator and later something of a business cult leader, is portrayed here by the intense, superb Michael Keaton. He’s at once genius and evil in that banal way of greedy, insecure men; the film’s protagonist is also its villain. Director John Lee Hancock is at the helm of this wild and sometimes sinister story. (MJ)

NERUDO

Chilean director Pablo Larrain’s latest masterpiece is a partly fictionalized biopic of famed Chilean poet and politician Pablo Neruda, who was forced to go into hiding as a fugitive in his own country after his Communist Party ties were revealed in the late 1940s. Tasked with hunting down the labeled traitor and Nobel Prize-winning poet is obsessive detective Oscar Peluchonneau, played by Gael Garcia Bernal. At Magic Lantern (CS) Rated R

THE RESURRECTION OF GAVIN STONE

Mainstream Hollywood and evangelical Christianity are uneasy bedfellows, and this subtly titled film aims to bring those worlds together in its story of a child star turned adult ne’er-do-well, Gavin Stone. He’s sentenced to do community service at a megachurch,

but when he finds out about the congregation’s annual theatrical production of Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, Gavin thinks playing the role of Jesus could be just his ticket back to stardom. Instead, he learns the value of life away from Tinseltown. You know, where “real America” lives. (DN) Rated PG

SPLIT

James McAvoy easily takes on his most terrifying role to date in this psychological thriller/horror from M. Night Shyamalan about a man with dissociative identity disorder (aka split personality) who kidnaps three girls. The girls realize they need to leverage one of their captor’s 24 distinctly varied personalities to protect themselves from his most violent and creepy persona, “the beast.” (CS) Rated PG-13

XXX: THE RETURN OF XANDER CAGE

You didn’t think Xander Cage (Vin Diesel) would return, did ya? Well, tighten up your abs and check the oil in the motorcycle, because it turns out that the badass secret agent didn’t die after all! Cage is back with the CIA to stop the nefarious villain Xiang from obtaining the heinous super weapon called… Pandora’s Box. Seriously? Pandora’s Box? A little on the nose, don’t you think? (MB) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING 20TH CENTURY WOMEN

Annette Bening stars as a single mom in sunny SoCal in 1979 in this comedy/ drama by director Mike Mills (Beginners). Struggling to raise her teenage son, manage a boarding house and have some semblance of her own life, she recruits some of her tenants, ranging from a punk-rock girl (Greta Gerwig) to the house handyman (Billy Crudup) and one of her son’s school peers (Elle Fanning) for advice and guidance for her boy. (DN) Rated R

ALLIED

Two assassins (Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard) meet in North Africa in 1942, each attempting to kill the same Nazi official. They fall in love, move to London, and attempt to settle down and live a life of normalcy. But when you’re on the brink of another war and you’ve known all along that the one you love is a cold-blooded killer, how can you be sure they won’t turn on you? (HM) Rated R

THE BYE BYE MAN

“If you say his name, or even think it, he will come for you.” That’s the jumping-off point for this teen-oriented fright flick inspired by urban legends like Slender Man, and movies like The Ring and Evil Dead. The evil of the Bye Bye Man, discovered by three college students, passes from person to person, causing them to do unthinkable acts (apparently including appear-

ing in this movie). The most shocking aspect of this horror-thriller timed for release on a Friday the 13th? Probably its PG-13 rating. (DN) Rated PG-13

EAGLE HUNTRESS

Aisholphan is a 13-year-old girl living as part of a nomadic Kazakh tribe who wants to be the first woman in her family to learn how to hunt with an eagle, which is a tradition to her people. This uplifting documentary takes a look into a unique culture while telling an inspiring story. At AMC (MB) Rated G

ELLE

Isabelle Huppert won a Best Actress Golden Globe for this French-language revenge tale about a video game company executive who is attacked in her home, and then tracks down her assailant and engages him in a suspenseful game of cat-and-mouse. Directed by Paul Verhoeven (Basic Instinct), Elle is part whodunit, and part disturbing exploration of the depths a person will go to responding to a personal invasion of the most devastating kind. Thanks to the masterful Huppert, such unpleasantness is well worth watching. At AMC. (DN) Rated R

HIDDEN FIGURES

You’ve probably never heard of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who were pioneers in — respectively — mathematics, computer programming and engineering ...continued on next page

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 35 HorizonCU_SetSavingsSightsHigh_011917_12V_CPR.ai


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FILM | SHORTS at NASA, without whom it’s astronauts would never have flown. The three black women helped the space agency through its first manned space flight, as documented in this historical drama. (MJ) Rated PG

JACKIE

Chilean director Pablo Larraín (No) makes his English-language debut with one of America’s defining national narratives. Jackie has Natalie Portman as the title character in the days following the death of her husband, President John F. Kennedy. It often nails the connection between history and image, but it’s also never about to let you forget that central idea. (SR) Rated R

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When jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and aspiring actress Mia (Emma Stone) first see each other, their attraction is more than magnetic — it can bend time and space. The leads help the musical construction make sense; these two are so head over heels for each other that of course everything stops for a song-and-dance number now and again. (PC) Rated PG-13

LION

Dev Patel stars as an Australian man who was adopted by parents after getting lost on the streets of Calcutta as a child. As the memories come back to him, he sets out to find the mother and brother who he lost that day, even though 25 years have passed. At Magic Lantern. (MB) Rated PG-13

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Joe Coughlin (Ben Affleck, who also directed the film) is making a good living in 1920s Boston as a bank robber, with no desire to get involved with the mob, but — whoops — here he is falling in with them under duress. Then he gets sent to Tampa to head up the booming business in illegal booze and swanky nightclubs as his criminal empire grows and spirals out of control. (MJ) Rated R

LOVING

Writer-director Jeff Nichols tells a story, and an important story in American history: the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia that rendered states’ anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional, and affirmed the marriage of a white Virginia man, Richard Loving (Joel Edgerton), to his “colored” wife, Mildred (Ruth Negga). (SR) Rated PG-13

A MAN CALLED OVE

Ove, the curmudgeon in this Swedish import, walks around with the puckered face of a man who’s seemingly spent a lifetime sucking on lemons, a true crank after the death of his wife. But the Swedish film has a charming upside, even if there are dark elements surrounding Ove. At Magic Lantern (SD) Rated PG-13

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck) is a handyman in several Boston-area apartment buildings, who gets news from his coastal Massachusetts hometown of Manchester-by-the-Sea that his brother has died. What he does not expect upon his return — to a place

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filled with ghosts, and where everyone speaks his name like he’s a local boogeyman — is that Joe has named Lee as the guardian for Joe’s 16-yearold son Patrick (Lucas Hedges), forcing Lee to confront a past that has left him broken. Rated R

MISS SLOANE

Jessica Chastain plays Elizabeth Sloane, a renowned lobbyist in D.C. with a track record of success and a history of cunning on behalf of her corporate clients. When she is asked to take on the gun lobby, she risks her career and the safety of the people she cares about. (HM) Rated R

MOANA

Moana is driven to find out what lies beyond the reefs off her beautiful South Pacific island paradise, reefs beyond which her people are forbidden to venture. What makes her special is how she will achieve this: she is chosen by the ocean itself, as a reward for a kind act toward a sea creature, to take on a quest involving a long and dangerous journey that will, hopefully, save her island and her people. (MJ) Rated PG-13

MONSTER TRUCKS

Tripp (Lucas Till) is a high-school dude sick of his small town and looking for something new in his life. So he does what a lot of teens are doing these days — he builds a truck out of spare pieces found in a junkyard. Then, he finds a lizard-octopus monster thing in his garage (he names it Creech), which takes up residence in his truck, giving it extra super powers. (MB) Rated PG

MOONLIGHT

Written and directed by Barry Jenkins, the film follows the life of Chiron, beginning as a 9-year-old drug dealer in Miami, as he grows up struggling to come to terms with his sexuality. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

In the latest from Tom Ford (A Single Man) comes this psychological thriller about a woman (Amy Adams) whose ex-husband (Jake Gyllenhaal) sends her a novel he’s written that’s dedicated to her. The problem is that it’s a revenge tale and brings her back to the awful thing she did that ended their marriage. (MB) Rated R

PASSENGERS

The starship Avalon rockets to a dis-

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

tant planet, carrying more than 5,000 comatose earthlings. At the end of its decades-long flight, Avalon will rouse the humans from their suspended animation, but then Jim (Chris Pratt) is roused from his cryogenic slumber about 90 years too soon Eventually, a young woman named Aurora (Jennifer Lawrence) wakes up, too, and they need to figure out what’s gone wrong. (PC) Rated PG-13

PATRIOT’S DAY

Boston native Mark Wahlberg plays a cop who is working on the day of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and is also involved in the hunt for the perpetrators behind the attack, which killed three people and injured many others. Directed by Peter Berg (Lone Survivor, Deepwater Horizon). Rated R

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

Set before A New Hope, Rogue One follows Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), the daughter of Galen Erso (Mads Mikkelsen). When Rebel intelligence soldier Cassian Andor (Diego Luna) rescues Jyn from prison, she becomes part of the mission to find out if there is any way to stop the new project that her father designed — the Death Star. Rated PG-13

SING

Here’s a tale of theatrical impresario Buster Moon (voice of Matthew McConaughey), a koala, who in a last-ditch attempt to save his grand but failing theater, decides to put on a voice-talent show, open to anyone. This brings animals of all shapes and sizes to work up routines to perform. (MB) Rated PG

UNDERWORLD: BLOOD WARS

Kate Beckinsale returns to her role as Selene, the vampire and werewolf hunter that she introduced to the series in 2003. This time, she’s trying to protect her daughter’s life while also attempting to end the war between the lycans and the vampires. (MB) Rated R

WHY HIM?

