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BOXING

Top boxers converge on Spokane next week PAGE 21

HOMELESS

Losing a home, but not a flock at First Covenant PAGE 46

JANUARY 16-22, 2014 | THINK GLOBAL. LIVE INLAND.

SUPPLEMENT TO

THE INLANDER INSIDE SNOWLANDER

A LO C A L O LY M P I A N G I V E S US A PREVIEW OF SOCHI

THE ART OF SNOW ( A N D S N O W B OA R D I N G )

HOW TO SURVIVE A NIGHT IN THE SNOW

T H E P E O P L E YO U M E E T I N T H E S K I H I L L PA R K I N G LOT


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WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WINTER OLYMPIC SPORT AND WHY? PHILLIP MAHUGH I like the one where they ski and they jump off the jump and fly through the air like squirrels. I don’t really know what it’s called. Why? Because it looks funny, and it’s also really badass.

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COMMENT | HEROES

The Manning Model America take note: We can still produce genuine role models, as NFL quarterback Peyton Manning is proving BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT

P

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eyton Manning is Sports Illustrated’s 2013 “Sportsman of the Year.” That honor was bestowed upon him as much for his strength of character as for his athletic prowess as the Denver Broncos’ record-setting quarterback. Let’s hope 2014 finds more politicians and celebrities following the Manning model. Peyton Manning was raised in a privileged atmosphere as the gifted son of a superstar quarterback. By all accounts, his family recognized the value of humility and respect and passed on those standards to their three sons. While Peyton is a multimillionaire, he fully respects those less fortunate, also recognizing the value of support staff and personnel — and they revere him for his genuine friendship, conduct befitting of someone possessed of humility and a caring heart. He pens handwritten notes to thank others for kindnesses and to acknowledge their accomplishments or particular struggles. When Manning has a subpar athletic day, he refuses to blame others or throw tantrums that would draw attention to himself. He saunters off the field after making spectacular plays and congratulates others, eschewing the currently popular victory dance or antics that draw attention. In short, he’s a gentleman.

M

anning sets the gold standard for how to behave in a world of self-importance and the attention-getting realm of professional sports. Others in politics who enjoy celebrity should take note. When faced with accomplishment or scandal, newsmakers often take a victory lap, noting their importance or that others are to blame for their misdeeds. Congressman Trey Radel of Florida was recently arrested for buying cocaine in Washington, D.C. Rather than resigning and disappearing, he feels justified in clinging to office — and his self-importance. Congressman Mark Sanford thought so highly of himself that he won reelection to the U.S. House of Representatives after disgracing himself as South Carolina’s governor in the wake of a domestic breakdown. Ever notice how celebrities who get caught breaking the law or saying something stupid and offensive apologize half-heartedly to “Any who were offended” by their ill-advised remarks? Peyton Manning is reportedly one who faces his mistakes, admitting falling short, but promising to atone. It’s easy to believe him and disbelieve the others. A recent ESPN documentary, The Book of Manning, mostly explained why. The Mannings have had a good life, full of success and wealth, yet it seems that their heads are not turned by

their well-earned money and fame. Any professional athlete with as much money in the bank or as many records in the books as Peyton and Eli Manning — or their famous dad, Archie — might find it easy to have a swelled head and be elitist. But the Manning family has a remarkable knack for steadiness and equanimity in the face of emotional situations that might make ordinary mortals behave differently.

A

bout the time the Manning documentary ran, a companion documentary highlighting the life of Tennessee Titans quarterback Steve McNair was also on the airwaves. It told the story of an equally gifted and famous professional athlete, and by all accounts, a good guy. McNair had plenty of fame and fortune, and a family of young sons, but an absent dad. His mother was prominent in the documentary, but not his father. Tragically, McNair made some mistakes and became involved with a mentally deranged woman, who shot him to death before killing herself. McNair was survived by his wife and sons, who will go through their lives without the husband and father they idolized.

“When Manning has a subpar athletic day, he refuses to blame others or throw tantrums…” We’re all influenced by the kind of upbringing we have and the values that are instilled in us early. Those without enough positive early influences may not have the tools to cope when challenges touch their lives. What we see is not always what we get with celebrities, newsmakers and politicians. That leads most Americans to conclude there are few heroes in modern times. And that also leads most Americans to especially appreciate a Peyton Manning when he comes along. I’m convinced the time has not passed when Americans can look up to and respect their leaders and people of prominence. Yet it’s up to leaders and newsmakers to genuinely act with the goodness, humility and statesmanship that we expect of them. Perhaps we can all use Peyton Manning as an example and an inspiration in 2014. 


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t’s been a long wait for Seahawk fans — from too many Sundays in the ’80s crushed by a patented Dave Krieg inadvertent backward pass, to the day the zebras bum-rushed us during Super Bowl XL. (Yep, still bitter.) Sunday’s game — with a trip to the big one on the line — is a tale of two dynamic cities vying for supremacy. It’s not just the 49ers vs. the Seahawks — it’s Apple vs. Microsoft, sourdough vs. Starbucks, fog vs. rain. But there’s the tale of two coaches, too — new-agey Pete Carroll, who blasts hip-hop during practice and defies NFL conventions (he has linebacker-sized defensive backs and the shortest quarterback in the league), vs. uptight Midwesterner Jim Harbaugh, who coaches like somebody just ran over his puppy. (Still, Harbaugh’s not as unhappy as Bill Belichick, who only smiled seven times all season — that’s just 0.4 smiles per game, landing him in the Mr. Grumpy Hall of Fame.) And of course it’s the tale of two young quarterbacks from different galaxies. Just check their Instagram pages: Colin Kaepernick has a picture of himself, shirtless (ridiculously ripped and heavily tattooed), kissing his own bicep; Russell Wilson has pictures of his visits to sick kids in the hospital along with tributes to Nelson Mandela. Everybody loves Wilson, while Kaeper-chip-on-his-shoulder has decided that everybody hates him — often citing an imaginary horde of “haters” as his central motivation in life. Whatever works for you, man! But the guy you can’t take your eyes off is Richard Sherman, who leads the NFL’s best defense — and the entire league in interceptions and trashtalking. In fact, when his high school coach banned him from trash-talking, he had his worst game ever. He hasn’t shut up since. You can’t help but admire him. He says he’s the first kid from Compton — one of the toughest addresses in SoCal — ever to graduate from Stanford. Other fun facts: He actually rehearses his trash-talk, testing out put-downs before games; and his dad still drives a garbage truck in L.A., keeping his son grounded to reality through all the fame. Sherman even writes a column for Sports Illustrated, where he shows the same self-confidence he does on the field. One column, “If I Ruled the League,” details what he would do if he was the Commish. He even dissed Tom Brady by leaving him off his list of the top five NFL quarterbacks. Sherman has fun — and, remember, this is supposed to be entertainment. Thanks to this cast of characters, Sunday’s game should deliver plenty of it. And if Sherman keeps backing up his talk with timely picks, he may rule the league yet.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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Given the city’s plan for targeted investment, what do you think East Sprague will be like in five years?

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ballot about completing this aging project, though I was sorry to read that the Spokane City Council voted everyone I talked to was eager for it to be built. to extend the hours the Sit-Lie Ban is in effect. This In contrast, several projects intended to bring change strikes me as particularly unfortunate now in revenue into our city lacked overwhelmthe coldest time of the year. ing voter support (the new arena, the I think it is easy to forget who the incinerator, the convention center), but homeless actually are. I’m conscious of Send comments to homeless vets who have PTSD or Traumatic editor@inlander.com. were conceived, planned and built. It would be a wonderful thing if some of this influx Brain Injury from their time fighting overof revenue from afar could be funneled seas for our protection, and of people who into a 70-year-old plan to ease the driving burden for are employed by fast food places and big box retail but thousands of Spokane residents. getting less than 40 hours a week work and paid at far less than a living wage. I’m aware of people who are GEOFF HAWORTH out of work because they can’t find work, and also of Spokane Valley, Wash. folks who have disabilities that make it hard or impossible to find jobs. There also are felons who have served their time, but forever have to carry the stigma of their mistake. A lot happened in 2013, and some amazing people I’m grateful that we had at least three people on were sadly lost. The Sgt. Pepper album cover copy the City Council who voted against the extension of this (1/2/14) featuring people of 2013 was a cool idea, but I ban. have to ask why someone who did so much like Nelson Mandela was hidden behind a lot less notable people? PAULINE DRUFFEL Are Kim and Kanye really more important? Miley Cyrus? Spokane, Wash. Have they really contributed more than Mandela? Suffered more? Even though I am white, I have always looked up to Mandela’s struggle and ultimate triumph. Without his I am a 33-year resident of Spokane and have seen many buildings erected, freeways, bridges and surface streets built, improved upon, or replaced. Living in the eastern side of the Spokane Valley it is a quick commute to downtown via the vastly improved I-90. I cross the river daily over the new Barker Road Bridge and witnessed its two-year building process. Both Spokane breaking new ground, I am sure Barack Obama would City and Spokane Valley have proven they can plan a not have become president in our country. Why then, is project, secure the funding and get the job done. Nelson Mandela barely visible? I hope that in the future, My first 20 years in Spokane I was a North Side your staff shows greater appreciation to those that resident and the very first project I learned of was the have done so much for the world. proposed N/S freeway. When I learned that the planning stages of this project began two years before I was SHANE DEAN born, I began to lose hope that I would ever get downSpokane, Wash. town quickly. I don’t recall ever seeing anything on any

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Are Kim and Kanye really more important? Miley Cyrus? Have they really contributed more than Mandela?

BRUTAL WOTANSSON: Hope not, I have a vested interest in the area. I know the city is on board to clean it up. It is gaining interest with investors from all over wanting to place businesses here. WILLIAM PIN: I think the concentrated funding idea is smart and hope that it works in this case. I’m just not sure about the area, or maybe the comparison to the Perry District. Perry is a true neighborhood commercial center, surrounded by homes on all sides, filled with places that can survive on local residents alone. This part of east Sprague isn’t like that. ERIC JOHNSON: The same; or worse. CASEY BYERS: East Sprague is a nice place for truck stops, boarded up industrial properties and weekly rate motels... I’d like to see it become a Vietnamese district, or some other kind of community for recent immigrants who can save it from becoming a trashy, sad place. TIMOTHY J FINNERAN: I would rather see the City of Spokane concentrate money and effort into one area like the East Sprague corridor, than to use the “salt shaker” approach to funding problem areas as they have done in the past. DANIEL WAGNER: Probably just like the North-South freeway. Unfinished! PAUL LINDBERG: Clearly, Spokane has made incredible strides in both economic and cultural arenas. … Spokane is nothing like it was in 1990. East Sprague stands to be one of the great reclamations after the Perry District and in could well be a magnet zone for tech startups. Many of those derelict brick buildings are just waiting for new vision, investment and a brand new life. 


JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 9


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COMMENT | SATIRE

Lost in Jersey BY ANDY BOROWITZ

A

t a hastily called press conference this week, Chris Christie revealed that he only became aware that he was the governor of New Jersey in the past 72 hours. “Unbeknownst to me, some people I thought I could trust were secretly working to elect me governor of this state,” a visibly stunned Christie told reporters. “I have acted swiftly and fired them all.” While asserting that he had terminated all of the people who were involved in the scheme to elect him, he said that, if he finds additional conspirators, “I will deal with them accordingly.” Christie struggled to explain how he remained in the dark about being governor, a position he has held since 2010: “I guess I’m just not much of a detail person. People think I’m a micromanager. I’m not. If a bunch of people are going behind

my back and plotting to make me the governor, that’s not the kind of thing I pick up on.” Reflecting on his reaction to the news that he is the governor of New Jersey, Christie said, “It’s a sad situation for me and for New Jersey.” Later Christie lashed out at the media, saying it had “failed to focus on the single most important issue regarding me, which is my weight.” “How much I’ve weighed in the past, how much I weigh now, and how much I’m eating — that’s all you clowns should be writing about!” he yelled. “Anything else is just a distraction!”  For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | MEDIA

Sneaky Web Ads BY JIM HIGHTOWER

A

ttention, class. Here’s today’s new word: “native advertising.” Okay, that’s two words. But it’s one concept, and it has nothing to do with native people. Rather, it’s a phrase sprung on us by the wonky wordsmiths of Internet media, who also refer to it as “brand content,” meaning that these particular web pages are not articles, but paid advertising. But they don’t want to be too explicit about distinguishing between genuine news items and ad hustles. Why not? Money, of course. In today’s fledgling web publications — from such newbies as BuzzFeed to the digital versions of old-line pubs like the New York Times — there’s been a blurring of the line between the publications’ legitimate journalistic content and the faux “stories” that are provided by marketers and designed to look like real articles from nonbiased news sources. For readers and viewers, the questions are obvious: Whose stuff is this, and what can I trust? The best ethical response by online publishers would be to draw a bright line around all “branded content,” perhaps with some flash-

ing neon lights and honking horns to announce: “This is an ad.” But no. While internet publishers say they seek journalistic integrity, they’re hungrier still for advertisers’ dollars, so their game is to flash just enough integrity without losing the bucks. That’s a losing game for integrity. Media analyst Bob Garfield notes that the very effectiveness of native advertising depends on it being confused with editorial content. Eliminate the confusion, and the ethical failure diminishes, he says, but “what will also diminish to a near vanishing point is the readership of those adverts.” Any media so dependent on corporate money that it resorts to deceiving its audience is — in a word — “dependent.” Also “untrustworthy.” We need public funding to free the independence of journalism on the web.  For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 11


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IDAHO

Mike Nelson, the Coeur d’Alene School District’s director of curriculum and assessment, points to Schoolnet, an educational software system that still hasn’t delivered on its big promises.

Below Grade Millions have been invested in a school data system that major districts find nearly useless BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

deally, technology in the classroom is supposed to improve learning and save teachers time and money. In reality, those high hopes can just as easily be brought low by a tangle of technical difficulties. In Idaho, that’s what’s happened with Schoolnet, the ambitious “instructional management system” that the state of Idaho and the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation have spent millions piloting over nearly three

years. Districts believed it would be able to seamlessly transmit data on students from one district to another when they transfer. It would allow teachers to easily create tests and lesson plans, and share them across the state. They would be able to quickly access test scores and grades on their students and share that information with parents. Instead, Schoolnet has been plagued with wildly inac-

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

curate data, slow loading times and aggravating navigation. A May 2013 study from the Institute for EvidenceBased Change (IEBC), commissioned by the Albertson Foundation, found that while many of Schoolnet’s goals have been accomplished, Idaho Department of Education representatives were worried that “the number and magnitude of errors and problems in the system are great enough that the users are losing trust and will continue to do so.” In that report, only 23 percent of Idaho teachers say they have enough time to use Schoolnet and only 25 percent believed it had resulted in more success for students. So as Idaho begins its legislative session, the progress of Schoolnet is again on the agenda. “Schoolnet has frustrated a number of teachers,” says Idaho State Sen. John Goedde, R-Coeur d’Alene, chair of the Idaho Senate’s education committee. “We have been promised things are ...continued on next page going to be better.”

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 13


NEWS | IDAHO “BELOW GRADE,” CONTINUED...

DISTRICT STRUGGLES

Two years ago, the Coeur d’Alene School District received a $250,000 grant to use instructional coaches to train teachers to use Schoolnet. The district hoped to use it to upload their curricula and prepare the school for the new Common Core standardized tests. That didn’t happen. “It became too slow for us to use,” says Mike Nelson, the district’s director of curriculum

and assessment. Just pulling up a single student’s name and information with the system, he says, took 30 to 45 seconds — far too long for teachers to look through multiple classrooms. “It does a lot of things,” Nelson says. “It just does not do a lot of things well.” The Schoolnet system already had been used in large school districts in Chicago and Philadelphia, but Idaho, along with Kentucky and North Carolina, are the first to try to take the system statewide. That meant the data system had significantly more data to deal

with, and in Idaho, there’s an additional challenge: The software had to simultaneously interface with multiple brands of local district grading software. That’s very similar to the reason the beleaguered HealthCare.gov site was so glitch-prone this fall. Some problems aren’t with the technology, but with the design. While Schoolnet allows teachers to automatically generate tests easily, drawing from a bank of 50,000 pre-loaded questions, creating new test questions can be tiresome. Nelson walks through the process step by step: Creating a

single new question means clicking through screen after screen asking for the question’s grade level, difficulty, school subject, subject matter, curriculum, and how it matches the district standards and the Common Core. “If you were going to offer your own test, a 20-minute test would probably take you up to two hours or three hours to create,” Nelson says. This from a tool supposed to save teachers time. But getting changes made to Schoolnet, Nelson says, has been as difficult and slow as “turning around an aircraft carrier.” Part

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of the problem is the contractor: Mere days after Idaho made the decision to contract with Schoolnet, the company was purchased by Pearson, a giant, multinational education corporation with its hands in everything from textbooks and grading software to the Financial Times. The IEBC report highlights a testy relationship between Pearson and the state, with education department administrators complaining about a lack of communication and follow-through from Pearson. “We paid $8 million, we’re being told a person is only available every other Friday,” one anonymous state education department official said in the report. Pearson, however, complained the department was too authoritative and didn’t give Pearson a chance to pilot the software on a smaller scale before applying it to the entire state. (Last week, both groups reiterated they’re committed to making Schoolnet successful.) The biggest complaints, however, continue to come from districts. “We had a bunch of teachers all excited, ready to jump in and it didn’t work,” says Tom Taggart, director of business and operations for the Lakeland Joint School District in Rathdrum. He says the district previously used a more narrowly focused, Idaho-developed software system called Milepost. It worked better, but cost the district $20,000. When the state let Lakeland use Schoolnet for free, the district switched. But while it’s saved them money, it hasn’t been successful. At a state hearing in September, Meridian, the largest school district in the state, revealed that even after two years, the data it was receiving on Schoolnet was so inaccurate that it still wasn’t ready to train teachers on the program. Even things as simple as class schedules turned into buggy messes. “Students weren’t showing up in the right class,” says Cindy Sisson, director of curriculum and staff development for Meridian. “If I had six sections of math, it would show I was teaching 10 or 12 or 15 sections.” Some classes appeared multiple times; others didn’t show up at all. All three districts say that so far, their teachers have only heavily used Schoolnet for one purpose: to link to the district’s Discovery Education library of educational instructional videos.


Roger Quarles, deputy superintendent of the Idaho Department of Education, says Schoolnet is working much better now — but he’ll have to convince local districts. But while many teachers effusively praise Discovery Education, it’s a system that doesn’t actually require Schoolnet to work. Meridian, at least, is heading in a new direction. It’s abandoning the statewide system and using a separate instance of Schoolnet only within its own district. After all, that what Schoolnet was originally designed to do. “Basically, what we’re doing now is we’re building our own version of Schoolnet,” says Sisson. “It might work much better as a district solution rather than a statewide solution.”

