Inlander 01/13/2022

Page 1

COVID-19

Omicron wave arrives in the Inland Northwest PAGE 12

SCREEN

Scream asks, “Do you like scary sequels?” PAGE 31

JANUARY 13-19, 2022 | TIMELESS JOURNALISM

ST. IGNATIUS HOSPITAL IN COLFAX CIRCA 1917


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INSIDE VOL. 29, NO. 14 | COVER DESIGN: DEREK HARRISON

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY SNOWLANDER

5 8 14 20

CULTURE SCREEN MUSIC EVENTS

28 31 33 34

I SAW YOU ADVICE GODDESS GREEN ZONE BULLETIN BOARD

36 38 40 43

EDITOR’S NOTE

W

hen a cool old building is threatened by a wrecking ball in downtown Spokane, you typically hear about it well in advance. Folks interested in historic preservation and architectural history often have time to rally a group of like-minded citizens and go to work to save the structure. When it comes to HISTORICAL PRESERVATION IN RURAL COMMUNITIES, though, such efforts are often the passion projects of individuals, couples or tiny groups. Chey Scott introduces an array of preservation advocates and their projects in small towns scattered across Eastern Washington in this week’s cover story (page 14). Also this week, reporter Wilson Criscione delivers a powerful and all-toocommon tale of a fentanyl tragedy (page 8), Stage Left Theater launches its new season with Terrence McNally’s powerful Corpus Christi (page 28), and Music Editor Seth Sommerfeld chats with virtuoso guitarist Jesse Cook in advance of his Spokane concert (page 33). — DAN NAILEN, editor

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CANCER HASN’T STOPPED AND NEITHER WILL WE. ANOTHER FENTANYL TRAGEDY PAGE 8

COURTING CONTROVERSY PAGE 28

Community Cancer Fund works collaboratively with existing regional cancer organizations to identify and fund gaps in services provided to cancer patients. We are committed to investing donated funds in local programs that benefit cancer patients, their families, and the Inland Northwest organizations that serve them. Join our fight against cancer across the Inland Northwest at: CommunityCancerFund.org

WORLDLY SOUNDS PAGE 33

THINGS TO DO PAGE 34

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JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 3


4 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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Tired of monkeying around at your job?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL HISTORIC BUILDING?

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JOAN MAMANAKIS: [Northern Pacific Railroad] depot in Cheney. (22 I St.)

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KRISTEN PISCOPO: City Ramp parking garage! (430 W. First Ave.) KATIE KENDRICK: McKinley Elementary! (117 N. Napa St.) ROBIN FONTAINE: The Hallett House in Medical Lake looks like a rundown castle. What’s the story there? (623 E. Lake St.) THERESA SCHIMMELS: The Chancery Building!! (1023 W. Riverside Ave.)

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BRIDGET E C FREEMAN: The Fox, the Fox, the Fox!!! I went to movies there as a child, my daughter performed onstage there just before renovations, and I work there now. Well worth the time and money to save it! (1001 W. Sprague Ave.) DAVE KOCH: The Jensen-Byrd warehouse. (314 W. Riverside Ave.) COURTNEY HEITSTUMAN KRAMER: The school in Harrison, Idaho. Great Mission Revival style with views of Lake Coeur d’Alene! Would make an amazing boutique hotel or apartments. LYNE NAGELE: Old North Central High School and the old elementary schools replaced in the late ’70s with concrete gray buildings. (All have since been demolished.)

SLEEP

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JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | PUBLIC LANDS

THE

COURSE THE

THE

PEOPLE IES

MEMOR

The cunning cutthroat trout offer lessons even when you can’t reel them in.

Cutthroat Lessons Out in our West’s beautiful public lands is where life lessons can be learned BY BILL BRYANT

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n 2016, I ran for governor of Washington as a Republican, aspiring to lead in the tradition of Washington Republican Dan Evans and Idaho Democrat Cecil Andrus, both ardent conservationists responsible for national and state parks, recreation and wilderness areas, wildlife refuges and national forests — and who both had supported my political career. That I finished shy by about 4.5 points wasn’t inevitable. In late spring 2016, the race with Jay Inslee had tightened, but once Donald Trump was nominated it was as if I were fishing and a pontoon of partying tubers floated by, scaring from the pool those I needed to land: independent voters. The night I lost my bid to become Washington’s governor, I remembered one fall day before campaigning began, when I went head to head with a hog of a cutthroat.

I

was in Wyoming with some time, but foolishly without gear, so I called a friend who recommended a fly shop. Before I knew it, I was bouncing down a road in a guide’s rig. It was

still morning, but warming. Aspens radiated topaz; blood maroon tinged the bankside bushes; snow powdered peaks pierced a spa-calming blue sky. We fished. I landed a few trout, but not ones you jot notes about. The one a few casts later, that one I went back to my hotel and wrote about: about our conversation, about the color of the trees, and about the eagle — yeah, the eagle — that soared barely over my head right before it happened. The moment before my cast still swaddles me. The swishing current, the plunging beaver, the geese heralding the impending dark. Then, I saw it. Momentarily, but I saw it, in the seam, where the current folded. I placed my fly just on the other side of the foam. My guide whispered, “That’s it, perfect.” “Oh, he’s moving away, damn.” “Wait. Yeah, easy, here he comes. Slowly.”


A few seconds later, murmuring to myself, the guide, the fish: “Yeah! Come on!” He took it. Strike. Set. Tight. On. “Good job. OK, give him some line, he’s a big one.” “I’m going to tire him out a bit,” I said. If the fish thought at all, I bet it was thinking the same thing. I’m collapsing this sort of blood-pulsing yet hushed dialogue that went on and on for what seemed like 40 minutes, but might have been 12, likely longer. Time disappeared. I was focused on not losing the fish. When a big fish rises from the depth, from an overhang, a rock’s shadow, from the camouflage of foam and takes your fly, that, sorta as is written in Hebrews, is the “substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” And when hope and faith manifest themselves in substance, as they do with such a rising and taking, when I’ve freakin’ hooked up with what I’ve desired, there’s a bit of performance anxiety. No one wants to lose the big one. The key is finding the fulcrum between bringing a hog into the net and snapping the line. One wants to be on the net side of that fulcrum. Duh, but how? Well, it’s never the same. In the outdoors we can learn techniques, but reeling in a hog requires adapting techniques to the moment, the current, the fish. And in the outdoors, we learn we can’t control everything. At some point, I had to make my move. Every minute I kept playing him was a minute I might lose him. I reeled in line. He didn’t like that; the fish, I mean — the guide was fine with it. “I’m going to let him run,” I said, as if it were my choice. “You’re playing him perfectly.” Eventually, I said, “OK, I’m bringing him in on this side.” The cutthroat fought, shooting vibrations through my tiring arm. That is when the bald eagle soared only feet above my head. “You see that?” I asked, not referring to the eagle. “Twenty-two inches?” he reverently breathed. Nearing the net, just beneath that wavy band of diffusing light and water was a fish the color of the aspens, its translucent rosy golden gills and red cut glistened. Then, snap! The rod snapped. Broke. The guide screamed, “Grab the line! We still got him. Bring in the line.” “Damn, he’s gone! What did I do wrong? Why’d that snap?” “It just snapped, should never’ve done that, look, it broke here, not at the seam — just, snap. Damn, congratulations man, that was a fish!” We locked hands high in the air despite finishing shy of the landing — something I remembered on election night 2016.