Bryan Cranston plays a dad who joins his family on a trip to visit his adult daughter’s bad boy tech industry billionaire boyfriend (James Franco). Soon, he realizes that the ridiculously rich and ridiculously behaved d-bag is about to ask for his daughter’s hand in marriage. This does not please the dad. (MB) Rated R 


FILM | REVIEW

www.SpokaneMovies.com

2017 Spokane International Film Festival

JANUARY 27 FEBRUARY 5 2017 Don’t Miss The

Opening Gala!

The Basket JANUARY 27

7:30pm

The Bing Crosby Theater Director Rich Cowan and other crew are scheduled to attend.

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE PG-13 Daily 9:30 Sat-Sun (12:15) 2D Daily (4:50) 7:10 Sat-Sun (2:30)

SILENCE

R Daily 9:00

SPLIT

PG-13 Daily (4:30) 7:00 9:35 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:00)

LIVE BY NIGHT

R Daily 6:40 9:20

PATRIOTS DAY

R Daily (4:20) 7:00 9:40 Sat-Sun (1:40)

SLEEPLESS

Michael Keaton is as intense as ever as the king of fast food.

R Daily (5:00) 7:10 9:25 Sat-Sun (12:40) (2:50)

Golden Arches

THE BYE BYE MAN

PG-13 Daily (4:40) 6:50 9:00 Sat-Sun (12:15) (2:30)

MONSTER TRUCKS

PG Daily (4:00) 6:30 Sat-Sun (2:00)

HIDDEN FIGURES

PG Daily (4:00) 6:45 9:30 Sat-Sun (1:15)

UNDERWORLD: BLOOD WARS R Daily (4:00) Sat-Sun (1:20)

SING

PG Daily (3:50) 6:20 8:50 Sat-Sun (10:50) (1:20)

Michael Keaton gives us the story of McDonald’s in the Founder

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:30 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:30)

WANDERMERE

BY MARYANN JOHANSON

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

F

ew things are more American than Mceven really hidden, driving force underneath it. Donald’s, which is what makes The Founder And it’s not even about the food! This is not rather horrifying. I found myself scribbling Super Size Me, not a denunciation of McDonald’s that word — horrifying — a lot during my viewing as a dealer, pushing junk food on susceptible of the film, which condemns with its conclusion consumers. It’s purely about the business side, that the American dream at its apex is nothing and how the innovations Kroc brought to the more than rapacious bullshit. industry radically changed America. Hell, the The Founder is also clever and funny; the fast-food industry didn’t exist before Kroc: he sharp script is by Robert D. Siegel. The story it invented it, picking up the ideas meticulously tells is brilliant and kind of inspirdesigned by Dick (Nick Offerman) THE FOUNDER and Mac McDonald (John Carroll ing, until it turns frightening and even sinister. Its protagonist — Ray Rated PG-13 Lynch) of southern California and Directed by John Lee Hancock Kroc, McDonald’s innovator and turning them into something that Starring Michael Keaton, Nick later something of a business cult the brothers had no interest in Offerman, John Carroll Lynch leader, portrayed by the intense, pursuing: nationwide presence and superb Michael Keaton — is genius success. And cheating them in the and evil in that banal way of greedy, insecure process, naturally. What’s more American than men; the film’s protagonist is also its villain. that? Director John Lee Hancock’s previous movie Keaton is absolutely mesmerizing in a — yes was Saving Mr. Banks, about Walt Disney’s at— horrific way with his vision of McDonald’s as tempt to twist a tough, true story into something “the new American church,” the golden arches a cartoonish and suitable for mass entertainment, sight as iconic of America as church spires and which is also how you might describe The the Stars and Stripes. What we’re seeing here in Founder’s Kroc in broad strokes. The Founder is, The Founder is the beginning of the corporatizalike almost every other story about anything tion of civic spaces. quintessentially American, about the twisted, not It’s amazing. It’s horrifying. It’s America. 

XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE PG-13 Daily (12:15) 9:30 2D Daily (2:30) (4:50) 7:10

THE RESURRECTION OF GAVIN STONE PG Daily (12:40) (2:40) (4:40) 6:40 8:40

SILENCE

R Daily (2:50) 6:20 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:35)

SPLIT

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:30)

LIVE BY NIGHT

R Daily (1:20) (4:00) 6:40 9:20 Fri-Sun (10:45)

PATRIOTS DAY

R Daily (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:40

THE BYE BYE MAN

PG-13 Daily (12:15) (2:30) (4:40) 6:50 9:00

MONSTER TRUCKS

PG Daily (1:00) (3:00) (5:10) 7:20 9:25

HIDDEN FIGURES

PG Daily (1:15) (4:00) 6:45 9:30 Fri-Sun (10:30)

SING

Followed by the SpIFF Opening Party! Montvale Event Center 1017 W 1st Ave

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFO, VISIT: SPOKANEFILMFESTIVAL.ORG

PG Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:20 8:50 Fri-Sun (10:50)

PASSENGERS

PG-13 Daily (1:45) (4:15) 7:10 9:40

ASSASSIN’S CREED PG-13 Daily 6:45

WHY HIM?

R Daily (4:15) 9:15

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY PG-13 Daily (12:30) (3:30) 6:30 9:20

MOANA

PG Daily (1:10) (3:40) 6:10 8:40 Fri-Sun (10:40)

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM PG-13 Daily (1:40)

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 1/20/17-1/26/17

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 37


Enjoy the music of your favorite super heroes including Batman, Spider-Man and Princess Leia’s Theme from Star Wars Suite.

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PLAY IT NOW! INLANDER.COM/DUDE 38 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017


Nixon Rodeo drummer/screamer Ethan Harrison likes to get up close and personal with his audience. KATARZYNA CEPEK PHOTO

Grown-Ups The Nixon Rodeo continues to gain fans and write more music, but they have no grand illusions regarding their local act BY LAURA JOHNSON

S

ome in the band call this “the shitty basement,” but there’s cushy carpet here and a fresh paint job. “Hey, this house is new,” says Nixon Rodeo frontman Brent Forsyth, gathered in the basement with his band last week. “It’s not shitty.” But old habits are hard to break. Rock groups often practice in dirty, unfinished basements; Nixon Rodeo has done this plenty of times. But after seven years as a band, they’re all in their late 20s and early 30s. They have homes and families, and don’t have the time to party the way they once did. Tonight, the four-piece jokes about decorating this basement room with their mortgage payment statements. While they’ve matured over the years, their brand of rowdy rock ’n’ roll still resonates. This Friday, the local band with more than 5,800 Facebook likes headlines a free Knitting Factory show, as they’ve done multiple times,

releasing their new “Left to Die” single and music video. “We always want our shows to feel like events,” says drummer Ethan Harrison, who also books the act’s gigs. That means that while the crew plays in Spokane at least once a month, they’re always trying to make a performance fresh, with either a new release or creative angle. These are guys who grew up in the scene, playing in bands in high school and beyond. Now they’re the elder statesmen, and they want to push for more. “We always try and bring in different acts to open for us,” Forsyth points out. They want to give younger acts a chance to shine, to continue to grow talent locally. Their music is hard, ranging between pop-punk and screamo. On stage they pull faces, jump around and even walk out onto their audience’s raised hands. Their onstage energy is why longtime fans rarely miss shows, and why ...continued on next page

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | ROCK

Nixon Rodeo headlines the Knitting Factory this weekend.

KATARZYNA CEPEK PHOTO

“GROWN-UPS,� CONTINUED...

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some even have the band’s logo tattooed on their skin. One time, a fan and her parents came up to the group at a show and thanked them. After listening to the group’s often hopefilled albums, their daughter had found the will to live again. “Sometimes you think your music doesn’t matter, but after that, I realized these words I’m writing can have an impact,â€? Forsyth says. Nixon Rodeo’s most recent album, 2015’s Relentless, is full of tight riffs and heartfelt lyrics — many of which are purposely generic as to be more relatable. Each member of the band, including lead guitarist Josh Crites and new bassist Jules StClair, has varying musical taste. The mishmash of genres can be heard throughout their records, even in just one song. “There’s never been a time when we say, ‘Oh, that doesn’t sound like us,’â€? Harrison says. “We’re willing to incorporate everything.â€? “We can do whatever we want,â€? continues Crites. “We can write whatever genres of rock, acoustic, pop, rock. We’re just trying to rock.â€? The writing process can be brutal. They say they feel bad for Forsyth’s wife, as their blaring rehearsal nights can turn into tedious work, going over the same riff until it’s “right.â€? In this basement, they practice at least once a week. Even tonight, when it’s nearly down to zero degrees outside, they’ll keep the window cracked. Otherwise, they sweat too much. It’s hard to breathe. This is where they cooked up their new single “Left To Die,â€? which explores the feelings of being left behind either by a friend or lover. For a while it’s what the band felt when longtime bassist Travis Singleton moved to Seattle for a job. While they were immediately able to pick up local musician StClair, getting used to a new lineup is always an adjustment. This fresh song, the first written with the new team, shows off StClair’s additional vocals. Soon, they want to record their fourth record and eventually release an acoustic album. A live CD and concert video — recorded using multiple zooming drones at the Knitting Factory last spring — is also imminent. But for all the screaming fans, multiple Warped Tour showings, on-course Bloomsday participant awards, and Pig Out in the Park appearances, they say they have no plans to leave Spokane. This is their home. They want to keep pushing from here. “It’s important to us to stay respectful and humble,â€? Crites says. “We understand that we’re a Spokane band.â€? The rest of the guys agree. “Sometimes, I don’t get how people can be so excited about our group,â€? Harrison says. “I mean, I’m just a person with a job.â€? n The Nixon Rodeo with Project Kings, Death By Pirates, Wasted Breath and Itchy Kitty • Fri, Jan. 20, at 7:30 pm • Free • Allages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory. com • 244-3279