RESELLING SCHOOLNET

Last Friday morning, Roger Quarles, the recently hired Deputy Superintendent of the Idaho State Department of Education, drove about an hour south of Boise to Melba, to a tiny school district of about 300 students, and talked to 50 local teachers.

“We had a bunch of teachers all excited, ready to jump in and it didn’t work.” His pitch: Schoolnet has improved by leaps and bounds since the report was issued in May. “We have really, really worked hard to make sure that there’s accurate data uploaded in the system for classroom teachers,” Quarles says. “We’re probably 90 percent of the way there.” The fact remains: There’s been substantial investment of both time and money in Schoolnet. The $16.5 million the Albertson Foundation has already spent on Schoolnet would have been enough to pay the salaries of nearly 175 first-year teachers over the past three years. On top of that, the state has spent over $1 million. The Albertson Foundation has agreed to pay an additional $4.5 million, but only if the software can meet several milestones. After that, the entire cost will be picked up by Idaho. Quarles remains committed and optimistic, even enthusiastic. The IEBC report concluded the software still had potential. It showed many districts weren’t necessarily opposed to Schoolnet — they just wanted it to work. But considering how many teachers have already tried the system and found it wanting, convincing them to try again may be difficult. “If it did what they said it could do, it would be great,” says Lakeland’s Taggart. “Once you roll that out and it doesn’t work, and you fix it — you’ve [already] lost confidence.”  danielw@inlander.com

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

Last Wednesday, Sandpoint Mayor Marsha Ogilvie died due to complications from lung cancer. As she battled her illness, she had given Carrie Logan, Sandpoint city council president, power to conduct most mayoral duties.

MEMORIAL A LOST LEADER O

nly a few people shudder at the crack of the first rifle volley. Hundreds gathered Monday to remember U.S. Marine Sgt. Jacob M. Hess, a 22-year-old aviation mechanic, killed in Afghanistan on New Year’s Day. Most of the mourners brace themselves as the Marine honor guard snaps into formation. In the heavy silence of the church, an order rings out: “Ready. Aim. Fire.” Three times. Three blasts. As the echo of the final volley fades, a bugler lifts his horn. The piercing lament of “Taps” carries out over the auditorium. A lone casket, draped in the American flag, rests at the foot of the stage. Marines march forward, solemnly folding the flag, pausing to salute. Together, they kneel before Hess’ young widow, Bridget, as well as his parents, Mike Hess and Keirsten Lyons, presenting the starred banners. Loved ones remember Jake Hess as a quiet but fiercely determined young man, an exceptional Marine and a gifted athlete. Growing up, Hess moved Send comments to often as his father’s U.S. Navy assignments carried editor@inlander.com. the family from California to other coastal cities. But he came of age in Okinawa, Japan, forging lifelong connections with the island and classmates. Childhood friends describe Hess as a natural leader with a relentless enthusiasm for life. He served as an inspiration for many, whether on a soccer field or in military service. Close friend Brandon Dougherty pauses to compose himself often as he recalls a loyal, outgoing and trustworthy partner in many high school adventures at the beach or camping in the woods. “Jake showed us all to be every single thing you are and do every single thing you do completely,” Dougherty says, adding, “Jake was just such a strong, solid source of light, which is why I know what he showed us will never, ever go away.” Hess moved to Spokane before his senior year of high school, quickly proving himself a valuable member to local soccer and hockey teams. He

2.

Brandy Birkland, an owner of a Spokane Valley massage parlor raided by police in a July 2012 prostitution sting, now faces the possibility of life imprisonment for a charge of leading organized crime.

3.

LETTERS

DIGITS

21

Percentage of those signing up for private health insurance on the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, between ages 18 and 34. The Affordable Care Act’s success depends on convincing enough young, healthy people to sign up for health insurance; Washington’s percentage isn’t high enough yet.

U.S. Marine Sgt. Jacob M. Hess was killed in Afghanistan at age 22. graduated from North Central High School in 2009 and enlisted in the Marines the following year. He married his high school sweetheart, who also serves in the Marines, right after they both completed boot camp. In a brief biography handed out during the service, family members say Hess volunteered to go to Afghanistan once his wife’s unit came up for deployment. Military officials say Hess died while supporting combat operations, but no details have been released regarding the circumstances surrounding his death. An investigation remains underway. With a closing prayer, bagpipes take up the mournful tune of “Amazing Grace.” Several Marines, joined by Hess’ father and teenage brother, escort the casket from the hall. His widow follows closely, her eyes forward, flag under her arm. His mother trails behind, chin to her chest, leaning hard into her loved ones as she departs. — JACOB JONES

5.35

$

Approximate net worth of Idaho’s Jim Risch, the fifth-richest man in the U.S. Senate. Idaho Rep. Raul Labrador, who’s $57,000 in debt, is one of the least-wealthy House members.

million

A state investigation last week revealed that aides of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had closed important bridge lanes, creating massive traffic jams, as apparent political retribution against Mark Sokolich, the mayor of Fort Lee, N.J. Christie has spent the time since apologizing and denying he knew anything about his aides’ actions.

4. 5.

Six Spokane-area pharmacies were robbed over the span of nine days. Police are continuing their investigation. After the release of a 60-page report on Spokane’s criminal justice system, one of its biggest recommendations — the creation of a Criminal Justice Commission backed up by budgetary power — won the support of local political leaders. Ideally, the commission would be able to divert some criminals away from jail and into programs to prevent them from reoffending.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Politics and Murder An arrest in the South Hill killing; plus, Spokane City Council shows its new colors

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Based on DNA evidence matching their suspect to a glove at the crime scene, Spokane police investigators have arrested 50-year-old TIMOTHY E. SUCKOW for the alleged first-degree murder of South Hill businessman Douglas Carlile on Dec. 15. Detectives also recovered a black ski mask, an incriminating checklist and phones records linking Suckow to the victim’s business interests. Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub says Carlile, 63, appears to have been involved in numerous and complex business deals related to the growing North Dakota oil industry. Investigators believe property or assets disputes may have provided motive for his murder. “There were some significant financial issues that arose during those transactions,” Straub says. “We believe that it is very possible that the homicide is the result of those business transactions that went bad.” Major Crime detectives pursued the case relentlessly, Straub says. The FBI helped Send comments to match the glove DNA through its database. editor@inlander.com. Licensing records also led investigators to a white van Suckow often uses that matches a suspect vehicle spotted near the scene. “We also recovered this very detailed note,” Straub says, “outlining kind of a checklist of ‘here are the things … I have to do to prepare for the ultimate homicide.’” Suckow, who has previous convictions for burglary and firearm crimes, made his first appearance in court Tuesday. Bail was set at $2 million. — JACOB JONES

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HEAD OF THE TABLE

Aside from a new seating arrangement that splits the dais along political lines, the SPOKANE CITY COUNCIL showed the first sign of its newly instituted liberal majority this week. With Candace Mumm’s November election, the council’s 4-3 majority shifted from a conservative one to a liberal one and now all four of the council’s standing committees are chaired by one of those left-leaning members. Council committees, each focused on specific areas of policy, discuss and consider ordinances before they go before the full council. Council President Ben Stuckart appoints council members to committees and the rest of the council approves those appointments. In the new arrangement, Jon Snyder chairs the Public Safety Committee, formerly run by Nancy McLaughlin (whom Mumm replaced on council), and Amber Waldref chairs the Public Works Committee, which Steve Salvatori had previously chaired. The Finance Committee remains chaired Stuckart, and Candace Mumm will chair the Planning, Community/Economic Development Committee. Snyder says he’s already made changes to Public Safety, like scheduling monthly updates on the recently finalized recommendations of the Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Commission and creating a subcommittee to follow the implementation of marijuana legalization. More than political leanings, Snyder says he and the other new committee chairs are “biased toward action.” “I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s just more policy we consider,” he says. — HEIDI GROOVER

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NEWS | POLICY

Under One Roof A new workgroup is taking aim at shortfalls in serving victims of domestic violence BY HEIDI GROOVER

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espite the ease of modern technology, Patty Wheeler believes there’s a certain value to being in the same room. “I keep telling people you don’t make friends through email,” says Wheeler, programs director at the YWCA. That’s why she and some others who work with domestic violence cases are pushing to go back in time, to when many of them were housed in one building instead of counting on phone calls and emails to work together. In hopes of finding support for the idea, Wheeler is part of a new workgroup, made of judges, advocates and lawmakers, that’s meeting to take a big-picture look at the system that serves domestic violence victims and perpetrators. After its first meeting, certain systematic problems are emerging. In the 1990s, city and county prosecutors, detectives and advocates dedicated to domestic violence cases were housed together in one building, but a loss of funding shuttered those operations. Today, some domestic violence detectives and advocates are housed in the Spokane Regional Health District, though Wheeler says the offices provide less privacy, which makes talking with victims more complicated. But creating a bigger “co-located” domestic violence hub poses a funding challenge and is likely to come up against other immediate demands, like the reforms advocated by the Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Commission, which released its final report this month. That’s why the new workgroup includes policymakers like City Councilwoman Amber Waldref and County Commissioner Shelly O’Quinn. Waldref says even if funding a brand-new space isn’t immediately possible, she hopes to help the group find a new, more functional home at the cost of its current one. Communication gaps also persist in the courts that handle domestic violence cases. Superior, District and Municipal Court each use a different computer system, making it difficult for one to know if a domestic violence perpetrator faces separate charges in another, says Superior Court Judge Annette Plese. That means up to six attorneys can be working with one offender, making it difficult to address the root causes of the crimes.

YWCA Programs Director Patty Wheeler is part of a new domestic violence policy group. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO “We would like to move to where we look at the whole family, not just the criminal charges,” Plese says. “We need to fix the family. We can’t just fix one person.” Beyond making the system run more smoothly, better communication can keep victims safer. In a 2010 review of domesticviolence-related murders, the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence reported that not only did just 4 percent of abusers serve their full sentence, but victims had often sought out services or court protections before their deaths, but weren’t adequately protected by the courts. “I feel that as a community we’re moving forward, but we have slipped backward,” Wheeler says. “We have to regain that momentum again.”  If you or someone you know needs help, call the YWCA’s 24-hour crisis helpline at 509326-CALL (2255). In Idaho, call the North Idaho Violence Prevention Center at (208) 664-9303.

CALCULATING DANGER One bright spot locally is the use of a “lethality assessment” by officers responding to domestic violence calls. The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office uses the assessment and the Spokane Police Department is now in the process of training its officers to do the same. If a victim answers “yes” to any of the first three questions in the assessment — 1. “Has he/she ever used a weapon against you or threatened you with a weapon?” 2. “Has he/she threatened to kill you or your children?” 3. “Do you think he/she might try to kill you?” — an officer will dial a victim helpline at the YWCA. (Four “yes” answers to a second tier of questions — like “Does he/she have a gun or can he/she get one easily?” — also trigger the call.) “We’re increasing the likelihood that [victims] feel supported,” says YWCA Associate Director of Legal Services Chauntelle Lieske, who has helped implement the assessment. “You’re not just getting filed away somewhere.” (HG)


BOXING

Picking Fights

Top boxers converge on Spokane next week for national championships BY JACOB JONES

N

ationally renowned boxers Jennifer Hamann and Nicholas Jefferson recognize it might be a little hypocritical to label mixed martial arts or Ultimate Fighting as too bloody or too brutal. They say they can appreciate the primal intensity of MMA, but it’s the discipline and mental strategy that elevates boxing to a “Sweet Science.” “[In] MMA fights, people get slammed, bullied and things like that,” Jefferson says. “But in boxing, you really have to use your head. You have to stay smart in this sport.” Jefferson, 21, fights at a wiry 141 pounds, light welterweight. He has competed in Olympicstyle boxing since he was 8, winning a silver medal in last

year’s USA Boxing National Championships. The Tacoma native says he understands the popular appeal of MMA fighting. “But if I had to choose, I would always pick boxing,” he says. Hamann, 28, agrees. A featherweight boxer out of Seattle, Hamann reigns as the defending champion of her weight class after winning the gold medal in the 2013 USA Boxing Nationals. She also was last year’s Continental champion as well as the Washington Golden Gloves champion for 2012 and 2013. “I fight better when I focus on being creative,” she says of the mental side of the sport. “This year I just focused on relaxing and staying creative.” Both fighters seem eager for the upcoming 2014 USA Boxing National Championships, hosted for the second year in a row at the Northern Quest Resort & Casino from Jan. 20-25. Hundreds of the nation’s top boxers are set to converge on Spokane next week for six days of back-to-back fights, serving as a rare showcase of strength and style. “Boxing isn’t just about being able to punch somebody in the head,” Jefferson says. “It has an art to it.”

B

oxing spectators can take in a full week of fights, with preliminary bouts starting Monday and progressing through the quarterfinals and semifinals on Thursday and Friday, respectively. Championship fights will be held Saturday, Jan. 25. Several boxers from the 2012 USA Olympic teams will compete alongside other champion fighters and elite athletes from around the country. Hamann says national championships involve a rigorous schedule of fights each day. Boxers draw for match-ups and fight times, which might result in, at most, one day off during a tournament, but Hamann says she would rather fight every day and maintain a steady rhythm. Jefferson nods in agreement, but acknowledges it takes a toll. “Throughout those days, if you don’t have a bye, you’re prepared to fight,” he says. “It’s fight, fight, fight… You do get tired.” Returning to Spokane to defend their titles, both fighters see different challenges. Hamann says 2013 served as a grueling gauntlet of high-stakes tournaments and intense training. She hopes to relax this year Northwest boxers Jennifer Hamann and Nicholas Jefferson take on the and focus on her personal development as a nation’s best fighters at Northern Quest Resort & Casino. calculated boxer. But she still has a champi...continued on next page

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 21


CULTURE | BOXING

“PICKING FIGHTS,” CONTINUED... onship to defend. “It’s definitely harder,” she says. “Last year, I was nobody, so I had nothing to lose… I want to come to this tournament to learn and have fun. I think that’s my best chance of winning.” Jefferson says he still thinks of himself as an underdog. He doesn’t want to get ahead of himself or let his guard down. His plan for this year’s tournament: “Keeping poise, handling my business.”

A

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s two fighters circle each other in the ring, some will jab and dance. Others will tease, bait and counter. “Brawlers” will punch hard and wild, just trying to pummel their opponents. Hamann says next week’s tournament provides a unique chance to compare different techniques. “With such a big tournament, you just get to see different approaches,” she says. “I love it. I watch all the fights because I want to see how people use their stance or throw their jab. The audience, even if they don’t know anything about boxing, they can see the different styles. It’s kind of fun.” Compared to team sports, Jefferson says boxing is very liberating. Boxers win or lose based on their individual passion, preparation and focus. You have to own your record. You can’t blame anyone else. It’s a pure form of competition. “If you’ve never seen the boxing world, if you’ve never seen boxers compete, come check us out,” Jefferson says. “Really come out and try to understand what we do, why we love this sport so much. I promise you, when you do … you’ll understand.”  USA Boxing National Championships • Mon, Jan. 20-Sat, Jan. 25 • HUB Sports Center and Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • $5$40 • northernquest.com • (877) 871-6772


CULTURE | DIGEST

TV COMMUNITY R

emember that scene in The Two Towers where Gandalf the White frees Théoden, king of Rohan, from the darkness? Théoden is barely alive — senile and spittle-flecked. But then Gandalf casts off his cloak, raises his staff, and doesn’t just exorcise Théoden’s demons, but brings back the king’s youth, vitality and spirit. It’s not just the return of a king, it’s the return of an old friend. That’s what Season 5 of Community feels like. Last season, the show experienced a period of darkness. There were good behind-the-scenes reasons that Community creator Dan Harmon was fired at the end of the third season. He was prone to self-destruction, petty drama and blown deadlines. Yet he was also the soul of the show. Without Harmon, Community had the cringeworthy, desperate feel of a high-school basketball team attempting sketch comedy at a pep rally. But now he’s back. The king has returned, and so has the show. Harmon gets a lot of praise for his grand, ambitious ideas: Parodying mafia flicks and action thrillers, westerns and fantasy films, slipping in homages to My Dinner with Andre and Heart of Darkness. But his strengths go much deeper than that. He has a sense for the characters — they feel like real people again, instead of marionettes controlled by uncertain puppeteers. He’s the sort of perfectionist who’ll demand a rewrite. And then another. And then another and another, until it’s 2 am and everyone is drunk, hates themselves or both, but the script still isn’t good enough.

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TV | No doubt, someone has already told you to watch JUSTIFIED. But as the show isn’t on Netflix or Hulu, allowing you to veg out and view all the episodes in order, you most likely haven’t done it. Season five premiered last Tuesday on FX. It may not have been the series’ most clever season opener, but it promises to continue the story of Stetson-clad U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens in the most fascinating of ways — with dim-witted “villain” Dewey Crowe and his horde. This show has the smartest writing on TV today, even if no one else seems to notice.

WEBSITE | What does my 60-year-old father know about cooking? Almost everything. He has, after all, been getting Cook’s Illustrated magazine for years. This year, his daughter caught up by purchasing a subscription to COOKSILLUSTRATED.COM. For just $2.91 per month and a 14-day free trial, one can learn what it means to truly cook well at home, with access to most magazine content and more. Ever wanted to know the difference between sautéing and searing, or which knife is the best on the market? In the hands of America’s Test Kitchen experts, you’ll never be led astray. Yes, you can look up recipes for free all over the Internet, but finding the perfect one that has been tested over and over for accuracy? Now that’s priceless.