D

on’t misunderstand, I prefer winning days, but my experiences outdoors, and in particular that fish and that rod, that morning, have taught me to enjoy the journey, not just the finish. As long as we defend public lands, others can learn such lessons, and we can return to fish another day. John Muir emphasized the importance of public lands when he wrote: “Thousands of tired, nerve shaken, over civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountain is going home; that wilderness is a necessity; and that …[national] parks [and forests] …are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.” In 2022 and beyond, let’s all commit to preserving and protecting our public lands, not only for ourselves, but so generations who follow can go to the mountain and return with lessons that will guide them. n Bill Bryant, who served on the Seattle Port Commission from 2008-16, ran against Jay Inslee as the Republican nominee in the 2016 governor’s race. He is chairman of the company BCI, is a founding board member of the Nisqually River Foundation, and was appointed by Gov. Chris Gregoire to serve on the Puget Sound Partnership’s Eco-Systems Board. He lives in Winthrop, Washington.

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FENTANYL

“He definitely didn’t want to die,” Lori Decicio says of her son Nathan. “He didn’t order death that night.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

A FATAL MISTAKE A year after her son’s fentanyl overdose, a mother searches for meaning BY WILSON CRISCIONE

W

hen Lori Decicio went to bed on Nov. 9, 2020, the last thing she heard was her son laughing at the TV in the living room. The next morning, she went into the kitchen to make coffee. As she walked by the living room, she saw her son, Nathan Snow, slumped over on the couch, lifeless. She screamed and she wailed, as if, in her words, she’d been “skinned alive” in that moment. A friend rushed over to attempt CPR. Paramedics then arrived and pronounced Nate dead. Police knocked on the door, and her dog bit one of the officers, and Decicio allowed herself to think briefly that Nate would find that hilarious. But Nate, at 33 years old, was gone. It took weeks before she knew how Nate was killed. His phone showed that he had bought oxycontin the night he died — a surprise to Decicio. Then she remembered her friend, whose son died of fentanyl. “And I thought, could it be fentanyl?” Decicio says. “And it was.” The Spokane County Medical Examiner told Decicio that her son took a pill with enough fentanyl to kill six people. As the scourge of fentanyl continues to invade the Pacific Northwest, these tragic, sudden losses are becoming more common, leaving loved ones struggling to comprehend the unforgiving power of an opioid far more potent than heroin. More than a year later, Decicio still struggles to grasp how one simple mistake — buying an oxy pill that was actually fentanyl — took her son away so quickly: One day, Nathan Snow was a restaurant cook eager for a few days off work. The next, he was a casualty of the growing fentanyl crisis. “Nate made that phone call. I hate that. I hate that he did that. He was just an average guy, in the grind of the restaurant world, and he ordered oxycontin,” Decicio says. “He definitely didn’t want to die. He didn’t order death that night.” ...continued on page 10

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NEWS | FENTANYL “A FATAL MISTAKE,” CONTINUED...

I

n the months before he died, Nate had moved in with Decicio temporarily. He was a cook at a national chain restaurant. But COVID had made his income unsteady, so he gave up his apartment temporarily. “He asked me if he could stay with me for a while until he got on his feet again,” she recalls. “I said, ‘Absolutely.’” As she grieves today, those days feel like a gift, one that was cruelly taken away before Decicio could cherish it. In those months, it was as if a new dynamic was blossoming — no longer just mother and son, but two adults who enjoyed each other’s company. They laughed a lot. They bickered over the dishes. They had deep conversations on the deck with their dog. “It just brought me so much joy to hang out with him,” she says. “It was kind of rare quality time, and I loved it. We both knew it was temporary.” Nate grew up in Spokane, graduating from Lewis and Clark High School in 2005. Decicio says he was never going to have a conventional job. He didn’t go to college. But he loved to cook. His first job was at Frank’s Diner, where he worked for five years. Later, he worked in Sun Valley, where Decicio brags that he made friends with famous actors like Woody Harrelson and Jamie Lee Curtis before coming back to Spokane. In November, Nate had four days off work. He looked forward to the break, calling himself “vacation Nate,” Decicio says. He and his mom were planning a big seafood feast the next day. They talked about when they’d get up and go to the grocery store — Nate preferred it to be later — and Decicio went to bed. That was the last conversation they ever had.

There was a text on his phone from that night, presumably moments before his death, sent by a coworker from the restaurant where Nate worked (Decicio has asked that the Inlander not name the restaurant). Decicio provided the Inlander with screenshots of the texts. “Pullin up,” the coworker wrote, just after midnight. She had the pills that would kill Nate.

S

ince that day, Decicio has tried to make sense of her son’s death. First, she sought justice. She feels the people responsible for delivering fentanyl to her son should be held accountable, she says. Fentanyl often comes in the form of a blue “M-30” pill that’s made to look exactly like oxycodone, an opioid that’s far less potent than fentanyl. That’s what Nate thought he was getting, Decicio says. Spokane Police investigated and have made no arrests so far, though Cpl. Nick Briggs, public information officer, says the case remains an open investigation and detectives have been in contact with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and local prosecutors. “Controlled substance homicide cases are notoriously complex and difficult to prosecute, and therefore frequently time-consuming and slow to materialize,” Briggs says. Fentanyl has made its way into Spokane largely because of Mexican drug cartels. In 2020, Nate was one of 28 people who died of a drug overdose involving fentanyl — more than a 250 percent increase from the year before, according to the medical examiner’s office. And in 2021, preliminary data from the state health department indicates Spokane fentanyl deaths already surpassed the previous year’s total within the first six months.

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Unable to find justice for her son’s death, Decicio has turned to the restaurant industry, asking for restaurant managers to do something if they know employees are exchanging drugs with one another. Nate, his mother stresses, was not a drug addict. But she knows the reality of recreational drug use in the restaurant industry. Restaurant workers may be at the most risk for illicit drug use compared to workers in other industries, with nearly 20 percent reporting recent drug use, according to the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. And that becomes much more dangerous with fentanyl around. “I’m putting a plea out for other restaurant managers to care. Now that fentanyl is in the picture, recreational drug use can be deadly,” she says. David Blaine, chef and owner of the former Central Food, agrees that restaurants can be more aware of employee mental health and substance abuse issues. Some factors that may contribute to those issues are baked into the industry, such as long, late hours and cash tips. “It’s kind of a recipe for disaster in that you stuff their pockets with cash — it’s a cash-dominated industry — and then they get off work at 11 at night, make drinks, hang out with friends. There’s just a lot of opportunity with that structure to develop bad habits,” Blaine says. Beyond eliminating cash tips, however, Blaine says there should be room for compassion and support in the restaurant industry. Coworkers should support one another and be mindful of

when someone is struggling. Decicio hopes that her son’s death may at least inspire restaurant managers to talk to the crew about the dangers of drug use and fentanyl, adding that there are resources to help like I Got Your Back, which works to destigmatize mental health issues in the hospitality industry, and Big Table, which aims to help struggling restaurant workers. “I would say to a manager, ‘Be a leader. Be willing to have that hard conversation based in reality. Like, you’re my crew, fentanyl is killing people,’” Decicio says. “So let’s talk about it.” Maybe, Decicio thinks, these cultural changes can prevent someone else from going through the grief she’s gone through. It’s all part of her goal to find some sort of silver lining in her son’s death. She’s even taken a grief educator certification course, hoping to help people enduring grief both professionally and privately. She had to become a student of grief to move forward, she says. “I always said Nate was my greatest teacher,” she says. “And what I think is very cool coming out the other side of this is that he still is.” As she tells the Inlander about all that she’s doing in memory of her son, moments they shared together replay in her mind. She describes the moments of happiness he brought her in between her own moments of sadness. Each time, it seems to strengthen her resolve to make a difference in any way she can. “I’m all about making meaning, which is why I’m sitting here,” Decicio says. “I’m creating meaning.” n

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JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 11


NEWS | HEALTH

The Next Surge As contagious omicron hits Spokane, focus on testing intensifies as hospitals fear being overwhelmed BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

A

s the highly transmissible omicron variant impacts Eastern Washington and North Idaho, health care professionals are looking to Western Washington and other parts of the country to know what to expect. Overall, the variant is reportedly affecting most people with milder symptoms, particularly those vaccinated who’ve received a booster. But any time someone is hospitalized with COVID-19, that’s serious, reminds Dr. Dan Getz, chief medical officer for Providence Sacred Heart and Holy Family hospitals in Spokane. “We do worry that people are becoming complacent and calling omicron ‘mild,’” Getz told reporters in an update last week. “Because we don’t know as much about this variant, we should be cautious.” It will take time before omicron’s true impacts are fully understood, but early indications suggest that it is likely to result in fewer deaths than previous variants, even as hospitalizations nationally hit a record level early this week. Global modeling from the University of Washington based on the experiences in other countries shows omicron could kill 97 to 99 percent fewer people than the delta variant, and may have a lower death rate (infectionfatality rate) than the flu. However, the number of positive cases and hospitalizations are both likely to increase significantly in coming weeks because of how contagious omicron is. With more people infected, a significant number of people could still die. Here’s the outlook from local health officials.