40 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017


MUSIC | ROCK

Sunny Disposition Seattle trio Duke Evers’ new album is surprisingly full of bright pop-rock BY DAN NAILEN

W

e’ve all heard the stories of Seattle’s weather acting as inspiration for musical creativity, the city’s gloomy skies and rainfall forcing artists to hole up inside and woodshed their chops. That’s part of Duke Evers’ story, but the band’s experience recording its first full-length album, Velvet Hips, for San Diego-based indie label Randm Records lines up more with the vibrant, upbeat pop-rock filling its 11 songs. Back in February 2016, founders Josh Starkel and Kyle Veazey were incorporating a new member, multiinstrumentalist Dune Butler, to their guitar/drums two-piece, and the excitement of creating new music with the expanded lineup for a label that had sought them out dovetailed perfectly with the experience of heading to sunny SoCal to work in the studio. “We were literally right on the beach,” recalls Starkel,

who lived in Spokane from roughly kindergarten until midway through high school. (His dad still lives here.) “It was a completely different setting than we’re used to. Usually we’re recording underground and coming upstairs into the cold. We were on the beach, 80 degrees. It was cool to be in that environment, and be with your two best friends in a hotel room, just running amok. “It’s not something too many people get to experience, and maybe something we’ll never get to experience again, and we had a great time.” The two weeks in San Diego wasn’t all fun and games, as older songs had to evolve to include the bass and keyboard of Butler, and the trio wrote some new songs on the fly. The results are remarkably solid, even as Starkel calls the record “kind of a hodgepodge” of material. What comes through — as seen last year when

Duke Evers lead singer Josh Starkel, right, grew up in Spokane.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

the group thrilled at Volume and Elkfest — is a band confident in its ability to bounce seamlessly from style to style, never losing a sense of melody that turns songs like opener “Touch of Skin” and “Here We Go” into instant earworms. The last song on the album, the sprawling hard-rock “Delusioning,” is the first the band wrote as a three-piece and, Starkel says, “a good indication of where we might be going” as the current lineup continues to write new songs. Throughout, Starkel’s vocals stand out as remarkably pliable; no matter what style the musicians tackle, his voice’s ability to move from a growl to a sweet croon is a weapon not every young band can boast. MORE EVENTS His confidence as Visit Inlander.com for a frontman wasn’t complete listings of always a given, he says, local events. and comes thanks to his confidence in his bandmates and “a lot of time in the practice space being bad, then gaining the courage to get up there and just kind of do it.” n Duke Evers with Supervillain, Griffey and the South Hill • Thu, Jan. 26, at 7:30 pm • $6/$8 day of • Allages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

INDIE-FOLK COMMUNIST DAUGHTER

F

or the Bartlett’s 25th installment of the Round, a collaborative concert series between musicians, artists and writers, the event is going big. This time, the Minnesota-based folk act Communist Daughter will headline the normally localized show. The group — whose first-ever performance also happened to be a wedding reception for their friends, rock writers Chuck Klosterman (Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs) and Entertainment Weekly’s Melissa Maerz — has continued to enthrall audiences for the past eight years. While they started out making more straightforward indie-folk music, their second full-length, last October’s The Cracks That Built The Wall, offers a deeper and more introspective sound. — LAURA JOHNSON The Round No. 25 feat. Communist Daughter with Lauren Gilmore, Isaac Grambo, Ben Cartwright and Jenny Anne Mannan • Fri, Jan. 20, at 8 pm • $5/$8 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/19

BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Sunny Nights Duo BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell acoustic show J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BUCKHORN INN, The Spokane River Band J CHAPS, Spare Parts COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Scot Bruce as Elvis, PJ Destiny CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam hosted by Perfect Destruction and J.W. Scattergun FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Keanu & Joey FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho THE JACKSON ST., Ray Vasquez, DJ Afrodisiac J JOHN’S ALLEY, Nappy Roots J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Lucas Brookbank Brown MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Brandon Watterson J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic hosted by Scott Reid O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Open mic with Adrian and Leo THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown THE PALOMINO, Queens of The Palomino with DJ Perfechter POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade THE RESERVE, Liquid with DJ Dave RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Truck Mills and special guests Jam Night

42 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

ROCK BLACKWATER PROPHET

B

lackwater Prophet last performed together at Volume in June. After drummer Bryan Coats moved to Seattle, they didn’t know if they could continue. But as frontman Garrett Zanol said in a recent phone interview, the band (a 2014 Inlander Band to Watch) is too good to give up: “It’s worth the work of making it work long distance. So that’s really it. When the three of us get together we make music that I’ve never heard before. We make something that is rad and we know it.” While Zanol and bassist Nick “Beav” Parker rehearse on their own in Spokane, they’ve all been writing together across the state, sending riffs back and forth. Now they’re trying to release their third album, which is mostly written; they’re raising money for production costs. Playing together for the first time in more than seven months Saturday night, they host an album fundraiser event at the Big Dipper. — LAURA JOHNSON Blackwater Prophet album fundraiser with Von the Baptist and Deer • Sat, Jan. 21, at 7:30 pm • $5/$7 day of • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents. com • 863-8098

THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Spokane River Band J THE PIN!, Key Boy, J. Wheelz TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Robby French ZOLA, Framing Fables

Friday, 01/20

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Son of Brad J THE BARTLETT, The Round No. 25 feat. Communist Daughter (See story above), Lauren Gilmore, Isaac Grambo, Ben Cartwright, Jenny Anne Mannan BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND, JJ Heminway

BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and The Nerve BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, My Own Worst Enemy THE CELLAR, Farewell Jam Session with Laffin’ Bones COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium CURLEY’S, Tell the Boys DEER PARK EAGLES, 3D Band FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Kicho FIZZIE MULLIGANS, YESTERDAYSCAKE IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Ben Olson and Cadie Archer THE JACKSON ST., Zach Flanary and Sovereign Citizens

JOHN’S ALLEY, Ayron Jones and the Way J KNITTING FACTORY, The Nixon Rodeo (See story on page 39), Project Kings, Wasted Breath, Death By Pirates, Itchy Kitty LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MAX AT MIRABEAU, Triple Shot MOOSE LOUNGE, Dangerous Type J MOOTSY’S, Summer in Siberia, Rex Vox, Razzmatzz MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Kosh NASHVILLE NORTH, Luke Jaxon, DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick

O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Arvid Lundin and “Deep Roots” THE OBSERVATORY, World’s Finest, Hey! Is for Horses THE PALOMINO, Fiorini Thank You Party with DJ JT Washington PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Patrice Webb REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Bootleg Sunshine THE RESERVE, Ampersand, Wind Hotel THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SILVER FOX, Usual Suspects


SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Just Plain Darin STUDIO 107, Nic Vigil J THE PIN!, Just Say Yes, Nytrix THE ROADHOUSE, Bobby Patterson Band VICTORY SPORTS HALL, Tommy G ZOLA, Ryan Larsen Band

Saturday, 01/21

219 LOUNGE, Devon Wade 49 DEGREES NORTH, Nic Vigil Trio ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Son of Brad BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Just Plain Darin J THE BARTLETT, Danny Barnes, Lucas Brookbank Brown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Blackwater Prophet album fundraiser (See story on facing page), Von the Baptist, Deer BLACK DIAMOND, Nickolas DJ Stud BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and The Nerve BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, My Own Worst Enemy COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium CURLEY’S, Tell the Boys

GET LISTED! Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. DAFT BADGER BREWING, 2nd Anniversary Party feat. Kosh FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Kicho FIZZIE MULLIGANS, YESTERDAYSCAKE FREDNECK’S, Dee’s Nuts GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Usual Suspects HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Talmadge IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Scott Taylor IMPULSE, Winter Wonderland Party feat. DJ Patrick IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Kori Ailene THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave JOHN’S ALLEY, World’s Finest LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kari Marguerite MAX AT MIRABEAU, Triple Shot MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Harold’s IGA MOOSE LOUNGE, Dangerous Type J MOOTSY’S, Redvolt, Peru Resh, Wasted Breath MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Truck Mills NASHVILLE NORTH, Luke Jaxon, DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick THE PALOMINO, DJ Perfechter POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Ron Greene PROHIBITION GASTROPUB, Wyatt Wood THE RESERVE, Fuego and DJ Americo, Back2Basics with Dave Keset THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter &

Steve Ridler J THE SHOP, Ron Criscone SPIKE’S PHILLYS & MORE, Why Did Johnny Kill?, Snakes & Sermons, Lucky Chase STIX, Honky Tonk A Go Go J THE PIN!, Venture Crew: Pandamonium THE VENUE, Blitchard Stalks the Earth THE THIRSTY DOG, The Smoke’n Wheels ZOLA, Ryan Larsen Band