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CULTURE | VISUAL ART

Making Magic in Metal Sculptor Wayne Chabre has made a career out of being inspired by the Northwest BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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t’s a few weeks before his first-ever exhibition at CdA’s Art Spirit Gallery (which opened last week and also features Kay O’Rourke) and Wayne Chabre has a lengthy to-do list. He needs to arrange for transport of mostly metal-based sculptures of bronze, steel, and hammered copper, as well as cast glass and resin. Assisted by the folks at Walla Walla Foundry, Chabre needs to finish a few new pieces, as well as numerous commissions he’s engaged in at any given time. “Geometry Lessons,” which Chabre describes as a “waggish dog juggling geometric forms,” is one of several new, smallish pieces created for the Art Spirit exhibition. “Fish Lips,” consisting of two wall-mounted sconce lights, is typical of Chabre’s playful aesthetic, often involving an amalgam of industrial and organic components — heroic animals, anthropomorphized fish, undulating plant forms. The Art Spirit exhibition represents a minibreak from a 30-year career of public and private works dotting the Northwest landscape. Locally, there are the dozen figurative busts of local leaders lining the exterior of the Cowles publishing building in Spokane, which Chabre initially envisioned as gargoyle caricatures of Northwest journalists. His fanciful animals adorn the entry gates to Portland’s Oregon Zoo, while across town, “Second Growth” at a TriMet Light Rail station rises like a bronze tree sprouting symbols of the city’s rich culture: jazz music, glassmaking and the food and beverage industry. Several public works feature the artistry of Chabre’s wife, calligrapher Jeanne McMenemy, such at the 17-foot-tall “Wailing Bell” at Washington State University’s Vancouver campus. Made of bronze, locust, yew wood and steel, the bell is a memorial to the world’s extinct species. Each piece, he says, inspires the next set of ideas. “There are so many things I’ve been carrying around in my mind for years,” says Chabre, who learned to weld at a young age on an Eastern Washington wheat and cattle ranch. Inspired by the boneyard of machinery parts on the farm of his youth, Chabre created the steampunkish Great Combine to memorialize Stockton, Calif.’s early history. He envisions a similar structure in Spokane’s Riverfront Park celebrating the area’s waterfall-fueled industries. In Coeur d’Alene, Chabre pictures a gate or bas-relief addressing the power of the great floods of 15,000 years ago. Chabre’s familiarity with the Inland Northwest dates to his college days at Gonzaga University, where he fell under the tutelage of fellow Art Spirit artist Harold Balazs. From Balazs, Chabre learned casting techniques and metalworking, especially hammered copper, but also about how an artist might move through the world. “Here’s somebody who looks like he’s making a pretty good living [at art] and having fun doing it,” says Chabre of Balazs’ influence. What attracted him most to a career in art, says Chabre, was Balazs’ creativity, and the notion of “making something that wasn’t there before.”  Wayne Chabre and Kay O’Rourke • Jan. 10-Feb. 8 • The Art Spirit Gallery • 415 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • theartspiritgallery.com• 208-765-6006

“Delicate Balance” by Wayne Chabre

24 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014


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EDITOR’S NOTE

IN FULL SWING

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t’s full-on ski season! While we haven’t had the number of epic powder days we all hope for, there’s promise of a winter storm that could drop upward of 30 inches of snow on the mountains of the Inland Northwest. We’re fortunate that there are ski areas 100 percent open right in our backyard. Just a little farther to the east and south, resorts such as Jackson Hole, Grand Targhee and Bridger Bowl are boasting lots of snow, great coverage and epic conditions. Don’t forget that January is Learn to Ski Month, and area resorts are offering programs to get you started on the hill this winter. So whether you’re new to the sport or just want to dust off some cob-

Ski & Ride

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SNOWLANDER.COM O LY M P I C S SKI BUSINESS

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S N OW B OA R D ART 30 WINTER S U R V I VA L S N OWS H O E SPORTS

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LOCAL EVENTS

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LAST RUN

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EXPERT A DV I C E

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ON THE COVER: A CHAIR LIFT IN SOCHI

webs, area resorts have great deals and incentives. Check out each for unique offerings and details. Now with the holidays behind us, area resorts are in full swing, with event calendars chock-full of activities for the entire family to enjoy. Check out this issue’s calendar section for comprehensive listings. Every four years, skiing is more than just what’s happening locally, and we receive televised coverage of the Winter Olympics. This time around, Slopestyle was added as an event, and we’ll be watching to see how that’s going to play out. If previous years’ X Games are an indicator of the excitement and potential of these athletes, this will be one of the most exciting Olympics to date. We’ve lost our leading lady, Lindsey Vonn, to knee issues, but that might pave the way for an upand-coming star to shine. Between the added events, the loss of our star and the politics surrounding the Games thus far, it will be an Olympics not to miss. With so many reasons to get to the mountains this winter, I hope to see you on the slopes in the coming weeks! — JEN FORSYTH Snowlander Editor

Ski & Ride Powder Packs can be used from January 6th - April 6th, 2014. Purchase 8 gallons of gas and pick the Powder Pack of your choice from participating Conoco/76 stations in the Inland Northwest. (Present your receipt to the cashier to receive Powder Pack)

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OLYMPICS DOWNHILL SKIING “Obviously, I wouldn’t miss this event,” Luby says of the event in which she won her medal. “You can’t get the total experience of it by watching it on TV, but there are a lot of Americans to root for here.” One of the oldest events, the downhill competition is part of the alpine skiing discipline. Skiers reach speeds up to 75 mph, making the event the fastest of alpine competitions. WOMEN’S SKI JUMPING “It’s so cool that women are finally going to compete in ski jumping,” Luby says. While men have been ski jumping from the get-go at the Olympics, it’s taken until 2014 for women to get a chance to sail 100 meters or more through the air. Women will engage in the individual normal hill competition only, while men also take on the individual large hill and team competition.

EXPERT VIEWING Watching the Winter Olympics the Olympian way BY LAURA JOHNSON Susie Luby won a bronze medal in the 1972 Olympics. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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orn into a family of devout skiers, she was put on skis by age 4, the downhill technique becoming as natural as walking. She never envisioned international acclaim as a kid, yet from 1970-73, Susie Luby (then Corrock) was a talented alpine skier competing on the World Cup circuit. At 20, she unexpectedly won the bronze medal in the downhill ski event at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. “The French are still mad I was on the podium,” Luby says with a laugh. “I was just ‘on’ that day.” The next year, the Seattle native would retire from the sport, later relocating to her husband’s hometown of Spokane. However, skiing never left her bones. She still goes out to the mountains every weekend possible. “Winning an Olympic medal

was just one thing I’ve achieved in my life, it doesn’t define me,” Luby says from her office at John L. Scott, where she’s the managing broker. But every four years, the mother of two gets calls from journalists wanting to know about that one moment in her life, seeking her take on the upcoming games. Next month, the Russian city of Sochi hosts the 2014 Winter Olympics, with 15 winter sports disciplines. Although Olympic teams won’t be finalized until the end of the month, Luby says the American athletes to pay attention to are skiers Bode Miller, Ted Ligety and Mikaela Shiffrin. Also in the hunt are Spokane skier Will Brandenburg and Sandpoint snowboarder Nate Holland. Whoever makes the rosters, Luby will cheer on Team USA

from home. “I’ve never gone back to the Games since I won,” the petite strawberry blonde admits. “We’ve talked about it before, but I’m perfectly happy watching it on TV.”

LUBY’S TOP 5 EVENTS TO WATCH IN SOCHI SLOPESTYLE SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING A brand-new, trick-filled event for both skiing and snowboarding, slopestyle is part of the freestyle discipline. Athletes maneuver downhill going through, over and around railings, quarter-pipes and jumps. Expect Americans to do well here. “This one will be so awesome to watch,” Luby says. “It’s just so visual and thrilling for the audience.”

CURLING An official Olympic event only since 1998, the American public has taken time to warm to the sport of stones and brooms. Interest has grown slowly, as curling clubs — including the Lilac City Curling Club — pop up all over the country. “I am always fascinated by this event,” Luby says. “One time my family and I were in Canada and just watched an entire curling marathon on TV.” FIGURE SKATING “Like everyone else, I enjoy watching this one,” Luby says. “When the figure skating competitions come to Spokane, I never want to miss them.” Arguably one of the most popular of all the disciplines, figure skating is an event in which Americans have been very successful. But expect the Sochi team, except for ice dancers Meryl Davis and Charlie White, to be relatively inexperienced.  XXII Olympic Winter Games • February 7-23 • Watch on NBC • sochi2014.com

FORMER CHIEFS HEAD TO WINTER OLYMPICS

T

he Austrian and Canadian Olympic hockey teams have tapped three former Spokane Chiefs to fill their rosters for the 2014 Olympics. Michael Grabner and Stefan Ulmer will hit the ice for Team Austria; Mike

28 SNOWLANDER JANUARY, 2014

Babcock will coach Team Canada. Grabner, a Chief from 2004-07, currently plays for the NHL’s New York Islanders. Ulmer saw Spokane action from 2007-10 and now plays in the top-tier Swiss Na-

tional League A. Detroit Red Wings head coach Babcock, who coached the Chiefs from 1994-2000, is back at the helm of Team Canada after leading it to a gold medal in Vancouver. (LJ)


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BUSINESS ON THE SLOPES Joe Johnson proves there are careers in the ski industry off the runs BY ELI FRANCOVICH Joe Johnson is a ski industry account manager. BOB LEGASA PHOTO

S

ix years ago, Joe Johnson was a baby-faced Whitworth University graduate testing his marketing chops at the Spokane Visitor Information Center. He liked what he did — but it was missing something. Johnson grew up skiing, but throughout middle school and high school he focused instead on basketball. After college, he says he started skiing regularly. That was the beginning of the end for the visitor’s bureau job. “[Skiing] kind of sparked that love, that interest again, in doing something that you’re truly passionate about, every single day,” Johnson says. Like any sane person, he jokes, Johnson quit his job in the middle of the recession, packed his bags and went to Europe for three weeks. While there, he sent off some emails to different ski resorts in Utah — and promptly got a job offer. “Utah, as far as I’m concerned is the crème de la crème of the ski industry,” he says. “It was an amazing experience because I got my hands in every aspect of marketing.” That was five years ago. Since then he’s worked at a few different resorts in Utah and Montana. He’s currently an account manager for

Outside Media. Although relatively new to the business, he says he’s already seen major changes. “I think the biggest way the ski industry is changing is that it’s getting super competitive,” he says. “Everybody’s going for a shrinking piece of the pie.” That makes face-to-face customer service even more important. “From a public relations angle, it’s becoming more and more obvious that on the ski industry side of things, it’s all about relationships,” he says. That’s Johnson’s forte. He’s a people person, not afraid to put himself out there. Every job he’s gotten in the ski industry has been a result of his willingness to take a risk. “I knew what I wanted to do, and I wasn’t going to let being nervous stop me from doing what I wanted to do,” he says. For now, he’s happy to work in both the product and resort industries. Eventually, he says he wouldn’t mind being the PR director for a resort— as long as he can continue to ski. “I basically ski out of my office door at Alta. I pretty much ski every day,” he says. “Am I lucky? Hell, yeah. I consider myself one of the luckiest guys out there.” 

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SNOW ART

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“Meltdown” (above): one of Lori LaBissoniere’s many snow paintings.

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n the back of Lori LaBissoniere’s business card there is the oft-cited Confucius quote, “Choose a job you love and you will never have to do a day of work in your life.” She’s tried to stay true to that motto. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do when I graduated from college, and that’s what I’ve been struggling with ever since,” she says. Now, the 2002 Gonzaga art graduate is back in Spokane, trying to align her two big pas-

sions — snowboarding and art. Throughout college and afterward, she focused primarily on traditional art, preferring to paint on wood. At that time, she saw graphic design — how snowboard art is created — as compromising her passion. “I used to think that was selling out just because I wasn’t able to be an old-school artist, just using my hands and a paintbrush and reclaimed surfaces,” LaBissoniere says. “I also didn’t want to be on the computer all day.” Her art is clearly influenced by snowboarding. It’s generally set in


nature and features flowing lines inspired, she says, by carving in powder. LaBissoniere’s first experience designing snowboards came last year during Bend, Ore.’s annual Dirksen Derby Kickoff Party and Broken Board Art Auction, a fundraising event for a local boarder paralyzed in 2007. She says she used wood and acrylic paint as her media. The boards were meant as art pieces and were auctioned during the event. Although she’s had traditional art shows all over the Pacific Northwest, and her swirling mountainscapes are seen on walls around Bend, her former hometown, LaBissoniere says making a living that way is just too hard, which is why she began working on snowboard designs. She’s still painting, though. Her art will be on display next month at the Rocket Bakery in the Garland District. For seven years she taught art in a middle school in Bend, but says that was compromising her own creative expression. She was injured several times while snowboarding, which helped her tolerate sitting in front of a computer. Now she sees creating art that’s featured on the bottom

or top of snowboards as a way to reconcile her two loves. “I’ve gotten so much inspiration from snowboarding that I really want to put that into my art,” she says. She’s still learning the tools necessary to create snowboard art. Although she still wants to do “traditional” art, she hopes to make a living as a freelance snowboard designer. That’s not an easy route, she says. Unless you’re a fairly famous artist, companies require that you do all of the graphic work. Even then, it depends a lot on who you know. That, she says, is probably her biggest advantage: she’s well connected in the snow world. For snowboard companies, and the shops that carry them, the art is often a determining factor for buyers. “If it’s a good snowboard but the graphic sucks, it probably won’t sell very well,” says Eli Coski, a manager and buyer for Wintersport. For now, LaBissoniere is in Spokane studying graphic design. Throughout January and February, she plans to show her work locally. “My students used to ask me, ‘Ms. L, what do you like better? Art or snowboarding?’” she says. “That’s a really hard question.”  Breaking the Ice Art Show • Feb. through March • Rocket Bakery • 903 W. Garland

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SURVIVAL

CONQUER THE COLD

How to survive in the winter wilderness and enjoy it, too BY JO MILLER Kurt Perrigo discusses preparing for a winter camping trip during a class at the Spokane REI. MEGHAN KIRK PHOTO

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n a recent snowy trek in the Colville National Forest with friends, Kurt Perrigo packed only a knife, water bottle, flint and steel and some food. “I brought what I could stick in my pockets,” Perrigo says. A sales associate at REI, Perrigo teaches a winter camping class and has been going on outdoor excursions since he was a kid. He tells people who are planning winter trips to bring what you need based on your skill set and prepare to spend the night even if you’re only taking a day hike.

To keep your body heat up, wear synthetic or wool clothing instead of cotton, which holds onto moisture, says Perrigo. Avoid overheating and sweating by dressing in layers you can shed. Snack throughout the day — especially before sleeping — on foods high in calories and protein. “Calories and fat. That’s what you need, because that’s what your body’s going to burn to generate that heat,” he says. As for staying hydrated, just check the ground. “An ideal thing about winter camping is the fact that

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you don’t have to worry about water sources as long as there’s snow out there,” Perrigo says. But don’t melt snow in your mouth (it dries you out) or put it in a hot pan over a stove (you can scorch the snow). Instead, Perrigo says to melt a mixture of snow and water slowly over fire or fill a bag with snow and melt it close to your body. If you plan to camp out or find yourself in a survival situation, you’ll need shelter from the elements. Travis Johnson, founder of Northwest Survival School and a specialist in cold weather survival, says to build a fire first; that way you have warmth in case you lose light before your shelter is completed. And you’ll be able to cook food while you build. Always bring a guaranteed way to start fire, like a flint stick, waterproof matches or cotton balls with petroleum jelly. “Fire is a tool of its own,” Johnson says. “It’s the tool of all tools.” For shelter, you can bring a tent or use natural resources. If there’s enough snow, dig a snow cave, carving a place to

sleep higher than the doorway, so you stay warmer, and poking a hole in the roof for ventilation, Perrigo says. Or erect a debris hut, using materials on the ground and propping them against downed trees. Be sure to sleep on top of a mat or branches to insulate your body from the cold ground. Another thing to keep in mind: avalanche safety. If you’re at high altitude, stay aware of your surroundings and use a ski pole to test for frozen layers under the snow, Johnson says. Icy snow layers on an incline could mean danger, and you should move out of clearings and closer to tree lines. You can avoid emergencies when venturing into the frozen wilderness by going out armed with the right skills and by telling someone where you’re going and when you will return. It doesn’t have to be a miserable, cold and wet experience, Perrigo says. If you’re prepared for it, you can take in the beauty. “Just that winter landscape, that hush and quiet of it is really nice,” he says. 

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SPORTS ICY COMPETITION

At Priest Lake, it’s volleyball for the ladies and softball for the men — with snowshoes, of course BY MIKE BOOKEY Catching a softball is complicated by snowshoes. PECKY COX PHOTO

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he premise is a little old-school, but oh, so appropriate for the wilds of North Idaho. For more than 40 years, men have been gathering at Priest Lake to engage in a sport called snowshoe softball, which is exactly what it sounds like. Women found a game of their own, snowshoe volleyball. Both of these games are still played annually, often with competitors who’ve returned year after year for this seemingly bizarre but endlessly entertaining tradition. The popularity has not waned over the years — there’s a waiting list for softball, and this February’s volleyball tournament is filling up fast. “We were called the Original Priest Lakers and played [every year] until we were the last of the original teams,” says Suzie White of the inaugural tournament. She was joined on that team by Teri Hill, whose father George founded Hill’s Resort on Priest Lake. When

George passed away, they moved the tournament down to the resort itself and named it in his memory. Teri and her siblings still own and operate the popular resort — and still support the volleyball tournament. The games are held on two different courts on the shores of Priest Lake with nine-player teams, meaning you don’t have to run around too much, or at all, if your squad can cooperate. The tourney is double elimination, so you could play all day if your team keeps winning. If you can manage a top-three finish, there are prizes ranging from sweatshirts to champagne awaiting you and your chilly teammates. The softball’s not exactly as laid-back. The tournament features two weekends of preliminary play (with different teams each weekend) culminating in a championship battle on Feb. 1 and 2 that coincides with the volleyball tournament.

THE SMITH-BARBIERI progressive fund, a charitable foundation and ron and debbie reed host:

A film examining the widening income inequality in the united states.

JANUARY 20th 2014 | 6:00pm Bing crosby theater

tickets available through www.ticketswest.com for more information call 509.326.8683

proceeds will go to the second harvest food bank, and every dollar raised will be matched by smith-barbieri Sponsors include: the Smith-Barbieri Progressive Fund | Community Building Foundation The Inlander | Northwest Alliance for Responsible Media | Eco Depot | TicketsWest | Hamilton Studio wPacifiCAD | Spokane Alliance | Laborers Local 238 | Too Far North Productions | David Mercury Advertising Ron & Debbie Reed | KYRS Thin Air Community Radio | Peace & Justice Action League of Spokane Center for Justice | Teamsters Local Union No. 690 | Surviving the Future Film Group

TriStateOutfitters_011614_6H_BD.pdf

34 SNOWLANDER JANUARY, 2014


Jan 22 Waddell’s Neighborhood Pub The Rusty Moose 4318 S. Regal, Spokane, WA 7211 Main St, Bonners Ferry, ID (509) 443-6500 (208) 267-1950

Feb 5

If last year’s play was any indication, the dudes who gear up to smack a ball in subfreezing temperatures are there to win. Things get heated, calls are carefully monitored, and there are even rivalries that extend year to year. Teams from as far off as Northern

California make the trip to the corner of Highway 57 and Luby Bay Road, where two fields, complete with backstops, are set up in what’s usually an empty field. Oh, and there’s beer. Lots and lots of beer. Both contests prove to be surprisingly entertaining spec-

tator sports. If you don’t mind standing around in the cold, of course.  To register a team for the George Hill Snowshoe Volleyball Tournament, call Suzie White at 208-290-7945 by Jan. 24.

