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1995-2015

1990

The old Boone Street Barn had a 40-year run.

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS ARENA PEOPLE

Kevin Twohig Kevin Twohig, CEO of the Spokane Public Facilities District, has been involved with the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena since its inception. A native of Arizona, Twohig moved to Spokane in 1967 to attend Gonzaga University. While still an undergraduate, he established a sound and lighting company that would later assist with Expo ’74. That’s when he met Mike Kobluk, who went on to head the city department that oversaw the Spokane Opera House (now the INB Performing Arts Center) and the building across the breezeway — “the very first box that was ever a Convention Center in Spokane.” Twohig began working there under Kobluk in 1975. Four years later, departmental consolidation put Twohig in charge of managing the Coliseum. “I’ll never forget the first time Mike and I walked into the old building. We looked around and said, ‘Boy, Spokane deserves better than this.’” Nearly 40 years later, Twohig’s commitment to mass entertainment is undiminished. “That enjoyment you get from the crowd experience has always been the driver for me. I still get goosebumps when the crowd reacts as one. As human beings, we strive for those creative, shared experiences,” he says. “I don’t believe in hermits.”

.

SPOKANE (FINALLY) SAYS YES

The origins of the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena can be traced back to the completion of the Spokane Coliseum in December of 1954. The “Boone Street Barn,” as it was known, seated 5,400 patrons — a respectable number at the time. A 1955 issue of Life magazine praised its “dazzling efficient modern equipment equaled by few other halls on earth.” As the building aged, however, the need for a larger, modern facility became clear. During hockey games, orange cones marked the slushy areas where the pipes in the ice-cooling system had rusted through. “If you were in the building at night, you could see stars through the roof,” recalls Kevin Twohig, CEO of the Spokane Public Facilities District who managed the Coliseum in its final years. The state of the Coliseum sealed its fate by the late 1980s, when popular artists like ZZ Top and New Kids on the Block opted for other venues. Yet it took voters years to warm to the idea. Measures to fund a replacement began appearing on the ballot as early as 1985. They repeatedly failed. Sheri Barnard was the mayor of Spokane from 1990-94 — the leader of a city with a bit of reputation for saying “no.” (It took more than 20 years to build the Coliseum; Spokane even voted against hosting the World’s Fair.) “The issue was brought to the council, and people had concerns. That’s normal,” she recalls. “But then the leadership involved them, so the citizens felt they were a part of it.” As a result, the plan was adjusted to address those concerns, and in November of 1990, voters ratified a new idea — a municipal corporation called a public facilities district. Today, the Spokane PFD oversees the Spokane Arena, the INB Performing Arts Center and the Spokane Convention Center. Barnard sees the Arena vote and the support for new fire stations at the same time as important turning points in local history — votes that built public confidence and led to future success. “Look what we’ve passed since,” she says. “Park bonds, streets, swimming pools, schools, the expanded convention center. Every time I drive by the Arena, I’m extremely proud of Spokane.” NEXT TIME: Breaking ground on the new Arena; also, what’s a PFD?

TIMELINE: 1985-1991 GETTING PAST “NO”

Like its predecessor, the Spokane Arena wasn’t instantly popular with voters. After first floating the idea in 1985, it took five ballot measures over six years to achieve the necessary support. Their downfall? Linking the funding to local tax increases. Once the financing structure was revamped, the Arena passed with votes in 1990 and 1991.

CHER’S CHALLENGE

Even the promise of sellout shows wasn’t enough to lure Cher back to the deteriorating Coliseum. On Aug. 14, 1990, in the middle of her international Heart of Stone Tour, the diva told a packed house that she wouldn’t return to Spokane until the city could provide a new facility. She’s since played the Arena twice, in 2002 and 2005.

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SCOTT MCDANIEL I don’t think it is. Most of the people from other countries got their visas and are here legally, at least the people I know.

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COMMENT | EDUCATION

Common Sense

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It’s time to add civics and history to the other basics being taught in the Common Core curriculum

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early 184 months ago, under the leadership of the National Governors Association, teachers, parents and other education experts gathered together to chart a national course for effective student learning. They named it Common Core Education Standards and made it available for states to adopt. So far, 43 states have done so, intending maximum flexibility for schools and communities. The emphasis is on mathematics and language skills, but Common Core should be improved by adding a civic learning component. Civic learning requires a renewed emphasis — a dedication to teaching basic U.S. history, economics, foreign policy and government. The evidence of its absence from student education is pervasive. The October 2014 issue of Time magazine confirmed that only 36 percent of all Americans can name the three branches of the federal government — the Executive, Legislative and Judicial — provided for in the U.S. Constitution. Many citizens routinely have trouble identifying national leaders. Voting by citizens each election is less than robust. A recent YouTube episode showed an interviewer asking 10 random students from Washington, D.C.’s American University to name one U.S. Senator. Only one of the 10 could do so, but all were able to name the theme song from the movie Frozen. Educators supporting Common Core justifiably argue that developing a student’s mathematical skills allows them to incorporate reason and formulaic analysis to problem solving. Emphasizing language skills encourages them to learn effective expression by perfecting their understanding and use of words, whether spoken or written. Developing mathematics and language skills will allow our students to better compete with their peers internationally. But does this go far enough? Is de-emphasizing civics detrimental to the perpetuation of core American concepts: freedom, free enterprise, the rule of law, human rights, individual liberty and justice? Of course, of course!

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ost Americans are sadly ignorant of the basics of the American system. Understanding significant events in American history helps us analyze current events and the importance of adhering to historic principles in public policy decisions. Understanding basic economics helps Americans consider the consequences of federal budget decisions and other money matters; that supply and demand are essential principles of capitalism and marketoriented policies. With the United States historically acting as a bulwark against aggression by foreign nations, it’s important for Americans to be aware of where in the world young soldiers are sent

by their government to protect and preserve freedom. With Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan regularly in the news, Americans should know where their human and financial treasures are being spent. American government is now so massive, so complex, that most Americans have little understanding of how the federal, or state, government works. With more than a trillion dollars being spent each year on federal government functions, more Americans should be able to understand how and on what their federal tax dollars are being spent. Absent an understanding of government, citizens are at the mercy of the federal bureaucracy or compelled to hire a lobbying group or law firm to protect their rights when facing a federal problem — a luxury few can afford. If rising to global competition is a common core, then civics education is a critical companion. At a time when the New York Post has reported that civic engagement is “slipping” among young people, an emphasis on civic learning can encourage Americans to appreciate the 239-year odyssey our nation has undertaken. Creating a better life for millions of free and democratic citizens — and for millions more around the world — based on the concepts of liberty that are embodied in America’s founding documents has been a hallmark of civics. Even today, as American culture changes, civic learning is supported by Americans of all political and economic persuasions.

A

ccording to a December 2014 Wall Street Journal article, civic learning is on the increase. Seven states now require that high school seniors pass the immigrant citizenship test as a condition of graduation. The Massachusetts Board of Elementary and Secondary Education has created a civic learning task force to address this gap in student learning. The Edward Kennedy Institute in Boston is focused on student learning and the lessons of Sen. Kennedy’s long service in the U.S. Senate. The Washington Post recently featured an article titled, “Improving the U.S. in 2015 begins with knowing more about it.” The more our young people learn that our great country was built by people who staked their lives on the proud purposes of our founding, the more they’ll learn that our citizenship should never be taken for granted. Now that’s a Common Core principle all Americans can accept. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Looking for the Perfect Tenant for Your Rental Home?

Completing the Comeback BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

LET US HELP

G

ood news: America is hiring! Bad news: For too many jobs, the pay still stinks. The jobs numbers released last week showed 250,000 new hires in December — part of the 3 million jobs created in 2014, the best year since 1999. But pay for those December jobs was actually down by 0.2 percent. There’s a lot to be optimistic about in the American economy — gas prices are way down, unemployment is under 6 percent and the Dow has topped 18,000. But the dream that a rising tide floats all boats ain’t happening. The Pew Research Center recently pegged the gap between upperincome families and the middle class to be the widest ever measured. But let’s stop for a second and admire the resiliency of our economy. After the shock of 9/11, we came back. After the bottom fell out of our financial system in 2008, we came back. Policy had a lot to do with it — smart people made wise decisions that saved our bacon. Our corporations, too, navigated rough waters. But let’s not forget that American workers and consumers — the most high-functioning in the world — have been a huge part of the comeback. Together, we are a powerful force. For years now, we haven’t been able to talk about change because, you know, “we’re still in a recession.” But people are ready to talk about our inequality problem now — even Pope Francis. Of course, many leaders say America’s perfect, so don’t change anything. Workers who are stuck in minimum wage, fearful that technology will take their jobs, living a paycheck away from oblivion, know that’s crazy talk. So let’s move on to ideas that can help. Creating a health care safety net has been a game-changer. States not taking part, like Idaho, need to extend it to all their citizens. Focusing on worker training is crucial, too. The world is changing faster than ever; keeping up is a challenge. President Obama’s proposal to offer two years of free community college is right on. But pay is the key. Now that the recession’s over, the unfairness is plain to see. Here in Washington, we decided to raise the minimum wage. Did our economy tank? No, and according to a 2012 analysis in USA Today, we have the nation’s fourth fastest growing economy. In Seattle, they voted to raise the minimum wage even higher. A raise in the federal minimum wage would be a great step toward an even stronger America. Bill Clinton famously said the best social program he could think of is a job. Today we know he was half right. The pay needs to be fair, too.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | IDAHO

People vs. Machines

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

It’s time to end the war on people BY JOHN T. REUTER

O

ur transportation system is breaking down. In Idaho, we would need an additional $262 million a year to maintain our existing approach. Nationally, it would require $3.6 trillion — almost the same amount as our entire federal budget. We have built a system we can’t afford. The proposed solution? Supersize it, so it’s even bigger and less affordable. The current plan at both the state and federal levels

is to continue expanding our existing system through ever-wider roads. Forget about building a bigger system. To even close the funding gap to maintain existing roads and bridges would require tremendous tax increases. The gas tax, for example, would have to be raised not by pennies per a gallon, but by dollars. While solving our transportation crisis will require some additional funding, the first step is to open our minds to new approaches rather than further opening our wallets.

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The first step is to stop digging the hole deeper. We can’t continue building roads we can’t afford. When we rebuild a road wider, we’re not just expanding capacity — we’re creating a new liability on our balance sheet that will be even more expensive to repair when it needs to be replaced. The current auto-focused system is also dangerous. We’ve asked our engineers to focus almost solely on how to move cars faster. The results are deadly, as vehicles collide at higher speeds with each other and pedestrians — frequently fatally. A balanced transportation system, with increased support for biking, walking and transit, would be more affordable and safer for everyone. It costs less to move people by bicycle, bus and their own two feet than by single-occupancy vehicles. This isn’t just true for us as a society, but as individuals, too. Cars are expensive and not everyone can afford one. Personal liberty is enhanced by a transportation system with more options to get around. This argument for a more balanced, affordable transportation system with safe options for everyone to get around isn’t new. It’s actually the way we used to build things before the interstate highways and suburban sprawl. It’s about emphasizing economic growth through traditional downtowns and walkable neighborhoods. It’s an approach being championed by nonprofits, like Strong Towns (strongtowns.org), which is working to create a new paradigm for future growth that is economically sustainable. (Full disclosure: I serve on Strong Towns’ board of directors.) Of course, the protectors of the status quo also are organizing. A particularly dedicated faction have taken up residence at the Seattle Times, where they regularly attack the city’s “war on cars.” Their belief is that any new bike lane, reduction in parking or pedestrian safety improvement is an attack on our automotive-dominated transportation system. They might be right. But what they are missing is the more problematic battle being waged: The nearly century-long war on people by a transportation system that believes moving around hunks of metal is more important than actually moving and protecting the lives of human beings. Just for the sake of safety and quality of life, it makes sense to reform our transportation system. But even if that weren’t the case, it would still be time to make a change, because we simply can’t afford continuing to move in our current direction.  John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, is the executive director of Conservation Voters for Idaho. He has been active in protecting Idaho’s environment, expanding LGBT rights and the Idaho Republican Party.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

GET OVER IT! s Robert Herold (“All In For 2015,” 1/8/15) ever going to get over the

I

fact that, despite his fawning and effusive praise, Mary Verner lost and David Condon won? Apparently not. The latest target is Jan Quintrall, who has apparently committed the unpardonable sin of being successful in life without the benefit of a college LETTERS degree. So what? Quintrall appears Send comments to to be a talented and successful public editor@inlander.com. servant with a lengthy record of success working for the Better Business Bureau, an organization with a proud history of protecting consumers from fraud in the marketplace. I wonder if Herold would apply the same dismissive criticism to Bill Gates, America’s foremost college dropout? His latest bombast doesn’t merit a passing grade.

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TOM KEEFE Spokane, Wash.

Reaction to “Crossroads,” (1/8/15) on the Downtown Spokane Partnership and STA’s shared dilemma over a national retailer’s desire to move to the corner of Wall and Main, and what that could mean for the proposed Central City Line

SCOTT FITZGERALD: How does bending over backwards to bring in some high-profile national retailer help Spokane or Spokane small businesses? NICK MUTO: Yeah, keyword: delivery trucks. This area is the only access to the mall. STA doesn’t need to change it and neither does this “secret” company. Find another way. LAURIE HALL FORSBERG MUELLER: I’m not in favor of one over the other, but I can’t help but make the comment that I remember in the ’60s, my grandmother worried that the North-South freeway was going through her house. Well, it has taken 50 years for the freeway to come to reality and I would suspect a Central City Line connecting Browne’s Addition and GU has a long way to go as well. A new retailer could come and go by then. In the end I hope STA and DSP can agree to something that works for both. MONICA BERTUCCI: The last “high profile” tenant I can think of that was courted here evicted lowincome tenants and has since left the building for dead. Remember BlueStar Technologies? HEATHER STUART: We have plenty of vacant buildings downtown. I’m sure they can find another space to occupy. Don’t mess with what is working. We probably don’t want you here anyway, especially if this proposal is how you do business. 

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EDUCATION

Path of Least Resistance

Spokane Public Schools looks at reworking a grading system that drives students into the easiest classes BY DANIEL WALTERS

A

decade ago, when Steven Gering was principal at North Central High School, a student called a meeting with himself and the superintendent to call attention to an especially perverse incentive. The perfect 4.0, Gering remembers her explaining, had a loophole: Take easy classes, and the path to becoming a valedictorian was a simple one. Take tough classes, and risk marring the perfection. “Her point was that all the policies in the district are actually discouraging kids from taking challenges,” Gering says. “Why would you take [Advanced Placement] Chemistry and get a B, when you can take regular chemistry to get an A?” In the years since, the district has dramatically increased the number of AP classes available. But school board chair Jeff Bierman says there aren’t many current incentives to push students to take those classes.

“My daughter had friends that decided not to take AP classes, because their parents told them, ‘Don’t take that, you want to have a high GPA,’” Bierman says. “There’s nothing in our system that rewards students for taking that extra challenge.” Over the past few months, Spokane Public Schools’ board of directors has been discussing several possible solutions. What if, for example, grades were weighted so an A in an AP course was worth a 5.0 instead of a 4.0? Or if teachers could use pluses or minuses? What if students who took plenty of difficult classes got a separate diploma? What if students taking challenging courses received special recognition during graduation ceremonies?

A

t Gonzaga University, Dean of Admissions Julie McCulloh and her staff have just finished the first ...continued on next page

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 13


NEWS | EDUCATION “PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE,” CONTINUED... read-through of about 3,000 applications from prospective students. “We’ll see applications from around 600 different high schools,” McCulloh says. Some weigh grades on a five-point or 12-point scale. Others append supplemental transcripts or only offer percentages. At Gonzaga, like many colleges, the first thing they do is strip out all the gloss and rely on the basic 4.0 calculations. Gonzaga then uses transcripts to create their own customized weighting system. The days of simple GPA/SAT charts are over, McCulloh says. Top colleges don’t just look at volunteer hours, essays, test scores and GPAs: They dive down into transcripts, examining how many difficult classes students have taken. “We will give credit to students who take Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate honors,” McCulloh says. After all, “Answers in the Tool Box,” a 1999 landmark research study by the U.S. Department of Education, found the single best predictor of success in college was academic intensity and quality, “certainly not test scores, and certainly not class rank or grade point average.” “If a school provides a weighted GPA, we use it,” says Greg Orwig, vice president of admissions at Whitworth University. If they don’t, Whitworth has been using its own weighted GPA for the last three years. At first, the fact that many colleges rely on their own weighted grading systems seems like an argument against districts creating their own: After all, why go to the trouble to do what

14 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015 SpokaneSymphony_010815_8V_GG.tif

most colleges are going to do anyway? Plus, by default, all Washington schools use unweighted grades on their official transcripts — any weighting has to take place on supplemental transcripts. The idea, board members explain, is that the weighted grading system isn’t intended to show colleges the rigor of a student’s courses, but to better communicate to students what colleges already look at. (Coeur d’Alene Public Schools already weigh Advanced Placement courses on a 5-point scale — a student receiving a B in an AP course would still get a 4.0, for example, on her transcript.)

I

n December, the board tasked Gering to develop a possible grading policy that would allow teachers to modify letter grades with pluses and minuses, and would use weighted grades to determine class rankings. Still undecided: whether to award additional recognition to students with tougher course loads. “Personally, I think it would be phenomenal,” says Shadle Park senior Scott Hinshaw, student advisor to the school board. “Hopefully we can figure out something to do, as soon as possible.” He says many of his fellow students all support rewarding students who take tough courses and want the details worked out expeditiously. One area high school already has a system in place: Five years ago, North Central High School implemented a program called “Distinguished Scholars.” “We’re asking kids to take bigger risks with


their GPA,” the current North Central Principal Steve Fisk says. Students with straight A’s are still recognized as valedictorians. But to be able to give a speech at graduation, students need to be a “distinguished valedictorian,” with not only straight A’s, but a challenging course load. Even students who get mostly B’s are recognized and awarded if they take a lot of AP courses and score well on the test. “The grades aren’t the final weighted factor,” Fisk says. “You could finish with a 3.3, and still be a ‘distinguished scholar.’” At Rogers High School, Principal Lori Wyborney says her school is moving toward also officially recognizing students who take the toughest courses with a separate diploma. The tricky part, however, is communicating those changes. LETTERS There is already a slew of Send comments to distinct cords celebrating editor@inlander.com. different honors draped around necks at graduation ceremonies. “It has been confusing,” says Wyborney. “Honestly, the list of color cords right now, oh my God, it’s 10 or more.” At Gonzaga, McCulloh raises another challenge. “Students today are filling their hours with more coursework, with a busier schedule. ... They’re academically ready for college,” McCulloh says. “But we’re seeing more anxiety on the college campus.” The focus purely on academics has replaced the social and emotional maturity that comes from first jobs or first failures, she worries. There are subtler things, beyond test scores, grades and transcripts, that are important for surviving college. “Restoring balance for the high school years,” McCulloh says, “is really important.” n

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM More Inlander news every day

PHOTO EYE SILENT 49 Degrees NorthFLAME January 19th • Open for MLK Holiday January 24th • Renegades and Handrails Pt. 1 January 31st • Chewelah Peak XC Challenge January 31st • Masters Race

BLUESTAR GETS INDICTED

Ever since ERICK HANSEN bought up the Commercial Building in downtown Spokane, kicked out low-income tenants and launched a company that, ostensibly, would produce Blu-ray discs, he’s been dogged by accusations of fraud. And now those accusations carry a federal punch. In December, Hansen and his BlueStar Digital Technologies collaborator, Sean Michael Borzage Boyd, were indicted on 16 counts of mail and wire fraud. Many of the counts concern lying to investors and movie companies about their production capabilities. In federal court in Spokane on Monday, Hansen pleaded not guilty to all charges. Hansen was allowed to return to California, but only with a GPS monitor. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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Anti-abuse activist Edie Carlson holds a candle aloft, observing a moment of silence during the Human Trafficking Candlelight Vigil at River Park Square January 20th • SARS Western Regional Speed Series on Sunday. A few hundred people attended the vigil, including city councilmembers, high school musicians and Pastor AmberDawn McCall, who spoke • Smokin about being born into human trafficking January 38 years ago24th in British Columbia. Aces Slopestyle

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According to a new study from Seattle University, the average death penalty case in Washington state costs about $3 MILLION, and that’s at least $1 million more expensive than similar cases where prosecutors do not seek capital punishment. In the seven-month study, researchers examined 147 cases of aggravated first-degree murder in Washington since 1997. According to their findings, every expense associated with these types of cases is greater when the death penalty is sought, with the exception of postconviction incarceration costs. (DEANNA PAN)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Bait and Switch The Spokane City Council is consumed by abortion and driveways; plus, Baumgartner’s rules in Olympia ETHICS AND ABORTION

People packed Spokane City Hall on Monday to testify about an ordinance that Council President Ben Stuckart insisted was about DRIVEWAYS. Those who spoke during the council’s public comment period, however, insisted the ordinance was about abortion and free speech. The ordinance amends an existing city law, making it illegal to obstruct a driveway in the public right-of-way. Although the ordinance affects driveways throughout Spokane, it was specifically crafted for the Planned Parenthood on East Indiana Avenue. The clinic has been the target of anti-abortion protesters, who have been known to approach cars coming into the driveway. The new ordinance passed 6-1, with Councilman Mike Fagan casting the lone vote against it. The council also passed an update to the city’s ethics code, which lays out conflicts of interests, what gifts employees and officials can take and how to seek redress. Notably, the update to the code makes it easier to recall an elected official. Previously, it required a majority plus two on the council to trigger a recall election for an elected official. Under the updated ordinance, it now requires only a simple majority. — JAKE THOMAS

FULL RIDE?