MUSIC | VENUES

Sunday, 01/22

J BEEROCRACY, Comanche Joey, Dionysus And the Revelry DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J KNITTING FACTORY, Excision, Cookie Monsta, Barely Alive, Dion Timmer LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open jam O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music THE OBSERVATORY, Choir Boy, Water Monster, Local Pavlov J RED ROOM LOUNGE, AJ Suede, Prison Religion, Honey Badger, Wolftone REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Danny Barnes ZOLA, Blake Braley Band

Monday, 01/23

J THE PIN!, Armed for Apocalypse, Witchburn, Deathbed Confessions, Withheld Judgement, Vultra ZOLA, Kellen Rowe

Tuesday, 01/24

JOHN’S ALLEY, Comanche Joey J MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Brian Clark & Eric Sorensen RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover w/ Storme THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jam night with Gil Rivas J THE PIN!, Vessels, Lifelink, Guardian ZOLA, 5 Second Rule

Wednesday, 01/25 THE JACKSON ST., Zach Flanary and special guests JOHN’S ALLEY, Kris Lager Band LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 THE OBSERVATORY, Young Jesus, Goon THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Piano Bar with Christan Raxter SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic THE ROADHOUSE, Open mic with Johnny Qlueless ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

J THE BIG DIPPER, Supervillain, Duke Evers (See story on page 41), Griffey, the South Hill, Jan. 26 THE BARTLETT, Anniversary week show with Super Sparkle, the Dancing Plague of 1518, Jan. 27 JOHN’S ALLEY, Krizz Kaliko, Jan. 27 THE OBSERVATORY, Fat Lady, Nat Park & the Tunnels of Love, Jan. 27 THE BIG DIPPER, Bullets or Balloons CD Release, Boat Race Weekend, Fun Ladies, Jan. 28

154 S. MADISON ST. THESTEELBARREL.COM

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N Liberty Lake Rd, Liberty Lake • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W Garland THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • (208) 773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 THE JACKSON ST. • 2436 N. Astor • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 4669918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LOON LAKE SALOON • 3996 Hwy. 292 • 233-2738 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S• 312 N First Ave., Sandpoint • (208) 255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • (208) 265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-6647901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • (208) 765-3200 x310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY• 15 S Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N Lidgerwood St • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside . • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S• 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • (208) 930-0381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 THE VENUE • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 43


Folkinception, seen here playing at ElkFest, is teaming up with the Coeur d’Alene Symphony this weekend. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CLASSICAL FAMILY AND FOLK

Collaborations between local classical and rock groups don’t occur nearly enough in this region. But this weekend, the Coeur d’Alene Symphony is teaming up with Spokane indiefolk act Folkinception for a performance of the group’s original works. The family-oriented concert also features the winners of the recent Youth Melody Competition and members of the Coeur d’Alene Youth Orchestra. Shades of Freddie Mercury will also shine with a performance of the great “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Dr. Philip Baldwin conducts the show. — LAURA JOHNSON Coeur d’Alene Symphony feat. Folkinception • Fri, Jan. 20, at 7:30 pm and Sat, Jan. 21, at 2 pm • $10-$27 • Kroc Center • 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA • kroccda.org • 208-667-1865

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44 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

THEATER MORE THAN A MEAL

CLASSICAL AMERICAN GIANTS

Disgraced • Jan. 13-29; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $10 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third • spokanestageleft.org • 8389727

Spokane Symphony Classics No. 5: American Voices • Sat, Jan. 21, at 8 pm and Sun, Jan. 22, at 3 pm • $15-$54 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

Want to “do something” in your local community? Get the conversation started with Stage Left’s production of Pulitzer Prizewinning play Disgraced by Ayad Akhtar (pictured above). It’s a dark, witty and thankfully, comedic look at prejudice, identity and faith. A pleasant dinner party disintegrates in one act as a diverse group of friends tackle religion and culture in the 21st century, and not always in a levelheaded manner. Centered around Pakistani American Amir’s struggle with his Muslim upbringing, the play also dives into modern discourse on radical Islam, terrorism and much more during its 85 minutes. You’ll want to hire a babysitter for children under 10, as this show is for mature audiences and contains profanity and physical violence. — RAVEN HAYNES

For the fifth installment in the Spokane Symphony’s annual Classics concert series, the two-evening program celebrates works both beloved and familiar, by some of the country’s greatest compositional minds: Joplin, Gershwin, Ellington, Barber and Adams. Also on the list is Sergei Prokofiev; that may seem like an odd inclusion, yet the Russian composer wrote plenty of music living in the U.S. while in exile. Learn more about these famed names of classical music during a one-hour pre-curtain talk before each concert, free to all ticket holders. Attendees of this next program can expect a lively night of music fusing the American traditions of ragtime, blues and jazz with a classical counterpart. — CHEY SCOTT


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COMEDY FUNNY DEAL

Howie Mandel was kicking up yuks well before his job as host of Deal or No Deal and then as a judge on America’s Got Talent made him a seemingly omnipresent TV force. As a stand-up comic, his manic energy served him well, particularly with a gag in which he pulled a rubber surgical glove over his head and blew it up with his nose. Subtlety, clearly, is not Mandel’s thing, but his act has evolved even as TV and film roles took up more of his time, and he still performs upwards of 200 stand-up dates a year. — DAN NAILEN

B-DUBS

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Howie Mandel • Sun, Jan. 22, at 7 pm • $45/$55/$75 • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2100

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FILM CULTURAL IMMERSION

Expand your world views during the annual festival hosted at Gonzaga University this weekend by Jewish Family Services of Spokane. Each of three international films featured this year address elements of Jewish culture from a range of perspectives. Thursday night’s film, Once in a Lifetime, shares how a French high school teacher gives her apathetic students a reality check with an assignment centered on child victims of the Holocaust. Saturday’s feature, Transit — the Philippines’ foreign-language entry for the upcoming Academy Awards — follows a refugee family living under the threat of deportation from their adopted home in Israel. Capping off the three-night showcase is The Kind Words, a comedy-drama about three Jewish-Israeli siblings who take a road trip across Europe to uncover truths about their family. — CHEY SCOTT Spokane Jewish Cultural Film Festival • Thu, Jan. 19 and Sat, Jan. 21, at 7 pm; Sun, Jan. 22, at 2 pm • $7-$10/show; $18-$27/festival pass • Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center • 702 E. Desmet • sajfs.org

U I SAW YOU CHEERS & JEERS

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JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 45


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU MOUNTAIN RESCUE From this lonesome valley your mountain fortress has an aura of illusion. I know you’re real I have seen and connected with you. I’m off balance and a little lost. Could it be I’m looking down? Am your mountain fortress? This road is very bumpy for two legacies. It would be so much better traveled in one. A VERY ULTRA-SUCCESSFUL 2017? Nico and Joey, it is 2017 now. When will the next Ultra-Successful podcast episode be released? Sincerely, your anxiously awaiting listeners #NotBrad #NotKyle #MaybeNigel

CHEERS FAR SIGHTED YIPPIES Cheers to the Youth International Party who saw the future of American politics in 1968 when they nominated Pigasus the Immortal as their candidate for President of the United States. Now forty-eight years later, their vision has been realized with the election of a pig to the presidency. ALMOST A TIE Tom Green vs. Pauly Shore: who won, what’s next? The Comedy Store in Hollywood is worth a trip to L.A. if that’s all one did. The best of the best grace the stage... some famous, others unknown, and many forever forgotten. Many may know Tom Green performed here in Spokane. As a mega-fan, I was going to drive to Salt Lake to see him

on his last tour but I just couldn’t make the trip. When I found out that he would be in Spokane, I was in shock [thank you Inlander!]. They are both single men, so I have very little respect for either of them in that regard. I’m assuming they live off the land so to speak & the odds that the right girl hasn’t come along is a function of immature will; not a product of circumstance, or fate. To end this circumlocutory hypothetical, I’ll give the edge to Pauly Shore. Being in the City of Angels, surrounded by stylish people in the crowd who could be movie stars in their own right, and never knowing what was going to happen next on stage was addictive. That being said, Mr. Green made the most of the resources he had. My contest is really between two bad-a** + gritty artists... one with a complete oil set and a canvas, and another with sidewalk chalk. So my comparison isn’t quite fair. Both men are and were phenomenal, creative and entertaining... the times of my life. Cheers! JANUARY 20TH INAUGURATION OF DONALD TRUMP! That Friday I’ll be driving north then south on Division with my large pickup that cheated on the Clean Air Act emission standards. You’ll notice my pickup by having a large American flag planted in the pickup’s bed. It will stand out since the flag will be positioned upside down. “JJ” SPOKANE STREET DEPT SNOW BERM-BUSTER Finally getting our Comstock neighborhood streets plowed last night after 5 days of surfing deep snow ruts without the ground clearance of a 4x4 or SUV was great. Coming out early to see a considerable berm of freshly-plowed snow and ice impervious to traditional snow shovels was not so great. At 9:00 am you rolled up out front on Jefferson Dr as I and my neighbors set about digging out our driveway entrances. Your gracious offer to use the blade of your City of Spokane plow/ de-icer tanker to do it for us was very much appreciated and goes a long way to repair any misgivings we’ve had about timely snow plowing by our city street dept. We couldn’t believe our good fortune. A small courtesy on your part had a huge impact. Thank You Very Much. Mark Serbousek should give you a raise in pay. At the very least, your employee file should radiate our collective gratitude at

your next dept evaluation. WELCOME HOME SON I find that each day we grow closer to each other and I would not change this for anything. You continue to make me a better man, a better person and a better father. Man have you taught me patience! Basically, we live in your world : ) I just want to welcome you back to Spokane, your forever place if this is what you chose in life. Mom and I found you a beautiful home with many great places to play and a nice backyard for you to run around. We love you very much Baby H, you are the most amazing little guy. Here’s to many years of happiness in your new home. We love

you little guy, now go play :) Dad THANKS TO RESCUERS Grateful to the five people who cared enough to help me when my car slid in an icy intersection northbound on Lidgerwood near Northtown on Friday the 13th. Your pushing and digging helped me get out of a snow/ice berm. Don’t know your names and you don’t know mine, but if you read this you know who you are. Bless you a thousand times! GOOD DEED FOR A DISABLED VETERAN Cheers to the gentleman who stopped by my aunt and uncle’s house to dig out the snow berm blocking their driveway. My aunt is out of town visiting her daughter in Arizona and my uncle (Retired Col. US Army) is now living at the Spokane Veterans House due to a neurological disorder called Multiple System Atrophy. The young man they hired to deal with the snow bailed on them, so I (their nephew) volunteered to deal with the remaining removal before the weather warms up. Much to my surprise you were just finishing up digging out the plow berm when I arrived Sunday after-