The Parkside 6249 W. Maine St, Spirit Lake, ID (208) 623-2799

Trinity at the City Beach 58 Bridge St, Sandpoint, ID (208) 255-7558

Feb 19 Capone’s Pub & Grill 9520 N. Government Way, Hayden, ID (208) 667-4843

219 Lounge 219 N. 1st Ave, Sandpoint, ID (208) 263-5673

Feb 26 The Foggy Bottom Lounge Mt Spokane, Spokane, WA (509) 238-2220

Pend Oreille Winery 301 Cedar St, Sandpoint, ID (208) 265-8545

Mar 8 Boomtown Bar 49 Degrees North, Chewelah, WA (509) 935-6649

Downtown Crossing 206 N. 1st Ave, Sandpoint, ID (208) 610-8820

Mar 19 The Falls Club 611 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls, ID (208) 457-1402

Taps Schweitzer Mountain, Sandpoint, ID (208) 263-9555

Uphill Side of the Lodge

Ugly Sweater Contest, Three Legged Race, Beer Tasting and BBQ, Volleyball, Snowman Building Contest, Face Painting, Two Inflatables from thefunguy.com, and Music by Jimmy Finn in the Loft Pub.

JANUARY, 2014 SNOWLANDER 35


WINTER EVENTS Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead. gossra.org (979-7499) COLLEGIATE RACES College skiers, snowboarders and snow lovers, get ready for the 2014 races with prizes offered for the best times in various categories. Jan. 18-19. 49° North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649)

$229

WINTER WONDERLAND

T

hough this annual festival centers around activities for the snow-loving family, one event that stands out by name is the Pacific Northwest Wife Carrying Contest. It’s a real thing, and has been entertaining couples and spectators for years. So guys, get lifting and get a wife-carrying strategy lined up now. The family aspect of the weekend goes much further, with kid’s bouncy houses, face painting, a three-legged race, snowmanbuilding contests and an ugly sweater contest. A barbecue on the deck with a beer tasting hosted by Sam Adams will keep everyone’s (of drinking age, of course) bellies full. Relax and listen to live music by Jimmy Finn the Piano Man in The Loft from noon to 3 pm, and don’t forget to squeeze in a few runs, too. — CHEY SCOTT

FREE SKI SCHOOL Register early for Lookout’s popular free ski school program for kids (ages 6-17), held every Saturday through March 15. Beginners from 10-11:15 am, intermediates from 11:30 am-12:45 pm. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) MOUNTAIN TOP BREAKFASTS Silver Mountain hosts a new series of early access skiing with a hot buffet breakfast served at Moguls. Saturdays through Feb. 22; gondola loading starts at 7:05 am, with early access to Chair 2 starting at 8:15 am. $30 for advance lift tickets, purchased online. Silver Mountain, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-344-2675) DESCHUTES WOODY WAGON WEEKEND A weekend of food, beer, prizes and fun on the slopes, hosted by the Schweitzer Mountain Community Association and Deschutes Brewery. Jan. 17-18, event times vary. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. (208-263-9555) FUN & FEMALE SNOWSHOE PROGRAM A ladies-only snowshoe adventure through the pristine B.C. mountains, led by the mountain’s female staff members, is a great introduction to the low-impact sport of snowshoeing. Jan. 18 and 25 from 3-4:30 pm. $59 per person. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431)

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

36 SNOWLANDER JANUARY, 2014

COUGAR GULCH XC SKI RACE This year the race now offers new courses for snowshoe and snow bike, in addition to skiing, with equipment available to

MOUNTAIN GEAR NACHSPEKTAKEL Mt. Spokane teams up with Mountain Gear to host an uphill travel night to the Vista House, then everyone skis down the mountain together. Jan. 24, meet at Lodge 2 at 6 pm. Limited to 50 participants, pre-register with Mountain Gear. Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

FEBRUARY KAN JAM FREESTYLE FESTIVAL The seventh annual event includes a rail jam, slopestyle and big air contests, open to skiers and snowboarders of all levels who compete for prizes. Feb. 7-9. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead. (238-2220) GOGGLE PARTY Leave your ski goggles on. A day on the slopes turns into a night in the lodge for an evening of drink specials and chances to win prizes at Noah’s Canteen. Feb. 8. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg. silvermt.com (866-344-2675)

KASLO SNOWMOBILING INVITATIONAL The town of Kaslo hosts this event featuring free activities all weekend, including informational sessions, displays, trail rides, live entertainment and more. Jan. 24-26. Downtown Kaslo, B.C. kaslotourism.com (250-353-2250)

PRIMETIMER LUNCHEON The local 55+ skiing social group meets for lunch and skis on Wednesdays through the ski season. Feb. 12, RSVP requested. Meets at Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. primetimerlunch@gmail.com (238-2220)

rent, and different course lengths (5K or 10K). Jan. 18, registration at 8:30 am. $10 entry, must also have a Nordic Pass ($10). Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-255-3081)

WOMEN’S SNOWSHOE TOUR Trail passes for the mountain’s Nordic trails are offered at a two-for-one special price, making it an ideal outing for mothers and daughters or groups of girlfriends. Jan. 25. 49° North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649)

SANDPOINT WINTER CARNIVAL The festival celebrates its 40th year with the return of annual favorites including skijoring, community bonfires, a laser light show on the mountain, the canine keg pull and much more. Feb. 14-23. Full schedule online. sandpointwintercarnival.com

MOONLIGHT DINE & SKI Enjoy an evening dinner at the summit before flying back down the mountain. Jan. 18. Time/price TBA. Whitefish Mountain Resort, 3889 Big Mountain Rd., Whitefish, Mont. skiwhitefish.com (406-862-2900)

ADVANCED SKATE SKI CLINIC Improve skills and learn new techniques to improve speed and stability in a threehour clinic. Jan. 26. $39, includes clinic and trail pass. 49° North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649)

NIGHT SKIING FOOD DRIVE One of only four night skiing opportunities at 49° this year, featuring lit runs on both upper and lower mountain areas. Bring at least two cans of food to get a lift ticket for only $4. Jan. 18. 49° North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649)

SNOW DREAMS This annual winter deck party has been voted one of the best on the continent. This year, it’s co-hosted by Kokanee. Jan. 25. Fernie Alpine Resort, 5339 Ski Hill Rd., Fernie, B.C. skifernie.com (250-423-4655)

Lookout Pass Winter Carnival • Sun, Jan. 19 • Most events free • Lookout Pass • I-90 at Mullan, Idaho • skilookout.com • 208-744-1301

JANUARY

EVERGREEN CUP The Fast Blast ski races are hosted by the Forty-Nine Alpine Ski Team (FAST). Jan. 24-26 at 11 am and 1 pm. 49° North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649)

USASA STOMP GAMES This year’s competition offers several events for all ages of skiers and boarders, including the slopestyle, alpine races and banked slalom. Jan. 31-Feb. 2. $25 entry fee per event. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. (208-263-9555)

NORTHERN LIGHTS The mountain comes alive with bursts of color and light during the annual torchlight parade down the mountain, a spectacular fireworks show and an afterparty in the Village. Jan. 18, parade at 6 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. (208-263-9555) GONE TO THE DOGS DAY Head up to Chewelah Peak for a day of Nordic skiing with your furry best friend, allowed to ski with you on the lower trails of the Nordic Center just for this special event. Jan. 19. 49° North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649) PNSA CHAMPIONSHIP QUALIFIERS The Spokane Ski Racing Association hosts the Pacific NW Ski Association qualifying races for the 2014 Western Region U16 Championships. Jan. 18-20. $46-$50/ day competitor fee. Mt. Spokane Ski and

BAVARIAN BREWS/BRATS & MUSIC FEST After a long day on the slopes, relax and refuel with a juicy Bavarian-style bratwurst and a stein as you enjoy live music in the lodge. The annual media team races and appreciation day also take place. Jan. 26. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) PRIMETIMER LUNCHEON The local 55+ skiing social group meets for lunch and skis on Wednesdays through the ski season. Jan. 29, RSVP requested. Meets at Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. primetimerlunch@gmail.com (238-2220) NORDIC SKI CLINICS Learn the techniques of “skate skiing” or improve your abilities in a weekend clinic. Jan. 31-Feb. 2. $65/day session, includes clinic, rental and ticket. Registration due by Jan. 19. Schweitzer, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-22-3070)

MARDI GRAS FESTIVAL Don’t forget your gold, green and purple beads to wear atop your snow gear as you hit the slopes this weekend. After a day outside, cozy up in the lodge for a night of live music and New Orleans-style celebrating. Feb. 15-16. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. (208-744-1301) FAMILY FESTIVAL The B.C. resort’s annual weekend festival includes ice skating, ski races, karaoke, hockey, s’mores parties and more. Feb. 15-16. Kimberley Alpine Resort, 301 North Star Blvd., Kimberley, B.C. skikimberley.com (250-427-4881) LADIES DAY The annual program includes a lift ticket, rentals, continental breakfast, four hours of instruction, lunch, wine and cheese tasting and an end-of-day massage. Feb. 19 from 9 am-4 pm. $99. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead. mtspokane.com (238-2220, x215) SECOND HARVEST FOOD DRIVE Ski the NW Rockies and KREM 2 host a food drive for Second Harvest Food bank, offering free lift tickets for all who donate a minimum of three nonperishable food items. Feb. 21. Lookout Pass, I-90 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) 

MORE EVENTS

Visit Inlander.com for even more.


THE LAST RUN

PARK IT

Oh, the people you’ll meet in the ski resort parking lot BY JEN FORSYTH From bros to kids, they’re all in the lot. JIM CAMPBELL ILLUSTRATION

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here’s an aspect of skiing and snowboarding everyone has experienced — the parking lot scene. It’s not typical to see all of these subcultures at the same time, but you can guarantee that you’ll witness most of them at some point during your skiing career.

THE PARKING ATTENDANTS

Don’t get me wrong: anyone who can get to work before the sun comes out, stand in a cold parking lot and deal with drivers suffering from powder anxiety has got my respect. That said, the parking lot attendant is also my nemesis. If I don’t stand my ground when arriving at the spot they’re directing me to, I’ll be parked about three centimeters away from the car next to me, or placed in the middle of a mud puddle on warm spring days, or positioned to have to make a million-point turn to exit my space after my day is done. They basically test every single one of my boundary issues.

THE WELL-ORGANIZED FAMILY

I can only imagine what it’s like packing up a car full of ski gear for an entire family. Let alone trying to get all the kids and yourself outfitted with gloves, goggles, helmets, boots and clothing, all while trying to keep feet dry and clothing off the snow-covered parking lot, while trying not to get run over by other cars. Some families have a system in place: plastic bins, carefully labeled and color-coordinated for each family member.

The bins then double as seating for booting-up — genius!

THE NOT-SO-ORGANIZED FAMILY

This family arrives at the resort and starts wondering where certain pieces of gear might be located. “Honey, where is my other glove?” Followed by “Kids, where did you put your goggles?” The spectacle continues into the village as the walk to the chairlift becomes one reminiscent of Hansel and Gretel; instead of breadcrumbs, the trail is littered with ski gloves, goggles and other equipment.

THE SKIER CHICK

Most likely drives a Subaru. If she doesn’t currently, probably has had dreadlocks or another hygiene deficiency typically amplified during ski season. Methodically, she boots up, assembles her gear and efficiently makes her way to the chairlift.

THE DUDES

This subculture, the easiest to spot and to hear, is my favorite. They arrive in some sort of front-wheel drive, packed as full as capacity will allow. They fall out, immediately crack beers, light cigarettes and crank up their favorite tunes for all of their parking lot neighbors to hear. They hang out for an abnormal amount of time, swilling beer, chatting about previous days on the mountain and the adventures of the night before. Then they just repeat the whole routine — as always, starting in the parking lot. 

Winter in the Inland Northwest is loaded with opportunity. There’s so many great activities and many things to prepare for as we move into the season of snow. It’s always helpful to have experts to help guide the way. The following opinions and short features from area businesses can help as you navigate your way to a great winter season.

gear Tuning and Structuring Your Downhill Equipment By Brady Anderson – Tri-State Outfitters How often do you tune your skis or snowboard? Once every five years? Once per season? Twice per season? Maybe you’ve never even heard of a ski or snowboard tune up? Well, depending on how often you’re able to hit the slopes, the answer could be as many as four times per season or more! Two factors contribute to this need: 1) how often you use your equipment, and 2) the condition to which you subject your equipment. Like all things, each time you use your equipment it’ll suffer a degree of wear. Sharp edges are worn dull and structured bottom surfaces become smooth and sticky. The more the equipment wears, the more your performance and stability suffer. Bases can even begin to dry out or lose form, making turns difficult, greatly diminishing your overall performance. As snow conditions change so does the need to change your surface structure as well as keep your wax up. Sharp edges and fine structure are important when conditions are hard packed and icy, plus; these conditions also remove wax much faster than soft snow. When snow is soft, a more coarse structure is required in order to create “turbulence” underneath the equipment, thus reducing suction and sticking which is what causes your equipment to perform so sluggishly and causes you to have to work harder for less than satisfactory results. Basic ski and snowboard tunes can be done by a variety of providers and are typically CONTACT US very affordable featuring a simple edge sharpening and wax. Full stone grind tunes are only slightly more expensive but are PHONE 1-208-772-0613 EMAIL cda@tri-state.com provided only by specialty shops like Tri-State Outfitters.

WEB www.t-state.com

JANUARY, 2014 SNOWLANDER 37


mountain

gear Try before you buy On-snow ski and snowboard demos help skiers and riders find the best choices for new equipment. Spokane Alpine Haus offers on-snow demo events throughout the season. “It’s the best way to find the gear that’s right for you,” says Fred Nowland, Spokane Alpine Haus shop manager. Once you’ve made the decision to try new equipment at a demo event, use the opportunity to really make an informed comparison. Whether it’s park-oriented, groomers or off-piste with extreme terrain, pick a run that is appropriate. Then, try a few different models and brands, you’ll be amazed at the difference. Spokane Alpine Haus organizes multiple on-snow demos each year , featuring over 60 pair of 2013/2014 skis in the store’s demo fleet. Fred takes it one step further by giving participants a card that not only lets you write down comments on every ski, but also has a coupon for $75 off a pair of new skis and another for $10 off a ski or snowboard tune-up. Plan on attending the next Spokane Alpine Haus demo event at 49 Degrees North on February 8th & February 22nd and at Mt. Spokane February 15th.

The Great White SNOWY North The snow keeps falling north of the border at Whitewater Ski Resort. With a settled snow pack of 69 inches and over 200 inches of snow accumulation this year, you can see why they call it the Great White North! Good snow is not the only reason to head North for a ski get-away. Whitewater offers a range of ski vacation packages, some that include catskiing, some that include hot springs, but not to worry as all of them offer snow! For the best value try the Mid Week White Package – under $300 to ski 3 days and stay 3 nights! Only available Sunday through Thursday. NEW this year Queen City Shuttle & Charters is running a shuttle five days a week from Spokane to Nelson, just $198 + gst for a return trip! www.kootenayshuttle.com/spokane/ Ski & Stay Packages starting at $95+tax per person, based on double occupancy. Call now to book your powder filled ski holiday!

CONTACT US ADDRESS 2925 S. Regal PHONE 509-534-4554

CONTACT US PHONE 1-800-666-9420 EMAIL info@skiwhitewater.com WEB www.skiwhitewater.com

Technique Tips: Getting Off the Groomed A new year means new goals and more time to enjoy your local ski mountain. This year take the opportunity to ski off the groomed, enjoy fresh powder, and explore new areas on the mountain. To do so effectively, we need to make a few adjustments to our stance and to the way we distribute our weight on our skis. In terms of stance, I know many of us have worked very hard to get our feet apart when it comes to groomed skiing. Off the groomed, however, we need to create a stable platform, so narrow up. When it comes to weight distribution in powder or chopped up fresh snow (aka crud), we want to apply equal weight to our skis. Having too much on one will cause us to get off balance and hinders turn initiation, which forces us to work harder. So narrow up your stance, stand on both skis, and enjoy the powder!

CONTACT US 3311 Flowery Trail Road, Chewelah WA PHONE 509-935-6649 EMAIL ski49n@ski49n.com WEB www.ski49n.com

38 SNOWLANDER JANUARY, 2014


49 Degrees North January 18th • Night skiing Food Drive January 18th • Rail Jam January 24th - 26th • Evergreen Cup - F.A.S.T. Blast January 25th • Womens Snowshoe Tour

Lookout Pass January 19th • Winter Carnival January 26th • Media Team Race / Bavarian Brews Fest February 2nd • Super Bowl Sunday

Mt Spokane January 18th-20th • PNSA U16 Championship Qualifier February 7th-9th • Kan Jam February 19th • Ladies Day February 22nd • Hope On The Slopes

Schweitzer January 18th • Cougar Gulch XC Ski Race January 18th • Northern Lights at Schweitzer January 20th-26th • North Idaho Carve Event January 21st • 26 SARS Western Regional Speed Series

Silver Mt January 18th-22nd • First Turns Mt Top Breakfast January 25th • Shack Snow Party February 8th • Goggle Party February 14th-17th • US Airbag Tour

Drive ANY Toyota to the designated mountain on their FreeSki Friday, and your Lift Ticket* is FREE!

INLAND EMPIRE TOYoTA DEALERS

Jan 31 • Schweitzer Feb 7 • Mt Spokane Feb 14 • Lookout Pass Feb 21 • Silver Mountain Feb 28 • 49º North Toyota offers more vehicles with

available All-Wheel Drive or 4-Wheel Drive than nearly any other brand.

*One Lift Ticket awarded to the driver of every Toyota on specific Friday.

JANUARY, 2014 SNOWLANDER 39


40 SNOWLANDER JANUARY, 2014


The Candy Kanes

Patty Kane (center) and her fellow Halletts Chocolates co-owners and daughters Kitty (left) and Kari. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Three sisters and their mom keep the candy flowing at Halletts Chocolates BY JO MILLER

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black-and-white poster of the iconic I Love Lucy moment in which Lucy and Ethel stuff their faces with chocolates hangs above a similar conveyor belt inside the Halletts Chocolates factory. On the last stretch of the enrobing machine, after two curtains of chocolate flow over each cube of caramel or buttercream and they scoot through a cooling tunnel, the worker has to act fast to inspect and cup each candy before they tumble off the belt. “They’re not eating them like that, but it’s that same idea — picture of panic,” says Kitty Kane, one of Halletts’ owners. That’s just one aspect of this North Spokane choco-

late factory, where everything is done by hand — whether it’s labeling each chocolate with an artistic mark, cooking toffee or packing truffles into Valentine’s Day heart boxes. Kitty and her sister, Kari Kane, point to a large table in the middle of the factory that’s usually covered by an army of molded chocolate bunnies during Easter time. They pull out an example from last year’s batch, the largest bunny they make, weighing in at 5 pounds and standing 2½ feet tall. “We tell people to use a hammer to eat that bunny,” Kari says.