Last Friday, President Barack Obama launched another big policy proposal: He wants to make two years of COMMUNITY COLLEGE free. If students “attend at least half-time, maintain a 2.5 GPA while in college and make steady progress toward completing their program,” they would have their first two years of tuition completely paid for by the state and federal government. “We think it’d be a huge boost for students and for Washington’s economy,” says Marty Brown, executive director of the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. During the recession, community college tuition increased and support services were slashed, as the system struggled to handle an influx of students. He hopes Obama’s plan would counter that trend. But Janet Gullickson, president at Spokane Falls Community College, says cost usually isn’t the largest hurdle for students. “To me, the biggest obstacle is: Are you prepared for the rigors of college level learning?” says Gullickson. Community colleges have very high non-completion rates and very high student-loan default rates. Getting students to enroll isn’t nearly as hard as getting them to graduate. To that point, she hopes if Obama’s plan is

implemented, it might push both students and colleges to better performances. “If we tell students in seventh grade, ‘You don’t have to worry about paying for [community college],’ perhaps students will be more motivated,” she says. “It might make us in higher ed say, ‘We have no excuses.’” Ultimately, all the speculation may be academic. A Congress controlled by Republicans, already unhappy about entitlements, is unlikely to leap at a free-community-college proposal recommended by Obama. — DANIEL WALTERS

PROCEDURAL RULES

A new procedural rule change passed by Republican state Senators on the first day of Washington’s 2015 legislative session will make it harder for lawmakers to enact new taxes. Last week, Sens. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane, and Doug Ericksen, R-Ferndale, proposed a sweeping rule change that would require a TWO-THIRDS VOTE of the legislature’s upper chamber for any measure that raises taxes. On Monday, the Senate approved a modified version of the rule change, requiring a two-thirds procedural vote to advance only bills that create new taxes for a final vote. Every Senate Democrat, with the exception of Sen. Tim Sheldon, D- Potlatch, who caucuses with Republicans, opposed the change. Under the new rule, 33 of 49 members in the Senate would have to vote to advance Gov. Jay Inlsee’s new revenue proposals, such as his cap-and-trade program and a capital gains tax, for debate on the Senate floor. In 2013, the state Supreme Court ruled that a voterapproved initiative requiring a supermajority to pass tax increases was unconstitutional. The state constitution, however, allows each chamber to make its own procedural rules. — DEANNA PAN

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 17


NEWS | IMMIGRATION

Culture Clash

Jackie Murray, a Spokane truck driver, is leading an effort to combat illegal immigration.

Who and what is driving a controversial effort to roll back immigration policies inside Spokane? BY JAKE THOMAS

J

ackie Murray is nervous. Nervous about talking with the press. Nervous for her family. Nervous that she’ll come home one day and find her tires slashed. “I had no intention of becoming infamous,” says Murray. “I’m just an ordinary person.” A 59-year-old Spokane truck driver with virtually no political experience, Murray says she just wants people to do what her dad did when he legally immigrated to the U.S. in the 1950s from Jamaica. But she’s waded into one of the country’s most combustible issues by sponsoring a local ballot initiative that would reverse a current ordinance preventing police and other city employees from asking people about their immigration status.

18 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

Supporters of Murray’s efforts say the current policy will attract undocumented immigrants, who, they insist, will bring crime and potentially terrorism while draining public resources. Opponents of the proposed initiative contend it would simply make us less safe. Greg Cunningham, director of refugee and immigration services program at Catholic Charities of Spokane, says the ordinance boils down to a jurisdictional matter: Local police should enforce local laws while federal agencies enforce federal immigration law. He adds that Spokane is safer if immigrants can cooperate with local law enforcement without worrying about being deported.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“If you have people in the community who are afraid to approach law enforcement, we all suffer from that,” he says. Not one of nearly 2,500 valid signatures needed to qualify the initiative for the November ballot has been gathered, but its politics have already proved quarrelsome. The city council hearing on the initiative held last week was the most confrontational in recent memory, with an irked Council President Ben Stuckart gaveling the meeting to an abrupt end after people cheered and clapped in violation of council rules. On its face, the issue could be problematic for Republicans looking to expand their base, but the Spokane County GOP has heartily embraced Murray’s efforts. County Republican chair Dave Moore says the city council is forcing a very unpopular policy on the voters. “At the end of the day, I’m responding to a very large cry from the citizens that have contacted me,” he says. Mark Kadel, the director of refugee resettlement group World Relief Spokane, says proponents of the initiative are often working from false assumptions and rumors. “My personal reaction,” he says, “is that there are some very uneducated people who make very knee-jerk reactions.”


B

y passing the ordinance in October, Spokane joined a growing number of cities, from small towns to New York City, that have sought to scale back the use of local law enforcement in immigration matters. According to a report in the International Business Times, more than 250 municipalities have adopted such laws. Spokane’s ordinance was meant to codify an already existing police policy, under which officers can still inquire about a suspect’s immigration status if they think that person has been previously deported or has committed a crime. As is, nothing prevents U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement from doing its job, and the agency still conducts raids in Spokane. For her part, Murray says she never paid particular attention to the council until she learned that it had passed the ordinance in October. She decided then to get involved. “I wanted to do a lawsuit, but they talked me out of that,” says Murray. “They” is Councilman Mike Fagan, an outspoken foe of the ordinance, and Craig Keller, co-founder of Respect Washington, a group with a mailing address in Federal Way that has been involved with a handful of immigration-related ordinances across the state. Fagan recommended that Murray get in touch with Keller, who helped with the language of the initiative and the process of filing it. “One thing I want to set the record straight on right away is this is not a Respect Washington initiative,” says Keller. “This is a petition on the behalf of Jackie Murray.” When reached by phone, Keller is also nervous talking to the media. He won’t say much about his background. He won’t say what he does for a living or what city he lives in, but he mentions how in 2014 he lost badly to U.S. Rep. Jim McDermott, a Democrat whose district includes Seattle and surrounding areas. For the past seven years, Respect Washington has been pushing a ballot initiative that would require public and private employers in Washington to use E-Verify, an Internet-based system that uses government databases to determine if a potential employee can work in the country legally. Supporters, though, haven’t been able to put the issue on the ballot. In Spokane, all citizen-sponsored initiatives pass through city council, which has the option of voting them into law or referring them to voters without requiring any signature gathering. If the council takes no action, the initiative is reviewed for legal soundness before supporters can start collecting signatures. Fagan is continuing to drum up support for the initiative. He’s discussed the issue on his “The RIGHT Spokane Perspective” radio show on KTW, which likely increased turn-out for last week’s council meeting. “I didn’t think it would garner that much attention,” says Fagan, chuckling. “But I’m grateful that it brought that much attention.”

N

BARTENDERS MIX BARTENDERS MIXJOCKS OFF

ationally, a debate is going on within the GOP over immigration policy, and last Friday Republicans in the U.S. House introduced legislation to undo President Obama’s executive action allowing 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country. The local GOP, however, rarely inserts itself so directly into city politics, and its motivations might be to rally its base, says Mike Treleaven, an associate professor of political science at Gonzaga University. “The initiative that they are proposing sounds like a solution in search of a problem,” he says. “But it is a solution for a party to find a hot-button issue to energize a party.” The local GOP doesn’t have the same demographic pressures seen in other communities. According to U.S. Census numbers, only 5 percent of Spokane County is Latino or Hispanic. Statewide, that number is 12 percent. Cunningham, from Catholic Charities, says he’s disturbed by the fearful language that’s been used by the pro-initiative side, but he says that such talk is nothing new. Irish immigrants, he says, were once derided as drunk, and pseudoscientific arguments were made that immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe had smaller brains. “It’s the same sort of rhetoric,” he says, “that’s been used since before the U.S. was a country.” 

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NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH

Letters from Mark

Sandra Carr with a photo of her son, Mark Overland, at his tree-planting memorial service at Mirabeau Park. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

A mother tries to understand the suicide of a son — just as he was regaining his freedom BY DEANNA PAN The competency therapist here at the hospital has given me the choice of pleading not guilty by reason of insanity, and that’s the best decision I can make right now. They have informed me that I will most likely be sent to a long term ward here at the hospital for about three years, which would be drastically shorter than a prison term. — Mark Overland, in a letter to his Uncle Norm from jail, July 2000

T

he last time Sandra Carr saw her son alive was four days before her mother’s 95th birthday. It was Saturday evening, Aug. 9, at the Old Spaghetti Factory, their first dinner together as a family in 14 years.

In the fall of 2000, her son, Mark Overland, had been admitted to Eastern State Hospital after pleading not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) for attempting to kill his neighbor. Overland had paranoid schizophrenia and was undiagnosed at the time. Once stable, he spent the next decade at the hospital, “working the program” so he could get out and start a new life. He got that chance in July 2014, when he was granted a conditional release from the court to live in the community. He moved into a transitional house in Spokane and was preparing to take classes at Spokane Falls Community College. He wanted to be a video-game designer. For the first time in more than a decade, Overland

was on the cusp of achieving everything he had always dreamed of since his commitment at Eastern State. Less than a month later, without warning, Overland, 38, committed suicide. Carr was shocked and, to this day, is struggling to understand why. “Everything that we ever knew about Mark, we believed he would be successful,” Carr says. “My question is why? Why did he do that? He seemed to have a goal in mind for getting out. He worked hard to get out. He did everything they asked him to do.” But maybe that wasn’t enough, says John Murphy, the programs manager at Passages Family Support and a former, long-time patient advocate at Eastern State

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Hospital. After Eastern patient Phillip Paul’s escape from the Spokane County Fair in September 2009, all NGRI patients, including Overland, immediately lost privileges to leave their wards and make reintegration trips into the community. In 2010, state lawmakers passed additional laws that effectively confined NGRI patients within hospital walls and, attorneys and advocates argue, delayed their release. Patients are currently suing the state in federal court to have those laws overturned. “You can’t go from being in a real structured place for so long and then all of the sudden, you’re out there and you’re not having any transition,” says Murphy, who knew Overland personally while he was at Eastern. “When you’ve been in there too long and all of the sudden, they throw you out, you don’t know how to survive any more.”

Who are the kids you know?

C

arr describes Overland as a good kid who got good grades, never skipped class and always kept his room clean. Then two months before he was set to graduate from high school, he started to change. Suddenly, he dropped out and quit his after-school job at Allied Janitorial. He started experimenting with LSD. “He seemed to have gotten lost,” Carr says. He would stay up for days at time, blasting music and chugging Mountain Dew. He accused his mother of being part of a conspiracy against him. He told her he could hear his co-workers’ thoughts. He thought the TV was watching him. On Christmas Eve in 1999, the very last one they spent together, Carr drove Overland around the Valley and up a hill to see the nice houses strung up with Christmas lights, one of his favorite pastimes as a kid. As they were driving down the hill, Carr pulled to a stop. Overland had begun to cry. “Mom,” he said. “I don’t want to die.” “He told me that several times over the next several months,” Carr remembers. “We knew something was wrong. He knew something was wrong. He didn’t know what it was. All he knew was he didn’t want to die.”

Amazing things are done by youth and teens every day and they deserve to be nominated for a #ChaseYouthAward. To nominate cool kids or youth groups that have been killin’ it in 2014 visit ChaseYouthSpokane.org/programs/Chase-Youth-Awards for more information about each category and a downloadable nomination form.

AWARD CATEGORIES: • Arts & Creativity • Community Involvement • Courage • Cultural Awareness • Environment • Leadership • Personal Achievement

O

verland was admitted to the Sacred Heart psych ward for a little over two weeks, but that didn’t stop his downward spiral. After Overland received his first Social Security Disability Insurance check, he bought a handgun, a .45 caliber Smith and Wesson, at the General Store. On March 28, 2000, at approximately 10 am, Overland kicked down the door of his upstairs neighbor’s apartment and began shooting. He fired at least five shots; three struck the victim, who survived, in the face and neck. Overland was calmly arrested and charged with first-degree attempted murder and burglary. At the booking, he admitted to the shooting, according to court documents. He did it, he told police, because of everything “they” had put him through, because ...continued on next page

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NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH

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Mark Overland at a family dinner

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of all the noise: the creaking of the floorboards, the tapping on the pipes. Before he went upstairs, he loaded his gun and fired at the closet because he thought someone was hiding inside. He said “they” had been reading his mind. “I had to go up and take care of that guy,” Overland said. Five months later, Overland was acquitted by reason of insanity and admitted to Eastern State Hospital with a lifetime maximum commitment.

H

opefully though I’ll get out in a couple of years if I can excel through my treatment plan and the doctors think that I’m ready to integrate back into society and not be a danger to myself and others. I’m doing pretty good here. I listen to music, watch television, play video games and go outside a couple of times a day. I attend meetings with my therapist and have contact with my psychologist and take medication to combat depression and anti psychotics to control schizophrenia which I don’t think I have, but it keeps me running on an even keel. — October 2000 One month into his stay at Eastern, Overland wrote one of the first of many letters that he would write to his Uncle Norman, a pastor in Seattle. Norm gave them to Carr after her son’s death. Overland’s writing — scraggly, but not careless, cursive with a hard-right slant — describes his life at Eastern: his setbacks and frustrations, successes and ambitions. He was bored most of the time. He hated the food. The highlight of his week was taking a 4-mile walk around Medical Lake on Saturdays, drinking a double shot of espresso. [I want] to look back and know that I contributed something to this miniscule tick of time. I’ve been given the opportunity to turn my life around. I’m not going to let anything stop me from being successful, including myself. — March 2006 In nearly every letter, he told Norm about his dream to go to college at Eastern Washington University and study video-game design — and expressed his hope of being released in a few short years. His signed them all “Love Mark.”

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f believe God wanted me to look towards the light and to him for inspiration and hope during these dark times. ...I just want to be the best person I can be and when the time comes, maybe God has a place in heaven for me. — 2014 After dinner at the Old Spaghetti Factory, Carr drove Overland back to his transitional home. She helped him carry a few of his old things from her car up to his room: a PlayStation, a few video games, a cigarette lighter, some clothes and aftershave. His room was small, a bit of a mess. So Carr tidied up before she hugged him goodbye. “I love you,” she said. She didn’t hear back from him three days later, when she texted him about evening plans with the family. Or the next


Overland’s senior photo morning around 8 am, or again, at 9 am. “HELLO,” she texted him, in capital letters, “IS EVERYTHING OK?” She learned about his death a few hours later, when she got a call from his forensic counselor at Eastern. The night before his death, Carr later learned, he had asked house staff for a plastic bag from the kitchen.

I

n this place, if they don’t like you, you’re not getting out. You cannot question these people’s actions because there is no accountability from any independent agency to oversee what goes on here. Most of our human rights our taken away and they treat us like dogs. If I had to do it all over again I think I might have gone to prison… I wish I had better things to say about this place, but it’s a facade. The real goal of the hospital is to protect the community from us. When it should be about treatment, recovery and rehabilitation. — January 2008 The Department of Social and Health Services can’t comment on specific patients’ cases. Asked about the process of transitioning NGRI patients into the community, DSHS provided LETTERS the following statement: “Work Send comments to on discharge of NGRI patients editor@inlander.com. begins from the day of admission. … As patients receive treatment and transition through stages of recovery, they are given more opportunities to build outside support systems that can be used when they are eventually released from one of the hospitals.” In September, Overland’s toxicology report came back clean. Based on the drug’s half-life, he hadn’t taken his antipsychotic medication, Seroquel, in at least a day. One of the conditions of his release was that he continue taking his medication; otherwise he would risk having his release revoked and being sent back to Eastern. Today, his mother wonders if, after years of stability, he believed he didn’t need the medicine anymore, and then realized too late that he did. “That one infraction would have finished him. He always said, ‘I’m getting out. I’m never going back,’” she says. “He just took the only way out that he knew.” On September 4, DSHS wrote its last letter about Overland to Spokane Judge John Cooney. On August 13, 2014, Mr. Overland committed suicide at the group home where he was residing. An autopsy was performed shortly thereafter and a Certificate of Death was issued by the State of Washington Department of Health on August 18, 2014. … As is customary, we are requesting that an Order for Final Discharge be granted in this case to indicate termination of his sentence. After 14 years, Mark Overland had finally been released.  deannap@inlander.com

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Find out all the things we have planned in February for THE BIG READ by visiting www.scld.org/BigRead2015. THE BIG READ is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. Find out more at www.NEABigRead.org.

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H

DEVON PLOPPER ASCENDING ARTISTS

er activity in the arts community has been sporadic over the past year or so, causing some to maybe wonder if she’s an artist in hiding. Devon Plopper hasn’t had a solo show in Spokane since last spring, but the artist’s most recent series of inkon-paper drawings took nearly a year to create. If you’ve seen them, you’d know why. On the black painted wood floor of her 100-yearold Browne’s Addition apartment, the leggy 26-year-old kneels over a 3-by-3-foot sheet of paper. A tasteful mix of vintage and contemporary furniture fills the space, and the walls are mostly adorned with Plopper’s own art. Behind her, books on a set of four shelves are organized not by author or genre, but rather by the dominant spine ...continued on next page

A young artist pushes the boundaries of detail and time BY CHEY SCOTT

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | PROFILE

“ASCENDING ARTISTS: DEVON PLOPPER,” CONTINUED...

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Devon Plopper’s “Black & White Series #4.”

color, in a cool-to-warm color spectrum. While pen on paper is Plopper’s focused Leaning forward on her knees, a wisp of medium of late, the Spokane native studied bobbed, strawberry-blonde hair escapes from philosophy and fine art, including printmaking, behind her ear and swings below her chin. Most at Whitworth University. Intaglio printmaking of the paper is still blank — an early-stages work was her favorite technique mastered in college. in progress — but is tentatively planned to be a She still has a series of copper plates created larger version of the tiny, circle-stippled patterns then, and longs to have access to a printmaking from her latest series, shown at the Baby Bar last lab again. April. “The technique is difficult to master — “I don’t usually work like this,” she explains printmaking in general is a lost art,” she reflects. as a fine-point Staedtler pen in her hand barely “People see the word ‘print,’ and they think moves over the paper beneath her. “Usually I get printed on a computer.” really comfy on the couch because I sit for hours Although the bulk of her recent portfolio, inat a time working on these.” cluding the intaglio prints, was created a year or Any attempt to describe the tedium of the more ago, Plopper describes her creative drive as countless hours she’s invested into her most constantly fluctuating. She also works two jobs, recent work seems futile until one has seen the waiting tables and bartending at the Flying Goat minute detail of the untitled, nine-piece series. and selling high-end fashion at Cues boutique in A richly textured gradient of cellular circles, downtown Spokane. the centerpiece of Plopper’s “Black & White Series” is simply titled ASCENDING ARTISTS “No. 5.” Circles and ovals fill the D E VO N P LO P P E R entirety of the 11-by-14-inch sheet Age: 26 from corner to corner. Most are less Hometown: Spokane , Wash. than a millimeter in diameter, unitCollege: Whitworth University, class of 2013; Philosophy and fine arts ing by the thousands to form larger Media: ink on paper, intaglio printmaking shapes and undulating curves. Next art show: February, at Stella’s Café, 917 W. Broadway The cellular pattern looks like Artist’s website: devonreneeplopper.tumblr.com something under a microscope — maybe a hand-drawn version of the 400-times-magnified view of animal tissue, sliced Thus, time spent working on art, she says, is microscopically thin and affixed to a glass slide. “usually on a whim, and I like to start things and Many viewers draw a similar comparison put it away and come back to it. I do make asfrom the series, but that’s not what inspired the signments for myself, but I don’t have anything organic textures and patterns. like that in the moment that’s really dialed in.” “I am really inspired by detail,” Plopper Bent over the mostly white sheet she’s spent explains. “I prefer non-representational art, and 20 hours so far working on, she says, “I just that’s a lot of the reason I don’t title my art. pick away at it every few days. For me, it’s really People should appreciate it for their own right cathartic, and I think it’s neat to look at art that’s and not have perceptions going into it, and what non-representational, and think about the huthey think they should see.” manity of people and what it took to create it.” n


CULTURE | DIGEST

Paint by Lyrics

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY LAURA JOHNSON

BY CHEY SCOTT

W

ith a plastic pitcher of torn red raffle tickets in hand, she gracefully flits between tables and greets new arrivals in an already packed brewery. “Would you like to enter a raffle for the painting I’ll be doing tonight? I’m giving it away for free at the end of the night,” the petite painter asks. “If you don’t like it, you can always just throw it away,” she emphasizes quickly, shrugging her shoulders and giggling. No one is impolite enough to refuse. Even though she feigns diffidence, 25-year-old Audreana Camm has drawn a surprisingly large crowd — many more than the full-time, selftaught artist expected on a snowy January night the day after New Year’s. DISTILLED After 20 minutes, it’s A SHOT OF LIFE still standing room only, and the cement-floored tasting room of Spokane’s Ramblin’ Road Craft Brewery hums with chatter as the lone bartender bounces from tap to table to bartop. Camm sets the raffle tickets down and moves to the back corner of the room, where a paint-stained easel has been set up alongside a mic stand and amp. She waves her arms slightly to catch the room’s attention and starts to speak, but no one hears her. A little louder, she tries again, and all but a few tables turn silent. “I know this is a weird request, but if everyone could try and be as quiet as possible, I’m going to be painting from the music and the lyrics.” A group of tipsy, middle-aged couples whose center table is filled with empty pint glasses begin laughing and chatting

again a minute later. The rest of the room, though, is transfixed when the flannel-shirted musician, Andrew Dempsen, takes up his guitar and begins strumming a mellow, folksy tune. Camm’s movements are a blur. Back to the audience, her waist-length red curls swing back and forth as she seems to dance with the canvas. Her right hand flutters around it like a hummingbird — up, down, right, up, left, and then down to the cloudy jar of water on the easel shelf. “On the drive to Seattle / past windmills and tractor trailers / the passenger seats of other cars are your only neighbors… ” Dempsen croons. Through the singersongwriter’s original, fivesong set, the canvas in JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION front of Camm morphs from a glowing sunset to a dim, empty room with a fireplace. The final version — an abstract, heart-shaped tree inside the room — looks nothing like the cheery, bright landscape she began with. The tasting room fills with warm applause as Dempsen’s last note fades out. Camm takes a timid bow. The first name drawn from the raffle is absent — presumably one of the middle-aged drinkers who’s since departed for No-Li Brewhouse down the street — so she draws again. The winner is Camm’s cousin, but she’ll have to wait a while before toting the artwork out into the snowy night. Leaning against the front windowpane, wet paint glistens in the dim light. 