IT’S TIME TO WARM UP

46 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

HELLO BATMAN Time to enter the batcave and get warm. Your birthday present awaits. Planning for that trip to Cancun with you as my escort. Get your suitcase packed. Waiting patiently. Loving you always and forever.

RE: SOME THINGS ARE BETTER KEPT TO YOURSELF Not all wet/hacking coughs are due to flu or viruses. You should be aware of that. My cousin is highly allergic and very sensitive to fragrances, and for some reason, every woman seems to overdose on their perfume. (Men don’t

JEERS CRUELTY TO KITTENS Jeers to whomever dumped three, six-week-old kittens on our land. The nighttime lows are appalling. May the scum who abandoned the poor little tabbies find him/herself without shelter in such cold. SOUTH HILL BRAT To the strange selfrighteous woman trying to pick a fight with me outside of Ross, I would normally pay someone like you no mind, however whatever comment you were targeting at my 13-month-old daughter before I closed the car door makes you the scrum of the earth. Don’t do that to others, it’s just plain nasty. Praying for you and your bloated sense of selfimportance. Sincerely, Momma Bear TEXTING WHILE DRIVING: NOT JUST YOU Jeers to the mother (I’ll assume she was a mother) in the white Subaru with a firefighter’s license plate driving up Stevens (turns into Bernard) on the South Hill on a Saturday (1/13/16) after-

seem to do this with their cologne). If one of those oversaturated women sit next to him on the bus, he will go into a coughing AND sneezing spell. It has absolutely nothing to do with being ill; just allergic. Fortunately, he’s almost got enough saved up to buy a car so he won’t have to put up with those who wear too much perfume. Just for future reference, someone could just be allergic to fragrances; not have the flu. Be sure you know the full story before making comments to such person. 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS B R A S

A C L U

J U N T A

A S Y E T

H A I R P I E C E S

P R K A U L C D M E E

A R T G I I E L R N E U P T U L E S A I T V S E

M A R C

I D E A

G O A L

S H O O U T I G H H E R D O G I D E A S Y A S I

A Y N O T G S T I Y O B S E E R B O R A R A Y E G N T O A I R Y M E S S Y

A I N T

B L O C

B A E D T E H

A T A C H O D E H O O D T R E S H E S I F B A M A I A N R I D Y D S

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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noon with two kids in the back of your Subaru. You were texting while driving. How selfish of you to do so while you had your kids in the back of your car. I was in the car in the back seat next to you. There were also cars in front of and behind you. Just know that IT CAN WAIT. To the rest of Spokane who texts and drives, please stop.

Forty-eight years [after Pigasus], their vision has been realized with the election of a pig to the presidency.

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

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noon. You told me that you lived in the neighborhood and that my uncle had helped you out in the past. I commend and thank you for braving the frigid temperatures and taking time from your Sunday to perform such a laborious task for a couple in need. You saved me a lot of time and energy too, I will be sure to pay it forward!

January 31stst

202 W 2nd Ave, Spokane WA

509 455 9596 wildwalls.com


EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC: Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) GUYS WE F@#KED Like “Guys We F@#ked: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast?” Join co-hosts Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson as they bring their hit podcast to life through games, audience participation, rants, stories, standup comedy, and never before seen video. Jan. 19, 8 pm. $22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) CHOOSE TO LOSE Join the Blue Door Players for a wacky, all-improvised Game Show — to win, you have to lose and the loser is the winner! Fridays, through Feb. 10, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com COMEDY NIGHT AT THE INN Two nights of live standup comedy, featuring Auggie Smith and Travis Nelson on Jan. 20, and Patrick Maliha and Mallory Wallace on Jan. 21. Doors open at 7 pm, show at 8. Ages 21+. $15. Best Western CdA, 506 W. Appleway. (208-765-3200) KEVIN HEFFERNAN & STEVE LEMME Do love the movies “Super Troopers” and “Beerfest?” See two members of the Broken Lizard crew in Spokane; Farva and Mac, share stories of their shenanigans. Jan. 20-21, 8 and 10:30 pm. $20-$27. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (318-9998)

STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third. reddragondelivery.com (838-6688) MAKE IMPROV GREAT AGAIN Liberty Lake Community Theatre’s Improv Co-op is back for the new year. Ages 18+. Jan. 21, 7 pm. Free. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. (342-2055) SAFARI The Blue Door’s fast-paced, short-form improv show. The gamebased format relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Rated for mature audiences. Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) HOWIE MANDEL The award-winning comedian performs for two shows, at 4 pm and 7 pm. Jan. 22. $45/$55/$75. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (509-242-7000) MICHAEL GLATZMAIER A performance by the local comedian, musician and Improviser who takes suggestions from the audience, writes it on a board and then creates improvised songs on the spot. Jan. 22, 8 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) SPOKANE COMEDY’S STANDUP SHOWDOWN Comedians get a topic and have four minutes to perform; the crowd then votes for a winner. Tuesdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard. observatoryspokane.com (598-8933) OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

BRAD WILLIAMS A California native, Brad started doing stand-up at age 19 and has been touring ever since, making humorous observations on disability, relationships, sex and race. Jan. 26-27, at 8 and 10:30 pm. $12-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

COMMUNITY

THIRD FRIDAY SWING: THE BLACK & WHITE BALL A monthly swing dance for dancers of all swing styles: Lindy Hop, Charleston, East Coast, West Coast, Balboa, collegiate shag, or country swing. For men and women of all ages. This month, come dressed in semi-formal black and/or white. Jan. 20, 7-11 pm. $5. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com DROP IN & GEEK OUT Check out Spark Central’s collection of robotics toys, programming kits, and software, and connect with fellow aspiring geeks. Jan. 21, 3-5 pm. No cost. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org LEGORAMA The library’s annual program for young Master Builders invites the community to “Build a Better World” for this year’s challenge theme. Jan. 21, 11 am-1 pm. Free and open to the public. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) MLK HUMAN RIGHTS COMMUNITY BREAKFAST The annual event hosted by the Latah County Human Rights Task Force features a presentation by Mark Trahant, a Native American journalist and faculty at North Dakota University, speaking on the topic of environmental justice. Also includes a presentation of

the Rosa Parks Human Rights Achievement Award, winners of the annual essay contest and more. Jan. 21, 9 am. $4-$8. Moscow Middle School, 1410 E. D St. humanrightslatah.org (208-882-3577) NORTH IDAHO/SANDPOINT COMMUNITY MARCH A non-partisan, grassroots event serving as a call to get involved. Various local organizations share their missions and recruit volunteers to work in the areas of protecting the environment, human/women’s rights, economic/ social justice, building a welcoming and charitable community. Jan. 21, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. facebook.com/northidahomarch PEOPLE RISE UP! A COMMUNITY INVITATION TO ACTION The Peace And Justice Action League of Spokane and partners host a free, all-ages grassroots festival to sharpen our activist skills. Music, poetry, speakers, action bar, creative activities, kids’ zone, and a free soup and bread potluck to warm up after the Women’s March. Jan. 21, 2-5 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. tinyurl.com/jan21riseup (232-1950) SPOKANE PUBLIC SCHOOLS ENROLLMENT FAIR Representatives from SPS schools and option programs are on site to answer questions. Also, enrollment is currently open for students who want to attend a school other than their neighborhood school. Families can fill out an application online through Feb. 15. Jan. 21, 9 am-noon. Free. Shadle Park High School, 4327 N. Ash. spokaneschools.org SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY BOOK SALE The Friends of the Spokane Valley Library’s annual sale offers $3 bags. Presale ($10 admission) Jan. 20, 3-5 pm. Jan.