K

itty and Kari own Halletts Chocolates with their sister, Kristy Kane, and their mom, Patty Kane. As you might be wondering, the Kanes are not part of the Hallett family, but bought the company from the Halletts 10 years ago. Brothers Joel and Tom Hallett started out in 1976 as Hallett Farms, growing berries in Otis Orchards, but began making candies in the ’80s and opened the chocolate factory in North Spokane in 1984. Kari worked for Halletts for a couple of years while in college and remembers it as her favorite job. “There’s something about just packing up a one...continued on next page

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 41


FOOD | SWEETS

The gray sea salt caramels from Halletts. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“THE CANDY KANES,” CONTINUED... pound box of chocolates and making it look pretty,” she says. “I just always enjoyed that.” After college, Kari quit Halletts to start a career as a geologist, but several years later she got a call from Joel saying the company was going up for public auction and asking if she was interested. “In an instant my life changed,” she says. When the auction closed, Kari and her family were the new owners of Halletts. “It was a company we knew of already, that [Kari] really loved, really loved,” Kitty says. “I mean, every year we would get Halletts chocolates for Christmas from her. And then we owned the company. It was so surreal.” After working 15 years as a chemist, Kitty started doing the bookwork for the business and Patty retired from Rosauers to manage the factory. Kristy started out doing retail, but after she moved to Seattle, Kari took over the retail side, and does the marketing while also making all of the truffles.

S

ince buying Halletts, the Kanes have added a few things. They’ve come up with new creations like habanero caramels and grey sea-salt caramels to join an already long list of candies that include lemon buttercreams, chocolate-covered cherries, almond toffee crunch and jelly sticks. The Kanes also opened a coffeehouse and retail store on East Trent Avenue, just east of downtown, in 2008. There you can get blended coffee drinks made with their peanut butter crunch and almond toffee crunch, as well as hot chocolate with their bittersweet, semi-sweet or milk chocolate ganache. Last month, they moved their retail store out of the factory and opened a second retail store/coffeehouse at a location on North Nevada Street, less than a mile away from the factory (so close they wheeled their candy case over on a cart instead of loading it on a truck). The move was spurred by a motivation to be more visible on a main street. In the past three years, Halletts won more than 10 awards at chocolate salons in Seattle and Chicago, but Kari says some people who lived just a few blocks from the factory never knew they existed until they walked into the new store. “We’re thinking if people in Chicago like us [and] people in Seattle, it’s about time Spokane knows who we are,” she says. The factory store had many regulars, though, and Kari says they’re glad they just have to point customers to the store right around the corner. Kitty says it’s rare to encounter a grumpy customer anyway because, well, they came to buy chocolates. “There’s just something special about [this job],” Kitty says. “You feel good making a quality product, interacting with people that appreciate it and you appreciate them. And it’s candy; what can you say?” 

42 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

Halletts Chocolates • 6704 N. Nevada • Open Mon-Fri, 9:30 am to 7 pm; Sat, 10 am to 5 pm • hallettschocolates.com • 4740899 • also: 1003 E. Trent Ave.


FOOD | OPENING

From left: Hailey Ogle, Boiler Room manager Mitch Holda and bartender Jake Gaebe. MEGHAN KIRK PHOTO

Sizzle and Swill The Boiler Room serves up artisan pizza and more in a modern space in Five Mile BY CHEY SCOTT

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s customers cross the threshold, shuddering off the icy air behind them, they’re welcomed by a cacophony of conversation and music, mixed with the warm aroma of tomato sauce and dough yeast. It’s the Friday after Christmas, the first Friday of business for the Boiler Room, and it seems as if all of Spokane’s North Side residents are packed inside. Diners are there to check out the chic yet industrial space that had been slowly rising from the ground for months, and of course to investigate the Boiler Room’s please-everyone menu of wood-fired craft pizza, beer, cocktails and small plates. Owned by local restaurateur Matt Goodwin — whose other projects include the Volstead Act, Press bar on the South Hill, and the rejuvenated downtown bar Fast Eddie’s — the Boiler Room seeks to fill a void in this edge of town. While there are several other sit-down restaurants in the Five Mile area, Goodwin felt that still, “it’s a very underserved market. There are a lot of people who are looking for a fun, family-friendly, yet still adult-oriented restaurant.” His approach seems to be working — it’s standing room only in the bar, and tables beyond are filled with families, from grandparents to infants. The “swill” aspect of the Boiler Room’s tagline, “craft pizza and swill,” includes housemade cocktails named after neighborhood streets and places. The draft and bottled beer list even features a few brews from its also new next-door-

CORRECTION

neighbor, Waddell’s Brewpub & Grille. Located in the new, mixed-use Cedar Crossing development, the Boiler Room sits atop a parcel once covered in weeds for more than a decade, the former site of a Tidyman’s grocery store. The restaurant’s utilitarian interior is the work of local design firm HDG Hurtado + Hissong Design Group, resulting in a functional, boiler room-esque setting. Two cylindrical stone pizza ovens are wrapped in metal sheets to give the illusion of boilers, with purely decorative pipes coming out of the top. The rest of the space further enhances the industrial design approach, with a treated cement floor, butcher block-style table tops and metal pendant lighting. Rectangle-shaped artisan pizzas are served piping hot on long wooden boards, the golden crust baked to the ideal crispness. House specialties that have been a hit so far, Goodwin says, include the “Fireball,” ($16) topped with Italian sausage, pepperoni, pancetta, peppers, chili flakes and Sriracha hot sauce. A Thai-inspired pizza and one topped with Yukon potatoes and sour cream are others created with the foodie in mind. But the Boiler Room’s menu also adheres to pizza-lovers’ classic staples: margherita ($13), pepperoni ($14), three cheese ($12) and veggie ($13) round out the selection of specialty pies.  Boiler Room • 6501 N. Cedar • Mon-Sun, 11 am-2 am • facebook.com/TheBoilerRoomPizza • 863-9213

A story last week about V du V Wines incorrectly stated that the company began by selling wine out of a van. While the wine was indeed stored and fermented in a van, it was never sold out of the van.

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JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 43


Cost of Combat Lone Survivor is a sobering, powerful war movie BY MARYANN JOHANSON

T

he spoiler is in the title: Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell was the only one to walk away — well, get medevacked away — from a doomed 2005 mission in the mountains of Afghanistan to capture or kill Ahmad Shahd, a Taliban leader who’d targeted U.S. Marines and was an all-around villain. Now, writer-director Peter Berg, in a gripping bounce-back from his deeply terrible Battleship, has adapted Luttrell’s story into one of the more realistic military movies ever (at least as far as someone who’s never been in the military can determine), one that acknowledges the powerful fraternity of soldiers without being jingoistic about their work, one that depicts a battlefield’s intensity and adrenaline without getting pornographic about it. It’s even got something to say about the ironies of modern asymmetrical warfare and the senselessness of the Western military presence in the region. The giveaway of the title immediately turns some clichés of the war flick into resigned tragedy: The SEAL who has a sweet Skype chat with his wife before heading out on the mission. Another who discusses with a brother-in-arms the appropriate wedding gift for his fiancée. We already know these guys are doomed. And yet, just as these soldiers don’t

44 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

linger on the possibility of their own demise as they troop into the rugged hills to seek out their target, we also forget the inevitable and are caught up in the immediate moment as the mission goes wrong almost instantly. The mission isn’t “cursed,” Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg) corrects one of his fellow soldiers. “It’s just Afghanistan.” Hanging over everything that happens is the unspoken suggestion that they shouldn’t even be here at all, and they’re certainly not prepared for it. As fighting machines, sure: they’ve been through brutal, almost abusive training, as we see in the montage of (presumably) real SEALs being toughened up that opens the film. But not one in this band of four — led by Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch) and including Danny Dietz (Emile Hirsch) and Matt Axelson (Ben Foster) — speaks a word of the language of the hill tribes they’re wandering among. That presents an enormous problem when an old man and a little boy shepherding goats stumble upon their hiding place above the village housing their objective below. Berg does not shy away from the terrible realities of the SEALs’ situation, and listening to American soldiers arguing over whether they should kill

unarmed civilians in order to protect their mission is horrific. (They fear their presence would be revealed to Shahd if they let the goatherders go, and they can’t talk to their captives to determine whose side they might be on; the film makes it plain that plenty of Afghans hate the Taliban.) The film’s centerpiece LONE SURVIVOR is an extended firefight, not in the least bit HolRated R lywoodized action, in Directed by Peter Berg which the four SEALs Starring Mark Wahlberg, sustain awful — and awTaylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch fully realistic — injuries, are utterly beaten up and shot up, and make decisions aimed at survival that indicate their seemingly abusive training was indeed necessary, and far from too extreme. From the perspective of mere movie entertainment, the non-CGI stunt work and you-are-there action is riveting, and not like anything you’ve seen on film before. From the perspective of real-world military activity? We need to find better ways than this of resolving conflicts. We must be insane to let anyone, on either side of this deplorable state of affairs, go through what we witness here. 


FILM | SHORTS

OTHER OPENING FILMS DEVIL’S DUE

When a newlywed couple is surprised with a pregnancy, they believe the surprises will end there. Unfortunately, they don’t. As months pass, the husband notices increasingly dark and disturbing changes in his wife. When these changes become horrifically dismaying, questions begin to arise about what his wife is carrying inside. (CF) Rated R

GOD LOVES UGANDA

In this documentary, Academy Awardwinning filmmaker Roger Ross shares his detailed exploration of the increasingly overwhelming influence of Americanimported religion on Uganda’s culture. At the same time, Uganda faces a fatal anti-gay movement. At the center of this documentary are a number of African and American religious leaders and missionaries who play a critical role in Uganda’s terrifying transformation. At Magic Lantern (CF) Unrated

THE GREAT BEAUTY

There is great beauty in The Great Beauty. You just have to know where to find it, in the hidden corners and secret rooms of Rome. That’s what once-successful novelist Jep Gambardella (Toni Servillo) wants to do, while pondering where life has led him at age 65. He sees and feels emptiness where he craves that beauty. Director Paolo Sorrentino’s lavish love note to Rome guides Jep and all of us watching him, to a place, make that an attitude, where we’d all like to be. A lovely movie about life and death and pretty much everything in between. At Magic Lantern (ES) Unrated

JACK RYAN SHADOW RECRUIT

While working for a billionaire in Moscow, Jack Ryan unearths a plan to take down the U.S. economy. Now he is the only one with the brains and bravery to stop this collapse. This film follows Ryan on his action-packed mission to clear his name, protect his loved ones, and save his country. Based on a character created by author Tom Clancy, Jack Ryan is played by Chris Pine, who is supported by Keira Knightley and Kevin Costner. (CF) PG-13

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THE NUT JOB

This animated feature begins with cute little animals who are worried about starving, introduces a group of violenceminded bank robbers, sets up a confusing message about the differences (or is it the similarities) between selfishness and heroism, and features bland voice performances that go with a bunch of unappealing characters. (ES) PG

RIDE ALONG

Ice Cube and Kevin Hart team up in this action-packed comedy to deliver plenty of thrills and laughs. When Ben (Hart) is finally accepted into the police academy, he sets out to impress his girlfriend’s brother, decorated Atlanta Police Department detective James (Cube). But when James sets up a ride-along to test Ben, the night turns out to be crazier than expected, forcing them to team up to defeat the city’s most dangerous criminal. (CF) PG-13

NOW PLAYING ALL IS LOST

We never learn the name of the grizzled yachtsman (Robert Redford) whose eight-day fight to survive on the open sea is chronicled in J.C. Chandor’s magnificently primal All Is Lost. After all, how in the world are we supposed to sympathize with our soggy protagonist if we don’t know about a rift with his daughter, or a childhood trauma, or why he’s sailing alone in the middle of nowhere? At Magic Lantern (SR) Rated PG-13

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Coming off the splendid Silver Linings Playbook, director David O. Russell is back, bringing the stars of that film, Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, along. This time, the subject matter is a little more intense: He takes us back to the glittery 1970s for a crime drama about a group of corrupt politicians living the high life in New Jersey. (MB) Rated R

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES

In their 2004 masterpiece Anchorman, Adam McKay and Will Ferrell captivated audiences with his uncompromising profile of legendary San Diego anchorman Ron Burgundy. He brought his lens to bear not just on the cutthroat atmosphere of internal and external news rivalries, but on the entire 1970s zeitgeist — gender equality, male ego. (DW) PG-13

AUGUST: ORANGE COUNTY

With snappy, southern drawls and huge screaming fiascos, August: Orange County delves into a family feud that has been going on for years. Brought together because of a missing patriarch, three sisters (Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis and Julianne Nicholson) are once again subjected to their vicious, pill-popping mother’s (Meryl Streep,) verbal abuse. (ER) Rated R

PRESENTS

RESTAURANT WEEK

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. (ES) Rated PG-13

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS

Set in 1965 Spokane, this locally produced film tells the true story of Lyle Hatcher (who co-wrote and co-directed the film with Don Caron), who befriended a wheelchair-bound boy at his school suffering from muscular dystrophy. The film tells the story of how Hatcher, full ...continued on next page

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

February 21 - March 2 2014

2013 Restaurant Week Diner “Restaurant week is a great opportunity to introduce the Spokane community to our local restaurant scene. A favorite annual event. I use it as an opportunity to try out that new restaurant I keep hearing about…or to visit an old favorite. Great friends, savory food, and fun cocktails.”

- Shelly O’Quinn Spokane County Commissioner

Pick up the official guide in the February 20TH issue of the Inlander

InlanderRestaurantWeek.com Menus debut online January 30th

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 45


FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

THE MAGIC LANTERN

NOW PLAYING

FRI JAN 17TH - THUR JAN 23RD

NEBRASKA (121 MIN-R)

Fri-Mon: 2:00, 6:15 Tues-Thurs: 4:15

PHILOMENA (98 MIN - PG-13)

Fri/Sat: 4:15, 8:30 Sun/Mon: 12:00, 4:15 Tues-Thurs: 6:30

THE GREAT BEAUTY (142 MIN-R) Fri-Mon: 5:30 Tues-Thurs: 2:30

ALL IS LOST (96 MIN- PG-13)

Fri/Sat: 3:30, 8:00 Sun/Mon: 1:30, 3:30 Tues-Thurs: 5:00

GOD LOVES UGANDA (80 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 1:45 Sun: 11:45 Tues/Weds: 7:00

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

WEEK OF JANUARY 17th THRU JANUARY 23rd

$1

WEDNESDAYS

4

$ 50 BEER & DINNER IN THEATER!

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

CLoudy with a chance of Meatballs 2 Sat & Mon 3:00

Walking with Dinosaurs Fri 5:00, Sat & Mon 1:00 5:00 Sun 12:30, Tues-Thurs 5:00

The Butler

PG-13

Fri-Sat 7:00, Mon & Wed 7:00

Homefront Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, January 17, 2014. Saturday, January 18, 2014. Sunday, January 19, 2014. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 1/14/2014 011414070014 Regal 865-925-9554

Fri-Sat 9:30pm, Sun & Tue 9pm Mon 9:30pm, Wed-Thurs 9:30pm

RIDE ALONG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1250 330) 700 950 THE NUT JOB IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 PM) 455 PM DEVIL'S DUE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 315) 530 745 1000 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1240 310) 740 1020 THE NUT JOB [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(245 PM) 730 PM 940 PM LONE SURVIVOR [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1220 320) 640 925 THE LEGEND OF HERCULES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(115 PM) 945 PM THE LEGEND OF HERCULES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(340 PM) 710 PM SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.1005 PM HER [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1255 350) 720 1010 ANCHORMAN 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(110 355) 645 1015 SAVING MR. BANKS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1215 305) 620 920 THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1200 PM) 650 PM 930 PM THE HOBBIT: SMAUG IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(325 PM) FROZEN [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1205 PM 255 PM) 630 PM THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1235 345) 655 915

THE NUT JOB IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 PM) 515 PM DEVIL'S DUE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(105) 415 650 1000 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100 355) 645 945 THE NUT JOB [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(255 PM) 735 PM 910 PM LONE SURVIVOR [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1245 340) 635 930 THE LEGEND OF HERCULES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(110 PM) 920 PM THE LEGEND OF HERCULES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.410 PM 640 PM SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1250 335) 620 915 HER [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1240 345) 645 945 ANCHORMAN 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1230 325) 630 920 THE HOBBIT: SMAUG IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.440 PM SAVING MR. BANKS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(105 355) 650 945 THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(110 PM) 805 PM FROZEN [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1255 330) 700 940 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(130 PM) 445 PM 800 PM

Little Shop of HorrorS PG-13

Tues 7:00pm

Seattle vs San Francisco Sun 3:00 Gonzaga vs San Diego Thurs 7:00 Both Games are FREE!