DIGITS IN THE RED ON THE PALOUSE

12.4 Million

$

That’s the budget deficit Washington State University’s athletic department was facing at the end of 2014. The school spent $59.7 million on athletics last year, but brought in only $47.3 million in revenue. The university contributed $7.2 million to athletics. Increased spending was attributed by Athletic Director Bill Moos (pictured) to, among other expenses, a $1.8 million buyout of ousted men’s basketball coach Ken Bone and bonuses paid to the 2013 WSU football coaching staff for reaching a bowl game. Moos said new television contracts and increased donations from boosters are likely to narrow the gap going forward.

MUSIC | It’s so punk rock, barely 32 minutes. Yet I’m grateful the new Sleater-Kinney album NO CITIES TO LOVE — the band’s first in 10 years — is here at all. As riot grrrl as ever, the originally Olympiabased trio stampedes through songs about growing older, getting through the recession and general badass behavior. All three women have been successful in various projects (Portlandia, Wild Flag, Corin Tucker Band, the Shins) but together they’re still totally bold, albeit with better sound quality. It will be fun to see how many of the new songs the band plays at their Knitting Factory show next month, the kickoff date for their entire tour. DVD | Rom-coms are generally ridiculous. The little indie movie TWO NIGHT STAND bucks that trend of low brainpower by asking questions about the selfie generation’s relationship style, and really gets inside of what makes its two selfish 20-something leads (the super-hot-right-now Miles Teller and Analeigh Tipton) tick. The plot follows a boy and a girl who meet via a Tinder-esque site and decide to hook up. The next day, they’re snowed in together, much to their chagrin. The movie’s ending is a bit cheesy, but there’s so much food for thought here. BOOK | Sometimes cookbooks are less about giving you amazing recipes you can easily make at home and more about teaching you how to be yourself in the kitchen. Sean Brock’s beautiful debut cookbook, HERITAGE, is definitely the latter. Brock, a tattooed chef whose Southern restaurants have warranted many accolades, believes in getting into the kitchen, making a big freaking mess and learning from all of your mistakes. His recipes range from not too hard (Lowcountry Hoppin’ John) to super challenging (roasted scallops with pumpkin and matsutake, brussels sprouts and black truffle). 

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CULTURE | THEATER

How to use THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION

Pull down then out

Mallory Ware as Smeraldina and Preston Loomer as Truffaldino in the Civic’s Servant of Two Masters. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Returns and Beginnings

NOT a phone.

After 14 years away, Patrick Treadway returns to the Civic to direct The Servant of Two Masters BY E.J. IANNELLI

I

t was almost a quarter-century ago that Patrick Treadway last directed a show at the Spokane Civic Theatre. It was the theater’s first-ever production of Nunsense; Troy Nickerson, now a veteran director in his own right, was choreographer. Treadway continued to perform there as an actor afterward, but even so, it’s been 14 years since he trod the Civic stage. The week the hijacked planes were piloted into the Twin Towers, he was appearing in his final performance, the unfortunately titled My Favorite Year. For Treadway, who relocated from San Francisco in the late ’80s, those early years at the Civic hold special significance because they led to regular professional work in Spokane. For a while he even became the go-to director for local revivals of Nunsense. “I’m pretty certain it’s because of the Civic that I had any kind of professional career here at all,” he says. Like other actors, Treadway drifted from the Civic over the years that followed (though not completely: his elaborate puppets were the yuletide ghosts in 2011’s A Christmas Carol), but he noted the recent staff changes, particularly the arrival of artistic director Keith Dixon, with some anticipation. He entertained the thought of returning. Then he got the phone call. “As I recall, they offered me Nunsense,” he laughs. “I said I’d like to direct anything but that one.” He ended up leading The Servant of Two Masters, written by Carlo Goldoni in the mid-18th century. The convolutions of its plot bend around love, rivalry, scheming, deceit and, well, food. It’s a classic commedia dell’arte, typified by its masked archetypal characters and improvisational comic routines. These often included Zanni (forebear of the English word zany) — sly or silly servants like the constantly famished Truffaldino of Goldoni’s play. Treadway says he looked to a classic repertory production of Taming of the Shrew directed by Bill Ball at San Francisco’s historic Geary Theater for inspiration.

28 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

“It was a groundbreaking West Coast production because he incorporated so much commedia in it. So I’m borrowing really heavily from Bill Ball’s direction, because he was such a smart guy,” he says. “And because some of the gags are so funny, I think the audiences will appreciate what I’ve brought from that production.” Some modernized versions have transported the play’s setting from Venice, Italy to places like Venice Beach, California, but the Civic’s version follows a traditional scenario set by Jeff Hatcher and Paolo Landi, the play’s adapter and translator. Coincidentally, it was adapted by the same Jeff Hatcher who adapted the Civic’s recent production of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde for the stage and who also modernized the version of Wait Until Dark performed last April at Interplayers. Treadway says the connection is entirely unintentional: “He’s just a busy guy, I think.” The production is on the Civic’s main stage, not the Firth J. Chew studio theater. To retain some of its intimacy, it will take place on a raked — that is, front-sloping — stage, affording the audience a full view of the action. “The Zanni drape themselves around the perimeter of that rake, providing sound effects and percussion and heckling. For the most part, nobody ever leaves the stage,” says Treadway. He adds that the ensemble nature of Goldoni’s play is what allowed him to cast so many untried actors, such as Preston Loomer as Truffaldino. “They mostly seem to be fresh faces and college students. This is one of the beauties of community theater,” he says. “You get to open the door to new talent.” Treadway, returning to the theater where he first established himself in Spokane, has a singular appreciation for that. n The Servant of Two Masters • Jan. 16 through Feb. 8: Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sat-Sun, 2 pm • $18-$25 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • 325-2507 • spokanecivictheatre.com

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EDITOR’S NOTE LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW!

M

4

M O U N TA I N PEOPLE

6

CANADIAN G E TAWAY

8

EVENTS

12

LAST RUN

— JEN FORSYTH Snowlander Editor

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Freeride Media

NEWS & NOTES

other Nature and Ullr finally answered all of your calls: They’ve taken note of the snow dances and sacrificing of old skis and have brought us snow! It looks like winter is here with a vengeance. The holidays are behind us, and now we can just focus fully on ski season. I’ve heard many people talking about “patterns” in relation to past snow seasons. The one that keeps coming up is the winter of 199899, when it was a slow start, like the current season. But once the snow started falling, it didn’t stop. Every day was a powder day for weeks on end. Let’s hope this is true and we can start making up for lost time. We’re now in January, Learn to Ski Month. All area resorts are offering an array of packages to get you up on the mountain this winter. Events are lined up for each weekend through the end of the season; check out the calendar of events for all of the details. Don’t forget about Toyota Ski Free Days, starting on Jan. 30 at Schweitzer Mountain Resort and continuing each week through the month of February at other area resorts. The conditions at our local mountains are only getting better and better with the fresh snow, and holiday travelers helped create a nice “skier compaction,” resulting in an optimum base for the season ahead. There’s no better time than now to get up and enjoy the mountains. Hope to see you soon!

The

M O M E N T

# 0 7 8

I skied powder today. I skied it well. Thanks to Garry, my instructor. He taught me to relax, bend my knees, and learn how to dance on the snow. Now I know what all the fuss is about. Bring on the powder!

JUST 28 MILES FROM DOWNTOWN SPOKANE!

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JANUARY 2015 SNOWLANDER 3


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L

ike farmers in a drought, local ski and snowboard resorts spent the first few months of the season staring, pleadingly, toward the heavens. “The start — you know, Thanksgiving, early December — was a bit of the struggle,” says Neal Scholey, director of marketing at Silver Mountain. “We were all on our knees, praying to the skies, going ‘Come on, man!’” Their Christmas gift came a day late: On Dec. 26 and 27, finally, Silver got the big dump of snow it’d been waiting for and could open their terrain to the post-Christmas crowd. By now, most runs are open and thriving. Local resorts knew that a mild appearance of El Niño could put a crimp on the season. But this year, the weather has been particularly frustrating. “I don’t know if I’d say if it was warmer or colder. It’s just been spotty, is the thing,” says Eric Bakken, general manager of 49 Degrees North. “We haven’t got the big, long, sustained series of storms.” They didn’t open until Dec. 22. “I’ve been here 18 years,” says Bakken. “This was our latest opening, for sure.” When the snowstorms

finally started rolling in this past month, they came as a relief. By now, Silver’s racked up 118 inches of snowfall, about typical for this time in the season. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, by contrast, had an advantage: When the skies refused to give them snow, Schweitzer made it themselves. This summer, Schweitzer upgraded their snowmaking capabilities, and the cold, dry air of the early winter made for the perfect climate for their snow machines. “We shoot to open after Thanksgiving. We were able to open the weekend before that,” says Sean Mirus, marketing director. In fact, Schweitzer’s 95 inches of snowfall actually exceed last season by a foot. The problem is that, each time, a big dump of snow has been countered by a downpour of rain. “The rain really kills the snowpack… You’ll lose more snow in the rain than on a nice, sunny day,” Mirus says. “This past Monday [last week] was a perfect example. Monday morning: 12 to 18 inches of snow. And then the rain followed.” In other words, it’s not enough to just root for precipitation. It has to be the right kind. n


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MOUNTAIN PEOPLE

MAN IN MOTION Coeur d’Alene’s Jeff Yates is a thrillseeker for all seasons BY JEN FORSYTH On water or land, Yates’ life is an adventure. HOWARD STODARD AND BOB LEGASA PHOTOS

I

magine a windy, 32-degree early December morning in North Idaho. Most folks are thinking about skiing or snowboarding, but the mountains are either not open yet or have limited terrain open, due to low snowpack. But for 46-year-old Coeur d’Alene native Jeff Yates, it’s the perfect morning to hit the lake. Yates has engaged in a lot of adrenaline-filled

activities in the hills of the Inland Northwest since he was a child. When he’s not chasing the wind, looking for the perfect lake to kiteboard on, he’s on his snowboard chasing freshies. He has also competed in two Coeur d’Alene Ironman events, finishing both. He explains, “The first one I trained my ass off, and the second one I drank beer and ate pizza.” He continues, laugh-

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ing, “My times were 14 minutes apart for an 11-hour race. I used to road-bike race,” he adds, chuckling modestly, “but then all my friends got too fast.” His love for the lake began many years ago, wakeboarding and wakesurfing on Lake Coeur d’Alene. His career took him to Seattle for several years; after an opportunity to move


these are the good old days. back to Coeur d’Alene presented itself, he jumped at the chance to move home. Upon returning, the economy took a downturn, which gave Yates the option of taking some time off. That’s when he decided to start kiteboarding. “Kiteboarding is now my primary sport,” says Yates. “When I decided to learn, I took a year off from work and went down to Hood River (an international kiteboarding mecca). It was all I cared about. The feeling of being out in the middle of the lake — there is a sense of individual freedom that is unmatched.” Some of his early stories about learning to kiteboard involve taking some hard hits. He recalls an adventure including the kite, ice skates and full hockey gear: “I was going so fast, very high speed. I took a crash that lasted for about 300 yards.” His gear and ability have improved significantly since then. He understands the danger of being on the lake at this time of year: “It can be a recipe for disaster.” He mitigates that risk with strategic launches and having the proper gear, including a full dry suit, and training. “Every December, I swim a mile in the lake. This isn’t for the exer-

cise, but rather to know that if the wind dies or shifts, that I am able to get back to the shoreline,” he says. “This time of year, should something happen, no one is there to give you a hand.” He enjoys winter months on the lake more than summers: “The shoreline is bigger in the winter,” making launching the kite easier. In the summer months, Yates can be found driving between North Idaho and Hood River on his days off from work. He loads up his car with his kiteboarding gear, including 18 PBRs, a bunch of PB&Js, Lucky Charms and coffee, and sets off to chase the wind, camping along rivers and lakes along the way. His passion for every aspect of life carries through to his personal life. Living in Seattle several years ago, he came home for Christmas, when he met the love of his life and now wife, Jen (pictured). “I met her eight years ago, and we’ve been married for a year and a half now,” Yates says. “Jen and I do a lot of stand-up paddleboarding together. We have a lot of fun doing that.” Professionally, he sets goals for himself, as with his adventures. “I’ve been working for Parker Subaru now for a year and a half. I had a goal of being the No. 1 salesman, and if I did accomplish that goal, I would get a whole new Liquid Force kiteboarding quiver.” In his first full year at the dealership, he accomplished his goal and is now enjoying all of his new gear. How does Yates fuel all of these adventures with so much energy? “I like to party,” he explains. “And by party, I mean take naps.” n

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ALIVE AND KICKING Searching for powder? You’ll find it at B.C.’s Kicking Horse Mountain Resort BY BOB LEGASA Kicking Horse sits 8 miles outside of Golden, B.C. BOB LEGASA PHOTOS

I

t’s very seldom in life that something is even better than you expected. I was lucky enough to have that experience on my adventure to Kicking Horse Mountain Resort on the outskirts of Golden, British Columbia, last month. Let’s face it: Winter started off a little slow here in the Inland Northwest, which led me to start researching ski reports and watching weather maps in search of fresh powder. With continual snowfall hitting the Selkirk-Purcell range around Kicking Horse, it was time for another road trip north. Kicking Horse sits approximately 8 miles outside of the historic railroad town of Golden, just off the Trans-Canada Highway, a scenic 5½-hour drive from the Spokane/Coeur d’Alene area. Back in the late 19th century, the Canadian Pacific Railway constructed

its cross-country network of rails, using Golden as its base camp as it expanded further into western Canada. The railroad is still deeply embedded in the community, but the town of Golden has transitioned into a destination retreat. Nowadays the winters around Golden are busy, with snow sports enthusiasts visiting the area in search of powder in the Purcell Mountains. Kicking Horse overlooks the town. Its highest peak is just over 8,000 feet, and it averages more than 23 feet of blower powder annually. Mix in 2,800 skiable acres of some the most exciting inbound terrain you’ll ever find, and you’re in for a great time. “The size and variety of terrain at Kicking Horse is incredible,” says Tommy Frey of Hayden Lake, Idaho. “There’s terrain that will test the best of abilities,


Ski & Ride Ski & Ride Powder Packs can be used from January 5th - April 5th, 2015. Purchase 8 gallons of gas and pick the Powder Pack of your choice from participating Conoco/76 stations in the Inland Northwest. (Present your receipt to the cashier to receive Powder Pack)

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must be used same day. Silver Mountain | Mondays - buy 1 get 1. Purchase full price ticket and recieve a free ticket. Both must be used same day.

Conoco Stations WASHINGTON

West Plains Conoco 11980 W Sunset Hwy | Airway Heights, WA Chattaroy Quick Stop 28312 N Newport Hwy | Chattaroy, WA Cheney Conoco 2654 1st St | Cheney, WA PDQ 14710 N Newport Hwy | Mead, WA Chester Store 11504 E Dishman Mica | Spokane, WA Circle N Stores 3620 N Sullivan | Spokane, WA Conoco Food Mart 1605 W Third | Spokane, WA Hillyard Grocery 5803 N Market | Spokane, WA IDAHO

Junction Quick Stop 1550 S Hwy 3 Ex 34 | Cataldo, ID Cd’A Gas Mart 1936 Government Way | Coeur d’Alene, ID Chad’s River Mart 400 Cd’A River Rd. | Kingston, ID Depot Express 614 E Main | Grangeville, ID Ady’s Convenience & Car Wash 1815 E Seltice | Post Falls, ID Mac’s Gas & Grocery 708 9th St | Priest River, ID Miller’s Food City 31964 N 5th Ave | Spirit Lake, ID

76 Stations WASHINGTON

Speedy Convenience Store 1001 E Wellesley | Spokane, WA IDAHO

Speedy Convenience Store 213 Spokane St | Post Falls, ID Osburn Gas Mart 3rd & Mullan | Osburn, ID Post Falls Gas Mart 211 E Seltice | Post Falls, ID Ross Point HICO 770 N Hwy 41 | Post Falls, ID Rathdrum HICO 15963 N Hwy 41 | Rathdrum, ID

SkiandRideProgram.com

and plenty of other runs on the lower portion of the mountain for the beginners and intermediates. It really has something for every level.” With a high-speed gondola, three chairlifts and a surface lift for beginners, getting around Kicking Horse is easy, and with a vertical drop of more than 4,100 vertical feet (the fourth-longest vertical drop in North America), there’s plenty of riding to be had. Not only is the terrain jaw-dropping, so is the scenery. “Kicking Horse is surrounded by five national parks. The views are unparalleled anywhere else. It’s just amazing,” says the resort’s media marketing coordinator Andy Brown, who moved out to the Canadian Rockies several years ago from Ontario. “I grew up ski racing in eastern Canada, and when I ended my competitive skiing, I moved to Calgary to pursue an education,” says Brown. “I started exploring the different resorts around the Calgary area, and once I discovered Kicking Horse back in 2003-04, it became my favorite place to ski. I was lucky enough to land a job here when I finished my education. There’s no better place, in my opinion, than to be in these mountains.” Whether you’re an intermediate or an expert, the upper mountain has plenty of varying terrain, from wide-open bowls ...continued on next page

This offer cannot be combined with any other discounts offered at Mt. Spokane and Silver Mountain. This ticket must be used the same day as purchased, has no cash value and cannot be used to resell. Stamped gas receipt must accompany voucher. *Mt. Spokane, Silver Mountain, Conoco/76 stations, member, affiliate, subsidiary companies and their retailers/wholesalers and the employees, officers and agents of each entity are not liable for any claims, demands, actions or causes of action on account of any injury to participant in this promotion. 76 Logo and Tagline

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Send your comments to Editor@Inla nder.com

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JANUARY 2015 SNOWLANDER 9


GETAWAY

Jan 7

Capone’s Pub & Grill 4th St., Coeur d’Alene, ID (208) 667-4843

Jan 14 The Foggy Bottom Lounge Mt. Spokane, Spokane, WA (509) 238-2220

Connie’s Cafe 323 Cedar, Sandpoint, ID (208) 255-2227 The Neighborhood Pub 124 S. 2nd Ave., Sandpoint, ID

Jan 21 Waddell’s Neighborhood Pub Taps Schweitzer Mountain, Sandpoint, ID 4318 S. Regal St., Spokane, WA (509) 443-6500 (208) 263-9555 Jan 28 Capone’s Pub & Grill 315 N. Ross Point Rd., Post Falls, ID (208) 457-8020

Laughing Dog Brewing 1109 Fontaine Dr., Ponderay, ID (208) 263-9222

Feb 4

A&P’s Bar and Grill 222 N. First Ave., Sandpoint, ID (208) 263-2313

The White Horse Saloon 6248 W. Main St., Spirit Lake, ID (208) 623-2353

Feb 11 Paddy’s Sports Bar & Grill 601 W. Appleway, Coeur d’Alene, ID (208) 765-0701

Trinity at the City Beach 58 Bridge St., Sandpoint, ID (208) 255-7558

Feb 18 Capone’s Pub & Grill 9520 N. Government Way, Hayden, ID (208) 667-4843

Kootenai River Brewing Co 424 Riverside St., Bonners Ferry, ID (208) 267-4677

Feb 25 The Foggy Bottom Lounge Mt. Spokane, Spokane, WA (509) 238-2220

The Neighborhood Pub 124 S. 2nd Ave., Sandpoint, ID

Mar 4 Listen for Details TBA

219 Lounge 219 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint, ID (208) 263-5673

INLAND NORTHWEST HISTORY

T i m e l e s s Ta l e s o f S p o k a n e a n d t h e I n l a n d N o r t hwe s t , Vo l u m e 1

TIMELESS TALES OF SPOKANE AND THE INLAND NORTHWEST I EDITED BY TED S. McGREG

Timeless Tales of Spok ane and the Inland No rthwest, Volume 1

OR JR.

f you call yourself an Inlander, you need to know the stories. Do you remember those ancient ivory tusks pulled from a farm down on the Palouse? What happene d after fur trappers set up their first trading post on the Spokane River? Or how a local basketba ll team captivated the nation? What about “The Biggest Thing That Man Has Ever Done”? A World’s Fair? Those are just a few of the tales that define the rich history of the Inland Northwest — stories that were first retold in the pages of the Inlander newspaper starting in 1993. In Inlander Histories, you’ll meet Nell Shipman, the silent film star who launched her own studio on the shores of Priest Lake. You’ll hop a flight over Mt. St. Helens on a particularly memorable day. And you’ll learn how Walt Worthy kept the dream of Louis Davenport alive in downtown Spokane. Noted local historians Jack Nisbet, Robert Carriker and William Stimson join Inlander staff writers, including Sheri Boggs, Andrew Strickman and Mike Bookey, to take you on a tour of some of the most important moments in the region’s past. Collected together for the first time, Inlander Histories pieces together the tapestry of Eastern Washington and North Idaho culture, creating a rare documen t of life in the “inland” part of this corner of the continent.