21, 9 am-3 pm. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400) WOMEN’S MARCH ON SPOKANE Citizens are invited to gather in Spokane and join communities nation-wide as part a coordinated Women’s March, beginning in Washington D.C. Activities begin at 11 am with a rally at the Convention Center, featuring inspirational speakers from human rights, justice, and women’s advocacy groups, as well as musical entertainment. A peaceful march begins at 1 pm, followed by a volunteer fair at the Center. Jan. 21, 11 am-4 pm. Free. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. WomensMarchOnSpokane.org BLACK LENS SECOND ANNIVERSARY PARTY Join The Black Lens as it celebrates its second anniversary and all that we have accomplished, and learn about what’s coming up in 2017. Jan. 22, 3-5 pm. Chkn-N-Mo, 414 1/2 W. Sprague. bit. ly/2jtmefI (509-838-5071) SPOKANE HOMELESS CONNECT 2017 The sixth annual event offers services including hot meals, medical/dental screenings, housing services, vet care for pets and more. Organized by the Spokane Homeless Coalition, with support from local nonprofits and service providers. Those interested in supporting the event can donate money/items at the Catholic Charities Annex Building (19 W. Pacific) from 8 am-5 pm. Jan. 24, 10 am-2 pm. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana Ave. salvationarmyspokane.org DROP IN & CODE Explore the world of coding using game-based lessons. Grades 3 and up. Jan. 25, 3:30-5:30 pm. No cost. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299)

2017 AAA CRUISE SHOW Hotel RL by Red Lion Spokane at the Park 303 W. North River Drive, Spokane Saturday, February 4 8:30 AM – 2:30 PM (Doors open at 8:00 AM)

RSVP: (509) 358-7039 AAA.com/CruiseShows

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*$10 per person cruise deposit and up to $100 per stateroom onboard spending credit (applies to first two full-fare passengers only) valid on select sailings only. $10 per person cruise deposit is nonrefundable. Offers valid day of show only. AAA does not charge service fees on the purchase of cruises and tours. Other service fees may apply for items such as airline tickets, passports, fees imposed by other companies or gov’t entities, etc. Travel Store 15% off savings valid day of show only. Restrictions and limitations apply per product. Ask AAA for details. Delta Air Lines® official rules and regulations posted at event and online at AAA.com. Agency #178-018-521 #1874 11/16

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JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess IS IT SOMETHING I WED?

AMY ALKON

Two of my girlfriends just got divorced. Both recently admitted to me that they knew they shouldn’t have gotten married at the time but did anyway. Just this weekend, another friend — married for only a year and fighting bitterly with her husband — also said she knew she was making a mistake before her wedding. Can you explain why anyone would go through with something as serious and binding as marriage if they have reservations? —Confused

Consider that in most areas of life, when you’re making a colossal mistake, nobody is all, “Hey, how about a coronation-style party, a Caribbean cruise, and a brand-new blender?” But it isn’t just the allure of the star treatment and wedding swag that leads somebody to shove their doubts aside and proceed down the aisle. Other influences include parental pressure, having lots of married or marrying friends, being sick of dating, and feeling really bad about guests with nonrefundable airline tickets. There’s also the notion that “marriage takes work” — meaning you can just put in a little emotional elbow grease and you’ll stop hating your spouse for being cheap, bad in bed, and chewing like a squirrel. However, it also helps to look at how we make decisions — and how much of our reasoning would more accurately be called “emotioning.” We have a powerful aversion to loss and to admitting we were wrong, and this can cause us to succumb to the “sunk cost effect.” Sunk costs are investments we’ve already made — of time, money, or effort. The “sunk cost effect” is decision researcher Hal Arkes’ term for our tendency to — irrationally, ego-servingly — keep throwing time, money, or effort into something based on what we’ve already put in. Of course, our original investment is gone. So the rational approach would be deciding whether to keep investing based on whether the thing’s likely to pay off in the future. A way to avoid the sunk cost trap is through what psychologists call “prefactual thinking” — thinking out the possible outcomes before you commit to some risky course of action. Basically, you play the role of a pessimistic accountant and imagine all the ways your plan could drag you straight down the crapper. But don’t just imagine all the awful things that could happen. Write out a list — a detailed list. So, for example, if you sense you could be making a mistake by getting married, don’t go all shortcutty, like “get divorced!” Parse out the itty-bitties, like “figure out how the hell to find a decent divorce lawyer”; “get lost on the way to the lawyer’s office and stand on the side of the road weeping”; and “start working as the indentured servant of a bunch of sorority girls to pay the lawyer’s retainer.” Yeah, that kind of detail. Making potential losses concrete like this helps you weigh current costs against the future ones. This, in turn, could help you admit that you and your not-entirelybeloved might have a real shot at happily ever after -- if only the one of you in the big white dress would bolt out the fire exit instead of walking down the aisle.

EXPIRATION DATING

I’m a 32-year-old guy using dating apps. I was in a long-term relationship that ended badly, and I’m not ready for anything serious right now. I get that many women are ultimately looking for a relationship. I don’t want to ghost them if they start getting attached, but saying from the get-go that I just want something casual seems rude and a bit presumptuous. —Conflicted Not everybody likes to spoon after sex. You like to slip out of the house without being noticed. It isn’t presumptuous to explain “from the get-go” that you aren’t ready for anything serious; it’s the right thing to do. Lay that out in your online profile (or at least in your first conversation) so women are clear that you’re an aspiring sexfriend, not an aspiring boyfriend. Consider, however, that research by anthropologist John Marshall Townsend finds that even women who are sure that casual sex is all they’re looking for can get clingy afterward — to their great surprise. Townsend explains that women’s emotions evolved to “act as an alarm system that urges women to test and evaluate investment and remedy deficiencies even when they try to be indifferent to investment.” Ghosting — just disappearing on somebody you’re dating — is dignity-shredding. If a woman does end up wanting more than you can give, you need to do the adult thing and tell her you’re ending it. Sure, that’ll be seriously uncomfortable for both of you. But keep in mind that bad news is usually the road to recovery, while no news is the road to randomly running into a woman everywhere, including your shower. 

48 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR INTERSECTION OF WHAT? A PRESENTATION ON INTERSECTIONALITY A presentation asking “what is intersectionality and how does this term show up in our daily lives?” Jan. 25, 11:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3152) SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the band Crooked Kilt and contradance caller Larry Simmons. This is a community dance; no experience necessary, everyone is welcome, and it is fun for all ages. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Jan. 25, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. spokanefolklore.org (598-9111) GSI’S BUSINESS AFTER HOURS A networking event at the fourth hotel in the Red Lion chain to get a new look emphasizing community and connections. Jan. 26, 5-7 pm. Free to members/$10 non-members. Hotel RL by Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. greaterspokane.org (321-3630) MEET THE NEIGHBORS: BETHEL AME Last year’s house of worship tour series returns for a second season, offering introductions to faith communities in the area and guides so that guests can learn proper ways to visit these sacred places. Jan. 26, 6-8 pm. Free, donations accepted. Bethel AME, 645 S. Richard Allen Court. bit.ly/2iL5m2Y (534-3007) MONROE STREET PROJECT OPEN HOUSE The City of Spokane hosts an open house to gather additional input on its plans to reconstruct a section of Monroe Street between Kiernan and Indiana Avenues. Jan. 26, 4-7 pm. Free

and open to the public. Knox Presbyterian, 806 W. Knox. bit.ly/2jVSh4k BUILD GUILD A monthly networking event where designers, coders, hobbyists, and tech-focused makers of all kinds get together to talk and share ideas. Jan. 27, 6:30 pm. Free. Fellow Coworking, 304 W. Pacific. (280-7873)

FILM

BANFF MOUTAIN FILM FESTIVAL The festival showcases a collection of mountain films on adventure, culture, sport and environment. Jan. 19-21, at 7 pm. $16. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. (208-255-7801) SPOKANE JEWISH CULTURAL FILM FESTIVAL This year’s three films offer glimpses into the diversity of Jewish experiences in Israel and around the world. Jan. 19 and 21 at 7 pm, Jan. 22 at 2 pm. In the Hemmingson Center. $7-$10; passes/$18-$28. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. sajfs.org/ourprograms/sjcff. (747-7394) SFCC PLANETARIUM: UNDISCOVERED WORLDS Through the discovery of exoplanets, the hundreds of planets that have been found orbiting stars beyond the Sun, we have learned that our solar system is not alone in the universe and have had to redefine our understanding of planets and solar systems. Showing Jan. 19-22, times vary. $6/adults; $3/CCS students, ages 3-18. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls. edu/planetarium (533-3569) EARTH, MOON & SUN (KID’S SHOW)

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This educational planetarium show explores the relationship between Earth, Moon and Sun with the help of Coyote, a character adapted from Native American oral traditions. Recommended for ages 5-11. Jan. 21 and Feb. 25 at 3 pm. $/adult; $3/CCS students, ages 3-18. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu/planetarium MONDAY NIGHT MOVIE: BLADE RUNNER A screening of this sci-fi classic, starring Harrison Ford as Rick Deckard, an ex-cop and a “blade runner,” responsible for assassinating the replicants. Jan. 23, 7-9 pm. $3-$10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. friendsofthebing.org (534-5805) TRAIL RUNNING FILM FEST Some the best films from the three-day festival in Seattle are now traveling to 30+ cities around the U.S. and Canada. Jan. 23, 6 pm. $20. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. trailfilmfest.org (327-1050) BUDDYMOON When a former child actor is dumped by his fiancé days before the wedding, his excitable German best man takes him on the honeymoon instead: a backcountry trek in the remote mountains of Oregon. Directed by Moscow native Alex Simmons. Jan. 24, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) CERTAIN WOMEN The lives of three women intersect in small-town America, where each is imperfectly blazing a trail. Jan. 27, at 7:30 pm and Jan. 29, at 3:30 pm. $4-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) FRIENDS OF SCOTCHMAN PEAKS WILDERNESS 12TH ANNIVERSARY