TESTING

With record-setting daily case numbers in Spokane, some people have had a difficult time finding at-home tests, or

12 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

Dr. Ben Arthurs, Critical Care Medical Director at MultiCare Deaconess Hospital, examines a patient in the COVID-19 ICU on Sept. 17, 2021. have waited in line for hours to get the more-sensitive PCR tests at county testing sites. Making matters worse, winter weather closed the mountain passes for days last week, which meant that some retail stores were running out of supplies while waiting for trucks to arrive, and transportation of test samples to laboratories may have also been delayed. Heavy snow late last week also collapsed a tent at one of the two testing sites paid for by the Spokane Regional Health District (SRHD) and staffed by Discovery Health MD. Staff from the Spokane Falls Community College site temporarily relocated to the site at the Spokane County Fair and Expo Center. The two locations were expected to be running normally again this week. SRHD is working with Discovery Health to expand the hours at both locations. “Right now they’re only open four days a week,” Spokane Health Officer Dr. Francisco Velázquez tells the Inlander. “If we could get a weekend option, I think that would be great for the community.” The health district is also working on a contract with another testing company called Curative to expand options soon. “They’ve done employer-based testing, they’ve done

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

clinic-based testing, they also have kiosks,” Velázquez says of Curative sites in other communities. “They also do PCR, rapid PCR and rapid antigen testing.” It’s not clear yet what the final agreement with Curative will look like. State and federal assistance could also soon provide thousands more at-home rapid tests to the Inland Northwest, though it’s also unclear how long it could take for those to arrive. The health district asked the state Department of Health for 5,000 rapid tests, which will be provided to atrisk community members first, Velázquez says. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee also announced the state has ordered 5.5 million at-home tests, which could go out to residents through an online ordering system piloted in Spokane County. At the federal level, President Joe Biden promised a similar program will soon provide millions of rapid tests around the country. In addition to getting tests through a clinic or health care provider, Spokane County residents can also call their local library branch to request a free test for curbside pickup, no library card required. Schools also continue offering rapid tests and PCR


tests to students, depending on the district. State guidelines for “test to stay” enable students with low-risk exposures to stay in class while getting tested. They receive an immediate test and then another test five days later, explains Mark Springer, epidemiologist with the Spokane health district. At least under previous waves, that worked well to keep students in school while the majority of them (as many as 99 percent) tested negative after exposure, he says.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

While omicron appears to be filling up hospitals in other parts of the country, it has not yet started flooding Inland Northwest hospitals. However, regional hospitals have maintained a steady flow of COVID-19 patients in recent months, and with winter illnesses, delayed surgeries finally taking place and other factors, they’re already fairly full, according to hospital leaders. The biggest consideration for how “full” a hospital is comes down to having the staff members needed to care for the patients who are admitted. As omicron starts to spread through the area, and more nurses and hospital staff may have to stay home due to their own illness or possible COVID exposure, hospital staffing levels could get more stressed, says Getz, with Providence in Spokane. “Our hospitals are still dealing with many COVID-19 patients. I know nearly two years into this pandemic we’re all sad and frustrated by it,” Getz says. “What we’re fearful of is if we start seeing increasing hospitalization rates for COVID, which we’re seeing on the East Coast and into the Midwest, it’s going to be really challenging to care for everybody at the same time.” On Monday, Jan. 10, Reuters reported that U.S. COVID hospitalizations hit 132,646, breaking the previous record high set last January.

and the United Kingdom, as well as an older population than South Africa. The New York Times also reported that even as the proportion of deaths to positive cases may be lower than previous waves, because omicron is so much more contagious and is likely to affect far more people, the overall number of deaths could remain significant. Projections from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation show daily deaths in the U.S. in coming weeks could be similar to the peak of the delta variant wave if omicron spread is severe.

STEPS TO TAKE

As has been the case throughout the pandemic, health officials urge people to take precautions to keep themselves and others who are at higher risk safe. The primary recommendation is to get vaccinated and get a booster when you’re eligible. While it’s still possible to get COVID after you’ve been vaccinated, the cases have been far less severe. Plus, as intended, the vaccines have largely prevented people from landing in the hospital or dying.

“Our hospitals are still dealing with many COVID-19 patients. I know nearly two years into this pandemic we’re all sad and frustrated by it.”

DEATHS

It’s hard to tell if the U.S. will fare as well as South Africa and other countries that already saw omicron sweep through their populations with low death rates compared to the massive number of positive cases. Health experts are warning that deaths could be higher in the U.S. because we have lower levels of people who’ve had COVID vaccine boosters than affected European countries like Denmark

“I would like to just make sure we’re all reminded we have a highly transmissible strain of the virus that is highly contagious,” Velázquez says. “If you’re eligible … if you haven’t gotten your booster, please do so. We do know that increases the protective effect to higher than 70 percent.” Likewise, it remains important to wear a mask that fits securely over your nose and mouth when you’re around other people, maintain social distance when you’re around people outside your household, and avoid large gatherings, he says. If you have been exposed, Velázquez says to follow the new isolation recommendations from the CDC, which can be found at cdc.gov/ covid19. n samanthaw@inlander.com

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JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 13


The front of St. Ignatius Hospital in Colfax, which operated from 1893 to 1964. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

14 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022


Saving Our Spaces Historic preservationists in rural communities across Eastern Washington race against time to save old buildings

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BY CHEY SCOTT

t doesn’t take long for a really old building to fall apart.

Sitting vacant, the pathway to ruin is only expedited by the whims of nature and time, weather and neglect. It takes less than 20 years, for example, for plaster and paint to start peeling off walls in crumbly scabs. Wooden floors and walls rot and buckle from water damage even faster. Broken windows give the animal kingdom free rein to move in and make themselves at home, not to mention human vandals with ill intent. None of the above cares how old, nor how significant the architecture, nor how special a building’s past may be. Once a century-old building falls far enough into disrepair, bringing it back to former glory only becomes more challenging — and expensive. If the structure is in a less-desirable or out-of-the-way location, another obstacle arises. Combined, these factors make preserving old buildings in small, rural towns — towns that 50, 100, 150 years ago thrived, but have a fraction of residents today — even more difficult. Even so, there are some out there who see beyond peeling paint, crumbling brick, leaky roofs, broken windows and mounting costs. These visionaries are driven by an innate passion to preserve the past so that it can usher in a bright future for a town that, had they not taken on the challenge themselves, may have faded into historical oblivion. Here, we introduce readers to some of these passionate preservationists working to make sure their small, rural towns don’t become ghosts of the glory days.