Now available on $14.95

COVER DESIGN BY CHRIS BOVEY

Learn more at Inlander.com/books

10 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2015

“ALIVE AND KICKING,” CONTINUED... to gladed tree runs and steeps that would make a billy goat cringe. Kicking Horse is a rider’s mountain, and with that kind of advanced terrain, it’s no wonder that Ontario transplant Steve Fisk, another former ski racer, made it his home more than a dozen years ago. “I’ve been to a lot of resorts, and I have yet to find one resort that I like more than Kicking Horse,” he says. “It has everything I want in a mountain, and the people who live here are passionate about skiing

and living in the mountain environment.” I’d say that Fisk made a wise decision as he gave us a tour of his playground. With six inches of fresh powder over the previous two days, Fisk led us into some sweet runs off the Stairway to Heaven chair along Redemption Ridge. It was here we dropped into the north-facing slopes called Feuz Bowl. According to Fisk, “this is where the snow always accumulates after any storm.” This bowl definitely was holding the


goods as we skied boot-top powder with lots of challenging, technical lines and plenty of hidden powder stashes. “Steep and deep” was the theme for our Sunday morning. Kicking Horse is a relatively new resort, opening in 2000. It has a nice selection of lodging choices, from hotel/condo-style rooms to private townhomes. If, like our crew, you want to be closer to town, there are several hotel chains to choose from. We opted for the Prestige Inn because of the pool and oversized hot tub, which we knew we’d need RESOURCES after skiing the steeps all day. kickinghorseresort.com The town of Golden has a tourismgolden.com good array of dining options, from elegant cuisine at the Whitetooth Mountain Bistro to good pub food with a fun ski-town vibe at the Taps. If you stay on the mountain, you have plenty of dining choices, including Kicking Horse Saloon, Peaks Grill or the Eagle’s Eye, which sits at 7,700 feet atop CPR Ridge; you take the Golden Eagle Express gondola to the top of the mountain for a true mountaintop dining experience. The Eagle’s Eye definitely has great food: I witnessed my friend Devin Dufenhorst devour the Alberta beef burger with pesto mayonnaise in record time! If I’d put my hand near his plate, I’d have drawn back a stump. Ski Canada magazine voted the Eagle’s Eye the Best View from a Barstool — now that’s my kind of establishment! On our final day, we were graced with semi-clear skies and just enough cloud cover to create an incredible sunrise. It was a spectacular first run, as we skied freshies down Briggs Brag in what seemed to be a surreal setting. It seemed that everywhere we skied, we were treated to great turns and plenty of soft snow. “I loved the snow quality, and the fact that there were so many runs that were challenging,” says Spokane’s Desiree’ Leipham. One thing is for sure: Kicking Horse is legit, and you can bet I’ll be heading back there after a big storm for another round! 

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Visit ski49n.com for LESSON SPECIALS EZ 1,2,3 Ski & Snowboard Package “Learn to” Ski & Snowboard Package Both packages include lessons, rentals & lift tickets. Sale ends Jan. 31. JANUARY 2015 SNOWLANDER 11


WINTER EVENTS

JAN, THE TOY LADY, IS PLEASED THAT THE MOVE TO THE THIRD LEVEL OF RIVER PARK SQUARE WENT SMOOTHLY:

JANUARY

We’re here!

FREE SKI SCHOOL KICKOFF Lookout Pass’ annual program kicks off, offering free lessons for ages 6-17 every Saturday morning through March 14. Beginners’ lessons at 10 am; intermediate/advanced to follow at 11:30 am every weekend. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout. com (208-744-1301)

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS

DOWNHILL DIVAS The mountain hosts its women’s ski and snowboard program every Friday through March 20. Groups of riders are taught by top female instructors. Fridays from 9:30 am-noon through March 20. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com JUNIOR STARLIGHT SERIES Schweitzer hosts a low-cost ski racing series for experienced and new racers. Organized by the nonprofit Independent Race Team. Jan. 16, 23 and 30. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

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www.komeneasternwashington.org 12 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2015

FIRST TURNS Get early access to the gondolas and head to the peak for breakfast and first access to the powder. Reservations are recommended for this popular event (conditions permitting), which has limited seating. Jan. 17, 24 and 31; also Feb. 7, 14, 21 and 28. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-344-2675) SURVIVAL OF THE JIBBEST A jam-format park event, with skiers of all ages battling to become the best, aka “the Survivor of the Jibbest.” Jan. 17; details TBA. Mission Ridge Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com/events NORTHERN LIGHTS/MLK WEEKEND Always an annual favorite, the event starts with a torchlight parade down the Jam Session run and a spectacular fireworks show in the village, followed by live music and an afterparty at Taps. Jan. 17, at 6 pm. Other events throughout MLK weekend, Jan. 16-19. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) NIGHT SKIING AT 49° Forty-Nine lights up the night four times this season, with lit runs on the upper and lower mountain. Bring a food bank donation for discounted tickets (two cans are good for a $4 ticket). Jan. 17, from 4-8 pm; Feb. 14, from 4:30-8 pm. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649) FAMILY XC WEEKEND & COLLEGIATE SLALOM For family cross-country weekend, all kids under 18 get a free trail pass and rental if accompanied by a parent/ guardian. Jan. 17-18. Also on Saturday, the U.S. Collegiate Ski Association hosts teams from around the Northwest racing the giant slaloms. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com LOOKOUT WINTER CARNIVAL The mountain’s annual celebration includes Family Fun Day events and

a traditional favorite, the Pacific Northwest National Wife Carrying Contest. Jan. 18. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) LADIES DAY This all-day event includes a lift ticket, rental and continental breakfast, followed by four hours of instruction from female instructors, lunch and video analysis. To end the day, there’s wine and cheese and a massage. Jan. 21, from 9 am-4 pm. $99. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com SMOKIN’ ACES SLOPESTYLE This freestyle tour heads to Sandpoint, offering the chance to watch skilled riders perform their best tricks. Jan. 24. $35-$40/competitor. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. smokingacesschweitzer.eventbrite.com RENEGADES & HANDRAILS PT. 1 A rail jam with big sponsors, prizes and activities for all including a photo contest, video contest and jam session for the littlest rippers. Jan. 24-25. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n. com (935-6649) KOKANEE SNOW DREAMS FESTIVAL The annual fest, known as the best deck party in Canada, offers good times to all after a day on the slopes. Jan. 24; details TBA. Fernie Alpine Resort, 5339 Fernie Ski Hill Rd., Fernie, B.C. skifernie. com (250-423-4655) BAVARIAN BREWS, BRATS AND MUSIC FEST Another annual celebration at Lookout. As the name implies, there’ll be tasty brats on the grill and fresh local brews to enjoy while listening to live music on the deck, weather permitting. Jan. 25. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) ROSSLAND WINTER CARNIVAL The celebration honors the mountain’s history, going all the way back to 1897 when Olaus Jeldness invited friends to the top of the mountain for a “tea party.” Events today include family activities, live music, races and more. Jan. 29-Feb. 1. Rossland, B.C. rosslandwintercarnival.com BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL The 10th annual Winter Wildlands Alliance film fest screens nine films; proceeds benefit the Inland Northwest Backcountry Alliance. Jan. 29, at 7 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) WOMEN’S ESCAPE A day of fun on the slopes, specially for the ladies. Groups of varying ability levels, from beginner to advanced, will spend the morning riding with coaches, followed by lunch and socializing. Offered Jan. 29, Feb. 12 and March 1 and 21, starting at 9 am. $50. Mission Ridge Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com/ events CHEWELAH PEAK CHALLENGE XC RACE 49° hosts a 7K cross-country ski race to the top of the mountain; test your skills and see if you can make it to the

top. Jan. 31, registration at 9:30 am. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n. com (935-6649) COLLEGE DAZE All students with a valid ID get discounts on just about everything during this annual weekend event, including lift tickets, lodging, food, drinks and more. Jan. 31-Feb. 1. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

FEBRUARY SOUPER BOWL Spend the day playing in the snow while supporting the Women and Children’s Free Restaurant. Highlights include the the “Great SouperBowl Sasquatch Search,” and poker snowshoe and ski events. Feb. 1, from 8:30 am-1 pm. $35 suggested donation. Selkirk Lodge at Mt. Spokane State Park. 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. souperbowlspokane. org (see story on facing page) KAN JAM FREESTYLE FESTIVAL The mountain hosts its eighth annual freestyle rail jam, with events in slopestyle, big air and — of course — the rail jam. All ability levels are invited to compete for prizes and the glory of winning. Feb. 6-8. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SNOWSHOE CAMP SEKANI Explore this old Boy Scout camp that was once a jamboree meeting point for many troops. Headlamps, walking poles, snowshoes, instruction and tasty hot chocolate provided. Feb. 6, from 6-7:30 pm. $10. Camp Sekani, 67070 E. Upriver Dr. spokaneparks.org MOONLIGHT SNOWSHOE HIKES These popular evening hikes return for the current season, offering magical hikes (3 miles) through pristine oldgrowth forests with the moon lighting the way. Upcoming hikes on Feb. 6, March 6 and April 4. $30, includes equipment rental and trail fee (sign up a week in advance). Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com NORDIC SKI CLINICS Schweitzer hosts weekend-long clinics taught by a certified instructor of “skate skiing,” as Nordic is sometimes referred. Private lessons are offered, as well as group sessions for Nordic skiers of all levels. Feb. 6-8. Prices vary. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) SPOKANE LANGLAUF The 37th annual Spokane Langlauf is the Inland Empire’s oldest and most prestigious cross country ski race and the largest in the Pacific NW, attracting nearly 400 skiers. Feb. 8, from 11 am-3 pm. $25. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanelanglauf.com RAILS & ALES The second installment of Mission Ridge’s Rail Jam in downtown Wenatchee. More details TBA. Fri, Feb. 13, at 5:30 pm. Downtown Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com/events


A SUPER SOUPER BOWL

S

ince its inception a decade ago, the locally organized SouperBowl charity event has raised more than $83,000 for the Women and Children’s Free Restaurant, a dining destination that provides nutritious meals to those in need. For its 10th anniversary this February, the ladies’ day event offers the same favorites — snow events such as poker ski runs, cross country skiing and groomed-trail snowshoeing. The bravest of participants can even join in the hunt for the ever-elusive Sasquatch. SouperBowl is a twofold event — getting women together to participate in outdoor winter activities and helping support the most vulnerable in our community. — KIANNA GARDNER SouperBowl: Snowshoe and Cross-Country Ski Sunday • Sun, Feb. 1, from 8:30 am-1 pm • $35 suggested donation; Sno-Park permit required for parking • Mt. Spokane State Park, Selkirk Lodge • 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr • souperbowlspokane.org

SANDPOINT WINTER CARNIVAL This annual 10-day celebration of all things winter is back for 2015, with the same familiar favorites, including dining specials at local restaurants, skijoring, Schweitzer’s SnowSchool, sleigh rides, the Parade of Lights, the K9 Keg Pull and much more. Events Feb. 13-23. Around Sandpoint, Idaho and Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Details at sandpointwintercarnival.com VALENTINE’S DAY SPEED DATING Pick up a pass to this fun event at the bottom of Chair 3, and take the five-minute ride up the slopes while getting to know someone new. Later that evening, Noah’s Canteen offers a romantic dinner. Feb. 14. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866344-2675)

THREE LEGGED RACE VOLLEYBALL EGG RACE BEER TASTING & BBQ

SNOWMAN CONTEST FACE PAINTING MUSIC BY JIMI FINN IN THE LOFT

MARDI GRAS The mountain hosts its biggest party of the year, with drink specials and a balloon drop at Moguls. Feb. 21. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com SNOWSHOE/HIKE INDIAN PAINTED ROCKS A hike through the natural area alongside the Little Spokane River. Snowshoe, poles and guides provided. Discover Pass required. Feb. 21, from 10 am-noon. $15. Riverside State Park. spokaneparks.org COLLEGE UP-DOWN RACE North Idaho College hosts a race to the top of the mountain and down, offering the coveted title of first place and more perks TBA. Feb. 22. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com

PRESIDENT’S WEEKEND Events during the long weekend include family activities at the Village, night skiing and a spectacular laser light show. Feb. 14-16. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

EXPLORE SCHWEITZER A choose-your-own-adventure style event, with stations set up around the mountain offering vouchers for raffle tickets at each. Feb. 22; details TBA. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

EEYSL DOWNHILL RACES The Spokane Ski Racing Association and Mt. Spokane host the annual Emerald Empire Youth Ski League races. Feb. 20-22. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

TUBIN’ IN TUTUS Silver Mountain hosts the annual fundraiser event for the Shoshone Pet Rescue. Party includes a silent auction and a live auction of handcrafted wood piece by local woodcrafter Roger Baker. Feb. 28; details TBA. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-344-2675) 

#lookoutpass

When is our movie showing? Who is playing tonight? What’s happening this weekend? Where is the nearest Chinese restaurant?

The answers to life’s great questions.

JANUARY 2015 SNOWLANDER 13


THE LAST RUN

ROAD TRIPPIN’

From boots to beer, don’t forget to pack the necessities BY JEN FORSYTH Before you leave home... JIM CAMPBELL ILLUSTRATION

W

e’ve all been on road trips before. Packing for them seems relatively easy. The ski road trip is typically no different, although the list of things to “not forget” are a little unique. BOOTS: Whatever you do, don’t forget your boots. This is the most important rule in the world of ski road trips. You’re always able

to rent skis, but rental boots should never, ever be a fallback solution. You’d think this would easy to remember, but you’d be surprised. WINDSHIELD WIPER FLUID: Worth its weight in gold when following that semi truck. Or de-icing your windshield in a hurry. But splurge for the subarctic blend, as the cheaper stuff will freeze.

BEER (OR BOOZE IN GENERAL): You never know how far a “real” PBR will take you in Utah when visiting friends or making them. Their PBR is 3.2 percent alcohol; ours is 5 percent. You can buy “real” beer there, though it’s expensive and only available at the liquor store, which can be a hassle. THE SHOTZ SKI: A road-trip

Available in Prescription & Non-Prescription.

Main & Washington • 509.747.6581 Exam Appointments available at theeyecareteam.com

14 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2015

Your Downtown Eye Care Center

must that will make you friends wherever you go. Guaranteed. There’s nothing more satisfying than introducing someone to their first Shotz Ski ritual. Some other items good to remember while out on the open road: BEANS: While an economical option for food during the long, cold winter months, too much bean consumption will definitely ensure that you’re never invited back on a road trip, as road trips often mean extended durations of time in confined spaces. FUEL STOPS: While this is the biggest time-waster of any road trip, if you’re unsure where the next gas station is, it’s better to enter a long stretch of remote highway with a full tank at 11 pm than to risk running out of fuel somewhere between Hammond and Deer Lodge, Montana. MUSIC: Come up with a good playlist that can keep you motivated driving those dark, snowy highways. Do it before leaving a good wireless connection, as sometimes the cloud has a mysterious way of deciding what should be available on your iPhone, as opposed to what has been stored in the cloud. FEATHER BED: This is your best friend, should you be bunking in the back of a pickup truck. The small comforts of home will compel you to seek powder days in the most remote places, just so you’re able to sleep in the back of your truck or SUV. And if you have one of those power adapters to plug into your 12-volt outlet (about $20 at most truck stops), bring portable boot heaters and a coffee maker. You’ll be the envy of everyone, showing up on a cold, snowy morning, wearing warm boots while sipping your hot coffee. n


49 Degrees North

January 19th • Open for MLK Holiday January 24th • Renegades and Handrails Pt. 1 January 31st • Chewelah Peak XC Challenge January 31st • Masters Race

Lookout Pass

January 18th • Winter Carnival January 19th • Open for MLK Holiday January 25th • Bavarian Brews and Brats Festival February 13th • Toyota Ski Free Day

Mt Spokane

January 16th • PNSA Region Championship Qualifier January 19th • Open for MLK Holiday January 23rd • USASA Rail Jam February 20th • Toyota Ski Free Day

Schweitzer

January 17th • Northern Lights at Schweitzer January 20th • SARS Western Regional Speed Series January 24th • Smokin Aces Slopestyle January 30th • Toyota Ski Free Day

Silver Mt

January 19th • Open for MLK Holiday January 24th • First Turns (conditions permitting) February 6th • Toyota Ski Free Day February 14th • Valentines Day

Toyota Drivers get a FREE LIFT TICKET

INLAND EMPIRE TOYoTA DEALERS

on the following Fridays!* Jan. 30 » Schweitzer Feb. 06 » Silver Mountain Feb. 13 » Lookout Pass Feb. 20 » Mt Spokane Feb. 27 » 49º North

*One Lift Ticket awarded to the driver of every Toyota on each mountain’s designated FreeSki Friday.

JANUARY 2015 SNOWLANDER 15


16 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2015


Beyond the Shaker Often an afterthought, salt is now getting the craft treatment

O

f all the food trends to emerge in recent years, it might be hard to imagine that salt, the unassuming mineral that sustains the lives of humans and animals alike, could become fashionable. After all, humans have been utilizing salt as food, medicine and currency for thousands and thousands of years. With endless salt options, table, sea and kosher salt are widely used at home and in restaurants. Table salt, acquired by solution mining, is finely ground and highly processed and possesses a harsh, bitter essence. Sea salt

San Juan Island Sea Salt is made from Puget Sound water in Friday Harbor.

BY AMY MILLER-KREZELAK is minimally processed and evaporated from seawater. Used as a finishing salt, sea salt reflects the flavor and color of the water from which it was harvested. Kosher, or koshering salt, can be mined or evaporated from seawater. An all-star in the kitchen, kosher salt gets its name from the practice of koshering meat, or drawing blood out of meat before cooking, which locks in moisture and prevents meat from drying out. These salts have become such an ordinary part of our everyday life that it’s easy to dismiss their significance.

But chefs and food lovers are embracing the infinite number of salt varieties for cooking and finishing dishes, and artisanal salt harvesters are cropping up along both coasts. The coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest are perfect environs for the artisanal salt renaissance. In Washington’s San Juan Islands, Brady Ryan perfects his solar-evaporated sea salt. Ryan was inspired to create San Juan Island Sea Salt after reading an article about making salt by boiling seawater. A self-proclaimed water rat and ...continued on next page


FOOD | COOKING

HAPPY HOUR 4-6 PM DAILY Beer sampler paddle

509 789 6900 • poststreetalehouse.com 1 North Post Street., Downtown Spokane

30 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

San Juan Island Sea Salt is made by pumping seawater into a 1,500-gallon tank (above) before being dried out (below).