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...and find The inside. 46 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

Big Screen: RIDE ALONG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(120) 415 720 955 THE NUT JOB IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 PM) 440 PM THE NUT JOB [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(220 PM) 710 PM 930 PM DEVIL'S DUE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(115) 400 730 950 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1255) 410 655 945 AUGUST OSAGE COUNTY [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(125 PM) 430 PM 810 PM Big Screen: LONE SURVIVOR [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 330) 645 940 THE LEGEND OF HERCULES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(110 PM) 635 PM THE LEGEND OF HERCULES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(350 PM) 925 PM SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1220 345) 630 920 AMERICAN HUSTLE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(140 PM) 450 PM 830 PM ANCHORMAN 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1245 335) 650 935 THE HOBBIT: SMAUG IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.500 PM THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) 840 PM SAVING MR. BANKS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(105 PM) 640 PM INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS [CC] (R) Fri. - Sun.910 PM FROZEN [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM 320 PM) 625 PM THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(130 PM) 435 PM 820 PM GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(340 PM) 915 PM Times For 01/17 - 01/19

of copious amounts of energy, tried to teach his friend to run as the two became inseparable, getting into no shortage of trouble along the way. At AMC only. (MB) Rated PG

FROZEN

Frozen is a princess story; Disney is doubling down on the princesses — there’s two of ’em here. But Disney is also doubling down on the hints of nascent feminism Brave hinted at, the sort of barebones feminism which accepts that girls and women might possibly want more out of life than to get married. The princesses are sisters — the elder Elsa (the voice of Idina Menzel) and the younger Anna (the voice of Kristen Bell) — and this is mostly the story of their troubled relationship because Elsa is known to turn things into ice with her magical powers. (MJ) Rated PG

HER

In a near-future Los Angeles, Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) earns a paycheck by penning intimate correspondence for those who don’t possess his way with words, but is soon left by his frustrated wife (Rooney Mara). Writer-director Spike Jonze allows his introverted sad sack to find companionship in the form of the world’s first artificially intelligent operating system. (CW) Rated R

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

Splitting up a novel into three movies might seem like a bad idea, but most audience members will be still trying to keep track of all the names in this fantasy flick based on the Tolkien classic. (Smaug? Biblo? Erebor? Come on, now.) This second chunk features the majority of the action as Biblo Baggins (Martin Freeman) journeys with Wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellan) and 13 dwarves to save the dwarf kingdom of Erebor. (ER) PG-13

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

Almost a year after surviving The Hunger Games, victors Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) live torn between the bourgeois control of the Capitol and the serfdom of their home, District 12. A cloud of tension hovers over their relationship in the wake of Katniss faking a romance with Peeta in order to survive the Games, while she actually pines for Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth). (SS) Rated PG-13

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

Joel and Ethan Coen, following their own footsteps of filling a film with music, as they did in O Brother, Where Art Thou?, this time take on the early ’60s Greenwich Village folk scene. The title character (Oscar Isaac) is a multi-talented folkie who has no people skills and is likely ahead of his time. The people around him seem to cause nothing but crises, but the determined Llewyn sings on, against all odds. Not always a good idea in a Coen Brothers film. At AMC (ES) Rated R

LONE SURVIVOR

Grab your tissue box and prepare to bawl out your eyes in the movie adaption of one soldier’s true story of survival. As the title reveals, four Navy Seals go on a mission to neutralize a high-level Taliban operative and are ambushed by enemy forces and, tragically, only one returns. The story though, is not only about survival, but also about the ties of brotherhood, and the consequences of choices made seemingly for the greater good. (ER) Rated R

NEBRASKA

Finding a Publishers Clearing House envelope stating that he’s won a million bucks, Woody Grant, a reckless, lonely boozer played by 77-year-old Bruce Dern, heads out from Montana to Nebraska to claim his fortune. He takes along his skeptical son (Will Forte), who’s humoring him, as Woody tells everyone he knows that he’s become a millionaire, gathering clingy new money-hungry friends along the way. Payne (Sideways, The Descendants, Election) shot the film in black and white, adding its already present sense of despair. At Magic Lantern (MB) R

OUT OF THE FURNACE

Can two brothers be any more different? Good boy Russell (Christian Bale), resigned to working in a small-town mill, tries to keep a protective eye on his loose cannon younger brother Rodney (Casey Affleck) and Iraq war vet who would rather pummel opponents in bare-knuckle street fights to pay off his debts than get a job. Willem Dafoe plays a good-hearted bad guy, Woody Harrelson plays a purely evil one, everyone owes everyone else big money, brutal violence is an everyday thing, vengeance and/or revenge is on the minds of many. (ES) Rated R

PHILOMENA

Philomena Lee, an elderly British woman, confides in her daughter that she gave birth to a son in Ireland 50 years earlier. Unwed at the time, she was forced to give him up for adoption. Martin, a former government adviser and journalist out of a job, is looking for a story idea to bring to his editor. At a party, he hears of Philomena. Together, he and Philomena

investigate the life of her lost son and find themselves exploring America looking for answers. At Magic Lantern (KS) Rated R

SAVING MR. BANKS

Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) has a 20-year promise hanging over his head. After his daughters ask for their beloved Mary Poppins to be turned into a movie, Disney begins a quest to gain the rights from stubborn P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson). Refusing him time and time again for fear Walt has a two-week window where she will listen to his proposal, and hopefully let him make his movie. (ER) PG-13

THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY

Arriving at the offices of Life where he toils in “negative asset management,” Walter Mitty (Ben Stiller) discovers that the venerable publication has been bought out and condemned to the most undignified of fates: going web-only. A frequent day dreamer, Walter soon finds himself heading out to Greenland to track down one of his photographers (Sean Penn) who has all but disappeared — thus giving Walter some real-life adventures. (CW) Rated PG

WALKING WITH DINOSAURS

More advanced than the animation in Land Before Time but just as heartwarming, Walking with Dinosaurs, set in the late Cretaceous period more than 70 million years ago, follows three dinos — Patchi, Scowler, and Juniper — as they transition out of childhood into adulthood and lead their herd in migrating. cularly produced. (KS) PG

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Martin Scorsese’s satirical adaptation of a memoir by Jordan Belfort, who rose from Long Island penny stock swindler to shady Wall Street power player, is so over the top that it risks becoming what it sets out to mock. But it’s a spectacle of opulence that demands to be seen. The film is all about Jordan Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) pursuit of more: more money, more stocks, more vulgarity, more power, more excess, more sex and more drugs. (SS) Rated R.

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Inside Llewyn Davis

94

Her

91

American Hustle

89

Wolf of Wall Street

75

Hunger Games 2

73

Lone Survivor

59

Walter Mitty

44

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

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FILM | REVIEW

Spokane International Film Festival

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 NUT JOB

PG Daily 8:30 Sat-Mon (10:50) In 2D Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:40 Sat-Mon (12:50)

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT

The Rocket, SpIFF 2014

The Nut Job is not the first great animated film of 2014 BY ED SYMKUS

F

resh off a year that didn’t have many rewards for fans of animated features (I liked Frozen, but still feel that The Wind Rises was overpraised), 2014 isn’t exactly getting off to a strong start. Made on the cheap in Korea, The Nut Job is actually quite a good-looking film, filled with pleasing colors and nicely detailed elements such as realistic hair and water, and there’s plenty of breakneck action going on to keep very young kids occupied. But it falls short everywhere else. From the get-go, the idea that the film’s two central stories about two simultaneous heists would fit together into one neat whole doesn’t work. You’ve got your animals in the park, worried that with fall coming on there won’t be enough food to go around, so a plan is put into action to steal a bunch of peanuts from a local nut shop. Then you’ve got the owners of that “soon-to-open” nut shop, who are actually a bunch of crooks with a plan to break into a bank vault. No matter how many times — the number is high — the two groups intersect and kind of interact, nothing makes them mesh. This is a case of two completely different stories being passed off as one. Yet that could still work in this relatively (and mercifully) short film, if only the characters were

interesting and the acting was good. Nope and nope. Not one of these talented folks rises to the occasion, including Will Arnett as a self-centered squirrel, Brendan Fraser as an egotistic squirrel, Katherine Heigl as a sweet but tough squirrel, Liam Neeson as a less-than-benevoTHE NUT JOB lent raccoon, and Rated PG Maya Rudolph Directed by Peter Lepeniotis as a moronic dog. Starring the voices of Will Arnett, There’s a good Brendan Fraser and Liam Neeson chance these folks actually phoned in their performances. What’s worse is that the film is loaded with gags that fall flat (though I did laugh once) and some irresponsible violence toward animals (one of them is repeatedly tortured by the sound of a dog whistle). On top of that, it carries a halfbaked, misguided message about what appears to be the extremely thin line between selfishness and heroism. Yet even that gets lost in the film’s final minutes, when too many loose story ends are sloppily tied up in a confusing jumble of too many conclusions. I really couldn’t figure out was going on, and neither could the kids in the audience who, by the way, weren’t laughing. Bad sign. 

RIDE ALONG

PG-13 Daily (2:50) (5:00) 7:10 9:20 Sat-Mon (12:40)

DEVIL’S DUE

They’re as worried about the plot holes in this movie as we are.

Squirreled Away

PG-13 Daily (2:30) (4:40) 7:00 9:15 Sat-Mon (12:15)

R Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:50 9:00

SAVING MR. BANKS

PG-13 Daily (3:40) 6:30 9:20 Sat-Mon (12:40)

LONE SURVIVOR

R Daily (2:15) (4:45) 7:15 9:45 Sat-Mon (11:45)

THE LEGEND OF HERCULES

16th Annual Festival

Jan 23 –Feb 1 AMC, Bing, Magic Lantern, and Garland Theatres

Opening Night Reception Thursday January 23! www. spokane filmfestival .org

PG-13 Daily (2:45) 7:20 9:35 In 2D Daily (5:00) Sat-Mon (12:15)

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:35) 7:00 9:30

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG PG-13 Daily (3:00) 6:10 9:25 Sat-Mon (11:40)

FROZEN

PG Daily (3:50) 6:15 8:35 Sat-Mon (11:00) (1:30)

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

NUT JOB

PG Daily 8:30 Fri-Mon (10:50) In 2D Daily (12:50) (2:50) (4:50) 6:40

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT

PG-13 Daily (2:30) (4:40) 7:00 9:15 Fri-Mon (12:15)

RIDE ALONG

PG-13 Daily (2:50) (5:00) 7:10 9:20 Fri-Mon (12:40)

DEVIL’S DUE

R Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:50 9:00

LONE SURVIVOR

R Daily (2:15) (4:45) 7:15 9:45 Fri-Mon (11:45)

THE LEGEND OF HERCULES

PG-13 Daily (2:45) 7:20 9:35 In 2D Daily (12:30) (5:00)

HER

R Daily (1:10) (4:10) 6:50 9:30

THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY PG Daily 6:40 Fri-Mon (11:30)

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS PG-13 Daily 9:10

SAVING MR. BANKS

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (4:00) 6:40 9:20 Fri-Mon (10:45)

AMERICAN HUSTLE R Daily (3:40) 6:30 9:20

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:35) 7:00 9:30

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG PG-13 Daily (3:00) 6:10 9:25 Fri-Mon (11:40)

FROZEN

PG Daily (2:15) (4:30) 7:00 Fri-Mon (11:45) PG-13

GRAVITY

Daily 8:35 Fri-Mon 10:40

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE PG-13 Daily (12:00) (3:00) 6:20 9:20

PHILOMENA

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 1/17/14-1/23/14

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 47


Jan 16th - 22nd

THURS

412 W. Sprague Ave. 509.747.2302

SHOTS POWER HOURS

9PM-11PM

Any drink - $6!

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

LET THE PARTIES BEGIN!!

FIREBALL FRIDAY $3 POWER HOUR

11PM-12AM

Any drink - $6!

PARTY ALL WEEKEND AT

&

Dueling DJ’s 2 Dance Floors/3 Bars

SUN

SEAHAWKS SUNDAY! $3 DRAFTS & FIREBALL DURING GAME LIVE MUSIC 7-11 HOSPITALITY NIGHT

WED TUES MON

Industry Specials All Night Long / DJ ONE

48 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

CLOSED HOSPITALITY NIGHT $1 PBR LADIES NIGHT ALL NIGHT

$5 Double Martinis


T

he unfinished basement is reverberating. Here in this narrow room, the seven musicians are crowded in an oval, nearly on top of one another, playing absolutely boisterously. The breezy, Americana reggae-rock serves well as a soundtrack for the rest of the goingson at the lower South Hill residence. At the top of the steep staircase, a gray dog surveys the scene. In the corner, roommates are washing laundry. The Rustics pay no attention to any of this. They’re simply filled with enthusiasm for the fullbodied, joyful music they’re ready to drop Saturday at their album release party.

T

RUSTIC MOMENT Local act the Rustics add more members, complete their first album and constantly live for today

KRISTEN BLACK PHOTO

BY LAURA JOHNSON

he Rustics began in 2012 as just Ryan Miller and Mackie Hockett. While they had previously been in other groups, the Rustics project came out of wanting to write music as a duo. “We were in Hawaii working on a farm for six months,” Hockett says. “The songs just happened naturally with so much inspiration around us.” After moving back to Spokane, they would sometimes steal away to Seattle or Portland, to play in the streets. With the help of a loop station, Miller’s guitar and Hockett’s ukulele, the duo would make enough to pay for the trips in one sitting. That’s when they knew they really had something. The two have been friends since they were 7 and 8 years old, but it wasn’t until four years ago that the relationship blossomed into romance. And while they don’t put a title on it, the love between them is still palpable. “There’s a fire with these two,” volunteers Scottie Feider, the bass player at whose home the group practices. If anything, they’re a couple who complement each other well. Hockett, 22, is tiny with a megawatt smile. Miller, 23, is tall and thin with a quiet disposition. They both wear dreadlocks, and their shimmery vocals weave together superbly. Theirs is not one of those singer-songwriter duos where the guy does mostly ...continued on next page

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | FOLK “RUSTIC MOMENT,” CONTINUED... everything, while the woman offers a little backup, seemingly an afterthought. Instead, the music is written together. Mostly, their lyrics focus on the beauty of nature, family, love and reflect the group’s need to live in the moment. All-around, they’re positive. “There’s only so much negative you can hear,” says Miller, whose sister is recent America’s Got Talent finalist Cami Bradley. “Open your mind/and face the fact that we should all live free/to feel peace,” Hockett sings on the album’s title track,

50 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

“Be Here Now,” a cut that cements the pair’s hippie ethos. “Having no expectation, there’s a freedom in that,” Hockett says of that line. They didn’t have much expectation when they began their Kickstarter campaign last year to fund an album. But by the end of June, they had surpassed their goal of $2,500. In July, they took up with Avast! Recording Co. in Seattle, finishing the six-track EP in October. The tightly produced record is a stripped-down version of what the band will bring to the stage this weekend. Little by little, after playing shows like Elkfest and Gleason Fest, they’ve added musicians to performances, letting the

loop station fall to the wayside. With the exception of Sam Stoner on drums, the rest of the group plays something from the string family: There’s Cassie Kirkeby on electric cello, Griffin White on fiddle, Lucas “Bodhi Drip” Brown on guitar and Feider playing bass. All of them play in other bands as well. In the Spokane music scene that’s how it is; musicians want to help one another out, live in the moment.

T

hey’ve all been rehearsing before the sun went down outside. Loud, ringing feedback echoes over the space, sometimes not every note is completely dead on, but while working the kinks out, it looks like this is the most

CAMERA READY

fun anyone here has had all day. Kirkeby lends her cello’s sound to the group for the first time tonight. But her instrumentation flows into the music seamlessly, like all of the additional parts. “Playing music is kinda like having sex,” says Hockett in between songs. “It just kind of happens.” The band members laugh in agreement, then decide it’s time to strike up a blues jam. The room bounces once more.  lauraj@inlander.com The Rustics CD release party with Cami Bradley, Hey! is for Horses • Sat, Jan. 18, at 8 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • $12 • All-ages • ticketswest.com


MUSIC | ROCK Nov 27 - Dec 4

at IRV’s @ 9pm

Dance your ASS off until 4am all weekend!

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

LOVE

the rts?

A

We’ve got you covered.

SUN

at Club Red 6pm-10pm

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

MON

Shadow Play

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

TUES Chicago-based Disappears will make you feel something when they play Spokane next week.

th

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

WED

SAT & FRI

THURS

th

LE GIRLS

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR

at Club Red @ 10pm 415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450

If you can classify Disappears, you might be missing the point altogether BY LEAH SOTTILE

L

ike cultural taxonomists of sorts, music critics love to classify and package a band — give it a label, stick it in a category. And it can make some sense to do that. When a music fan sees a “folk” label, as opposed to “black metal,” on a record review, they have a sense of what they’re in for. But even the finest, most label-happy music critic can’t seem to box in Chicago band Disappears. And they shouldn’t. On the band’s 2013 record Era, you can pick up hints of so many types of music: psychedelic rock, krautrock, garage, new wave, shoegaze, goth. It’s a record that’s hardly for the straight-and-narrow — a collection of songs that ranges from dark and slow to towering tidal waves of crashing, frenetic energy. And even when it feels like songs might explode and fall apart in a plume of dust and blood, the band’s drummer, Noah Leger — who has been called its secret weapon — ensures that there’s a steady, rigid spine holding everything together. Ambiguity has served Disappears well. Last year, the Chicago Reader called them “Chicago’s best band,” and Era was on the year-end lists of critics around the world. That’s saying something, considering it’s been a couple of years since the band’s previous drummer and most recognizable member — a guy named Steve Shelley from a little band called Sonic Youth — amicably

parted ways with Disappears. The band wasn’t always the type that stood in the shadows — its early albums were filled with punky garage songs. But it was only when Disappears stripped away traditional structures and turned off the brightness on its own songs that it truly became an incredible, groundbreaking band. Disappears started to get weird on 2012’s Pre Language — something the Chicago Reader noticed most notably in singer Brian Case’s howling, exasperated vocals. “I really can’t ‘sing’ so I kind of have to just let whatever comes out come out,” Case said in an interview. “It’s kind of like barking really loud and trying to get the vocal delay to react or act up, so it can be pretty harsh.” Those loud, yelping vocals don’t make a ton of sense on their own — and there probably aren’t many people who sing along to a Disappears song. But this isn’t a band about making sense or singing along, or doing much of anything the same as other bands out there. Disappears is a band that makes you feel something. And that’s something so many bands with classifiable labels will never be able to say.  Disappears with Dead Serious Lovers • Thu, Jan. 23, at 8 pm • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • $10/$12 day of • All-ages • thebartlettspokane.com

Thursday Jan 16th “I Hate My Job” Support Group All Night Friday Jan 17th

OOOOB Chisolmism

Saturday Jan 18th

- New Menu -

Local Brews & Craft Cocktails

Oh, what a night...