ST. IGNATIUS HOSPITAL

Colfax, Washington A haunted reputation is turning out to be a major boon for the derelict, 1893-built brick hospital that looms over the Palouse town of Colfax from a treed hillside. While new owners Laura and Austin Storm scrounge up funds to begin turning the historic St. Ignatius Hospital into their vision of a modern, mixed-use venue, locals and visitors from afar are paying to spend chilly nights inside its purportedly paranormal-prone halls. The building’s been featured on the paranormal TV show Ghost Adventures, and both the Colfax Chamber of

Commerce and Whitman County Historical Society have partnered in recent years to co-host paid ghost tours as seasonal fundraisers. Those tours, currently closed for the winter season, helped elevate the hospital’s profile so that the Storms were able to raise about $41,000 last year via a crowdfunding campaign, matched by a $50,000 donation from an anonymous private donor. “It was a bit of a revelation” when the couple first saw St. Ignatius, Austin Storm recalls. “We were struck by how beautiful it was and were surprised that it was so neglected. How could a building this amazing be here in this area and no one is doing anything with it?” The Storms aren’t new to historic preservation. Previously they restored a building in downtown Moscow, Idaho, where they run a secondhand shop, the Storm Cellar. Four years ago the couple moved to Colfax, bought a 138-year-old house and have since opened Bully for You, a vintage and overstock boutique in yet another historic space they’re bringing back to life on Main Street. An unexpected opportunity to purchase St. Ignatius from its former out-of-state owner for $115,000 finally arose in April 2021, seven years after they first laid eyes on it. “We knew there was a real possibility that [St. Ignatius] would go away,” Storm says. “That it would catch on fire, or just melt into the earth. It’s disintegrating because the roof is open, and at some point it would be too late for anyone to save it for any amount of money.” “I couldn’t imagine losing something like that,” he continues. “It happens all the time, but you can’t go back and get buildings like this back. They don’t make them like that anymore.” Despite the building’s decrepit state, the Storms have big dreams for the five-story, 50,000-square-foot former hospital, which last served as an assisted living facility until shuttering in the early 2000s. Its use as a hospital ceased in the mid-1960s. Fixing St. Ignatius’ leaky roof is priority one now that the Storms have some capital. Multiple failures have caused rainwater and snowmelt to pool in its center, where it’s dripped down all the way into the basement for years, causing serious structural damage. (While a structural engineer determined the building is still safe to enter, these unstable areas are roped off on each floor.) ...continued on next page

ABOVE: From top to bottom: "Rose's Room" is said to be haunted by its past resident; a room in the former maternity ward; the hospital's kitchen. CHEY SCOTT PHOTOS

BELOW: Austin and Laura Storm want to save St. Ignatius and turn it into a mixed-use venue for housing, businesses, community spaces and more. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 15


“SAVING OUR SPACES,” CONTINUED... “We are racing against an unknown clock to get that fixed,” Storm says. “But we’re so optimistic. I can’t believe how much interest and support we were able to get in such a short period of time. The response has been amazing.” St. Ignatius truly is a time-capsule relic, having sat unused for the past two-plus decades. While some rooms were converted into apartments in later years, Storm loves showing off the hospital’s older areas, like several porches used for tuberculosis patients, each with big south-facing windows to be opened for fresh air. The original hospital operating room was in a turreted tower with floor-toceiling windows to provide ample natural light before electricity was installed. On the top floor, he points out a set of stairs to the “spooky” fifth-story lodgings of the mother superior and fellow Sisters of Charity, who ran the hospital from 1893 to 1964. Old root cellars, now filled with refuse and cobwebs, were built into the hillside facing the back of the hospital to be easily accessible from its kitchen. The latter is an eerie place filled with dark shadows, dust and rust-covered commercial appliances. Boilers for heat were located in a separate brick building on the property with underground steam tunnels between the two. The Storms see that particular structure, with its tall smokestack, as the perfect future home of a craft brewery or similar venture. As to when something like that envisioned brewery, or hotel rooms, retail spaces, offices and art studios in the main building could become reality, it’s too early to say. “We have a couple years to stabilize it and keep it from getting worse, but we want to get a phase done soon that involves people being able to use it for something other than ghost tours,” Storm says. “It’s hard to say how long that will take, but three to four years seems reasonable.”

ROCK BUNKHOUSES

LaCrosse, Washington Community pride is driving a small but mighty effort to revitalize the tiny Palouse farm town of LaCrosse, population 310. It’s even in the name of the nonprofit, LaCrosse Community Pride (or LCP), whose members describe themselves as a “feisty team of volunteers” spearheading efforts to transform the town. The first accomplishment the group checked off was restoring the town’s original general store to again house a small market selling groceries and household sundries, along with the LaCrosse branch of the Whitman County Library and a community gathering place. A cafe on Main Avenue where locals gather to talk over coffee, plus the town’s original bank, now operating again, are other recent success stories aided by LCP.

I can think of the difference it would make for our small town.”

“Mostly it’s a story of community and people pulling together and turning what was once an empty Main Street into a vibrant one,” says member Alex McGregor, whose family has lived and farmed on the Palouse since the 1880s. The nonprofit received assistance and support from several state agencies and nonprofits, including the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation’s Main Street program, which helps communities revitalize their cores, plus

16 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

ABOVE: One of LaCrosse's historic rock houses yet to be restored. CHEY SCOTT PHOTO BELOW: Hotel Lincoln owners Karen and Jerry Allen have been working to restore the building since buying it in 2009. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

the Washington State Historical Society and the state’s Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Next up, and perhaps the most ambitious project so far, is the restoration of five rock-walled bunkhouses and an old service station, all built during the Great Depression. The tiny houses are being transformed into Airbnbstyle guesthouses. The nonprofit envisions the adjacent garage and gas station becoming an interpretive center and museum about the Ice Age floods that geologically shaped the region and were responsible for depositing all the basalt rocks that were later picked from nearby fields and used on the bunkhouses’ facade. The structures originally housed transient railroad and farm workers, but until LCP got involved they sat vacant and in a state of constant deterioration for nearly 60 years. “What LaCrosse is noted for is the rock houses, and they were just falling apart,” says Peggy Bryan, a retired librarian and LCP member who first pitched saving the structures. “Wouldn’t it be nice to have them saved to benefit the community?” Bryan recalls thinking. “So I looked at the phone number on one door because they were for sale, called, and that is how it started.” LaCrosse Community Pride took ownership of the property in 2014 after learning there was an outstanding tax lien. Three of the smallest rock houses ONLINE are near completion For more photos, head to — the project involved inlander.com/slideshows removing all the basalt from the outer walls and essentially rebuilding each from the ground up — yet two across the street from those, plus the gas station, are still untouched. “Of course when you live in a small community, you know, there are naysayers,” Bryan says. “I can think of the difference it would make for our small town, and I think having a vision of what could be, and the future of our town, I think that’s the best. That is my goal.”