“BEYOND THE SHAKER,” CONTINUED... science nerd, Ryan decided to combine his two loves. “It almost feels like alchemy. You see the seawater go away and the salt form. It’s almost magical,” he says. Once a month during the summer, Ryan pumps seawater into a 1,500-gallon potable water tank. The seawater is gently filtered to remove excess sediment and seaweed, placed in solar-powered greenhouses and left to evaporate. “The longer you let your water evaporate down, the more trace minerals — magnesium, potassium — come in. We let ours evaporate down to dry, which is very unusual,” says Ryan. He’s focused on consistency and appealing to home cooks and chefs alike. “I’ve been trying to develop a consistent product. I want to feel really confident when I produce. A big part of growing a business is getting it out to the chefs,” Ryan says. Appealing to chefs is key, especially when you find a chef who is as passionate about salt as Laurent Zirotti, who also owns Fleur de Sel in Post Falls. Zirotti utilizes an expansive array of salt in his repertoire, including kosher, fumé de sel (smoked sea salt), Himalayan pink, Hawaiian red, sel gris and fleur de sel, the prized top layer of hand-harvested sea salt. “Fleur de sel is a noble ingredient, it’s the cherry on the cake. You don’t cook with fleur de sel, you finish with it. It’s way less salty than regular salt,” says Zirotti. “Because it’s less salty it’s pleasing to the palate. It’s too expensive to cook with. It would be a waste. It would be depreciating the product. It’s almost like wine. You cook with decent, good wine, but you drink the good stuff.” Fleur de sel graces more than savory dishes; Zirotti’s chocolate tart and caramels are finished with fleur de sel as well. Spokandy owner Todd Davis’ confections are also eager recipients of a finishing touch of sea salt. Davis uses sea salt to create balance in his chocolates and caramels, and Spokandy’s devotees have welcomed this final touch. “We all thought salt would be a trend, but we are going on year eight of salted products and adding more salted products annually,” says Davis. Savory or sweet, food just doesn’t taste as good without the perfect balance of salt. Salt brings out the flavors in the otherwise bland and elevates sweets to new levels. “For a lot of people, salt is salt, but it’s not. It has finesse,” says Zirotti. n


The Pacific Northwest is home to several companies that are finding great success with their artisan salts:

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Payment options that fit your lifestyle.

SAN JUAN ISLAND SEA SALT, FRIDAY HARBOR, WA

This pure, white sea salt has a brininess reminiscent of the sea. The flakes vary in size and texture, for prolonged flavor with a little crunch. Sprinkle on fresh vegetables to experience the salt’s dynamic zing. sanjuanislandseasalt.com

With colder weather comes rising energy use. So to help with your energy bill we offer a variety of payment options, including: • Comfort-Level Billing to smooth out those seasonal highs and lows. (It divides your annual energy costs into 12 equal and predictable payments.) • Online Statement/Payments so you can receive and conveniently pay your bill electronically.

ADMIRALTY SALT COMPANY, STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA, WA

• Energy Assistance Programs that may provide help to limited-income customers.

Hand-harvested seawater is boiled and steamed to produce this delicately flaky sea salt. Use as a finishing or cooking salt. Truffle, lemon zest and vanilla bean sea salt are in the works at this chef-run company. admiraltysalt.com

JACOBSEN SALT CO., NETARTS BAY, OR

West of Tillamook, Oregon, in Netarts Bay, Jacobsen Salt Co. evaporates Pacific seawater to create a delicate yet crunchy finishing salt. A wide variety of flavored salts — ghost chili, Oregon pinot noir and lemon zest, to name three — are sold alongside salty black licorice and caramels. jacobsensalt.com

ARTISAN SALT CO., WOODINVILLE, WA

With salts imported from more than 20 countries, Artisan Salt Co. has salts for all occasions and palates. Cold-smoked alder, hickory, chardonnay oak and applewood salts are popular, as are favorites like black truffle and Thai ginger. saltworks.us

We also have online tools such as our Bill Analyzer and Home Energy Advisor that can help you manage your energy use.

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JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 31


FOOD | BEER

TIME TO MARK OFF YOUR FIRST 2015 RESOLUTION

Beer by the Jug The growler store has finally arrived in the region

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hile the Inland Northwest has embraced its local craft beer industry, we’ve been a little slower to fall in love with the growler. You know the growler: the big jug that can fit 64 ounces of beer within its cold glass body. Usually there’s the name of a brewery on its side, but it doesn’t matter where you take it — any beer maker will gladly fill it. One notion behind the growler is that even the most wellstocked bottle shop isn’t going to have some beers, simply because some beers only come on draft. This gave way to the emergence of growler shops, which have begun to pop up in the region, with two independently owned Growler Guys stores in Spokane. One is at the on the Newport Highway by the Division Street Y, the other off of Grand Avenue on the South Hill. Another argument in favor of the growler is simply that draft beer is better. “Sadly, anything you get in a can or a bottle, unless you know how to read the code, you’re not sure how long it’s been sitting there or if it’s been in the sun. Draft beer is almost always refrigerated the entire time,” says Sean Kirkpatrick, the store manager of Growler Guys on the South Hill and a beer and wine industry veteran. The two Growler Guys stores in Spokane are franchises of the original shop, which opened in a gas station shop in Bend, the Oregon mountain town where craft beer culture comes close to religion. The South Hill location offers 48 different rotating brews (the website updates in real time as kegs are changed out), most of which you’d be hard-pressed to find elsewhere. When you step up to order, there’s no rush. The bartender asks what you typically drink and begins pouring samples to fit your taste. Chances are, they’re going to suggest something you’ve never heard of, but that’s all part of the fun. “There’s such a huge array of different breweries and emerging styles that there’s something out there for everyone,” says Kirkpatrick, who says the shop is happy to do some beer education for craft beer newbies. n Growler Guys, South Hill • 1314 S. Grand • Open Mon-Sat, 10 am-10 pm; Sun, 10 am-8 pm • thegrowlerguys.com • 315-4367 Growler Guys, Newport Highway • 9329 N. Newport Hwy. • Open Mon-Thu, 11 am-10 pm; Fri, 11 am-11 pm; Sat, 9 am-11 pm; Sun 9 am - 8 pm • 808-2691

BEER NOTES: PERRY STREET BREWING ADDS FOOD

For its first year in operation, Perry Street Brewing has had a very laid-back approach to food. You can bring your own, order it from one of the neighboring restaurants or grab a bite from the food truck that’s often parked alongside the brewery. Now the brewery is offering a small plates menu of its own, including a choose-your-own cheese and charcuterie board and a bread, jam and cheese plate, as well as Bouzies Bakery’s quinoa and sunflower bread. Don’t worry: those food trucks will still be making appearances. (MB)

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32 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015


FOOD | FESTIVAL

Snow Pours

Imbibe in the seasonal magic of more than 40 beers at the Lantern Tap House’s Winter Beer Fest BY MIKE BOOKEY

T ing.

he tent is going up again outside of the Lantern Tap House and that means one thing to those familiar with the South Perry District pub: a whole lot of beer is flow-

This time around, the tent is for the second annual Winter Beer Fest, the most recent beer event from the Lantern, coming on the heels of a packed fresh hop festival in the fall. Lantern owner Mike Dolmage says the festival, set for this Thursday through Sunday, should have more than 40 different beers from 23 breweries from throughout the region. For Dolmage, the seasonal festivals are a chance to bring the neighborhood together to taste brews that typically don’t stick around too long. “The Perry neighborhood is an active and vibrant neighborhood that really gets behind us,” he says. “With our spirit of being a taphouse, we like to celebrate the times of year when special beers roll out.” Dolmage says curating the extensive beer list is a simple task. He trusts the breweries — many of which he and his wife have visited in person — to bring in whatever beers they think will best fit the festival, and he says that process has yet to let him down. This year’s selection should offer a variety of interpretations of the “winter beer” designation. “A winter beer helps bring alive those senses of wintertime nostalgia — a fireplace or snow falling,” says Dolmage. “It’s awesome to be in the Northwest because we’ll have Belgian-inspired beers, big porters and stouts, and then there’s some that have reds that have a hoppy note to them.” The festival, held this year in a larger (and heated) tent, also features live music each night and something called a Slow Track Bike Challenge on Saturday (noon to 3 pm) organized by bikeloving New Belgium Brewing, in which contestants try to bike down a 20-foot track as slowly as possible. n

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JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 33


Coming Home

Bradley Cooper turns in one of his best performances to date as real-life sniper Chris Kyle.

One soldier’s struggle for normalcy tells a bigger story in American Sniper BY SCOTT RENSHAW

I

f movie-world think pieces are any indication, Ameriing the Marines clearing buildings door-to-door. From can Sniper is the latest fact-based movie that simply the moment of his first life-or-death decision, the story isn’t going to be allowed to be a movie. We’re apparflashes back — to his Texas childhood, his career as a ently not allowed to talk about it without worrying about rodeo cowboy, his eventual enlistment, and his courtship whether it smoothes over the rough edges of its primary and marriage to his wife, Taya (Sienna Miller) — before subject, Navy SEAL Chief Chris Kyle, or speculating returning to his experiences serving in Iraq. But between on its politics because of what we know about director those tours, he finds himself unable to return to normalcy Clint Eastwood and his conversations with empty chairs. in his family life. It’s not possible for me to stress this enough: If you are Plenty of American Sniper is spent on Chris’ battlefield looking for a review of the documentary that American exploits and traumas, from the expertise as a marksman Sniper isn’t, I invite you to search elsewhere; good luck that earned him the nickname “The Legend” to the and godspeed. death of fellow soldiers he was unable to save. Eastwood None of which is to say that what is on the screen brings tension to plenty of those life-or-death set pieces, isn’t occasionally frustrating, or disapincluding a harrowing section where an AMERICAN SNIPER Iraqi informant for the U.S. troops faces a pointing, or simplistic. But it’s also startlingly good at one particular thing: Rated R barbaric enforcer. looking inside the head of a soldier who Directed by Clint Eastwood Yet it’s also hard to ignore that the Starring Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, can’t process his wartime experience film’s perspective often turns it into a Sammy Sheik because he doesn’t know how to look straightforward action movie unconcerned inside his own head. And it’s a fantastic with moral complexity, especially when showcase for Bradley Cooper playing Chris’ counterpart in the Iraqi insurgents the kind of character it’s not always easy for an actor to — an Olympic marksman named Mustafa (Sammy Sheik) capture. — practically becomes a James Bond supervillain in his American Sniper opens with Cooper’s Chris Kyle on seeming invincibility. Virtually all the time that American his first tour in Fallujah, perched on a rooftop protectSniper is on the field of battle, it feels indistinguishable

34 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

from any patriotic, troop-supporting tale you could name. When Chris has to stare down the aftermath during quiet moments, it’s an entirely different story. Eastwood and screenwriter Jason Hall struggle with how to incorporate Taya into Chris’ unsettled world — sometimes finding the convincing terror of a phone call home that’s interrupted by a sniper attack, sometimes making her the whiny wife who says things like “It’s not about them, it’s about us” or “Even when you’re here, you’re not here.” Yet American Sniper is terrific at conveying Chris’ inability to leave Iraq behind, whether it’s his nervous reactions to sounds like a lawnmower starting, or his awkwardness in knowing how to respond when he’s greeted by a soldier whose life he saved. As a portrait of post-traumatic stress that never allows the end of the war truly to be the end of the war, it’s remarkably potent. Much of the credit for that portrait goes to Cooper, in a performance that’s engrossing in its taciturn simplicity. As portrayed in American Sniper, Chris doesn’t overthink his job of killing the people who threaten his comrades in arms, which makes him both very good at what he does and very bad at knowing how to live when he’s no longer doing it. He’s a God-fearing patriot, and neither Eastwood nor Cooper ever put that context in ironic quotation marks; they make Chris’ lack of introspection both intriguing and heartbreaking. Was the real Chris Kyle that same guy? Based on other journalistic accounts, perhaps not. Yet ultimately that has little to do with either the successes or the failings of American Sniper as a piece of cinematic storytelling. After it plugs through the men-at-war business, it gets at something real about the fight still facing so many of America’s soldiers once they’ve returned home. That feels far more significant that what it may or may not get right about one soldier. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS AMERICAN SNIPER

American Sniper opens with Bradley Cooper’s Chris Kyle on his first tour in Fallujah, perched on a rooftop protecting the Marines clearing buildings door to door. From the moment of his first life-or-death decision, the story flashes back — to his Texas childhood, his career as a rodeo cowboy, his eventual enlistment and his courtship and marriage to his wife, Taya (Sienna Miller) — before returning to his experiences serving in Iraq. But between those tours, he finds himself unable to return to normalcy in his family life. (SR) Rated R

BLACKHAT

Chris Hemsworth, best known as Thor, plays a hacker ex-con recruited to take down a cybercrime network. The movie enjoys a Bond-esque international vibe as it bounces through America, Hong Kong and Jakarta, and you can do a lot worse than putting your modern techno-thriller in the hands of director Michael Mann (Heat, Collateral). (DN) Rated R

FOXCATCHER

In this real-life story Steve Carell plays borderline wacko John E. du Pont, the wealthy heir to a family fortune who

recites Reaganesque platitudes of patriotism while snorting cocaine, drinking scotch and coaching — in the loosest sense of the term — the Foxcatcher wrestling team he believes will somehow elevate America’s standing in the world. Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo play Olympic wrestlers caught up in du Pont’s world, with deadly results. (SD) Rated R

PADDINGTON

This kid-centric movie brings the long beloved children’s book character Paddington bear to life. The bear winds up in London in search of an old friend after a family tragedy in his native Peru. He soon finds a loving family to take him in, but is quick to cause a series of calamities in the home of the friendly Londoners, who name him Paddington. (MB) Rated PG

THE

ROYAL

IGHT MOVIE N

TENENBAUMS

AT

RATED R

THE WEDDING RINGER

Hollywood tests America’s love of Kevin Hart by giving him the role of Jimmy, proprietor of Best Man, Inc., a company providing groomsmen to loser dudes with no friends — in this case Doug (Josh Gad). Naturally, Jimmy and Doug become fast friends in the process of lying to Doug’s wife-to-be (Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting). (DN) Rated R

NOW PLAYING ANNIE

The original Broadway version of Annie came out in 1977. And while the story told four decades later could use some updating, the newest film version of the beloved orphan leaves much to be desired. The pieces are all here — Jamie Foxx in the Will Stacks (aka Daddy Warbucks) role, Cameron Diaz as Miss Hannigan and the cheeky Quvenzhané Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) as Annie. (LJ) PG

ANTARTICA: A YEAR ON ICE

After a decade of filming, Anthony Powell has completed his awardwinning international documentary, Antarctica: A Year on Ice. The visual phenomenon offers viewers an immersion into a full year in the life of people who choose to live in one of Earth’s most isolated regions characterized by harsh climates and awe-inspiring displays of nature. At Magic Lantern (KG) Rated PG

THE BABADOOK

Jennifer Kent makes a stunningly assured feature filmmaking debut with this unnerving thriller about a single mom, Amelia, who’s exhausted due to the sleeplessness of near-7-year-old Samuel, who fears monsters that he believes to be hiding in closets and under the bed. Things escalate when Mister Babadook, an ominous children’s pop-up book, mysteriously appears in Samuel’s bedroom At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

BIG HERO 6

Boy genius Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) spends his time illegally hustling in robot fights until his brother shows him

his college science lab where his buddies are making astounding inventions under the tutelage of professor Robert Callaghan (James Cromwell). But after tragedy strikes, Hiro accidentally activates Tadashi’s project — a marshmallow-puffy medical robot named Baymax (Scott Adsit). (SS) Rated PG

BIRDMAN

After good work in lots of small supporting roles over the past couple of decades, Michael Keaton gets back to work as a former franchise movie star now trying to make a comeback on the Broadway stage, but finding obstacles everywhere, many of them in his own head. (ES) Rated R

BOYHOOD

Richard Linklater’s film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the big-bang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-andone little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. (MB) Rated R

CITIZENFOUR

An intimate look at Edward Snowden’s life in the days just before his spooky treasure trove of NSA secrets went public thanks to Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, the latter of whom directed this film. Citizenfour takes place almost exclusively in Snowden’s Hong Kong hotel room. The details laid out, though, are enough to keep you riveted and make you wonder why this story isn’t still dominating the news cycle. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated R ...continued on next page

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9:15 & 11am 36 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

FORCE MAJEURE

A sly satire of masculinity as well as an engaging family drama, Force Majeure follows a Swedish family that travels to the (gorgeously shot) French Alps for a ski vacation that is brutally disrupted by an avalanche that turns a relaxing lunch into a disaster — particularly for family patriarch Tomas. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

GONE GIRL

David Fincher (Fight Club, The Social Network) gets his paws on the novel by Gillian Flynn (who also wrote the script) and comes up with one of the twisting-est, turning-est and most unsettling movies of the year. Ben Affleck is the once-happy husband whose once-happy wife, Rosamund Pike, up and vanishes on the morning of their fifth anniversary, with lots of clues and a few secrets pointing directly at him as the perpetrator. (ES) Rated R

THE HOMESMAN

Tommy Lee Jones, Hilary Swank and Meryl Streep star in this film that offers a glimpse into the challenges faced in the early American West. When three women become mentally unstable due to their trying pioneer lifestyles, the hardened Mary Bee Cuddy — played by Swank— sets out to deliver them to safety in Iowa. (KG) Rated R

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY, PART 1

Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), reluctant heroine of District 12, has been snatched from the arena where she accidentally inspired a nation of downtrodden serfs in the future North American nation of Panem to begin tentatively to rise up. (MB) Rated PG-13 During World War II, the Germans used a machine called an Enigma that created what were thought to be unbreakable codes for top-secret military communications. British mathematician Alan Turing, played here by Benedict Cumberbatch, was hired by Allied forces to decipher the machine’s codes and help win the war. (MB) Rated PG-13

January 18, 2015

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FILM | SHORTS

INHERENT VICE

Searchable by Movie, by Theater, or Time

Thomas Pynchon’s epic novel comes to the screen with director Paul Thomas Anderson at the helm. Set in 1970, the story features Joaquin Phoenix as Larry “Doc” Sportello, a private detective high on just about everything whose girlfriend goes missing. Soon, he finds himself involved with powerful L.A. real estate moguls and a bunch of criminals. (MB) Rated R

INTERSTELLAR

Coop (Matthew McConaughey) is a lonely would-be adventurer in a world that, like ours, has lost its taste for space exploration and is teetering on the edge of environmental collapse. Mathematician Brand (Michael Caine) and his scientist daughter Amelia

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Birdman

89

The Babadook

87

Foxcatcher

81

Interstellar

76

Into the Woods

70

The Homesman

68

Unbroken

60

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

(Anne Hathaway) have discovered a wormhole out near Saturn that could hold the key to humanity’s salvation: a new planet to call home on the other side. (MJ) Rated PG-13

INTO THE WOODS

The song-filled new telling of familiar Grimm fairy tales is a terrific piece of work, with wonderful performances, outstanding production design and snappy writing. But this film, based on the Broadway musical, is also extremely dark, featuring themes of deception, greed, infertility, and even a taste of lasciviousness, and should be of some concern for parents who are thinking of bringing their kids. (ES) Rated PG

KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON

Clark Terry made his mark on the jazz world as one of the genre’s most skilled trumpeters and later went into teaching music. When he began to lose his sight from illness, he became closer with one of his students, Justin Kauflin, a blind piano prodigy. This documentary follows the two over the course of four years. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

NIGHTCRAWLER

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

civil rights. But director Ava DuVernay and her team are interested in doing something much less common, something that echoes the similar success of 2012’s Lincoln. (SR) Rated PG-13

TAKEN 3

Liam Neeson is quite the ass-kicker, never more so than in the role of exspy Bryan Mills. In the first two editions of what we can only hope will end as just a trilogy, Mills saved his daughter Kim and ex-wife Lenore. In Taken 3, Lenore has been murdered, Bryan’s been framed, and he has to open a can on the real killers to clear his name. (DN) Rated PG-13

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Inspired by Jane Wilde Hawking’s memoir about her life with former husband Stephen Hawking, the brilliant theoretical physicist (A Brief History of Time) diagnosed with motor neuron disease at age 21, the film’s heart beats with a romantic optimism, even when each of them finds new soulmates and their union ends. (SD) Rated PG-13

UNBROKEN

Jake Gyllenhaal is Lou Bloom, a loser who stumbles upon a career as a freelance videographer who chases down after-dark accidents and crime scenes, then sells the footage to TV stations. Writer-director Dan Gilroy gives us an L.A. that’s riddled with plenty of fodder for Lou and others to make a good living. (ES) Rated R

The story of Louis Zamperini (Jack O’Connell), a bombardier during World War II who, as a young man, was a medal-winning athlete at the 1936 Olympics, but was stranded for more than a month on a raft after his plane goes down only to be captured by the Japanese. (SR) Rated PG-13

MY OLD LADY

Socially maladroit and painfully single-minded, Andrew (Miles Teller), a freshman at a competitive conservatory, lives only to drum. Early on, he’s tapped by an instructor named Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) to join his elite competition band. Fletcher is a legendary monster, but he knows how to seduce this dewy-eyed hopeful, who he works to the bone. (KJ) Rated R

Kevin Kline is Mathias Gold, a 57-yearold New Yorker with no family, no money and no prospects who arrives in France to take ownership of an apartment left to him by his estranged father. There, Mathias finds an elderly British woman named Mathilde Girard (Maggie Smith) living in the place, the result of an odd bit of French property law called a viager. Accordingly, not only must Mathias wait until Mathilde’s death to take ownership of the place, he also has to continue his father’s payments to her until her demise. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated PG-13

SELMA

Selma could have been just an inspirational drama about a pivotal historical moment, and it could have been just a portrait of King’s efforts at promoting

WHIPLASH

WILD

Reese Witherspoon stars as Cheryl Strayed, the woman who walked the length of the Pacific Crest Trail and lived to write a hit book (upon which this film is based) about it. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild follows Strayed as she deals with her mother’s death and her crippling addiction issues by heading into the wilderness alone. (MB) Rated R 


FILM | REVIEW

SpIFF Opening Night Gala

Friday, February 6 The Bing Crosby Theatre

Filmmakers in Attendance. Meet & Greet at 7:30pm

Show starts at 8 pm.