Sunday FUN DAY! Jan 19th

Happy Time Sunday with Movies Monday Jan 20th

5pm-7pm Poems by Tom Davis for Tom TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm

Tuesday Jan 21st OPEN MIC of OPEN-NESS Hosted by Lucas Wednesday Jan 22nd

WHISKEY WEDNESDAY & Sally Bop Jazz

BRAND

FRICKIN’ NEW TAP

ROOM OPEN DAILY

121 SOUTH CEDAR

rivercityred. blogspot.com

25 Craft Beers & Craft Cocktails 120 E. Sprague Ave.

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 51


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK CROOKS ON TAPE

J

ohn Schmersal has a long-documented history of being kind of weird. But considering there are a lot of weird people out there in the world, he’s always found an audience — especially with his excellent former band Enon. With Crooks on Tape, his new project, Schmersal experiments with all things bizarre: kooky Wayne Coyne-esque vocals, demented pianos and bombastic drums. The band’s foundation was built in the mid-1990s, before Enon. After that band split, Schmersal and Enon bandmate Rick Lee found themselves listening to improvisational jam sessions they had recorded long ago — and that’s what inspired Crooks on Tape’s first record. — LEAH SOTTILE Crooks on Tape with Mirror Mirror • Wed, Jan. 22, at 8 pm • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • $10 • All-ages • thebartlettspokane.com

 = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW  = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/16

 THE BARTLETT, (SOLD OUT) Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Noah Gundersen, Lemolo, Bart Budwig BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser CHECKERBOARD BAR, Jaeda with Dj TEEJ COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny  THE HOP!, Spokane Boxing Club Benefit feat. Ashes of Yesterday, What Wings Once Held, Deviance, Bloody Gloves, Saxeus JOHN’S ALLEY, Steven Roth  LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind  THE PHAT HOUSE, The Tone Collaborative, Moksha ZOLA, Cruxie

Friday, 01/17

 THE BARTLETT, (SOLD OUT) Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Typhoon with Silver Torches, The Holy Broke BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Krashbox THE CELLAR, The Fur Traders COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Smash Hit Carnival COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Mike & Shana Thompson THE COUNTRY CLUB, Last Chance Band CURLEY’S, Bad Monkey FEDORA PUB, Truck Mills FIZZIE MULLIGANS, The Cronkites GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Brad Keeler Trio  THE HOP!, Pandamonium! feat. Armchair Pirate, Dawnchaser, Shauk and more

52 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

ALT-ROCK MOON TAXI

L

ast year was a huge step forward for Moon Taxi — they released two CDs, one plugged in, one not, and made their TV debut on The Late Show with David Letterman. Earlier this week, the alt-rock five-piece became official members of Team Coco, playing Conan. But it hasn’t just been a walk in the park for the Nashville act; they’ve been working hard at it since 2006. With each record released, they’ve built on their jam-band sound. At times they’re a long-haired ‘70s rock band, and the next they’re on the cutting edge of what’s happening in the electronic rock scene. — LAURA JOHNSON Moon Taxi with Miah Kohal Band • Thurs, Jan. 23, at 7:30 pm • The Sandpoint Hive • 207 N. First Ave. • $10/$15 day of • ticketswest.com

IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR, Nova JOHN’S ALLEY, The Dimestore Prophets JONES RADIATOR, Oooob  KNITTING FACTORY, Meltdown Music Fest  LAGUNA CAFÉ, Daniel Mills  THE LANTERN (315-9531), Hannah Reader, Dust and the Blood  LOTUS SELF DEFENSE SCHOOL, KYRS Benefit Concert Feat. Real Life Rockaz, DJ Major One LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls MAX AT MIRABEAU, The Usual Suspects  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Spare Parts Trio NYNE, The Divine Jewels PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Tom Catmull  THE PHAT HOUSE, T. Mike and Evan Guest

SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Echo WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (208-263-9066), Mike Morris ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Saturday, 01/18

 BABY BAR, Lady Problems, Bloody Gloves, Gardening Angel  THE BARTLETT, Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Surfer Blood, Psychic Rites, BIAS BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn  BING CROSBY THEATER, The Rustics Album Release Party (See story on page 33) feat. Cami Bradley, Hey! is for Horses BOLO’S, Krashbox  CARR’S CORNER, The Drip, Rutah, Losing Skin, Dislich THE CELLAR, The Fur Traders  CHAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Smash Hit Carnival

COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Eric Neuhausser COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Ben Baker THE COUNTRY CLUB, Last Chance Band CURLEY’S, Bad Monkey FEDORA PUB, Truck Mills FIZZIE MULLIGANS, The Cronkites  THE HOP!, Extortionist, Verbera, Annie Sails Sorrow, The Hallowd Ground, Shadow of Heaven IRON HORSE BAR, Nova JOHN’S ALLEY, Red Clay Revival  KNITTING FACTORY, Tribal Seeds, Through the Roots, Facedown THE LANTERN (315-9531), Tyler Aker, Jeff Aker THE LARIAT (466-9918), Garrett Bartley Band LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls MAX AT MIRABEAU, The Usual Suspects  MT. SPOKANE SKI AND SNOW-

BOARD PARK, Flying Mammals  THE PHAT HOUSE, Jazz Jam, Paul Abner RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve  REVEL 77 (280-0518), Raze the City SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Pat Coast WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (208-263-9066), Mike Morris ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Sunday, 01/19

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast CURLEY’S, Fundraiser for Cassondra DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church THE DISTRICT BAR (244-3279), Likes Girls  THE HOP!, Battle of the Bands feat. Upbeat for Sundown, Arrow in Orbit, Fast Fox and more THE LANTERN (315-9531), The Holy


Broke MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus ZOLA, Bill Bozly

Monday, 01/20

THE PHAT HOUSE, Little Big Band ZOLA, Nate Ostrander & Friends

Tuesday, 01/21

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Max Daniels  COMMUNITY SCHOOL, Know Hope Benefit Show feat. B Radicals, Casey Myers, Joshua James Belliardo, Dead Among Friends

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, VX36, Dislich, I Hate This City, Collateral Damage JOHN’S ALLEY, T Bird and the Breaks  KNITTING FACTORY, Buckcherry, Monster Truck, 3 Pill Morning, Seven Cycles  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Local Artis Forum (Open Mic)  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Alana Leonhardy  THE PHAT HOUSE, Bebop Jazz REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Lindsey Lou & the Flatbellys

SPLASH, Bill Bozly ZOLA, Dan Conrad & the Urban Achievers

Wednesday, 01/22  THE BARTLETT, Crooks on Tape (See story on facing page), Mirror Mirror BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Echo  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Spokane Songwriters Open Mic Night JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz  KNITTING FACTORY, Excision, Dirtyphonics, Ill. Gates LA ROSA CLUB, Jazz Jam with the Bob Beadling Group  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Re  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Michael Robinson ZOLA, The Bucket List

Coming Up ...

 THE HIVE EVENT CENTER, Moon Taxi (See story on facing page) , Jan. 23. THE PHAT HOUSE, Dionvox, Jan. 23 THE HOP!, Exhumed, Jan. 23  THE BARTLETT, Disappears (See story on page 35), Dead Serious Lovers, Jan. 23 SWAXX, Ying Yang Twins, Whurlwind Ent, Marc P, Coaster & Darez, Jan. 24 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Nappy Roots, Jan. 29

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 53


SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

THEATER SILLY RICH KIDS

Thrown together in 1992 around a score of 18 better-thangood George and Ira Gershwin songs, Crazy For You is more about the music than the actual story line. If Broadway musicals are your thing, the tunes are catchy and uplifting, making up for the slightly ragtag storyline about rich kid Bobby Child, with a flourish of good feeling and high kicks. Child desperately wants to go into show business; his mother dearest sees him more as a banker, and ships him off to foreclose a theatre. After Bobby falls in love with the owner’s daughter, Polly Baker, he decides to stay in town and save it, creating a situation that will surely make the Civic’s rendition of this hilarious romantic comedy romp a treat. — EMERA L. RILEY Crazy For You • Jan. 17-Feb. 9, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $22-$30 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

54 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

COMMUNITY COMMEMORATING MLK

FILM HELP FEED THE HUNGRY

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day events • Sat, Jan. 18-Mon, Jan. 20 • More info at facebook.com/mlkspokane

Inequality for All • Mon, Jan. 20, at 6 pm • $10 suggested donation • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater. com • 227-7638

Pledge to do more than lounge around the house on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. There’s plenty to do, including the annual Unity March, starting at the Convention Center at 10 am. Afterward, help out at one of six service sites, including the MLK Family Outreach Center, House of Charity and St. Margaret’s Shelter. Volunteers will work from 1-3 pm, but make sure to register online prior (tiny.cc/ MLKDay2014). Many other events are planned leading up to Monday, including a Youth Empowerment Luncheon (Jan. 18), a Commemorative Celebration (Jan. 19), and the Community Resource Fair, on Monday from 11 am-2 pm, in River Park Square. — CHEY SCOTT

In a benefit event for Second Harvest Food Bank, the SmithBarbieri Progressive Fund, a local charitable foundation, hosts a screening of the award-winning documentary Inequality for All. The film outlines a widening gap in income inequality in the U.S. through interviews with economists, politicians and experts, former labor secretary Robert Reich being one of them. “We need to raise awareness in the community, and more than raising money, we need to get people active about this,” says event organizer Ron Reed. A panel discussion about inequality follows the screening. — CLARKE HUMPHREY


ALL LEATHER ON SALE

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THEATER QUESTIONS OF NATIONAL SECURITY

Khaled, a young Arab-American, is visited in his apartment by two government officials and interrogated about an act of terrorism. This awardwinning play by Seattle-based playwright Yussef El Guindi — described as “Kafkaesque” by the Seattle Times — reflects the fear and suspicion that followed the Sept. 11 attacks and questions what we’ve learned to accept in the post-Patriot Act United States. The play was first staged in 2005, when the shadow of terrorism felt more urgent in the U.S., but the theme of privacy vs. security is hardly outdated. (See: NSA leaks.) The Stage Left production, presented as a staged reading, is directed by Robert Nelson. — LISA WAANANEN Back of the Throat • Fri, Jan. 17 and Sat, Jan. 18 at 7:30 pm; Sun, Jan. 19, at 2 pm • $10 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third • spokanestageleft.org • 838-9727

MUSIC SPLASH OF SYMPHONY

You’ll probably want to go drinking Friday night anyway, so why not do it in a little classier atmosphere? The Spokane Symphony is serving up its newest concert format Friday with Symphony With a Splash. The evening begins at 5 pm in the The Fox’s elaborate Art Deco lobby with drinks and music from local jazz singer Nicole Lewis. Dinner can also be purchased for $12. At 7, attendees will be guided into the theater for an hour-long orchestra concert. The performance will include works by Prokofiev, Scott Joplin, Philip Glass and more and will be conducted by Resident Conductor Morihiko Nakahara. — LAURA JOHNSON Symphony With A Splash • Fri, Jan. 17, at 5 pm • $25 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

MAKE THE NEW YEAR COMFORTABLE

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any Flexsteel® leather furniture purchase of $1099 or more. See store for details.

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

HONOR FLIGHT THE MOVIE Screening to benefit the 2014 Inland NW Honor Flight. Jan. 18, 3 pm. $5. Turning Point Open Bible Church, 11911 N. Division. (467-5122) FUNDRAISER FOR CASSONDRA Live band, silent auction and donation collection to support the local mother of four who diagnosed with the immune disease neutropenia. Jan. 19, 2-6 pm. Curley’s, 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser. (208-777-6896) KPBX RECORDINGS & VIDEOS SALE Spokane Public Radio is accepting donations of reusable CDs, DVDs, record albums, 45s and audio equipment for its annual fundraiser sale. Drop of donations Mon-Fri from 9 am-5 pm through Feb. 5. Spokane Public Radio, 2319 N. Monroe. spokanepublicradio.org (328-5729)

COMEDY

CHOOSE TO LOSE! Live improv show performed in the style of a game show. Fridays at 8 pm through Jan. 31. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) DON PARKINS Live stand-up comedy show. Jan. 17-18 at 8 pm. $12. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234)

1727 E Sprague Ave 509-535-1111 Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm Sunday 11am - 4pm

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JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 55 00000-01 Jan 10-FLX Leather Sale-12V.indd 1

1/10/14 12:48 PM


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess EAT, PRAY, BARF

My girlfriend and I just got back from vacationing in India, where we lived in an ashram (essentially a yoga camp) and she studied yoga and meditation for a month. Since we’ve been back, she’s been wearing a sari everywhere, which stands out completely here, and she greets everyone by bowing and saying “namaste” (an Indian greeting). She talks constantly to people about spirituality and energy and, to be honest, comes AMY ALKON off as totally pretentious. This is all starting to wear on me. Is it shallow of me to be bothered by her new look and attitude when she’s feeling so enlightened? —Downcast Dog When your girlfriend bows and says “namaste” to the bag guy at the supermarket, you have to wonder, are there two yogis in India fist-bumping and greeting each other, “Wassup, home slice?” and “Nuthin, dawg. What’s crackalackin with you?” It’s understandable that you feel guilty about being annoyed that your girlfriend has gone Suddenly Swami. If she’d come back from Paris and started marching around in a beret and an Hermes scarf and speaking French to the grocery bagger, you’d probably deem her an obnoxious phony and suspect she has a superiority complex (a shrink term for covering up feelings of inferiority by acting superior). The problem is, we’re told we have to “respect” people’s spiritual beliefs and practices. We should respect their right to have them, providing they don’t involve baby eating or witch burnings, but there’s been what British philosopher Simon Blackburn calls “respect creep,” the expectation of “more substantial respect” — admiration, approval, and deference. Well, these things are earned; they can’t be expected or demanded, and it’s no more wrong to have critical thoughts about somebody’s spiritual beliefs and expression than about their politics or choice of pizza toppings. So, getting back to your girlfriend, no, she isn’t exempt from being considered a pretentious jerk when she signs her credit card slip in Sanskrit. It also isn’t “shallow” to feel that the new her doesn’t work for the relatively unchanged you. (As a flamboyant bigmouth, I can tell you that flamboyant bigmouth girls aren’t for just any guy.) But you might give this some time. This might just be the yoga ’n’ meditation version of somebody excited about losing weight on a new diet and wanting to spread the word, and she may become less affected, preachy, and annoying in a month or two. To help speed the process, you could gently ask her to consider whether her clothes and talk might be creating distance between her and other people. A person shows their spiritual growth and attracts others to their path through how they act and treat people. (The saying is “Be the change you want to see in the world,” not “Dress as the change.”) Sure, Buddha dressed like an Asian monk, but it isn’t the monk suit that made the man. (If Buddha were from Milwaukee, he’d be sitting cross-legged in Levi’s and a trucker hat.)

A RUSE BY ANY OTHER NAME

I am 23 and like this really cute guy who lives in my building. I think he likes me, too, because he flirts back a bit when I flirt with him, so I’ve been trying to send stronger signals that I want him to ask me out. I friended him on Facebook and started posting cute photos of myself, and if I’m at the store, I’ll buy him something and knock on his door and say, “Hey, I got an extra box of cookies; thought you could use them.” I’m thinking of throwing a party and inviting him, but I’ll feel dumb if he doesn’t come and I threw the party for nothing. —Impatient Unfortunately, men are more complicated than cats. You can’t just tie a beer and a bag of Doritos to the end of a string. A guy takes note of your existence because your legs give him whiplash, not because you deliver snacks or slip a coupon under his door for a free carwash with every date. You should flirt to let a guy know you’re open to being asked out — and stop at that. What makes you attractive, in addition to the physical stuff, is your being a little out of reach, not inserting yourself into his life at every possible social or social media opportunity. The ploys you’ve been engaging in may not be so overt and aggressive as asking a guy out, but especially in combination, they cross over from indicating interest to screaming desperation. Because a guy can’t unhear that scream, your best bet is forgetting this guy, chalking this up to a learning experience, and moving on. And no, that doesn’t mean moving on to the plan of covering a big pit with leaves and luring him over to it with some Fig Newtons.  ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMMUNITY

SUSTAINO-PRENEURSHIP EXPO 52 seniors from the Riverpoint Academy showcase products and innovations they designed to address sustainability issues related to our community. Jan. 16, 10 am-6 pm. Free. Spokane Public Market, 24 W. Second. (465-7900) A LIGHT FOR LIFE Hosted by the EWU Black Student Union, a remembrance ceremony honoring those who have lost their lives to violence. Jan. 17, 5-6 pm. Free. EWU, Cheney. (359-2898) LEGO-RAMA This year’s theme is “Space: Building for the Future.” Entries must be original designs, judging is split into various age groups. Complete rules and more info available online. Jan. 18, 1-3 pm. Free. CdA Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) MLK JR. COMMUNITY BREAKFAST Hosted by the Latah County Human Rights Task Force, featuring speaker Dr. Thomas Les Purce, Pres. of the Evergreen College in Olympia. Jan. 18, 9 am. $4-$8. Moscow Jr. High School, 1410 E. D. humanrightslatah.org (208-882-3648) PLAYING FOR CHANGE Fundraiser event featuring a silent auction, dessert, live music by The SweetGrass Band and more to benefit Spokane County 4-H’s Know Your Government teens’ trip to Olympia. Jan. 18, 6:30 pm. La Belle Vie Event Center, 18507 E. Appleway Ave. facebook.com/spokane4h (477-2048) MLK DAY CELEBRATION Reverend Percy “Happy” Watkins delivers the famous “I Have a Dream” speech at an event offering reflection, music and refreshments. Jan. 20 at 12 pm at Holy Family Hospital. Also Jan. 20 at 3 pm at Sacred Heart Hospital. phc.org (474-3131) CELEBRATE ROE! Planned Parenthood of Greater Wash. and N. Idaho hosts a celebration in honor of the 41st anniversary of Roe vs. Wade. Jan. 22, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free to attend. Stella’s Cafe, 917 W. Broadway Ave. facebook.com/ppgwni MOTIVATING PEOPLE TO ACT Activist in Residence workshop on recruiting others to your cause, planning effective campaigns and more. Jan. 23, 3:30 pm. Free. EWU Monroe Hall. (359-2898)

FILM

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS A locally-produced film about true events in Spokane in 1965, written and directed by Don Caron and Lyle Hatcher. Through Jan. 30. $6.50-$10.50. AMC River Park Square 20, 808 W. Main. (216-2098) INTERNET CAT VIDEO FILM FESTIVAL Screening of the Walker Art Center’s 2nd annual video festival, feat. appearance by Spokane’s Charlie Schmidt and Keyboard Cat. Jan. 16, 9 pm. $20-$35. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague. (244-3279) BACKCOUNTRY FILM FEST 9th annual outdoor film fest, hosted by Friends of the Scotchman Peaks Wilderness and the Idaho Conservation League. Jan. 17, 7 pm. $7. CdA Eagles, 209 Sherman. backcountryfilmfestival.org (208-265-9565) THE GREATEST GAME EVER PLAYED Benefit screening hosted by The First Tee of the Inland NW with proceeds benefiting the organization’s programs. Jan. 19, 4:30 pm. $3-$5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (850-5346) RISING FROM ASHES Documentary screening hosted by Healing Hearts Northwest, benefiting the nonprofit’s trip to Rwanda to provide medical care.