HOTEL LINCOLN

Harrington, Washington Historic preservation doesn’t happen overnight, a fact demonstrated by the 13-years-and-counting project to restore Harrington’s 120-year-old Hotel Lincoln. “The Electric Hotel,” as it’s also known, being the first place in town to get electricity, opened in 1902 and was once a bustling hub of activity. The two-story brick hotel sits at the southernmost end of Harrington’s sevenblock main thoroughfare, near an intersection where most traffic these days consists of grain transport trucks rolling through town. Spokane couple Karen and Jerry Allen bought Hotel Lincoln in 2009 and have a grand vision for its return to prominence as a rural stopover with a dozen or so hotel rooms, plus a main floor restaurant and retail storefront. At the project’s current pace, this future is maybe two years at the earliest from completion, thanks to the Allens’ steady determination over the years to save the landmark. “Our vision has basically stayed the same,” Karen Allen says. “We want to restore the whole thing… It’s such a neat hotel, and it’s unique to the whole area. I don’t think you’ll find another one exactly like it.” “We came here with the idea of preservation of the building, and getting involved in the community through preservation, and with the idea of adaptive reuse and not letting the heritage die,” Jerry Allen adds. “Heritage tourism, agritourism and regular tourism — it’s all part of our business plan.” ...continued on page 18


A WASHINGTON-WIDE NONPROFIT HELPS OLD PLACES SURVIVE — AND THRIVE

S

ince 1976, the nonprofit Washington Trust for Historic Preservation has been advocating to save old places from oblivion. Based in Seattle, the statewide organization oversees grant programs, lobbies for public policy supporting historic preservation and helps connect eligible projects with funding. The trust also maintains a list of the “Most Endangered Places” of historic significance across Washington. “Really, our goal is to work to save and preserve historic resources, be it buildings, landscapes, or structures, and not just for the purpose of preserving the building, but also for the purpose of making sure our communities are more resilient and that historic preservation is working in support of economic development in these communities,” says Chris Moore, the trust’s executive director. “It’s not just about the building itself, but what the building means for its community, and capturing and preserving a sense of place,” Moore adds. Historically and culturally important structures on the Most Endangered Places list (nominated by communities and stakeholders, and vetted by trust staff) include venues that have been “saved,” as noted by the nonprofit, as well as buildings awaiting restoration and even those lost to demolition. While being on the list doesn’t preclude a historic building from being torn down, inclusion can raise public awareness and help secure funding for preservation work. “In a lot of ways, that listing is intended to amplify the voice and work that the local community is doing around a specific project,” Moore explains. “The rock houses [in LaCrosse] are a really good example of that. We didn’t know those existed until they brought them to our attention.” Many other listed venues are also in rural areas. Being located in lesspopulated — and thus less-visible — areas can make these buildings undesirable targets for developers or preservationists. “With buildings in rural places, one thing that’s important about them is by definition there aren’t that many around,” says Huy Pham, the trust’s preservation programs director. “So it’s going to be more impactful than a single building in a downtown metro area, and the impact for saving and preserving those is much more noticeable to that rural community because they don’t have that many to lose or gain from,” Pham continues. Both leaders at the trust also stress the sustainability of preservation compared with new construction. “Overall — it doesn’t matter where — the work to rehab [an older] building is more labor intensive than material, and so the cost of labor often stays in the local economy,” Moore says. A place’s “embodied history” is another important aspect of historic preservation, and refers to the collective memory of a building over time, even if its uses have changed. Likewise, “embodied energy” is a term in the field that refers to reuse of existing materials and the initial labor to build something. “When you talk about reusing and rehabbing an existing building, it’s the ultimate form of recycling,” Moore says. “The greenest building is the one already built,” he continues. “If you reuse it, not only are you keeping demolition debris from going to a landfill, you’re saving that embodied energy to essentially acknowledge it’s not just the material, it’s all that energy used 100 years ago to build, create materials and transport them, and all of the performance of the building over those 100 years.” The preservation of one historic building in a small town can also spur other similar projects, fostering a sense of community pride and even encouraging tourism. “People like historic buildings and like to congregate in them,” Moore says. “If you can retain those character buildings in your community, they are a draw for people, both residents in that community and visitors alike.” Even so, in the present day more historic buildings have been lost than saved, both in urban and rural areas. “If we tracked buildings saved versus buildings demolished, I would be too depressed to be in this field,” Moore notes. “I’m afraid we do lose a lot. We’re still a throwaway society,” he says. “I think rather than try to balance loss versus saves, it’s important to highlight and celebrate those ‘saves’ that do happen, and tell a story about the impact that ‘save’ has. Not just “This is a great historic building,’ but what does it do for a neighborhood, or a downtown street, to get that building saved?” — CHEY SCOTT

HOME OF THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY

THE FOX THEATER Eastern Washington buildings listed as “Most Endangered” ST. ELMO’S HOTEL (PALOUSE) Listed: 2020 Status: Currently vacant and for sale COLVILLE INDIAN AGENCY LOG CABIN (CHEWELAH) Listed: 2013 Status: Saved ST. IGNATIUS HOSPITAL (COLFAX) Listed: 2015 Status: Saved(?); preservation beginning soon JENSEN-BYRD BUILDING (SPOKANE) Listed: 2012 Status: In redevelopment limbo for 15+ years, owned by WSU ROOKERY BLOCK (SPOKANE; RIVERSIDE AND HOWARD) Listed: 2003 Status: Lost; torn down in 2006 and remains a parking lot VALLEY SCHOOLHOUSE (VALLEY) Listed: 2017 Status: Saved; moved to new site in 2020

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COURTESY OF JUSTIN BROWN

CHEY SCOTT PHOTO

St. Elmo's Hotel (left) in Palouse may not be a candidate for preservation. Cheney's historic railroad depot (right), meanwhile, was moved to a new site in 2020.

“SAVING OUR SPACES,” CONTINUED... The couple estimate the entire project will cost about $2 million, but they’ve been helped so far by several grants and donations. They paid $80,000 for the building in 2009, and are reusing as much existing material as possible — from bricks to doors to windows — both to save money and to preserve the hotel’s original integrity. “If I wanted to build this place again from the ground up, it would be an immense amount of money, and I don’t know if you could even find the material,” Jerry says. The work’s taken more than a decade because of slow funding and because the couple has split their time between their jobs; Jerry is a grain truck driver, and although Karen is now retired from her public school career, she cares for her aging mother. The couple is undertaking most of the restoration themselves, although they have received help from friends and family. Most of Harrington’s 400 or so residents have been supportive of the project, too, some going so far as to volunteer their time and skills. “Everyone knows everybody, and in this place, people help you and help each other like you can’t believe,” Jerry says. “In a small town like this, if I don’t know what I’m doing, all I have to do is ask my neighbor and he’ll tell me.” As a whole, the small wheat country town has seen a fair amount of growth in recent years as fellow property owners have reinvested in other historic buildings, turning them back into public spaces. Two blocks from Hotel Lincoln is the Post and Office, a coffee and gift shop inside the original Harrington post office. There’s also the Studebaker Garage, a car museum and event space, and the Harrington Haus, a new pub, is opening soon. Initial efforts to preserve Harrington’s historic opera house block began back in 1992. The property has been since listed on the state and national historic registries, and regularly hosts performances and community events. “There is so much history around here, that’s why I love it,” Jerry says. “The old construction, it lasts.”

ST. ELMO’S HOTEL

Palouse, Washington Not every historic building can be saved, even when supported by a vocal community. And lately, the potential of preserving one of the oldest structures in the small town of Palouse, Washington, is looking grim. It’s not because the current owners don’t want to save the building, but because it might not be realistically or physically possible.