Tickets $10 / $5 for students.

Followed by the SpIFF Opening Party!

To the Mat

Foxcatcher gives us Steve Carell in a creepy role, but not much else BY STEVE DAVIS

A

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

Believe it or not, that’s Steve Carell.

palpable sense of doom hangs over the world. chilling Foxcatcher, like a vulture resemNo question: There’s something unnerving bling the beak-nosed billionaire John E. about this cringe-inducing turn that separates du Pont (a prosthetic-enhanced Steve Carell), Carell from the rest of the pack, something that who’s at the story’s twisted center. will undoubtedly attract award nominations As the film slowly inches toward its inevitagiven his literal about-face here. But aside from bly tragic ending, you can’t help but think: Noththe Mommy fixation and homoerotic impulses ing good can come from this. Based on headlines that the film tritely references to explain this from nearly two decades ago, it recounts the enigmatic man, you’re left with a performance uneasy relationship between wrestling enthusiast that feels gimmicky, one in which an actor pridu Pont and the Olympic gold medal-winning marily known for his comedic chops goes weirdly Schultz brothers. dramatic. There’s a studied creepiness that informs As Dave Schultz, the older brother unwittingFoxcatcher, one that suggests its pregnant pauses ly drawn into the psychosexual drama between and deliberate pacing will contribute to a greater du Pont and the impressionable Mark Schultz (an meaning beyond the tabloid fodder that advances intense Channing Tatum, taking it up a notch), the otherwise mundane narrative of a privileged Mark Ruffalo goes to the mat when the rest of rich man with delusions of grandeur. Director the film wavers in its purpose. Although it’s only Bennett Miller’s execution is a supporting role, he’s the true beautifully evocative, but to champ in Foxcatcher. FOXCATCHER what end? Once the film conAs much as you want to Rated R cludes, the letdown weighs as admire (even like) this film, it’s Directed by Bennett Miller heavily as the dark mood that ultimately an unsatisfying experiStarring Channing Tatum, Steve Carell, permeates this contemporary ence, largely because you have no Mark Ruffalo, Vanessa Redgrave American horror story. idea what to make of it. Is it a comThe performances anchor mentary on the frequent hypocrisy the film, though not in the way you might expect of red-white-and-blue political values? A critique at the outset. Much has been said about Carell’s of the extraordinary entitlement of the 1 Percent? approach to playing the role of the borderline An unrequited love story in which repression wacko du Pont, the wealthy heir to a family mutes the expression of desire? Whatever the fortune who recites Reaganesque platitudes case, Foxcatcher provides little insight. Art can of patriotism while snorting cocaine, drinking shape the truth in ways that resonate beyond scotch, and coaching — in the loosest sense of the the obvious. Regrettably, the truth-shaping here term — the Foxcatcher wrestling team he believes grapples for significance, without any apparent will somehow elevate America’s standing in the aim. Catch as catch can. 

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JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 37


E T G N N E A T H S I C S N O C

How Flannel Math Animal plays some of the most complex rock around BY LAURA JOHNSON 38 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

Nick Palmieri, left, and Bradley Spracklin bring a human element to their math-rock sound. KRISTEN BLACK PHOTO


B

efore the mid-afternoon practice can begin, they stuff clear silicone earplugs into their ears. “Are you sure you don’t want a pair?” Nick Palmieri and Bradley Spracklin of Flannel Math Animal each ask. The acoustics in their low-ceilinged Logan-neighborhood concrete basement are unforgiving, and five seconds into their vigorous instrumental set, it’s clear that I should have accepted their offer. And yet the volume isn’t the most distinctive aspect of Flannel Math Animal’s instrumental music — that would be its complexity. “Most of the fun of our music is that it’s such a challenge to play,” says Spracklin, the drummer for the two-piece. Both graduated from the Spokane Falls Community College audio engineering program last spring, where they met. After realizing they had mutual acquaintances from their home state of Montana, they bonded quickly. “A lot of those first practices were just alcohol-addled jam sessions,” recalls guitarist Palmieri. But as jamming turned into writing full-fledged songs, they took a gig at Carr’s Corner in December 2013, one of the last shows at the now-defunct venue. “People probably didn’t know what to make of us then,” Palmieri says. Wanting to perform as much as possible, there was one point last year when they had a gig every weekend. Now they’re down to a more manageable twice a month. Friday night, the band releases its debut full-length, self-produced album, Steve the Dog, at Hamilton Studio, where Palmieri is an audio engineer. Each of the 11 songs (seven of which made the record) in the band’s arsenal is a salute to never taking the easy way out musically. Often, their math-rock-tinged tunes includes a different time signature every other measure. Key signatures shift at a moment’s notice. Adding to the difficulty is Palmieri’s eight-string guitar, featuring both guitar and bass strings. He plays the instrument using a method called tapping, running both hands up and down the fingerboard rather than using one to strum. It’s more akin to piano technique, especially when hands take on opposing rhythms, as Palmieri’s often do. As proficient as he is, he practices at least two to three hours a day to stay on top of his game. “It’s all about muscle memory,” Palmieri, 22, says. “I play each line over and over until it’s memorized.” Spracklin, 27, charts out his drum parts to keep everything straight. He’s played drums since he was 12, mostly delighting in jazz music. Now his drumming is based heavily in linear groove funk, but always complements Palmieri’s guitar and sometimes Moog lines. He also takes on experimental technique, like dragging a violin bow across a cymbal. “I’m constantly trying to use all of my limbs,” Spracklin explains. For all of its theory-based technicality, Flannel Math Animal’s music is never a chore to listen to. Often, parts of songs (when beats level out at basic 4/4) can get people up and dancing. Only solos are improvised, and that’s where the guys let loose. “We definitely can’t drink before a Flannel Math Animal set,” Spracklin says with a laugh. “We’re too busy focusing on what’s coming next. We’ll have a drink after in celebration of getting through it.” These are the type of dudes who geek out late into the night discussing the idiosyncrasies of Miles Davis or Frank Zappa’s form. “We’re so sick of what’s happening in mainstream music,” Palmieri says. “With this music, you can do just about anything.” Today in their chilly, bachelor-pad basement, they’re preparing for Friday’s upcoming performance. Each in a flannel shirt — part of their onstage uniform, they explain — they show off some of their choice licks with serious determination. Palmieri stands still as his fingers fly around the neck of his guitar while Spracklin keeps the tunes together with loud yet nuanced beats. “We’re trying to remember to smile more,” Spracklin says. “Music is our life obsession. We want to show how much fun we’re having.” n Flannel Math Animal CD release party • Fri, Jan. 16, at 9 pm • Free • 18+ • Hamilton Studio • 1427 W. Dean • Join the concert guest list at facebook.com/flannelmathanimal or call 327-9501

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | TRIBUTE

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40 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

Adrian Conner, left, leads one of the first all-female tribute acts.

Problem Children Hell’s Belles’ sweaty, stylish take on AC/DC still rocks BY DAN NAILEN

A

drian Conner’s parents should have just let her go to rock shows when she was growing up in Seattle. By forcing Conner to sneak around with friends to see gigs — her first was GWAR and the Melvins at the Moore Theatre — their strict ban on the devil’s music is probably what led their adult daughter to spend weekends stripping down to her panties while playing some of the most joyfully nasty rock ever created to rooms of boozed-up dudes. And Conner wouldn’t have it any other way. As the “Angus Young” in all-female AC/DC tribute band Hell’s Belles, she’s toured the country regularly, including stops in Spokane, since joining in 2001. And what started as what she figured would be a short-term lark has turned into a real career. “When I first got in the band, it was, like, hot shit in Seattle,” Conner says. “People were freaking out about Hell’s Belles. I can’t believe people are still into it. It’s so cool.” The band tours primarily in the west, where Hell’s Belles made their initial inroads as one of the first all-female tribute acts. Bands like Misstallica, Lez Zeppelin and Vag Halen followed in the Belles’ path, a form of flattery that eventually limited Hell’s Belles’ ability to break into new markets, Connor says. The East Coast only shows up on the quintet’s itinerary for occasional private gigs. “The tribute band thing is really played out, and we were lucky enough to be doing it early,” she says. “It wasn’t really a thing yet when Hell’s Belles started. Now there’s a flood of people trying to do it. It’s kind of like people are just over it. They’re not over Hell’s Belles, though. Like the members of the real AC/DC, current singer Amber Saxon’s an Aussie, and Conner praises her ability to deliver tunes from both the Bon Scott and Brian Johnson eras with equal power. It takes a special singer to deliver songs like “Big Balls” with all the sneering humor intended, in addition to nightly must-dos like “Back in Black,” “Highway to Hell” and, duh, “Hell’s Bells.” As we learned from This Is Spinal Tap, there’s a fine line between sexist and sexy in rock ’n’ roll. And AC/DC have duckwalked Chuck Berry-style all over that line for about 40 years via totally sexist lyrics and undeniably sexy, simple blues-rock. Putting AC/DC’s songs in the more-than-capable hands and throats of five badass women gives them a twist that could probably provide fodder for some Women’s Studies grad student’s doctoral thesis. Mostly, though, it’s just a damn fine night out, hearing Conner and Co. rip into a bunch of rockin’ songs with all the energy of the original band — and then some.  Hell’s Belles with 3LP, Undercard • Sat, Jan. 17, at 8:30 pm • $13.50 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279


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JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

EVENT OUTCOLD NO. 2

T

he promoters at the Viking realize it’s cold outside. To amp up the heat, a boatload of bands inundate the venue Saturday for the annual Outcold Concert Series. Local and regional (mostly rock) acts Thirion X, Seven Cycles, Death By Pirates, the Broken Thumbs (pictured), Beyond Today, Driven In Waves, DIVIDES and Drop Off perform at either the outdoor tent stage (complete with plenty of space heaters), or indoor stage. Get free tickets from any of the bands or the venue prior to the event. Revolver Bar & Lounge will host the prefunk event Friday night with special performances by Death By Pirates and Banish the Echo. — LAURA JOHNSON Outcold No. 2 Concert Series • Sat, Jan. 17, at 4 pm • Free/$5 day of • All-ages • The Viking • 1221 N. Stevens • 315-4547

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/15

ROCK DEM EMPIRE

O

n their recent Mythos EP, local rockers Dem Empire whet our appetite for their infectious music with just two songs. The relatively new, Spokane-based four-piece is already polished, exciting and best of all, catchy. Their music pulls in influences from new wave and punk, psychedelic grooves and bass-driven funk. Lead singer Will Zobrist confidently sing-yells his way through lyrics about surviving humanity in the information age. This is the kind of loud, in-your-face music you need after a hard week at work. — LAURA JOHNSON

J BuCEr’S COFFEEhOuSE PuB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCkhOrN INN, Spokane River Band J ChATEAu rIVE, Korby Lenker and Marshall McLean COEur D’AlENE CASINO, PJ Destiny ThE hANDlE BAr, Ken Haugin JOhN’S AllEy, Cody Canada and Jason Boland J lAguNA CAFé, Just Plain Darin lEFTBANk WINE BAr, Nick Grow J luxE COFFEEhOuSE, Particlehead J MONArCh MOuNTAIN COFFEE (208-265-9382), Open Mic with Scott Reid O’ShAy’S, Open mic rOADhOuSE COuNTry rOCk BAr, Steve Starkey ThE VIkINg BAr AND grIll, Christy Lee ZOlA, Karma’s Circle

Friday, 01/16

J BABy BAr, Dem Empire, The Smokes, Cycles (See story above) J ThE BArTlETT, Anniversary Celebration feat. Tango Alpha Tango, Dead Serious Lovers, BEVErly’S, Robert Vaughn J ThE BIg DIPPEr, Anna Copley Benefit Show feat. GS3 BIgFOOT PuB, Bobby Bremer Band BOlO’S, Phoenix BOOMErS ClASSIC rOCk BAr & grIll, Mojo Box J BuCEr’S COFFEEhOuSE PuB, Mijiga-Asker Duo BuCkhOrN INN, Country Soul ThE CEllAr, The West Side Cobras ChECkErBOArD BAr, Echo Elysium CurlEy’S, Tell the Boys EIChArDT’S, Bright Moments Jazz Trio FEDOrA PuB, Nate Ostrander FIZZIE MullIgANS, Shiner

42 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

Dem Empire with the Smokes and Cycles • Fri, Jan. 16, at 9 pm • Free • 21+ • Baby Bar • 827 W. First • 847-1234

grANDE rONDE CEllArS, Two Bit Jug Band J hAMIlTON STuDIO (327-9501), Flannel Math Animal CD Release Party (See story on page 38) ThE hANDlE BAr, The Usual Suspects hIll’S rESOrT (208-443-2551), Raised in a Barn Band J ThE hOP!, Conveyer, Meridian, Give And Take, Keep In Check IrON hOrSE BAr, Uppercut JOhN’S AllEy, Village JONES rADIATOr, Blue Canoe J kNITTINg FACTOry, Invasive, Beyond Today, Thirty Three, Marry the Mistress, Jimmy Nuge J lAguNA CAFé, Diane Copeland ThE lANTErN TAP hOuSE, Cloud Person lEFTBANk WINE BAr, Carey Brazil ThE MEMBErS lOuNgE (703-7115), DJ Selone and DJ Eaze NAShVIllE NOrTh (208-457-9128),

Jeremy McComb NECTAr TASTINg rOOM, Daniel Mills NOrThErN QuEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred NyNE, DJ C-Mad PEND D’OrEIllE WINEry, Tom Catmull J rEVOlVEr NOrTh (473-9885), Outcold No. 2 prefunk feat. Death By Pirates, Banish the Echo rOADhOuSE COuNTry rOCk BAr, Garrett Bartley ThE VIkINg BAr AND grIll, Stepbrothers ZOlA, Ryan Larson Band

Saturday, 01/17

J ThE BArTlETT, The Bartlett Awards feat. Friends of Mine, Loomer, Sea Giant BEVErly’S, Robert Vaughn ThE BIg DIPPEr, Razing Venus BIgFOOT PuB, Bobby Bremer Band

BOlO’S, Phoenix BOOMErS ClASSIC rOCk BAr & grIll, Mojo Box J BuCEr’S COFFEEhOuSE PuB, Eric E. & Rudd BuCkhOrN INN, Country Soul ThE CEllAr, The West Side Cobras J ChAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston COEur D’AlENE CASINO, Steve Simisky CurlEy’S, Tell the Boys FIZZIE MullIgANS, Shiner FrEDNECk’S (291-3880), In Transit hIll’S rESOrT, Raised in a Barn Band J ThE hOP!, Pandamonium III feat. DJs Bon Panda Breaks, DIGI, Domino, 1Slurr IDAhO POur AuThOrITy (208-5977096), Truck Mills IrON hOrSE BAr, Uppercut JONES rADIATOr, Secret Show J kNITTINg FACTOry, Hell’s Belles

(See story on page 40), 3LP ThE lANTErN TAP hOuSE, Marshall McLean Band, Duke Hogue ThE lArIAT (466-9918), Black Jack lEFTBANk WINE BAr, Karrie O’Neill MOyIE SPrINgS STOrE (208-2676266), PJ Destiny NAShVIllE NOrTh, Jeremy McComb NOrThErN QuEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ Patrick J NOrThWEST MuSEuM OF ArTS & CulTurE (456-3931), Mike Ross NyNE, DJ the Devine Jewels PEND D’OrEIllE WINEry, Justin Lantrip rEPuBlIC BrEWINg CO., Wil Kinky rOADhOuSE COuNTry rOCk BAr, Last Chance Band J SChWEITZEr MOuNTAIN rESOrT (208-263-9555), Flying Mammals SPOrTSMAN’S (935-6309), The Usual Suspects J uNDErgrOuND 15, Raised By


Wolves, Cold Blooded, Dark White Light J THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Outcold Concert Series feat. Thirion X, Seven Cycles, Death By Pirates and more (See story on facing page) ZOLA, Ryan Larson Band

Sunday, 01/18

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J THE HOP!, Dalima, Versatile, White Boy Will, Havoc tha Clown, Manwithnoname, Get $ or Get Lost Entertainment, Legion Sik, DFB, T.L.G, Sinister J THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Floating Crowbar SWAXX (703-7474), All Black Everything night feat. DJ K-Phi, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ X, DJ Gocou

Monday, 01/19

J CALYPSOS (208-665-0591), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Rain – A Tribute to the Beatles J RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic UNDERGROUND 15, Open Showcase ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 01/20

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub J THE BARTLETT, Open Mic THE BOILER ROOM (863-9213), Nick

Grow FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Nekrofilth, Weaponizer, Serpentspire JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 01/21 J THE BIG DIPPER, The Bight J CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Dan Conrad EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY (3155327), Open Mic with DJ Scratch n Smith GENO’S (368-9087), Open Mic with T&T JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Bodhi Drip SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic ZOLA, The Bossame

MUSIC | VENUES

5-8 pm. FREDNECK’S, In Transit, Every other 7 pm through Feb. 14. J THE BARTLETT, Mimicking Birds, Jan. 31, 8 pm. J J KNITTING FACTORY, G Love & Special Sauce with Matt Costa, Jan. 31, 8 pm. J JONES RADIATOR, So Pitted, Loomer, 66Beat, Phlegm Fatale, Jan. 31, 9 pm-12:30 am. SWAXX, Crooked I, Wildcard, Illest Uminati, Demon Assassin, Serious MAK, DJ JT Washington, Jan. 31, 10 pm. CHECKERBOARD BAR, Lost Dogma, Feb. 2, 9 pm. IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Open mic, First Wed. of every month. JOHN’S ALLEY, Turkuaz, Feb. 4, 9:30 pm. J THE BIG DIPPER, Turkuaz, Feb. 5, 7 pm.

Coming Up ...

THE BIG DIPPER, Haunted Summer, Sea Giant, Crystalline, Jan. 23 THE PALOMINO CLUB, Nixon Rodeo, Free the Jester, Elephant Gun Riot, the Broken Thumbs, Jan. 24 THE BARTLETT, The Holy Broke album release party Jan. 24

KPBX_011515_6V_KE.tif

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315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HANDLE BAR • 12005 E. Trent Ave.• 474-0933 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 43


Local NAACP chapter president and Inlander commentator Rachel Dolezal, center, at a solidarity march for Ferguson outside of Spokane City Hall on Nov. 25. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

COMMUNITY TEACH AND TALK

It’s a conversation that’s dominated our cultural landscape — and social media — for months now, so let’s talk about racial justice and civil rights. Aptly timed with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, Jan. 19, Eastern Washington University invites the community to a panel discussion among local community leaders, including Inlander columnist and NAACP President Rachel Dolezal. She’s joined by Smart Justice Spokane campaign member Mary Lou Johnson and academic leaders from EWU and elsewhere. — CHEY SCOTT Black Lives Matter Teach-In: Public Safety and Criminal Justice • Fri, Jan. 16, from 11 am-1 pm • Free and open to the public • EWU Patterson Hall, Rm. 126 • Cheney campus • 359-6335

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

44 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

THEATER QUOTH THE RAVEN

COMMUNITY UNIFYING SPOKANE

Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre: Raven Stories • Sat, Jan. 17, at 2 pm • $10-$30 • Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center • 405 William St., Post Falls • thejacklincenter.org • 208-457-8950

MLK Unity Rally and March • Mon, Jan. 19, at 10 am • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • mlkspokane.org

Tears of Joy’s puppets are far beyond the typical, elementaryschool storytime characters most children experience. Its humananimated characters are truly art. The renowned, Portland-based arts education nonprofit is heading back to the Inland Northwest this weekend to share one of its newest productions, Raven Stories. Based on regional Native American lore, the production features the beloved trickster, Raven, who’s joined by cohorts Coyote, SeaBird and the Great Chief. Wooden puppets in the show are inspired by traditional totem poles. — CHEY SCOTT

There are excellent options for celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day beyond going to see Selma. You’ll want to start with the annual Unity Rally, March and Resource Fair sponsored by the Martin Luther King, Jr. Family Outreach Center, at the Spokane Convention Center at 10 am. Then you can make your way to a dramatic reading of King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech by Rev. Percy “Happy” Watkins, happening at Providence Holy Family Hospital at noon, and again at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center, at 3 pm. — DAN NAILEN


PRESENTS

MUSEUMS MAMMOTHS & ART

A visit to the museum as a kid can seem, well... boring. Part of the intent of the MAC’s monthly “Super Saturday” events is to encourage families to spend a day learning in a more interactive format, and this weekend really packs a punch. Local artist Peter Thomas is on site working on a life-size, recycledmaterial “bust” of a Columbian mammoth, inspired by the renowned tusk in the MAC’s collection — currently on display in the ongoing “100 Stories” exhibit. Kids can partake in a fossil-themed art project, and visitors can also contribute to Thomas’ mammoth endeavor. — CHEY SCOTT

RESTAURANT WEEK

Super Saturday at the MAC • Sat, Jan. 17, at 11 am • $5-$10/admission (MAC members free) • Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture • 2316 W. First • northwestmuseum.org Brought To You By