Jan. 22, 7 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague (227-7404)

FOOD

OUTDOOR CHILI COOKOFF 15 competing chefs bring their chili in a crock pot for judges and the public to taste. Judging at 5:30 pm. Jan. 17, 4:30-7:30 pm. Free. The Nest at Kendall Yards, 1335 Summit Parkway. tinyurl.com/o586sa3 VINO! WINE TASTING Friday features Capitello Wines, Saturday features a blend wine tasting. Jan. 17, 3-6:30 pm and Jan. 18, 2-4:30 pm. $10/event. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) RAGIN’ CAJUN Southern-style cooking class with Chef Joshua Martin. Jan. 21, 6-8 pm. $49. INCA, 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark.scc.spokane.edu (279-6030) COOKING WITH CHEF COLOMBA Chef Colomba Aguilar of Cafe Carambola leads a class on making Spanish paella. Jan. 22, 5:30 pm. $50. The JACC, 405 N. William St. (208-457-8950)

MUSIC COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY “Family Fun at the Symphony” concert. Jan. 17 at 7:30 pm, Jan. 18 at 2 pm. $8-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. (208-765-3833) CELLOBRATION SPOKANE “Bach and Beatles” is the theme of the annual festival, feat. 60+ musicians. Jan. 18, 7:30 pm. Free, donations accepted. EWU, Cheney. (359-7078) RENE & THE RHYTHM SECTION Swing tunes featuring the classically-trained singer. Jan. 18, 7:30 pm. $10-$15. The JACC, 405 N. William St, Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) YOUNG ARTIST’S COMPETITION Gonzaga music students compete in the categories of concerto and aria. Held in the Music Annex I bldg. Jan. 18, 10 am. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. (313-6733) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET “Baroque Duet” featuring guest soprano Dawn Wolski. Jan. 19, 3 pm. $12-$20. The Bing, 901 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet.org (227-7404) SPOKANE YOUTH SYMPHONY The four orchestras of SYS perform a concert titled “Water.” Jan. 19, 4 pm. $12$16. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokaneyouthsymphony.org (448-4446)

PERFORMANCE

SPOKANE CIRCUS FESTIVAL Performances featuring local and international performance artists, workshops, and more, hosted by Spokane Aerial Performance Arts. Jan. 15-19, performance night Jan. 18 at 7 pm. $12. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. facebook. com/spokanecircusfestival (435-1576) EUGENE BALLET: SCHEHERAZADE Performance of the ballet based on stories in the “Arabian Nights.” Feb. 1, 7:30 pm. $21-$41. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

SPORTS

WRANGLER BULL RIDING CLASSIC Professional rodeo. Jan. 17-18 at 8 pm. $10-$30. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. (279-7000) JANUARY SWAMP RIDE Social cycling meetup and pub crawl. Jan. 18, meets at 7 pm, departs at 8 pm. Free. Swamp Tavern, 1904 W. Fifth Ave. (458-2337)

FREE SOCCER CLINICS Soccer skills clinics for beginning to advanced players, ages 5-14. Pre-registration and waiver required. No cleats. Jan. 20. Free. Valley Indoor Center, 2818 N. Sullivan. valleyindoorcenter.org (408-713-0842) 2014 USA BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS Elite boxing competition featuring top male and female competitors in all weight divisions from around the US. Jan. 20-25; full schedule of events TBA. Events at HUB Sports Center from Jan. 20-23; at Northern Quest Jan. 24-25. $5-$40. (242-7000)

THEATER

LITTLE WOMEN: THE MUSICAL Based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott. Through Feb. 1, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave., CdA. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) BACK OF THE THROAT Play by Seattlebased writer Yussef El Guindi. Jan. 1719, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org (838-9727) CRAZY FOR YOU Tap-dancing musical comedy. Jan. 17-Feb. 9, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) THE RAINMAKER Romantic comedy. Through Jan. 19, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13-$15. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. (795-0004) SERVICEMEN’S CANTEEN Local actors and singers perform in a USO-style tribute program. Jan. 17-19, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union, Newport. pendoreilleplayers.org (447-9900)

VISUAL ARTS

CHELSEA CORDOVA “Radiance and Reflection” feat. oil and acrylic landscapes. Reception Jan. 17 from 5-7 pm, runs through March 3. The JACC, 405 N. William St. (208-457-8950) DRAWING Group art exhibition featuring elements of line, drawing, strokes, and other gestures. Through March 28. Free. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org (625-6081) ANTONE G. HOLMQUIST Photography showcase featuring images by the Moscow-based photographer. Through Feb. 12, open daily from 8 am-9 pm. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. 5th. (208-882-8537)

WORDS

NAKED LUNCH BREAK Weekly lunchtime literary open mic and reading series Thursdays, with local writers and free pizza. Free. EWU Riverpoint Campus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (368-6557) JOHN GAETANO The author of the novel “America’s Deceit” presents and hosts a film screening about his new book, a thriller centered around the JFK assassination. Jan. 19 at 1 pm. Free. First Presbyterian, 318 S. Cedar. (747-1058) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM This month’s slam includes a performance by Mighty Mike McGee, a national champ slam poet. Jan. 19, 8:30 pm. $5. Lantern Tap House, 1004 S. Perry. (315-9531) AUTHOR GINA BULLIS Reading, discussion and book signing of “Splendor from Brokenness” by the Spokanebased author. Jan. 21, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. (8380206) 


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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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JANUARY 16, 2014 INLANDER 57


Health

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ZDATE, 2014 INLANDER 59


Make it Last Forever 509.921.9000 //

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

9110 E. SPRAGUE

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Jeers

Hop Shop You: frantic, foulmouthed, tatted alt girl in knit cap and pink top playing CAH. Me: older, athletic, bald guy with a large cyst on my forehead wearing a Nashville Pussy tank top. You had a ridiculous cold.. claimed to be responsible for most of the kleenex sales in Spokane this week. I believe that it probably true. You kept smiling at me and then turning to say something to your friend. I assume you were talking about me... something flattering I hope! We did talk briefly about the great beer selection when you passed by me on one of your many trips to the restroom. I’m going to get the cyst removed this week and you’ll be getting over that vile snotfest.. how about we get together over a beverage and talk tats and failed New Year’s resolutions.

You Made My Day! To the couple who paid for my meal at Three Sisters Vietnamese, the Friday before Christmas: I’ve never expected to be the recipient of such a random act of kindness! This is what people write Cheers about, things that only happen to someone else, not me. As promised, I will extend the same kindness to another. Thank you!

when I hand them my hello; to the individuals who don’t splat their droid to their ears to avoid aknowledging the existence of any one other than themselves; to the drivers who stop to allow pedestrians to cross. To the individuals who think caring is not a 9-5 job. To the individuals who don’t mind holding the door & to the individuals who smile & let you know you’re more than a space holder, you are a human being

blond hair, for blabbing, harassing and interrupting the comedy show at the Bing Saturday night. Would you start singing loudly along with the singer in a concert or recite lines in a play? You were so loud we couldn’t hear the comedians. And when we asked you politely to please be quiet you were argumentative, combative and even more rude. You even flipped us off! It was so bad that you stopped the show. They should have kicked you out. Were you born in a barn? (Sorry to insult the farm animals.) Before you go out again learn some manners.

Albertson’s A couple months ago, at Albertson’s on Trent and Argonne, you saw me. I didn’t think about it at the time, but you told me that you recognized me from your parent’s neighborhood off Locust. You had dark hair and a wonderful smile. I can’t stop thinking about our chance meeting and I keep find myself lingering at the mail boxes wondering if you are around. After telling my friend about our encounter, he told me that you were hitting on me. Was there an opportunity there that I missed? If so, email me and maybe we can grab a cup of coffee sometime.

Cheers Food Service Workers It seems in the the Jeers section of the last edition (The Ideas Issue) there was a lot of argument over bartenders, restaurant servers, fast food workers and the like. I’d just like to say that I sincerely appreciate the efforts of those of you in service positions. As someone who is too lazy to cook (and clean up after) every single meal I eat, I’m happy to pay someone a small fee to do it for me on occasion. I’m sorry there are so many assholes in the world that go out of their way to stress you out. Don’t let their misplaced anger ruin your day. Just know that there are those of us that really appreciate your efforts even if we aren’t as vocal as those who demand 110% and offer no empathy. Better Than Dreaming I never imagined I’d find a woman as beautiful as you. I never considered that a woman as beautiful as you would be interested in me. I can’t even say it was a dream come true when you agreed to marry me, because your beauty and grace is so far outside of the limited abilities of my imagination. Your presence in my life transcends my wildest dreams. I’ve never been so happy! jj

60 INLANDER ZDATE, 2014

Where Do We Go From Here? Two year`s ago you re-entered my life. I couldn`t hold back my feelings for you , it took everyone in the room by surprise “including myself”. The feelings I have were to overwhelming for me at that moment but I needed to let you know, I meant every word I said . fear held me back from the best thing that could have ever

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” happened in my lifetime. We have gone our separate ways, the regret is so very painful, not a day passes without you on my mind and in my heart . I`m trying so very hard to reach out to you, “only to fail everytime”. Why are we apart ? Why do we hold back from one another ? I want nothing more than to be with you . It will never be the same until we are finally together growing as one . I never wanted to hurt you but I know I have . Please don`t let me go ! Hang on to what can b . I cry more and more everyday while I`m being told that this never took place . Why is this happening to us ? I`m beginning to lose hope. everything is my fault for not saying yes and not having the courage to take your hand. I`m ready to take your hand and leave everything else behind, only if you let this happen. I never want to see a hurt look on your face ever again. It was never you I was angry at, I hope you know that. Do you love me ! Do you really love me! You’re the only one who knows where to take it from here Dodson’s Jewelers On Riverside downtown, for being so helpful & even excited when I (a girl) went in to purchase an engagement ring for my girlfriend. It can be intimidating to be so open about my homosexuality, but Dodson’s was incredible in helping me find the perfect ring - and she said, “yes”. Thank you! To The Individuals Who don’t suddenly fixate on the interesting concrete between their feet

Jeers Redbox Renters How impatient have we all really become! Really, you had to wait 2 maybe even 5 minutes to get your precious movie from the redbox. Maybe it was someone who hadn’t used it before, maybe not. The point is, shut up and go down the road. If you haven’t noticed, there all over the city, like Starbucks. Egotist Parents Let me clarify that you had sex to make a baby; you didn’t pass any test or climb a mountain. You had sex and the result was a child. As an egotist your priorities are your own needs, wants, and desires. Now you are a parent, ironically requiring selflessness; but you are an egotist and selflessness is not in your nature. Your child has become an object under your power and control and thus must appease your insatiable ego’s desires. Should your child not satisfy your ego’s desires you break them down, and when they rebel you send them to people like myself to “correct” them. I cannot help these children for helping them would mean removing them from your influence, but this is not easy or practical. You will not hear reason or even try to compromise. You desire absolute power and control. Your children grow up completely broken down and drained of all confidence and self sufficiency. They become selfish and self satisfying because they were deprived of the nourishment of a loving and supportive upbringing. Some make it out okay, but most of them never even try, they accept a life far below the standards of their potential; they were not raised to value their priorities, only yours. I myself do not have children of my own, but I have made a career out of trying to save yours.

RE: Groupon Users Dear disgruntled waitress or waiter did it ever occur to you that this person or family who used the Groupon may have been crunching numbers themselves trying to save, I bet your boss would love to use “if you can’t afford to go out, stay at home” for his slogan. Depending on tips to survive is ridiculous take your check figure out what you can do with that money and the tip money should be extra, a lot of minimum wage people work hard but don’t even have a chance to get a tip be happy. I bartended and my tips were extra gravy (no pun intended), don’t depend on them. I bet you have cable, a nice cell phone, ect. all I’m saying is dump cable get a trac phone these are the things people who are not rich do so they don’t have to stress about Bob or Sue giving them a tip. We hear from servers all the time and that is all we hear about is no tip, low tip. I’m just saying tips are nice and I know the government is now messing with your tips (that I disagree with) but if I have $7.00 in my pocket and wanna go to a bar and have a couple of beers ($3.50 each) and talk to friends according to you I should stay at home, ‘cause I can not tip. There are people who don’t tip on their first go round, but when they return if the service was good really make up for it.... just stop saying everybody should tip.

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2014

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the potatoes I couldn’t stomach and that it would be in my best interest to pay for another order of pancakes as well. I’m sorry I had recommended your diner to my friends and even brought my family in while they were visiting. I understand people have bad days, but your attitude remains unchanged at every experience. I appreciate the effort you made to show me how this favorite diner of mine isn’t worth another visit if it includes your lovely scowl.

arena. As far as I know we are all professional people parking there and I find absolutely no reason that a grown adult should be spitting gum on someone’s car. I know it’s the same person because the gum is always the same color. I am sick & tired of picking your nasty gum off of my car. Please stop! If you didn’t already know this there are handy little round containers most of us call garbage cans. I’m sure that is a more appropriate place for your wad to go. Next time its on my car it won’t be pretty.

Know The Law On Tuesday, at a food establishment, two employees working told my boyfriend and I to leave the store because we had a “pet” with us. We explained that he is a service animal and we pointed out to them his ID, which he was wearing and was fully visible. They went in the back of the store and refused to come out. I called back to them and finally the female employee came out and said that the owner does not allow pets in the store. We again showed her our dogs documents, told her it was Federal law that we were allowed in there and tried to hand her a card with the info regarding the law and service animals. She refused to look at it. She stated again that we could not be in her store and that we had to leave. This is the exact reason there are Federal Laws regarding discrimination against people with disabilities. We have tried to contact the owner with no luck. If it is the owner telling his employees to ban service animals he needs to learn the law before he gets slapped with a lawsuit. If it is the employees error, the owner needs to do some training. Customer Service Waitresses get paid to wait on customers, waiting on customers does not include ignoring them, or then walking right past them to serve people who have come in after them. You have turned my previous goodwill and positive word of mouth into ill-will and negitive word of mouth. Hope you’re proud of yourselves, you made an already lousy weekend even worse. Great Job girls! Eating Out To our waitress. Thank you for not bothering our table with refills of our drinks, ensuring our toast was quite well done, not making us uncomfortable with a polite demeanor, or pointing out how silly I was being when I ordered my pancakes I really meant

What Is Wrong With You? If you don’t want me to be the father of this baby, you should have told me! I wish we didn’t part ways. I don’t want to be a bastard who left his girlfriend and child. Hell for all I know you could’ve slept with another guy. Or maybe i’s someone you had a booty call right? Wouldn’t even surprise me. And even if it’s mine, you don’t want me to be the father of your baby. You do not want the son of an alcoholic to be the father of your baby. I don’t fit into your princess world. After a while you’d probably just leave me and take the baby with you. All that you wanted was my money and diamond rings. All that you wanted is to take you out to restaurants. You are mad you know. But I’m even more mad, for putting up with you. The problem is the sex to you was lust not love. I kept running back to you. Do I have a mind of my own? I guess I did not. It wasn’t love. You were only out for, what you can get. You were really fussy. A three star hotel wouldn’t satisfy you. It had to be five star. You never liked my sense of humor by the vex look on your face I could tell, you loved my money more than me. So I told you at the beginning of the relationship if you lead or use me this would happen. Really all that you want Is to make me look stupid. But I see through you. So the only stupid one now is you. By the way, you need to quit having your friends hit me up and act like don’t know you. To The Person Who.Keeps spitting their gum on my car at the

’S THIS WEEK! S R E ANSW

Heartless Owners Jeers to the owners of the dejected kitty that they refuse to allow into their apartment, thus forcing him/her to remain outside on the awning through the nights of pouring rain & the days of blistering heat, crying for help. If you can’t handle being adult enough to take care of the living creature that you were so impulsive to have, then at least accept the offers presented to give him/her a new home. And when your Landlord writes you a letter that something needs to be done about the situation, don’t trap the cat inside somewhere for a few days, only to let things fall back to where they were. Grow up!

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Train Your Dog To the woman on Pacific that repeatedly smacked, swatted, slapped & spanked her tiny black terrier for barking at someone on the sidewalk - take the poor thing to training or allow him to live in another person’s care. If I witness anything like that again, I will make the appropriate phone calls. Lunch Hour I work downtown & was appalled by the lack of respect shown at a certain fast food joint during LCHS lunch hour. I personally watched as the soda fountain became a sticky river due to a straw strategically placed to hold down the dispenser tab. Handfuls of napkins, half eaten food just thrown on floor along with a zillion wasted condiment packets smeared on the tables. I give kudo’s to the patience shown by the employee having to cleaning up after you little deginerate swines. You, to will be seeking employment someday & I hope that the same disregard is shown while you are on shift. In regards to the zit faced gangsta wanna-be punk who mouthed off to me on his way out ~ maybe you should reconsider your love of fast food, kiddo. Save your money & purchase some ProActiv AND a damn belt. No one want’s to see your filthy underwear. Mommie didn’t teach you how to wipe correctly? Front to back, dude...front to back

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JANUARY 16, 2013 INLANDER 61


Darla Marlow, right, worships during services at First Covenant Church. BOTTOM RIGHT: Pastor Rob Bryceson. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Among the People At First Covenant Church, you “come as you are” BY DEANNA PAN

T die.

he first time Suzanne walked into First Covenant Church on Second and Division on a Sunday morning was the day the love of her life would

She’d been living under the Maple Street Bridge, but had spent the previous 12 days at her boyfriend Steve’s side at Holy Family Hospital while lung cancer destroyed his body. Her hand trembled as she wrote a plea to God on a prayer wall, asking him to spare Steve’s life. She wept on the pastor’s wife’s shoulder. That was two years ago, and Suzanne, who prefers to go by her middle name because her family doesn’t know she’s homeless, has been coming to church ever since. “The fact is that she could come as she was,” says Rob Bryceson, the pastor at First Covenant Church. “What she wore, how she smelled… In our world, you come that way.” On this Sunday morning, Suzanne sits in the back pew with four other homeless men, their gear and backpacks strewn on the pew behind them. She’s wearing a Budweiser sweatshirt and her nose is buried deep in the First Book of Samuel. At First Covenant, half of the congregants are homeless, which partly explains the church’s longtime financial woes. In October, Mars Hill, the deep-pocketed, Seattlebased megachurch, offered to buy First Covenant at

62 INLANDER JANUARY 16, 2014

near-market value for $1.25 million. Bryceson expects the deal to close in February. In May, First Covenant will be forced to find a new home. “There are other [churches] that are like a social club now. It’s coffee, latte-driven. It’s a clique,” says Mike McDowell, who drives three hours from Walla Walla to catch Rob’s sermons. “This is a church that Jesus would walk in. Come as you are.”

I

n the beginning, there were three rules at First Covenant: Don’t come high or drunk. Don’t ask for money. Be polite. But now they really just enforce the last two. Last Sunday, a “meth tweaker” was kicked out of the service for causing a ruckus. Bryceson has had his congregants arrested in church after drunken outbursts. But there’s no drama this week. At service on Sunday morning, Bryceson plays the acoustic guitar on the stage in front of the church next to his two daughters, swinging and swaying and raising their arms. His eyes are closed as he belts into his mic. With his suede oxfords, chambray shirt and svelte goatee, he looks more like the cool uncle you wish you had than a man of the collar. It’s not a packed house here at First Covenant, with 70-some congregants following the lyrics from the pews, but the church has doubled in size since 2009, when the Brycesons arrived in Spokane from California. Their

mission was to revitalize the church, which at the time had maybe 30 members, all older, whose children and grandchildren had left town long ago. They sang solemn hymnals and played the pipe organ. “They were kind of doing church the way they were doing in the 1950s,” Rob says. Collections weren’t coming in, and neither were new members. That changed when the Brycesons started getting to know the homeless community downtown. On a Monday night, Rob handed out flyers to every “prostitute, drug addict, alcoholic, street guy [he] could find” and invited them to the church dining hall to watch football and eat chili. About 35 people came that night. By the end of the month, they were cooking for 150 homeless people every week. But the church was still limping by financially. A homeless man with a chronic mental illness donated $10,000 from own his savings to keep the lights on. The denomination loaned another $200,000. Half of the church’s congregants live on the streets. Every week after collections, they were still coming up $3,000 to $4,000 short. “When you pass the bags, you don’t get a lot, and we can’t get affluent people here because the neighborhood is rough, and they don’t want to sit in the room with the homeless people,” Bryceson says. “We think if you came once, you’d like it.” He sees the church’s sale as an opportunity. His dream is to open a deli and bakery, where his poorest congregants can work six days a week while he does the sermon on Sundays. No matter where First Covenant ends up, the flock will follow. “When they do move, we’re all gonna stay together. No matter what,” Suzanne says. “If I have to go sit on his couch in front of the TV on Sunday morning, I will. It’s not the church; it’s the people. Wherever this church goes, wherever Rob goes, I’m going.” 


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Inlander 01/16/2014