18 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

Palouse resident Justin Brown and his wife purchased the 1888-built St. Elmo’s Hotel in 2018 with eager plans to renovate and preserve the red brick SPOKANE building in the heart of town. Yet once interior demolition began and a structural engineer took a look, their hopes were dashed. After 134 years, St. Elmo’s CHENEY was showing its age in serious ways. DEPOT HOTEL The two biggest problems involve LINCOLN the hotel’s unreinforced masonry walls and overloaded timber joists throughout. “We didn’t purchase the building to tear it down,” Brown says. “But obviously for our dollar, and based on the research and studies and consulting we’ve done with other professionals, it ST. ELMO’S HOTEL doesn’t make sense.” The building requires structural steel supports. From that need, however, another problem crops up: The existing, low-qualST. IGNATIUS ity brick might not withstand being anchored to said supports. HOSPITAL Brown says the hotel’s brick walls currently pose a risk of crumROCK BUNKHOUSES bling and caving in, thus the building is currently unoccupied. “It was [construction] of that era, just multiple layers thick of brick that is meant to take all the loads and stresses of any given structure,” he explains. “What we found from day one — and you can’t fault the original builders because you don’t know the obstacles they were considering — is that it was poorly executed, and the brick is of substandard quality and corners were cut.” The Browns put St. Elmo’s up for sale in 2019 (it’s currently listed at $199,000), and hope to find a buyer with the means and vision to bring it up to modern building codes. In response to the building’s current predicament, a collective of Palouse residents formed the Friends of St. Elmo’s, and successfully petitioned in 2020 for it to be listed on the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation’s most endangered places list. ABOUT THE AUTHOR “I understand greatly the desire to preserve these historic Chey Scott is the Inlander’s Associate landmarks,” Brown says. “Local people want to rightfully see the Editor. She’s a born-and-raised building stay as is, so we accommodated that, but it’s been no luck Spokanite and has been with the so far.” paper since 2012, covering everything Brown isn’t sure how much longer he’ll keep St. Elmo’s on the from food to literature; regional history market. to pets. Other history-focused topics “It’s not an endless, open timeframe; things are just deterioratshe’s covered include the Hanford ing,” he says. “The latest conversation we’ve had is maybe another nuclear site’s legacy and the 40th year, but it’s still tough. You don’t want to be the person that tore anniversary of Mt. St. Helen’s eruption. the building down.” Reach her at cheys@inlander.com.


CHENEY DEPOT

Cheney, Washington Another long effort in regional preservation recently overcame its biggest obstacle, literally and figuratively. In June 2020, the 1929-built former Northern Pacific railroad depot in Cheney was lifted up onto cherry red steel trusses to make the five-block trip to its new home. Moving the historic depot off of current BNSF railway property along Cheney’s main rail spur was a moment six years in the making. In 2014, the railroad declared the vacant building as “surplus,” and it would have been demolished had concerned community members not stepped in, forming the nonprofit Cheney Depot Society with its catchy “SOS” call to “save our station.” Moving the depot was a spectacle, drawing hundreds of residents out on a sunny summer day to watch the technical process slowly and carefully unfold, which has since been documented on the society’s Facebook page. Cheney Depot Society Board President Tom Trulove was Cheney’s mayor at the time, and he recalls that his staff was ready to hand over a demolition permit to BNSF. Just in time, a local resident showed up at a City More about the Council meeting to call for the projects featured depot’s preservation. Cheney Depot Society: Another stroke of good cheneydepot.com fortune came soon after, when St. Ignatius Hospital: a well-off doctor and former stignatiuscolfax.com Cheney resident, Peter O. Hansen, caught wind of the depot’s The Friends of St. Elmo’s: potential fate and offered to friendsofstelmos@gmail.com match $500,000 in donations to LaCrosse Community Pride: save it. lacrossecommunitypride.com Suddenly, the project had Hotel Lincoln, the Electric momentum, says board Secretary Hotel: theelectrichotel.com Susan Beeman. Other donations from big regional organizations, nonprofits and local residents came trickling in, including work in-kind to prep the depot for its big move. “I think people in town are excited by the move as much as anything else, and it was such an event that it really boosted support and recognition, and resulted in quite a few contributions and volunteers,” Trulove says. Cheney’s former passenger train depot — a Spanish missionstyle building with tall archways, a tile roof and touches of Art Deco details — ceased operations in the mid-1970s, though Beeman says many residents still recall taking trips to and from its platform. Now that it’s settled onto its new foundation off the Lt. Col. Michael P. Anderson Memorial Highway, between I and Union streets, the depot is ready for the final phase to turn it back into a public space. The Cheney Depot Society needs to raise about $90,000 more to meet grant-matching requirements that will fund the project’s completion. “It’s a doable figure, but we would sure like to have a couple big donations,” Trulove says. “I think, realistically, we should be able to start site work this spring.” “We’ve had a huge amount of support from the community,” Beeman adds, “including a couple of huge, anonymous donations, one in memory of the men who built the depot for $10,000, and that, to a historic preservation person, just sings.” The society envisions the depot offering public space for events and housing a commercial tenant, like a restaurant or cafe. A patio planned on the south side of the building will offer prime views of the railroad tracks, and a reminder of its past. Displays inside will also showcase the depot’s history. “It’s Cheney’s connection to the railroad,” Beeman says. “This tells a story about our community, and it also tells a story about how we became our community. The rail transportation industry is very forward-looking, and this ties together the past, the present and the future all in this one building.” n

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IDAHO RESORTS

GEM STATE GETAWAYS

There’s plenty of time — and snow — to plan a road trip to destinations beyond our local five resorts. Here are three great choices in Idaho BY TED S. McGREGOR JR. Head east across the state line to enjoy some of the best skiing in the West. JON CONTI/​​BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

20 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022


​​BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN RESORT

McCall, Idaho • brundage.com 1,921 vertical feet • 67 runs, 6 lifts The resort, located on the Payette National Forest, encourages riders to explore the snowfields and glades between its runs, where 320 inches of average annual snowfall translates to long stretches of untracked powder. And this year already, the snowfall has been epic, with record-setting totals in December. Among its various health and safety protocols, Brundage requires masks indoors, and will be managing the total number of skiers on the hill, so guests are encouraged to pre-purchase lift tickets. Stay in McCall and take the 30-minute free shuttle to the mountain. In McCall, just under five hours from Spokane, you can access miles of nordic ski trails, dine and sample local brews along the McCall Ale Trail, and try some snow tubing Fridays through Sundays at the McCall Activities Barn, just south of town. ...continued on next page

JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 21


IDAHO RESORTS

Keep an eye out for celebrities when you hit the slopes at Sun Valley.

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“GEM STATE GETAWAYS,” CONTINUED... SUN VALLEY RESORT

Ketchum, Idaho • sunvalley.com 3,400 vertical feet • 122 runs, 18 lifts This resort, nestled above a once-remote Idaho valley, epitomizes all the glamor of skiing. Opening in 1936 as a destination resort of the Union Pacific Railroad, it really hit the public consciousness in 1941, when Sun Valley Serenade hit the big screen. Starring Norwegian superskier Sonja Henie and featuring the Glenn Miller Orchestra, exterior scenes were shot in Sun Valley and a legendary ski resort was born. It’s a long trip from Spokane, so it’ll need a multiple-day commitment — and it’s worth it. Not only are the resort’s 2,054 acres of long corduroy descents and steep open bowls world-class, but the apres ski scene is among the best in North America, with too many great dining options to try in one visit and live music at the Ram and the Duchin. Both Sun Valley and the town of Ketchum require face coverings indoors.