CLASSICAL SPLASHY MODERN WORKS

The Symphony with a Splash event format is simple: Show up at the Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox lobby and treat yourself to a drink, then wander into the glorious auditorium for an hour-long performance. It’s just the right amount of classical music for those who are warming to the genre. The modern works slated for Friday’s performance were all written within the past 20 years — their composers are so hip they’re actually alive and have websites. DJ Case will liven up the drinking portion of the evening with his electronic tunes. — LAURA JOHNSON Symphony with a Splash: A Midwinter’s Friday • Fri, Jan. 16, at 5 pm • $15$54 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BREAST CANCER DRAG SHOW The Scottie Black 18th Annual breast cancer drag show is a 1920s-themed event, with a raffle, auction and more. Jan. 17, 7 pm. nYne, 232 W. Sprague Ave. nynebar.com (474-1621) CHEF’S CULINARY CLASSIC The 22nd annual black-tie gala benefiting local Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, with a dinner prepared by 30 of the region’s top chefs. Also includes a social hour and silent auction. Jan. 24, 6 pm. $175/person. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post. cmnspokane.org ROBERT BURNS DINNER & DANCE The St. Andrews Society of the Inland NW celebrates Robert Burns, with a reading of Burns poetry, traditional haggis ceremony, buffet dinner, live

ceilidh band, traditional highland and country dance performances, single malt bar and more. Proceeds support the group’s scholarship fund. Jan. 24, 6-10 pm. $45/person. Mukogawa Institute, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. spokanescots.org (487-1080)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) CHOOSE TO LOSE A live comedyimprov show, using audience suggestions. Fridays in January, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com (7477045)

Showcasing the Region’s Culinary Talent 90+ Restaurants 10 Days 3 Courses Pre Set Price

February 20 - March 1, 2015 Pick up the official guide in the February 19th issue of the Inlander InlanderRestaurantWeek.com

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 45


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess LeAve Story

I had an amazing first date with this guy: dinner, a movie, a stroll around the park, and a passionate good-night kiss. That was two weeks ago. Since then, I haven’t heard a peep. How was it awesome for me but not for him? Were we, unbeknownst to me, on two different dates? —Disturbed When a man disappears on you after a great first date, it’s natural to search your mind for the most plausible explanation — that is, whichever one doesn’t shred your ego and feed it to your fish. Top choices include: 1. He was kidnapped by revolutionaries. 2. His couch caught fire while he was setting up candles around a shrine to you, and he’s now homeless and, more importantly, phoneless. 3. He double-parked at 7-Eleven, and then a witch put a spell on him, turning him into a Big Gulp, and some skater kid drank him. The reality is, maybe you and he actually were, “unbeknownst to (you), on two different dates.” We have a tendency to assume others’ thoughts, beliefs, feelings, and desires match our own, explains psychologist Nicholas Epley in “Mindwise.” What we forget to consider are what Epley calls “the broader contexts that influence a person’s actions.” For example, maybe smack in the middle of all that “awesome,” the guy was raking through a few thoughts — like whether he’s truly over his previous girlfriend, whether he likes the woman from Tuesday better, whether he’s straight. And sorry, but despite the “passionate” kiss, it’s possible the attraction to you just wasn’t there. One of my guy friends, a reformed cad, explained: “I used to do this all the time with women. I’d realize I wasn’t that attracted to them, but since I was already there on the date, I’d keep moving forward and see if I could get laid, ‘cause why not? So from their point of view, the date was ‘awesome,’ but what they didn’t know was that there was never going to be a second date.” The hurt and “huh?” you feel when this sort of thing happens is a measure of the distance between expectations and reality. You can avoid this by managing your expectations, and the best way to do that is by not allowing yourself to have any. In short, until your phone rings and the guy is on the other end asking you for a date or another date, he doesn’t exist. When you’re on a first date that seems to be going well, the attitude to take is to enjoy yourself to the fullest in the moment — which is loads easier when you aren’t all up in your head figuring out what you’ll say when the little girl you two have together comes home at age 8 demanding to be allowed to have her nipples pierced.

AMY ALKON

PAL rider

I’ve been friends with this guy for almost five years. We’ve always been attracted to each other, but we’ve never been single at the same time. Now we’re starting to date, and I have to say I feel a lot more safety and trust because we were friends first. I’m also not as concerned that he’ll take me for a ride or play games. Am I being unrealistically optimistic, or is there some truth to this? —Been Hurt Before There is safety in having been friends with a person for a while, like how you can be reasonably sure that when he says “Here, let me help you into the car,” it won’t be the trunk. And because we evolved to care deeply about maintaining our reputation, it also helps that you two have mutual friends. (A bank robber is less likely to hit a branch where all the tellers know him by name.) However, once you’re in a relationship, all sorts of emotional issues can pop up and start biting, and what prevents that is not having been friends but having done the work to fix whatever was bent or broken. To be realistically optimistic, make yourself look at the guy’s worst qualities, and decide whether you can live with them. You should also consider what went wrong in your prior relationships. Sure, getting hurt is sometimes a random act, like a stove falling out of the sky onto your car. But often, it’s something you could have seen coming — and would have, if you hadn’t been so busy sewing all the red flags into a big quilt. Finally, even if a guy doesn’t have a skull in his kitchen cabinet labeled “Marcy,” keep in mind that there are special surprises that will only reveal themselves once you’re “more than friends” — like his superhero underwear and his habit of taking over a bed “alphabet-style” (warding off zombies by sleeping in the letter X). n ©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

46 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

EVENTS | CALENDAR HOMEGROWN COMEDY Friends of the Bing present a local comedy open mic series, with the best comedians from the series to be featured in the “March Madness Comedy Showcase.” Jan. 17 and 24 and Feb. 21, at 10:30 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) IMPROPERA A mash-up of opera and improv comedy. Jan. 17, 7 pm. $10. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. (835-4177) JIM JEFFRIES Live comedy show featuring the British comedian, known for his specials on Showtime and HBO. Jan. 23, 8 pm. $39.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) W. KAMAU BELL Live show featuring socio-political comedian W. Kamau Bell, recently named an Ambassador of Racial Justice by the ACLU. Jan. 23, 8 pm. $15. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com

COMMUNITY

BLACK LIVES MATTER A public “teach-in” workshop and discussion on public safety and criminal justice, featuring panelists Mary Lou Johnson (Smart Justice Spokane); Dr. Scott Finnie (EWU); Krista Benson (Women’s Gender & Sexuality studies PhD candidate); and Rachel Dolezal (Spokane NAACP Pres.), also members of EWU’s Black Student Union. Jan. 16, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Eastern Washington University, Cheney. (359-2898) 10TH ANNUAL LEGO-RAMA A community competition for “Master Builders” ages 4-13, with LEGO-inspired activities, snacks and more. “Building Heroes” is this year’s theme. Jan. 17, 1-3 pm. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) MLK DAY HUMAN RIGHTS COMMUNITY BREAKFAST The Latah County Human Rights Task Force hosts Bob Butler, President of the National Association of Black Journalists as the guest speaker for the 22nd annual event. Jan. 17, 9 am. $4-$8. Moscow Middle School, 1410 E. D St. (208-8823648) MT. ST. MICHAEL’S CENTENNIAL OPEN HOUSE The historic Mt. Saint Michael Catholic Parish celebrates its 100th anniversary with guided tours, the Singing Nuns performing and the grand opening of the Mt. St. Michael Museum. Jan. 17, from 10 am-5 pm, Jan. 18, from 1-4 pm. $5/person; $2/kids. Mt. St. Michael’s, 8500 North Saint Michaels Road, Spokane. tinyurl.com/ktxkf7b SUPER SATURDAY AT THE MAC Observe local artist Peter Thomas as he works on a life size bust of a Columbian Mammoth, based on a tusk fossil from the MAC’s collection. Peter also displays some of his previous creative works. Other activities include art projects, exhibit tours and Campbell House tours. Regular museum admission applies; MAC members free. Jan. 17,

11 am. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. CELEBRATION All are invited to hear Rev. Percy “Happy” Watkins deliver the famous “I Have a Dream” speech, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at Providence Holy Family (1 pm) and Sacred Heart (3 pm) hospitals. Jan. 19, 12-1 pm. Free. holy-family.org (474-3081) SCHOOL’S OUT DAY CAMP Kids ages 6–13 are entertained and supervised by Kroc staff, and can partake in swimming, rock climbing, art, cooking and more. Jan. 19, 9 am-4 pm. $28-$35. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org/calendar (208-667-1865) CATHOLIC CHARITIES VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Learn about the many volunteer opportunities available and how to help others in need. Tours of the facility also available. RSVP requested. Jan. 20, 10 am. Catholic Charities Family Service, 12 E. Fifth. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (358-4270) CULTIVATE SPOKANE SALON New Spokane Arts director Laura Becker hosts an informal gathering to reflect, socialize and discuss community arts goals for the year. Jan. 20, 6-7:30 pm. Free. The Big Dipper, 171 S. Washington St. tinyurl.com/mry2obf TWEEN CLUB Monthly activities for kids in grades 4-6. Held on the third Tuesday of each month. Upcoming dates: Jan. 20, Feb. 17, March 17, April 21 and May 19. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) SPOKANE FOLKORE CONTRA DANCE Held every Wednesday night. The Jam Band is playing, Nancy Staub calling. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Jan. 21, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5-$7. Women’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth. spokanefolklore.org (747-2640) MLK DAY FEAT. SAUL WILLIAMS AND ERIN JONES: Erin Jones gives a keynote address, “Dreaming a Dream That is Bigger Than Me.” Saul Williams, best known for his slam poetry and music performances, also signs copies of his book, “The Dead Emcee Scrolls.” Jan. 21, 11:30 am. Free and open to the public. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-7378) WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT? Kate Shuster, PhD, from the Southern Poverty Law Center and author of “Teaching the Movement: The State of Civil Rights Education” speaks about the findings of her research and what we can do as individuals to make a difference. Jan. 21, 11 am-noon. Free and open to the public. EWU, Cheney campus. ewu.edu (509-359-2898) THE DREAM BEHIND BARS: MLK COMMUNITY CELEBRATION WSU hosts the 28th annual MLK Community Celebration, featuring a keynote presentation by Angela Y. Davis. Doors open at 7 pm. Jan. 22, 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. WSU Compton Union Building, 1500 NE Terrell Mall., Pullman. mlk.wsu.edu

FILM

THE HOMESMAN Three women driven mad by pioneer life are to be transported across the country by covered wagon. Rated R. Jan. 15-18, times vary. $3- $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) GLEN CAMPBELL: I’LL BE ME Riverview Retirement Community hosts a premiere of the award-winning film,

telling the story of the country legend’s battle with Alzheimer’s disease. Jan. 17 at 7 pm, Jan. 18 at 3 pm. $12.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bit.ly/1GeMsTt (1-800-325-7328) PATTERNS OF EVIDENCE: EXODUS Documentary filmmaker Timothy Mahoney chronicles an in-depth archaeological investigation in Egypt to explore if the Exodus story actually happened. At Regal Cinemas NorthTown and Riverstone 14 (CdA) Jan. 19, 7 pm. $12.50. fathomevents.com GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Free moving screening, ages 13+ welcome. Doors open at 2 pm. Jan. 20, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org/calendar (208-667-1865) TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s classic old-school movie series, every Tuesday at 7 pm. See website for schedule of upcoming films. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) SUDS & CINEMA: THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS Film screening for the Inlander’s beer + movie series, featuring Iron Goat Brewing Co. beer, $4/pint. Doors open at 6:30; movie starts at 7:30 pm. Jan. 21, 6:30 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) REEL ROCK 9: VALLEY UPRISING A second screening of the outdoor adventure film is hosted. In the Wolff Auditorium (Jepson 114). Jan. 22, 6-8 pm. $10. Gonzaga University Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone. commerce. cashnet.com/guoutdoors (313-4189)

FOOD & DRINK

WINTER BEER FESTIVAL Second annual winter beer fest, offering sample tastings of 40+ winter brews from local and regional breweries, plus a special food menu, live music and a heated, (all-ages) outdoor tent. $15/tasting glass and 5 tokens; free admission. The Lantern Tap House, 1004 S. Perry St. tinyurl.com/mcrdjct (509-315-9531) 4TH ANNUAL CHILI COOK-OFF A community-judged cook-off offering variety of home-cooked chili, corn bread, all the fixings, desserts, coffee and live entertainment. Jan. 16, 5-7 pm. $10-$12. Sinto Activity Center, 1124 W. Sinto Ave. (327-2861) VINO WINE TASTING Sample varietals from Efeste Winery. Tastings include cheese and crackers. Jan. 16, 3-6:30 pm. $15. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) THE WILD BUNCH Sample some obscure wines from grapes that are famous in their growing region, but rarely make it to American store shelves. Jan. 16, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. (343-2253) 4TH ANNUAL BARTENDERS MIXOFF Special guest bartenders gather for the mix-off, themed “Jocks vs Nerds.” Attendees can enjoy appetizers inside RedTail Bar & Grill and cocktail samplings created by mixologists from the Las Vegas Flair Academy. Jan. 17, 5-9 pm. $25. CdA Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com/events THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT Class on how to make savory and sweet bites just in time for Superbowl parties. Jan. 17, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141)


HEALTHY STARTS: NUEVO LATINO STYLE Cooking class with Chef Colomba Aguilar of Cafe Carambola, focusing on nutrient rich foods traditionally found in Latin American dishes. Jan. 21, 5:30 pm. $50. The JACC, 405 N. William, Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) “EAT WHAT YOU DRINK” COCKTAIL DINNER Sante hosts a 7-course cocktail dinner; each course showcases the same flavors and ingredients, both in food and cocktail form. Price includes cocktail pairings. Jan. 26, 5:30-9 pm. $100/person. Santé, 404 W. Main Ave. santespokane.com (315-4613)

MUSIC

SPOKANE SYMPHONY WITH A SPLASH Pre-concert happy hour from 5-6:45 pm with a live local band, followed by a concert by the Symphony at 7 pm. Jan. 16, 5-8 pm. $25. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) CELLOBRATION SPOKANE Hear Schubert’s monumental quintet performed by Jeff Lastrapes, John Marshall, and the Spokane String Quartet. Concert ends with 50 cellos on stage to perform a variety of music for cello ensemble. Jan. 17, 7:30 pm. Free; donations accepted. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. (359-2898) KPBX KIDS’ CONCERT: SIXTEEN STRINGS Four members of the violin family take the spotlight with Sixteen Strings, featuring local string musicians. Jan. 17, 1 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) MET LIVE: LEHÁR’S THE MERRY WIDOW The great Renée Fleming stars as the beguiling femme fatale who captivates all Paris in Lehár’s enchanting operetta, seen in a new staging by Broadway virtuoso director and choreographer Susan Stroman. Live simulcast approx. 3 hrs. Jan. 17, 9:55 am. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org/Met (208-882-4127) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET: OLD VIENNA, NEW VIENNA A concert program featuring pieces by Mozart, Webern and Schubert, with guest cellists Jeffrey Noel Lastrapes and John Marshall. Jan. 18, 3-6:30 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet.org (624-1200) FIVE MINUTES OF FAME Open mic night open to all writers, musicians, etc. Third Wednesday of the month, at 6:30 pm. Third Wed (Jan. 21) of every month. Cafe Bodega, 504 Oak St. fosterscrossingantiques.com/cafe.html (208-263-5911)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

OUTDOOR EMERGENCY BASICS Learn how to be prepared to help yourself and others in remote, wilderness settings, for one day or an extended trip. Jan. 15, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (509-328-9900) SPOKANE BRAVES HOCKEY Hockey matches; kids are free with each paid adult. $5/adults; $4/seniors and students with ID. Includes a beer garden, chuck-a-puck and music. Games on Jan. 16, 24-25 and Feb. 1 and 6. Eagles Ice-A-Rena, 6321 N. Addison. spokanebraves.com (489-9295) WRANGLER BUSHWACKER INVITATIONAL Bull riding competition. Jan. 16 and 17 at 8 pm. $10-$75. Spokane

Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com WINTER RECREATION CLASSES North Idaho College at Sandpoint offers three, one-day, winter recreation classes: Winter Ecology (Jan. 17); Animal Tracking and Sign Interpretation (Feb. 7); and Winter Birds of Prey (March 14). nic.edu/ wtc (208-769-3333) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. $3/ visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) USA BOXING NAT’L CHAMPIONSHIPS Preliminary bouts for the national championships are at the HUB, with winning athletes in the finals (Northern Quest) representing Team USA in the 2015 Pan American Games. Jan. 19-22. $10. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602) SNOWSHOEING BASICS FOR WOMEN REI share tips on the appropriate selection of gear, and where to go to get started in a class specifically geared toward women interested in trying out the popular winter sport. Jan. 22, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. rei.com/ spokane (328-9900) USA BOXING NAT’L CHAMPIONSHIPS (FINALS) Top male and female boxers in the elite division (19-40-years-old) battle for a highly coveted national championship. Finals Jan. 23-24. $15$100. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com SMOKING ACES TOUR Featuring the Ante Up Slopestyle, with men’s and women’s divisions competing to win cash, swag and other prizes. Jan. 24, 8:30 am5:30 pm. $35-$40. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. facebook.com/smokngacesfreestyle (208-263-9555)

THEATER

THE LAST FIVE YEARS The points of view of a relationship between a writer and an actress played out in this contemporary song-cycle musical. Through Jan. 25, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $17$25. The Modern Theater Coeur d’Alene, 1320 E. Garden Ave. themoderntheater. org (208-667-1323) CALL MR. ROBESON: A LIFE WITH SONGS A play chronicling actor, singer and civil rights activist Paul Robeson’s life, highlighting how his radical activism caused him to be disowned and disremembered, even by the leaders and descendants of the civil rights movement. Jan. 16, 7 pm. $40-$50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) THE EFFECTS OF GAMMA RAYS ON MAN-IN-THE-MOON MARIGOLDS Performance of the Pulitzer Prizewinning drama by Paul Zindel. Jan. 16Feb. 1; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$14. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. igniteonbroadway.org (795-0004) THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS Comedy farce, directed by Patrick Treadway. Jan. 16-Feb. 8; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St.

spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) SERVICEMAN’S CANTEEN Youth actors present a live “radio” show based on the Bob Hope USO shows of World War II. Jan. 16-17, at 7 pm, Jan. 18 at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave, Newport. pendorielleplayers. org (477-9900) TEARS OF JOY PUPPET THEATER: RAVEN STORIES An all-new production from the Portland-based theater, based on the Native American lore of the Raven, who uses wits and cunning to get what he wants. Jan. 17, 2 pm. $10/kids, $15/ adults. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St, Post Falls. thejacklincenter. org (208-457-8950) JEKYLL & HYDE A musical adaptation of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic. Jan. 26, 7:30 pm. $32.50-$45.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000)

VISUAL ARTS

COUCH POTATO A viewer-participant art installation featuring art videos and films beginning from the 1960’s and ’70’s, to contemporary artists working today. Through Feb. 6, open Mon-Fri, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Some films may not be suitable for all audiences. Free and open to the public. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org/gallery (5333710) HAROLD BALAZS: OLD & NEW A collection of the longtime, renowned Northwest artist’s work, including twodozen newly created works alongside past favorites. Through Feb. 7; gallery open Tues-Sat, from 11 am-6 pm. Free admission. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) THE ARTIST’S PALETTE: THROUGH THE LENS OF DEAN DAVIS A exhibit showcasing the work of local artist Dean Davis, including photographs and paintings. “The Artist’s Palette” becomes Story No. 66 in the MAC’s 100 Stories exhibit. Runs through June 2015. $5-$10/ admission. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) THROUGH THE LENS: AN AMERICAN CENTURY — CORBIS & VIVIAN MAIER: An exhibit exploring the personal and public uses of photography, featuring some of the most famous images in history — the Corbis Collection — and the most private, the work of Vivian Maier. Jan. 12-April 3. Gallery open MonSat, hours vary. Receptions Jan. 22 at 6 pm, featuring a talk by photography professor Dennis DeHart, and Feb. 12, at 6 pm, featuring a screening of the film “Finding Vivian Maier” in the CUB, at 7 pm. Free admission. Museum of Art/ WSU, Wilson Road. museum.wsu.edu (509-335-1910) JAQUAN TRACY Reception for the artist’s paintings, featuring alongside select works in clay by ceramicist Terry Gieber. Jan. 16, 4-6 pm. Taste Cafe, 180 S. Howard St. tastecafespokane.com (468-2929) MIDWEEK MONET PAINT PARTIES Local artist Chelsea Cordova provides a stepby-step introduction to acrylic painting, with themes ranging from landscapes to still life to abstracts. Glass of wine included in admission; all supplies provided. Upcoming classes Jan. 21, from 5:30-8:30 pm. $40/class. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) RIC GENDRON: RATTLEBONE An exhibition curated by Ben Mitchell, surveying the contemporary paintings

by Ric Gendron, a member of the confederated tribes of the Colville Reservation. The largest exhibition ever assembled of the artist’s work, Rattlebone is supplemented with cultural and contemporary objects from the artist’s family. Jan. 23-April 2. Gallery open Mon-Sat, from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/jundt (313-6843)