FSPW celebrates its 12th anniversary at the Little Panida Theater with a midwinter movie and music night, plus a little food, some appropriate beverages and a small silent auction. Jan. 27, 6-10 pm. $12. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. panida.org SPIFF’S OPENING GALA & SCREENING SpIFF 2017 kick-off with an opening night celebration and special screening of the 1999 film “The Basket”, which was filmed right here in the Inland Northwest. Director Rich Cowan presents the film and discusses how its conception paved the way for future film work in Spokane. Jan. 27, 7:30 pm. $13. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanefilmfestival.org SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL The 2017 edition of the Spokane International Film Festival features 19 feature films and 39 shorts from more than 20 different countries as well as from local directors. Jan. 27-Feb. 5. $10. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. spokanefilmfestival.org

FOOD & DRINK

BIG BABE CIGAR PARTY Guests can enjoy a buffet-style dinner, giveaways, samples and more at the monthly cigar party, featuring Big Babe cigars and Dalmore Whiskey. Jan. 19, 6-9 pm. $45. Legends of Fire, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (242-7000) COOKING FOR KIDS IN THE KITCHEN An afterschool cooking class, sharing how to make your own buttery soft pretzel from scratch, and how to make a tropical smoothie attached to the Blender Bike. Jan. 19, 4 pm and Jan. 21, noon. $20. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org

(534-6678) PASTA MAKING CLASS Learn the secrets to creating fresh pasta by hand, including how to mix the dough and roll it through the pasta roller. Jan. 19, 5:30 pm. $45. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon. (328-3335) SCOTCH & CIGARS Select a flight of whiskey, scotch or bourbon paired with a recommended cigar from Cigar Train during an event on the headed, outdoor patio. Thursdays, from 6-10 pm. $15-$25. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. (474-9040) THURSDAY WINE SOCIAL The weekly complimentary wine tasting event features different wine themes and samples of the shop’s gourmet goods. Thursdays, from 4-6 pm. Free. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. (208-762-1333) BARTENDER MIX OFF: VIVA LAS VEGAS The sixth annual event features worldchampion bartenders from the Las Vegas Flair Academy performing in a live flair and drink show. Local guest bartenders also compete for prize money in various categories. Jan. 21. $30. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com VINO WINE TASTING A wine tasting featuring Lake Roosevelt Wine Co. Tasting includes cheese and crackers. Jan. 21, 2-4:30 pm. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) BEEF SHORT RIBS: Chef Mark teaches how to cook the meat, while keeping it moist. You will also learn how to create a sauce from the braising juices. Jan. 22, 2 pm. $49. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. thekitchenengine.com (328-3335) MATTHEWS WINERY PROFESSIONAL TASTING: Join Vino! and distributor rep Eric Swikard to learn about eight wines.

Hear stories behind the creation of each, and taste and learn about these current releases. Reservations required. Jan. 23, 5:30 pm. $15. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) PERMACULTURE PRESENTATION & DINNER Paul Wheaton presents “Replacing Irrigation with Permaculture” during a community event sponsored by The Grass-fed Homestead. Jan. 23, 5-8 pm. $15. The Cellar, 317 E. Sherman Ave. grassfedhomestead.com SMALL PLATES WINE TASTING Distributor rep Eric Swikard guides participants through wine samples paired with small plates by Europa chef/owner Jeff Engel. Reservations required for this event cohosted by Vino!; call 838-1229 or email vino@vinowine.com. Jan. 24. $50/person. Europa, 125 S. Wall. COOKING CLASS: HEATHY BREAKFAST PLANNING Chef Michelle shares quick and easy protein breakfast smoothies and other recipes; all are gluten-free. Jan. 25, 6-8 pm. $40. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Gov’t Way. gourmetwayhayden.com POP & DROP SOUPS This class features six soup recipes you can make ahead of time; just pop into the freezer, then drop into boiling water with a few fresh veggies for a fast made-from-scratch meal. Jan. 25, 5:30 pm. $39. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. thekitchenengine.com GOURMET COOKING CLASS Enjoy an evening with Chef Mark Steinmetz from Clinkerdagger. Learn to prepare a delicious meal including, Clinkerdagger’s famous pea salad, chicken dijon and burnt cream. Jan. 26, 5:30-7 pm. $50. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org (534-6678) YEAST DOUGH CINNAMON ROLLS: Learn to make the classic rolls, as well as a

rich sticky bun. Also experiment with different toppings like a brown sugar smear, cream cheese icing, and a standard white glaze. Jan. 26, 5 pm. $45. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. thekitchenengine.com MYSTERY BEER DINNER A collaborative dinner with River City Brewing, featuring five courses, each paired with an unannounced beer from River City. Jan. 26, 6-9 pm. $55/person. The Blackbird Tavern + Kitchen, 905 N. Washington. bit. ly/2jVL58h (509-392-4000)

MUSIC SHAOLIN MARTIAL ARTS + MUSIC PERFORMANCE Performers from the Shaolin School in Henan Province, China, will present a free martial arts and musical show. Jan. 19, 7 pm. Free. Schuler Performing Arts Center at North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. uidaho. edu/kungfu (208-769-7780) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY FEAT. FOLKINCEPTION This regular season concert features the Symphony performing original music along with local band Folkinception, among other pieces on the program that also highlight winners of the 2016-17 Youth Melody Competition and members of the CdA Youth Orchestra. Jan. 20 at 7:30 pm, Jan. 21 at 2 pm. $10-$27. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasymphony.org (208-667-1865) SPOKANE SYMPHONY CLASSICS: AMERICAN VOICES Celebrate America’s vibrant musical voice in the fifth Classics Series concert, with music by Joplin, Ellington and Gershwin and more. Jan. 21 at 8 pm, Jan. 22 at 3 pm. $15-$54. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com WATER IS LIFE BENEFIT CONCERT A

concert organized by a group of Water Protectors who are using their time, energy and connections to keep the movement going. Featuring performances by local native artists, including dance, traditional and contemporary music and live art. Jan. 21, 6 pm. $15/$25 (VIP). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (634-3136) FRIENDS OF GUITAR HOUR FEAT. MARTHA MASTERS A concert by the former GFA winner and renown international player. Jan. 26, 7:30 pm. $30. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. friendsoftheguitarhour.bpt.me SPOKANE SYMPHONY SUPERPOPS 4: BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s signature sound continues to define the neo-swing movement of American Jazz; they perform in concert with the Symphony orchestra. Jan. 28, 8 pm. $42+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY The 40th Annual Domey/Gillespie Young Artists Fund concert features a program of works by Faure, Pavane and Haydn’s Symphony No. 103. Also includes a performance of the suite from “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” Jan. 28, 7:309:30 pm. $10-$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. washingtonidahosymphony.org (332-3408)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SPOKANE CHIEFS Regular season match vs. the Kootenay Ice. Jan. 21, 7:05 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000)

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JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 49


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*2017 Media Audit

HEALTH

Oh, the Humanity The murky take on marijuana and prenatal motherhood BY CONNOR DINNISON

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merica’s Jetsonian future is nigh. Companies like Virgin Galactic and SpaceX are close to spitting wealthy tourists into space. Robots large and small are talking with us (or at us), replacing us at work and whooping us on Jeopardy. Heck, hoverboards are

already a retro fad. We’ve become immortals, gods, and life in Orbit City, it seems, is good. Progress! And yet childbirth, the ultimate OG act of mortality, is no less removed from death. Maternal death rates in the United States, the most technologically advanced so-

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ciety on the planet, have more than doubled since at least 1987. Although its therapeutic benefits have been proven ad nauseum in other facets of life, marijuana remains a question mark for all involved in utero. A new comprehensive study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM), which reviewed and analyzed thousands of recent research reports on the health effects of marijuana, found “substantial evidence of a statistical association between maternal cannabis smoking and lower birth weight of the offspring.” A similar review published in last October’s issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology discovered the same connection, but determined it was “attributable to concomitant tobacco use and other confounding factors.” ...continued on page 52


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“OH, THE HUMANITY,” CONTINUED... Independently, there isn’t conclusive evidence of marijuana’s affiliation with low birth weight, say the researchers. Still, an author of the study told National Public Radio in September, “Any foreign substance that doesn’t directly benefit maternal or fetal health should be avoided.” Despite the risks, expectant moms are lighting up, often to combat the nauseating symptoms of morning sickness or its more severe incarnation, hyperemesis gravidarum, which can result LETTERS in dangerous levels of weight Send comments to loss and dehydration. Another editor@inlander.com. recent report in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that in 2014, 11.6 percent of pregnant women, ages 18 to 44, admitted smoking or ingesting cannabis within the previous year. “Marijuana did help. Immensely,” a woman named Shauna (her name was changed) told VICE in 2015. “I don’t think I would have made it through [the pregnancy] without cannabis.” Serious repercussions lie in wait for some who admit such use. In Colorado, a newborn child who tests positive for a Schedule I drug, such as cannabis, is considered, by law, a victim of child abuse or neglect (even though both medical and recreational marijuana are legal in the state). Here in Washington, positive toxicology tests for both mother and infant are reported to Child Protective Services. What gives? Our new freedoms, whether in self-driving cars or marijuana legalization, can dazzle and delight, but surely they come with a great responsibility, an obligation to our humanity. As Joseph Campbell warns in The Power of Myth, “Technology is not going to save us. We have to rely on our intuition, our true being.” n