TAMARACK

Tamarack, Idaho • tamarackidaho.com 2,800 vertical feet • 50 runs, 7 lifts Sitting high above scenic Lake Cascade, Tamarack Resort hits all the right buttons for skiers and snowboarders of all skill levels. Harrowing steeps give way to long winding groomers, with plenty of trees to duck into for the occasional face shot. Powderhounds can also access a bevy of off-area bowls boasting an annual average of 300 inches of snow. And if you’re looking for fun beyond the downhill slopes, Tamarack has you covered, with guided ice fishing, fat tire snow biking tours, snowshoeing and nordic trails. To fill your belly, Tamarack has combined four great dining options under the Rendezvous Food Hall roof. For alpine-inspired Northwestern cuisine, try the brand-new bistro, The Reserve. Tamarack is about four-and-a-half hours south of Spokane, on Highway 95, south of Riggins. n

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CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON (MT. SPOKANE) Lessons are taught by Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s certified instructors. Fee includes equipment rental. Sno-Park Permit required. Additional information emailed after registration. Sessions offered on select dates through March, from 10 am-2 pm. $34/$59. Register at spokanerec. org (509-755-2489) JACKASS DAY 2022 An annual tradition celebrating Silver’s roots. In 1967, Jackass Ski Bowl opened on Wardner Peak with a Riblet chairlift that is still in use today as Chair 4. Celebrate by donning your best vintage ski gear and enjoying retro-priced lift tickets for only $18. Tickets are limited and must be reserved in advance. Jan. 13. $18. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) NIGHT SKIING SESSIONS Mt. Spokane kicks off its night skiing sessions that run every Wed-Sat from 3-9 pm through March 12. $32. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com WINTER CAMPING BASICS Camping in the winter offers year-round access to natural spaces, and the beautiful calm that comes with the coldest nights. In this presentation by REI experts, learn trip planning, setting up camp and how to stay warm. Jan. 13 and Jan. 27, 5-6:30 pm. Free. Online, register at rei.com/events/98191/ virtual-winter-camping-basics FRIDAY NIGHT CLUB SHRED Bring your kids to this new event, offering a chance to learn and practice ski skills. They’ll get ski instruction and take part in activities such as snow fort building, games, crafts, movies and more. Each Friday night includes a kids-only dinner. Skiers level 1 and 2 only, ages 4-10. Fridays from 5-8 pm through Feb. 25. $39. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (509-238-2220) MLK WEEKEND AT SCHWEITZER Annual MLK weekend highlights include the Northern Lights fireworks show and more. Jan. 14-17. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com/event/mlk-weekend/ TURNS UNDER THE LIGHTS Twilight skiing is offered via the Basin Express high-speed quad and Musical Chairs double, plus in the Stomping Grounds Terrain Park as well as beginner terrain off Musical Chairs. Fridays and Saturdays from 3-7 pm through March 5; also on Sun, Jan. 16 and Sun, Feb. 20. $20/$40. Schweitzer, 10,000 Sch-

weitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com/ to-do/twilight-skiing SNOWSHOES & BREWS A 2 to 3-mile snowshoe hike on Mt. Spokane that’s beginner friendly, with all equipment provided, and is followed by a beer tasting ($2 per 5-oz. tasting, not included) at Big Barn Brewing at Green Bluff. Offered Jan. 16 (full), Feb. 27 and March 19 from 9 am-2:30 pm. $43. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanerec.org SPOKANE NORDIC WINTERFEST Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s annual cross-country skiing event offers a free waxing clinic and treasure hunt, as well as ski lessons to non-members of all skill levels for $10. Jan. 16, 9:30 am. Free. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org MT. SPOKANE SNOWSHOE TOUR Learn the basics of snowshoeing during this guided hike on snowshoe trails around Mount Spokane. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Fee includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation. Meet at Yoke’s Fresh Market in Mead. Ages 13+. Jan. 17, Jan. 29, Feb. 6, Feb. 13, Feb. 21 and March 5 from 9 am-1 pm. $25/$29. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanerec.org (509-755-2489) CHEAP SKATE TUESDAY Free skate rentals are included with each paid admission, every Tuesday (10 am-9 pm) through Feb. 22. Masks required. $5.95-$7.95. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane (509-625-6600) GET READY TO SLED Join REI and learn tips and tricks to stay warm, eat well and slide fast on your favorite local sledding hill. Jan. 19, 12-1 pm. Free. Online at rei.com/events/98510/ virtual-get-ready-to-sled SKATE FOR A CAUSE A new program designed to support community fundraising efforts allowing local nonprofit organizations to retain 30% of the public admission fee for their unique needs. January’s Skate for a Cause organization is the Women Helping Women Fund. Jan. 19, 4-8 pm. $10. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. my.spokanecity.org/ riverfrontspokane (509-625-6600) MT. SPOKANE FIS RACE Mt. Spokane Race Team and Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park welcome elite ski racers from across the Western United States. Jan. 20-23. Free. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com


WINTER SURVIVAL BASICS Join experienced REI staff for a presentation on the basics of winter survival, from how to prepare and plan for winter outdoor pursuits, to what to do when things don’t go as planned. Jan. 20, 5-6:30 pm. Free. Online at rei.com/events/98386/virtual-winter-survival-basics CROSS-COUNTRY SKI TRIP TO GEOPHYSICAL AREA Travel groomed cross-country ski trails at one of the USGS’s 14 geophysical observatories near Newport. Fee includes guides, transportation, ski area fees and equipment. Meets at Yoke’s in Mead. Ages 18+. Jan. 21, 9 am-3 pm. $39. Register at spokanerec.org SNOWSHOE NEWMAN LAKE Learn the basics of snowshoeing on this guided hike at the McKenzie Conservation Area. Includes transportation, equipment and guides. Ages 15+. Jan. 23, 10 am-1:30 pm. $29. Register at spokanerec.org TELEMARK CLINIC SERIES This three-session series is for anyone, regardless of ability or time spent on telemark gear. Come explore the free-heel world and broaden your horizons with our certified Telemark instructors. Sessions Jan. 23, Feb. 13 and March 20. $99. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd. ski49n. com WOMEN’S CLINIC SERIES Sessions offer a safe and supportive environment for intermediate and advanced skiers and snowboarders to develop new skills. Lift ticket/pass required to participate. Offered Jan. 24, Feb. 14 and Feb. 28 from 10:30 am-12:30 pm. $69. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd. ski49n.com MT. SPOKANE SKI RACE TEAM NW CUP Mt. Spokane Race Team and Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park welcome ski racers from across the Pacific NW. Jan. 27-30. Free. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (509-238-2220) SNOWSHOE HEADLAMP HIKE The glimmer of a headlamp will illuminate the pathway ahead on this guided hike at Mt. Spokane. Guides, transport and equipment included. Ages 15+. Jan. 28, Feb. 25 and March 18, 6-9:30 pm. $29. Register at spokanerec.org CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON (49 DEGREES NORTH) Learn to cross country ski the trails of 49 Degrees North’s nordic area with certified ski instructors. Fee includes instruction, equipment, trail pass and guided tour after lunch (BYO). Ages 13+. Jan. 29, Feb. 19 and March 5, 10 am-2 pm. $53. Register at spokanerec.org WINTER TRAILS DAY Enjoy a complimentary day out on the other side of Schweitzer, offering 32K of trails to explore on snowshoes or Nordic skis. Free. Jan. 29. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) SNOWSHOE LAKE GILLETTE Explore this mountain lake during a guided, uphill hike to a scenic overlook. Includes guides, equipment and transport. Ages 18+. Jan. 30, 9 am-4 pm and Feb. 19, 9 am-4 pm. $49. Register at spokanerec.org ...continued on next page

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JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 25


WINTER EVENTS

The 10 Barrel Brewing Beercat sets up shop at Silver Mountain Feb. 25-27.

FEBRUARY

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI TRIP TO FRATER LAKE Explore this glacial lake in the Pend Oreille Chain, featuring over 10 miles of trails for all levels, although some basic skills are recommended. Includes guide, transportation, equipment and fees. BYO lunch/water. Meets at Wandermere Rite Aid. Feb. 4, 9 am-4 pm. $40. Register at spokanerec.org STARLIGHT RACE SERIES This February, get your team (21+) together for a

night racing series with costumes, prizes and more. This year’s theme is the Olympics. Fridays in February, details TBA. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com CROSS COUNTRY SKI INTERPRETIVE TOUR W/ FRIENDS OF MT. SPOKANE Learn about Mount Spokane from the Friends of Mt. Spokane during this interpretive, guided cross-country trek. Skiing experience required. Fee includes equipment, guides and trans-

L ive ’Snow’

portation (optional) from Mead Yoke’s. Feb. 5, 9 am-3 pm. $39. Register at spokanerec.org (509-755-2489) LADIES DAY SKI AND SNOWBOARD CLINIC The package includes four hours of instruction and skiing, morning coffee, lunch, an after party and door prizes. Women skiers and snowboarders welcome, ages 18+. Feb. 11, 8 am-4 pm. $129. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (509-238-2220)

Meet the People Who Shaped the Inland Northwest

like there's tomorrow

When you’re here for the epic runs at Schweitzer — don’t miss the wow! of Sandpoint. Just 20 minutes down the mountain, Sandpoint has a bustling entertainment scene, excellent restaurants and taverns, eclectic shops and sumptuous spas for any non-skiers in your crowd. Cross-country and snowshoe trails at nearby Pine Street Woods, the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail or Western Pleasure Guest Ranch are superb, too.