WORDS

AUTHOR JAMES BARFOOT Book signing and presentation by the author of “Tribalize Now — The Practice of Belonging.” Barfoot is as a Master NLP life coach and clinical hypnotherapist, and studied 20 years with “Ten Bears” Bart Anderson, a Spiritual Elder. Jan. 15, 7-9 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. primalcoaching.org (230-5035) BIRTH CONTROL ADVOCACY IN EARLY URBAN SPOKANE Risking arrest and prosecution, birth control pioneer Margaret Sanger brought her message for legal and safe contraception to an audience of a 1,000 people in Spokane. Using newly discovered correspondence from Sanger, Richard Sola discusses why she came to Spokane in 1916. Jan. 15, noon. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth St. (359-6200) AUTHOR PAT SHARP BROWN After losing not one, but two husbands after long marriages, Pat Sharp Brown has written a book chronicling her grief and grieving process for both losses. Jan. 16, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) THE UNTOLD STORY OF THE PALESTINIAN LIFE Abd AlHadi Basheer is a doctoral student and research assistant, in the Department of Teaching and Learning at WSU, and shares his personal story providing a perspective of life in Palestine today. Jan. 16, 7 pm. Free. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third St, Moscow. (208-669-2249) AUTHOR ANDREA SWENSON The Spokne writer reads and answers questions about her debut book “Free Rein-in’ With Chester.” Jan. 17, 3-4:30 pm. Free. The Book Parlor, 1425 W. Broadway Ave. (328-6527) AUTHOR JENNIFER MILLER Miller meets fans and signs her book, “Beneath the Universe,” about family dynamics, set in Germany during WWII. Jan. 17, 1 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) FLASH FICTION WORKSHOP Buzzedabout Spokane writer Sharma Shields coaches participants on how to begin, maintain and resolve your own micro stories, whether they be six words in length or one paragraph. Jan. 17, 3 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (444-5390) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM FEAT. PAULIE LIPMAN Poets have three minutes per round and are judged by five audience members chosen at random. The poet with the highest cumulative score wins $50. January’s featured poet is Paulie Lipman, who’s represented Denver at the National Poetry Slam eight times. Jan. 19, 7-10:30 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. spokanepoetryslam.org (747-2174) AUTHOR WENDY FOX EWU MFA graduate Wendy Fox reads from and discusses her short story collection, “The Seven Stages of Anger & Other Stories,” which won the 2014 Press 53 Inaugural Short Story Collection Award. Jan. 20, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206)

BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) CIVIL DISCOURSE IN THE CLASSROOM AND BEYOND How can students be encouraged to engage in civil discourse and promote dialogue across difference? Lecture by Kate Shuster, author of “Teaching the Movement: The State of Civil Rights Education 2014.” Jan. 21, 2-4 pm. Free and open to the public. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. ewu. edu (359-2898) INLAND NORTHWEST WRITERS GUILD Monthly meeting features a presentation on “Choosing a Great Cover for your SelfPublished Book.” Jan. 21, 6:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) BLURT & BLATHER An all-ages open mic series, on the second and fourth Thursday of the month. Open to poetry, stories and other spoken word performances. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. facebook.com/blurtnblather NATIVE AMERICAN STORYTELLING Students and teachers from Salish School of Spokane present traditional Native American stories in Salish and English. Jan. 22, 3:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (444-5390) POETRY OPEN MIC No sign-up sheets, censors, or microphones. New poets are especially encouraged to attend. Held on the fourth Thursday of every month. Free. Monarch Mountain Coffee, 208 N. Fourth, Sandpoint. monarchmountaincoffee.com (208-265-9382) POETS KIM BURWICK & KEVIN GOODAN A reading and discussion by poet couple, both professors who reside in Idaho. Jan. 22, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) S.M. HULSE BOOK LAUNCH: The Spokane author’s acclaimed debut novel follows former prison guard Wes Carver as he returns to his Montana hometown in the wake of his wife’s death from cancer. Hulse reads from the novel and answers audience questions. Jan. 23, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206)

ETC.

DRIBBBLE MEETUP NO. 1 Dribbble Meetups are a chance for designers to socialize, talk shop, and foster their local design communities. This is Spokane’s first meetup. Jan. 15, 8 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. thebartlettspokane.com ZENTANGLE An introductory class to this relaxing activity creating beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. Jan. 17, 2 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. (444-5380) CONNECTED LEARNING: BLOGGING BASICS A class on how to set up a blog, choosing a platform and the best ways to promote your work. Pre-registration required, call 444-5300. Jan. 20, 1 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. (444-5336) DON’T FEAR THE FAFSA Experts on site help students navigate the Federal Financial Aid System, and complete their FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Jan. 21, 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) n

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 47


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BREATH TEST

WSU chemistry professor Herbert Hill and doctoral student Jessica Tufariello are developing a handheld device to detect THC on drivers’ breath. The portable device uses ion mobility spectrometry — a technique which detects trace quantities of gaseous organic compounds at atmospheric pressure. The device can’t pinpoint the exact level of THC in the body, but will provide law enforcement officers with enough information to warrant the arrest of an impaired driver. People with a THC blood content of 5 nanograms per milliliter are determined to be impaired drivers. Currently, law enforcement officers rely on blood tests to determine THC in a driver’s blood; however, test results aren’t immediately available.

WOMEN VS. WEED

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52 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Jeers

December 29th, Sandpoint USPS Vixen. You were directly ahead of me picking up your Holiday mail. You are in your 40’s-early 50’s, about 5’7” to 5’9”, slender, curly dark hair, gorgeous blue eyes; wearing a black nylon pillow jacket. Me - red coat, tall, dark curly hair, mustache. We exchanged many glances and some smiles. I was too shy to talk in front of all those people; you drove away in a small silver car. Interested in coffee??

but always stay with me. My interest in you is not fleeting or merely polite. If you are seeing this, you might know my name. Take a chance: get in touch and let’s get to know one another. I am interested yet hold no expectations. If you’re happily taken, but enjoy talking, let’s just talk again. I find you to be fascinating, and appreciate the value of pure friendship in this city between two strangers who can share their experiences of the world with respect and curiosity. Do respond if you’re reading, if only to tell me you’d prefer to let it go. It’d make me happy to know you saw this.

Silver Mustang Cheers to the silver Mustang convertible driving North on Monroe last Tuesday night around 6:45 p.m. We came to a stoplight somewhere around Mallon and you guys were obviously having a good time waving and whatnot, thanks for sharing the energy. You made an already wonderful day even better. I hope karma repays you in a huge way! Peace! One Love!

were never taught by the adults in your life that women, women’s bodies and their manner of dress is not for your sexual appetite or visual pleasure. We women are not wearing “bodysuits” (which I’m guessing you mean yoga pants) for you, or for any other man. I’m sure you are the type of pervert who catcalls, grabs his crotch to readjust himself when he’s having sex thoughts about women in public, inappropriately touches women when he thinks he can get away with it, and generally behaves as a slimy, disgusting human being when in the presence of women. No one has ever corrected you or your behavior. The Inlander publication of your post is a vile example of the reality women deal with daily. I pity your ignorance and pray you are run over by a bus.

Valley Winco I saw you at the valley Winco on January 8th. You were loading your car out front, you had long hair and a beautiful smile. You said hi to me and I said hi back. I was just wondering if you would like to have a coffee sometime. If so you can contact me at heylilworm@gmail.com I hope to hear from you soon. Yellow Rainboots at River Park Square It’s rare that men catch my eye the way you did. I saw you at the theatre before catching a matinee. You wore a black jacket and were with 2 other guys. Are you single? Hope so.

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World Market Christmas Eve. We talked at the store about TEA”s for my daughter-in-law, You had on a dark blue jacket, I think its called a Pete/ old style. You had your reading glasses in your hair, 5/6”ish tall, and your hair lte brn shoulder length and I told you I lived up north, Your smile and charm was to me over the top, You are very pretty, I have never been so rattled, thank you for the feeling. You where with a gal wearing a red top and she was driving a silver SUV. Hope We find each other, Contact me. To The Tall, Handsome Bank Teller On Francis I have noticed you for months, and am drawn to you every time I enter the bank. Our brief conversations are often silly,

TO C O N N E C T

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo. com” — not “j.smith@ comcast.net.” Goodwill Hunting I saw you twice at the Goodwill Outlet at the end of December. Once was on a Saturday and once was a Friday the following week (the day after Christmas, in fact). I thought you were cute and we kind of looked at each other both times, but we both never said anything. I kept wanting to, but then never did. The second time, I think you recognized me, but I wasn’t for sure; I was with some relatives and never got around to saying “hey.” I wish I did now though! You: dark hair, beard, tan skin, green winter coat. Me: brown haired girl with various pattern dresses. Would love to know your story. It seems that you love junk and picking and so do I. Maybe we will run into each other again at the Outlet or you can e-mail me at thriftstorecutie27@ yahoo.com. Tell me what kind of dress I was wearing (one of the week’s it was pretty loud and hard to miss), so I know it’s you.-The Girl In The Pattern Dresses

Hello Batman Thinking of you as always. Always anticipating your calls on those certain days. Your voice is like magic, bringing a smile to my lips. You will forever have my heart no matter what the future brings. My wish for you is total happiness and loving life. You take care of every one, but neglect yourself. I love you Batman, your Batgirl. Knight in Rusty Arm our I saw you Friday night at my favorite place in Rathdrum! I am holding onto HOPE that you will let your heart win the battle with your mind. I will be right here waiting for you because know one knows the secrets that we keep. So please keep me in mind because I won’t give up on us! Just me.... thinking out loud because I will always love you.... Mo Thank You For The Chocolate Muffins Many thanks to the lovely people who work at the Holley Mason Rocket Bakery. Like Mr. Rogers says, you are the people in my neighborhood (I work next door) and you always brighten my day. I hope you know that your presence and work make a difference for the people who stop by.

Jeers Neanderthal in Spokane To the author of the “Frisky Women” Cheers post: You sir are a neanderthal. Apparently you

RE: Frisky Women Well this was going to happen. So because you lack the maturity as an adult, women are at fault? How dare you be so condescending! I may not know you, but I know your type. Looking for attention by using others body type or look to some how make yourself feel better, you are a pervert an a bully. Happy Connecting. Winter Roads As a person who does snow removal on the roads there’s something you ought to know. Instead of judging how the road crews are doing their job maybe you should know what works. First thing you should know is if you put salt down before the snow hits you are causing more of a mess than helping it. The salt will automatically melt the snow and as it gets colder and the snow covers that up it turns into a sheet of ice. Any smart person knows that. As the wind blows the snow across the roads and hits the salt it turns to instant ice sheet. Once the snow has

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been bladed off and the sun starts showing then it’s best to start treatment if the wind has died down. And one thing you don’t do is spread salt on clean roads or it acts like a magnet for snow to stick. As for your tax dollars paying the city and state crews, don’t they pay taxes also?? So essentially they are paying their own wages which isn’t that good anyway. Be grateful they are out there risking their lives plowing at night while you’re all snuggled in bed at 2am!! I give a lot of credit to the city and state guys for being out there working on the roads both night and day through the winter months and especially in the summer when all the fast driving knit wit driver’s are out there. They risk their lives as traffic flies by them.

around in. There is no direct way to get anywhere in this town. The speed limits are crazy with how often they change and generally seem to be too slow. The drivers seem to be ok, but the roundabouts always seem to pose a challenge for many. My biggest complaint has got to be the insane amount of stoplights and the horrible timing of them. You can’t go more than a block without catching a stoplight on red. Transmissions and brakes have got to go quickly in this town not to mention gas mileage. Just a petty complaint, but oh well.

you both are still good friends.

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Meal Ticket Hi ladies, here is some advice if you want to keep a meal ticket around. Show your meal ticket that you’re interested in him, text him, call him, do what ever. Just don’t be insulted when he doesn’t respond after the 3rd date because you never showed any interest in him. Just some advice.

Thief I’m looking for information on the person or persons that shattered the rear window in my Subaru on the evening of December 31st. There was an infrared heater stolen from my car.The cost Worst Movie Date Last night for me to replace my window was the worst date I have ever $700.00. I would really like to been on, why did you even catch the punks responsible for show up? 2 minutes before the this. I would really appreciate if movie and you finally did, I was someone would come forward praying that you were going to and help me out. Traffic This is a pretty general stand me up but didn’t, grrrr. complaint, but this has After the movie why didn’t you Driving School I was raised in a got to be one of the worst just end it instead of having state that everyone must take cities I’ve ever had to drive me walk you to your car? You a drivers school coarse before didn’t want they were tested for driving. me to, so why? Does Spokane do it? It sure Ugh lesson doesn’t show it. Drag racing learned! Go two blocks to the next stop back to your light...lol. In traffic school they hero ex since teach you to stay in the right lane, unless passing. Here, the right lane is the passing lane?

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JANUARY 15, 2013 INLANDER 53


Bucking the Trend A champion bull stays busy in retirement By Dan Nailen

B

ushwacker’s last round on the Professional Bull Riders circuit might not look extraordinary to the layperson. A chute opens. A bull bucks and twists into the air. A cowboy hits the ground, running for his life. All of it over in less than three seconds. For fans of the sport, though, that ride cemented his status as one of the legends in bucking-bull lore. He’s one of the few bulls to be more popular than the riders, and his popularity appears to be ever-growing. More than 30,000 Facebook followers regale each other with stories of seeing Bushwacker, of his incredible record of bucking off 84 of the 87 men who tried to stay on for eight seconds. They coo over how handsome he is and recall ESPN the Magazine naming him the “baddest body in sports.” The Michael Jordan of bulls, Newsweek called him. A closer examination of Bushwacker plying his craft

54 INLANDER JANUARY 15, 2015

reveals what the bull’s fans have always known, and what we neophytes have missed in his six years on the circuit: Bushwacker is, quite literally, a beast. A 1,700-pound monster with a deadly calm demeanor until the chute opens. Then he becomes a tornado with hooves that reach upward of 10 feet high when he jumps, whose heavily muscled torso never twists the same way twice, whose reaction to 17,000 screaming fans and pumping rock music is to put on a show. But the show is over now. Bushwacker retired in October after that last run in Las Vegas, moving to his owner Julio Moreno’s ranch, where throwing his horns at tires and a mound of dirt in his pen has taken the place of poking at defeated riders. Chilling in the shade all day has taken the place of 14-hour rides between competitions in his personalized truck.

Bushwacker tossed 84 of 87 riders in under eight seconds. For fans, though, the legend lives on. Some travel to see Bushwacker in person, and Moreno says he loves the attention: “He’s a big showboat. We’ll have tourists come by, and he’ll pep up. He likes the camera.” He might miss the glare of the spotlight. The fans certainly miss him in it, which inspired Bushwacker’s people to take him on a tour of personal appearances, including this weekend in Spokane. While Bushwacker won’t be bucking, he’ll be in the Spokane Arena. And for a mere $75, people can enjoy a meet-and-greet with the snorting behemoth. That might seem steep, but it’s a drop in the bucket compared to what people are spending for some of Bushwacker’s genetic code in hopes of creating future champion bulls. Just as Bushwacker was the son of a world champion, Reindeer Dippin’, Moreno has bred him with 15 cows of his own in hopes of capturing a little of Bushwacker’s magic. Others are paying $5,000 for a straw of Bushwacker’s semen. Not the worst way to spend retirement. n The General Store Presents Wrangler PBR Bushwacker Invitational • Fri, Jan. 16 and Sat, Jan. 17 at 8 pm • $10/$20/$30/$40; VIP with Bushwacker meet-and-greet $75 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena.com • 279-7000


Together, we make great things happen. “Avista developed city property into the plaza as a gift to Spokane and revamped the park (Huntington) to commemorate the company’s 125th anniversary and its partnership with the community. Who benefits? We all do.” –Mick McDowell, Chairman, Downtown Spokane Partnership

“It has been a great pleasure working with Avista and the Avista Foundation toward development and operation of Family Promise of the Palouse. We are extremely pleased with the results of our work to develop the program to serve homeless families with children in the Moscow and Pullman area.” –Donna Watson Lawson, Director, Western Region Family Promise

“I am a first time college bound student in my family. I greatly appreciate this scholarship, and I will most assuredly put it to good use.” –Engineering Student, via Rayelle Anderson, Executive Director, North Idaho College Foundation, Coeur d’Alene

“Your grant allowed us to provide pool passes, swim suits and swimming lessons to kids throughout Spokane County who otherwise could not have enjoyed our area’s public pools this past summer.” –Heather Beebe-Stevens, Executive Director, Spokane Parks Foundation

At Avista, we proudly have partnered with the communities we serve for 125 years. It’s why every year we gladly donate our time and money—as individuals and as a company—to local organizations like those listed below. This past year, donations totaled $1.7 million and employees volunteered more than 45,000 hours. Whether supporting education, lifting neighbors in need, or boosting the economic and cultural vitality of communities, we are thankful for the opportunity to lend a hand.

“Thank you for your generous support! Your donation to the ILCTE Foundation goes towards increasing industry driven education in the region.” –Idaho-Lewis County Technical Education Foundation, Grangeville

“I would be hard-pressed to think of two brands more closely connected to Spokane than Avista and SNAP.” –Julie Honekamp, CEO, SNAP –

COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCIES: American Childhood Cancer Organization Inland Northwest • Audubon Park United Methodist Church • Big Table • Caritas Outreach Ministries • Catholic Charities • Our Place Community Ministries • Providence Health Care Foundation • Salvation Army of Spokane • Scottish Rite • Spokane Center for Independent Living • Spokane Valley Partners • Transitions • Volunteers of America • Colville Volunteer Food and Resource Center • Immaculate Conception Catholic Church • New Hope Resource Center • The Green House Community Center • Aging and Long Term Care SE WA • Gritman Medical Center- Light a Candle • Salvation Army of Lewiston • St. Vincent de Paul-Clarkston FOOD BANKS: Addy Rescue Mission • Cheney • Chewelah • Colville • Connell • Kettle Falls • Lincoln County • Loon Lake • Medical Lake • Northport • Northwest Harvest • Odessa • Othello • Our Place Community Ministries • Peaceful Valley • Ritzville • Second Harvest • Spokane Valley Partners • Sprague Lamont 4H Club • Valley Food Pantry • Warden • Washington Gorge Action Programs • ABC Community Food Bank • Bonner Community • Clark Fork • Jumpin’ Beans Mobile • Post Falls • Priest River • Rathdrum • Spirit Lake • West Bonner County • Asotin County • Community Action Center-Pullman • Community Action Partnership-Lewiston • Sojourner’s Alliance • The Idaho Food Bank CAPITAL CAMPAIGNS: Providence Healthcare Foundation for Children’s Emergency Room • KSPS Friends of Seven • YWCA Spokane • Spokane Arts Fund • Spokane Public Radio • Gonzaga University, Hemmingson Univ Ctr. • Kootenai Youth Recreation Organization • St. Vincent de Paul N. ID • Pullman Regional Hospital Foundation • Friends of Whitman County Library • U of I Integrated Research & Innovation Center STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS: GU, EWU, Whitworth University, NIC, WSU, U of I, LCSC, WWCC-Clarkston, U of I – Waters of the West, Hydro Research Foundation ADDITIONAL GIVING: Spokane Co. United Way • Spokane STEM Network • Girl Scouts of E. WA and N. ID • Inland NW Council Boy Scouts • Martin Luther King Jr. Family Outreach Center • Interplayers • Spokane Tribal College • Ronald McDonald House Charities • Partners with Families and Children • WSU Foundation for MESA Program • Money Management International • The Lands Council • Spokane Public Schools Foundation • Junior Achievement • Spokane Lilac Festival Association • Northeast Youth Center • American Heart Association • Spokane Parks Foundation • Friends of Centennial Trail • Spokane Folklore Society • United Way of Kootenai County • Sandpoint Community Resource Center • Heritage Health • North Idaho Violence Prevention Center • Children’s Village of Coeur d’Alene • North Idaho Fair and Rodeo Foundation • Hospice of North Idaho • CD’A Summer Theatre • Opera CD’A • Idaho Youth Ranch • Kootenai County United Way for Convoy of Hope • Boys & Girls Club of Kootenai County • Kootenai Health Foundation • Post Falls Education Foundation • Mission of Charity • Twin County United Way • United Way of Pullman • United Way of Moscow & Latah County • Family Promise of the Palouse • Nez Perce Tribe • WSU Foundation • Idaho-Lewis County Tech Ed Foundation • U of I Foundation Confluence Project • Circles of Caring Adult Day Health • Rendezvous in Moscow • Gritman Medical Center Foundation • LAMI – Alliance House • Asotin County Foodbank Backpack Program • Tri State Hospital Foundation • St Mary’s Hospital Foundation SPECIAL GIFT: The Spokane Tribe Gathering Place SPONSORSHIPS: GU Athletics • CCS Athletics • Whitworth University Athletics • EWU Athletics • Avista Stadium • Spokane Chiefs • Spokane Shock • Hoopfest • SYSA • Special Olympics • Cotton Classic • Spokane Sports Commission • Spokane Symphony • Spokane Lilac Association • Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture • NIC Athletics • Avista Pavilion at McEuen Park • The Festival at Sandpoint • WSU Athletics • Avista NAIA World Series, Lewiston, ID ...and many, many other non-profit organizations where our employees are personally invested through their time, talent and donations.

JANUARY 15, 2015 INLANDER 55


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