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POLAR BEARS AND CLIMATE CHANGE Join the Spokane Canoe and Kayak Club for a presentation by Steve Amstrup, chief scientist for Polar Bears International. Jan. 23, 7-9 pm. Free. Mountain Gear Corporate Offices, 6021 E. Mansfield Ave. sckc.ws

THEATER

BEST OF BROADWAY: COSTUMES An exhibition of costumes in celebration of WestCoast Entertainment’s 30th anniversary season, featuring pieces used in touring Broadway musicals including Cats, Annie, The Lion King and more. Through Feb. 19. Museum open Tue-Sun, 10 am-5 pm (to 8 pm Wed; half-price on Tue). $5-$10/admission. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. (456-3931) NT LIVE PRESENTS: NO MAN’S LAND:Following their hit run on Broadway, Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart return to the West End stage in Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land,” broadcast live to cinemas from Wyndham’s Theatre, London. Jan. 19, 7 pm. $12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org/hdlive (208-882-4127) DISGRACED The 2013 Pulitzer Prize winning play examines questions of identity and religion in the contemporary world, with an accent on the incendiary topic of how radical Islam and the terrorism it inspires have affected the public discourse. Jan. 13-29, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE Mitch Albom’s well-loved story is brought to the stage in this two-man show directed by Kevin Kuban. A professor and student are reunited 16 years after graduation. What follows is one final weekly class on life. Through Jan. 29; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12$15. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. igniteonbroadway.org MET OPERA LIVE IN HD: ROMEO ET JULIETTE When Diana Damrau and Vittorio Grigolo starred opposite each other in Manon at the Met in 2015, the New York Times said, “the temperature rises nearly to boiling every time Damrau and Grigolo are on stage together.” Jan. 21, 10 am. $20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org/hdlive

VISUAL ARTS

FROM THE COLLECTION: IMAGES ABOUT THE AMERICAN WEST An exhibition featuring 65 works predominantly from the Jundt permanent collection. Artists include Ansel Adams, Gustave Baumann, Luis Jiménez, Frank Tenney Johnson, Fritz Scholder, William Wendt, Andy Warhol, and many others. Through May 13; gallery open Mon-Sat, from 10 am-4 pm. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet. (313-6843) HAROLD BALAZS: ONE MORE TIME At age 88, the longtime artist continues to create. “One More Time” features 100+ pieces representing every decade of Balazs’ work. Enamels, paintings, drawings, mixed media assemblages, and more are included. Jan. 13-Feb. 4; gallery open Tue-Sat, 11 am-6 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com SEEKING A LIGHT Artists Hannah G. Thompson and Arvid Tomayko use dance-movement and wearables to explore communication using reactive objects. Performances at 6 and 7 pm.

Jan. 21, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Richmond Gallery, 228 W. Sprague. laboratoryspokane.com ANIMATE THIS! BLENDER BASICS Learn to create your own 3D graphics and basic animations using the free software Blender. Register online. Jan. 24, 7-9 pm. $10. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org RIVER RIDGE ASSOCIATION OF FINE ARTS For the first meeting of the year, bring new art to “show and tell.” Also includes a program survey and new info on the group’s venues. Jan. 25, 10 am-12:15 pm. Free. Spokane Art Supply, 1303 N. Monroe. (327-6622) SCABLAND An installation artwork by Jenene Nagy. Jan. 26-Feb. 23. Lecture Jan. 25, at noon, in room 116 of the art building, followed by an opening reception. Gallery hours Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm. Free. EWU Gallery of Art, 140 Art Building, Cheney. (359-2494) WINE & ART SERIES Resident artist Christie Zeoli shares how to create texture in painting through impasto painting techniques and the palette knife. Each session includes complementary wine and appetizers. Jan. 26, 6-8 pm. $35. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org LIMINAL: PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAY SANDERS An exhibition exploring queerness, belonging, and bodies in process, hosted by the Women’s & Gender studies center. Event located in 207 Monroe Hall at EWU. Reception featuring music by Raven & Dylan from Raise Your Voice on KYRS. Jan. 27, 3-5 pm. Free. EWU, 526 Fifth. (Lisa: 3592898. Tay: 551-4231)

WORDS

READING: TIM AND BECKY HATTENBURG The authors discuss the book “Death Ride: A Little Boy’s Night of Terror.” Jan. 25, 12-1 pm. Free. Deer Park Library, 208 Forest. (893-8300) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) HUMPBACK WHALE ECOLOGY & SONG IN A CULTURAL SEA This presentation, led by wildlife biologist George Halekas, focuses on humpback whale ecology, planet wide, and their creative use of song and other sound expressions. Jan. 25, 6:30-8 pm. $10 suggested donation. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org JOSHUA MOHR WITH BROOKE MATSON Joshua Mohr is the author of the memoir Sirens (2017), and five novels including “Damascus,” which The NYT called “Beat-poet cool.” Also featuring Spokane poet Brooke Matson. Jan. 25, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206)

ETC.

ILLUSIO: TOUR OF ILLUSION See Spokane illusionist Isaiah Daniels perform his brand new show for the first time. Directed and produced by Isaiah Daniels, Jesse Davis, and Andy Schneider. Jan. 20, 7-8:30 pm. $12-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) n


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JANUARY 19, 2017 INLANDER 53


LEFT: Parrish & Grove owners Chelsea Updegrove, left, and Amanda Parrish. RIGHT: An open terrarium.

Earthly Delights A new local business brings indoor gardening and the terrarium trend to Spokane BY CHEY SCOTT

J

oining the ranks of other old-fashioned ideals being revitalized through the current “what’s old is new again” zeitgeist, terrariums and other miniature indoor gardens have re-emerged from their Victorian origins as a hip home décor trend and creative hobby. The miniature gardens contained in glass or ceramic vessels not only offer an outlet for budding green thumbs who have little space or time, but also feed our hunger for personalized, creative expression in the spaces we occupy. An added benefit: Indoor garden plants can help purify the air, and of course the living greenery is peaceful and pretty to look at. If only we could shrink ourselves small enough to escape into these tiny, botanical oases that populate the desks and windowsills of our built environments. While any casual web or Pinterest search turns up endless terrarium-building inspiration — from plant species that pair well inside any of the trendy, geometricshaped containers, to how to care for the fairly lowmaintenance habitats — a new local business specializing in indoor gardening and botanical arrangements has all the resources to help anyone get started.

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arrish & Grove opened in downtown Spokane’s Saranac Commons last November, offering customizable mini-gardens at its build-your-own terrarium station, along with a variety of locally grown exotic house plants, fresh flowers and other botanical-themed gift items.

54 INLANDER JANUARY 19, 2017

Situated in the middle of the open-market space it shares with a brewery, bakery, café and Mediterranean restaurant, Parrish & Grove easily markets itself to passersby with lush displays of cascading greenery. Before opening, the vacant spot (formerly home to Sun People Dry Goods Co.) had long caught the eye of Parrish & Grove owners Amanda Parrish and Chelsea Updegrove, both of whom also work full-time at the local nonprofit Lands Council located next door in the Community Building. “We were sitting at Black Label [Brewing Co.] and saw the space was vacant, and we said to each other, ‘What do you think should go in there?’” Parrish recalls on a chilly Thursday morning. “Amanda said she always thought flowers should be in here because it has that market feel, and what market doesn’t have flowers?” adds Updegrove. “The next day we knew we’d struck gold, and we submitted a proposal.” Both women are avid houseplant cultivators, so stocking specimens they’d personally discovered were harder to find at other area retailers was another priority. Customers can also order fresh flower arrangements, or create their own in store. So far, the build-your-own terrarium bar has been one of Parrish & Grove’s most popular features. It offers a variety of materials and plants to choose from. A cabinet in the shop’s back corner offers all the sand, soil and other materials — sold by the scoop — needed to create the well-draining base layers for a healthy terrarium of desert plants that can survive with

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little water. Updegrove says it’s actually easier to kill plants like succulents due to overwatering than to neglect. Customers can bring their own container, or purchase one from the shop. After adding the tiny plants, finish off with a few mineral embellishments like polished stones, quartz crystals or sparkly druzy, with tiny crystals atop a colorful mineral. Both private parties and public workshops centered around terrarium building are offered at Parrish & Grove. Depending on the items used, most terrariums range from $30 to $45.

C

ultivating exotic, dry or tropical-climate botanicals inside glass vessels emerged during the Victorian era, after a physician and botany hobbyist named Nathaniel Ward accidentally discovered that a sealed glass environment would allow non-native plants to survive, even thrive, in his London home. Ward’s specimens otherwise died outside their natural climate when exposed to the city’s sooty, toxic air. Early terrariums were called Wardian cases, and became a wildly popular form of home décor for the day’s elite. Ward’s miniature greenhouse designs also ushered in a new era for exotic plant imports. Since then, we’ve seen terrariums resurge in the modern era as a kitschy trend of the 1970s, and of late as more of an elevated component of interior design and personal expression. What hasn’t changed, though, are terrarium plants’ hardy traits, minimal space and easy care requirements, making the houseplants accessible to a range of lifestyles. “Creatively, you get to create a mini-world, from the color of the sand that complements a quartz crystal cluster next to a spiky plant. It’s beautiful. There is nothing like making plants and nature into art,” Updegrove says. “Plus, who doesn’t like to get their hands dirty and play around and make things?”  cheys@inlander.com Parrish & Grove • 19 W. Main • Open Tue-Sun, from 10 am-6 pm • parrishandgrove.com • 838-7784


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