Inlander Histories Volume 1 & 2

Make your visit the complete experience. We’ll see you in Sandpoint!

1/14 MLK Weekend Enjoy the weekend on the slopes or relaxing in town

1/15 Fireworks Northern Lights Fireworks spectacular at Schweitzer

1/21-23 Film Fest

1/29 Winter Trails

Banff Mtn Film Festival at the historic Panida

Free day for nordic skiing and snowshoeing

On Sale Now

Get visitor information at 800-800-2106 • www.VisitSandpoint.com

Inlander.com/books 26 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022


SANDPOINT WINTER CARNIVAL After a two-year hiatus, one of the biggest events of the winter is back. Details are still coming together (as of early January), but this year’s 10day festival will include the Parade of Lights downtown, events up at Schweitzer, live music and parties, and the beloved K9 Keg Pull. Feb. 11-21. sandpointchamber.org SNOWSHOE BEAD LAKE A guided trip to Bead Lake north of Newport with opportunities for photography, wildlife viewing and more. Includes guides, equipment and transportation. Ages 18+. Feb. 12, 9 am-4 pm. $49. Register at spokanerec.org SNOWSHOE TOUR AT 49 Tour the trails of 49 Degrees North. A guide offers tips on better control and how to have more fun on snowshoes. Fee includes trail pass, guide/instructor, poles, snowshoes and lunch. Ages 15+ Feb. 12, March 6 and March 19, 10 am-2 pm. $43. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd. Register at spokanerec.org BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL The prestigious mountain festival is held every fall in Banff, Alberta, after which it travels the globe. At each screening, audiences see a selection of award-winning films and crowd favorites from the 100s of entries. Feb. 18, 7 pm and Feb. 19, 7 pm. $24. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (509-2277404) LET IT GLOW FIREWORKS SHOW An annual, free community fireworks show over the Village in celebration

of President’s Day weekend. Feb. 20, 6 pm. Free. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) SNOWSHOE & MEAD TASTING A 2- to 3-mile snowshoe tour, open to beginners, followed by a mead tasting at Green Bluff’s Hierophant Meadery. Ages 21+. Offered Feb. 20 and March 20 from 9 am-3:30 pm. $43. Register at spokanerec.org 10 BARREL BEERCAT The world’s coolest mobile snow pub and was created for epic days on top of mountains. Lift tickets will be in short supply and must be reserved in advance. Feb. 25-27. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208783-1111) SKATE SKI INTRO LESSON Skate skiing is done on groomed ski tracks and resembles a skating motion with skiers pushing off laterally and using both poles at the same time to propel forward. This basic class covers using your equipment, body position, stopping, slowing, cornering, balance, push off, momentum and glide. Feb. 26, 10 am-noon. $35/$75. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. Register at spokanerec.org (509-7552489) SNOWSHOE MT. KIT CARSON Join the Friends of Mt. Spokane for an interpretive, guided tour around the park and to the summit of Mt. Kit Carson. Intermediate level hike; includes equipment, transportation, instruction and guides. Feb. 26, 8:30 am-2:30 pm. $37. spokanerec.org n

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Inclusivity and compassion come through Stage Left’s take on Corpus Christi. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

THEATER

The Gospel According to Joshua A new production of Corpus Christi at Stage Left aims for compassion over controversy BY E.J. IANNELLI

F

rom the moment pen was put to paper, Terrence McNally’s Corpus Christi was bound to ruffle feathers. The play transposes the biblical story of Jesus and the Apostles to one of gay men living in latter-day Texas, a creative choice that predictably drew protests and condemnation from religious groups when it debuted in 1998. The strong reaction had an impact on performances and perspectives alike. As a result, early productions of Corpus Christi didn’t exactly earn a reputation for their subtlety. Focus tended to fall on the play’s homosexual relationships between James and Bartholomew as well as Joshua — a contemporary proxy for Jesus — and Judas, which risked obscuring its exploration of themes like unconditional love for humankind. As his own production of Corpus Christi prepares to open at Stage Left next weekend, delayed a week for health and safety issues, director Troy Nickerson is looking to present a more nuanced version of the play that honors those themes. “When I first read the script, I felt like some of the more in-your-face stuff may have been done that way intentionally in the ’90s. So I might have backed off from that because I didn’t feel like it was necessary,” he says. “I’m not overtly sexualizing anything at all, although I’m not hiding from it in any way, either. There is the important relationship with Joshua and Judas. That certainly exists, and there is the intimacy that happens between them. But I don’t feel the need to push any points. This is a story of ‘what ifs.’ If Jesus came back today, would we still have crucified and killed him for loving others?” For Nickerson, that makes Corpus Christi’s episodic tale of the Second Coming more about the fear and preju-

28 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

dices that cloud our judgment — or even elicit judgment in the first place. It also offers both religious and secular audiences an opportunity to reflect on what we mean when we talk about Christ-like compassion. “As a gay man myself, I dislike the saying ‘Hate the sins, love the sinner.’ It’s a way for people to still hate my lifestyle and judge me for it but pretend not to. This show is not saying that Jesus loves everyone in spite of all their horrible, horrible faults. He loves people because we should love people of all kinds. I hope that message is strong.”

I

n an effort to mirror that sense of inclusivity, Nickerson broadened the audition process. Corpus Christi has typically been staged with an all-male cast, but more recent productions like this one have deliberately taken a more ecumenical approach. “We have a very mixed cast — people who identify as he, she, they, them, gay and straight,” Nickerson says. “And one of the loveliest parts about it has been seeing people who identify with different pronouns to all of a sudden have this space and this show that is for them. It’s been really eye-opening for me, and the family that they have created amongst themselves has been a really special and beautiful thing to watch.” Playing the lead in this production is Rhead Shirley, whose recent acting credits include productions with Spokane Ensemble Theatre and Eastern Washington University. “The play is wonderfully written, and it’s really interesting in that it’s the entire life of this character, Joshua, structured in these stylized vignettes,” Shirley says. “We start at the birth, or the Nativity, then continue through

high school and into adulthood. So one of the challenges for me as an actor was finding specific ways I can separate these periods in Joshua’s life.” Another challenge was how best to approach the inevitable martyrdom of his character, which both Nickerson and Shirley agree is indispensable to the resonance of Corpus Christi. “From the beginning, he knows that he’s going to die,” Shirley says. “It’s an important part of the story because, instead of seeing the crucifixion as an indication that humanity is incapable of this unconditional love, it’s that, despite this horrible end, Joshua, or Jesus, still wanted the best for them. We might be able to draw on that example to do the same thing.” That might be one reason why McNally, who died in 2020 of complications from COVID, expressly chose to open and close his play with the actors breaking the fourth wall and appealing directly to the audience. They try to connect on a personal level, making it clear that they’ve come to tell “an old and familiar story” with “no malice in [their] hearts.” And though Corpus Christi itself has historically come up against its own assumptions and prejudices, Shirley says that its core message remains a universal one that transcends race, religion, gender and sexual orientation. “There’s a line when Joshua first meets Judas. He says, ‘I like boys. I like girls, too. I like people.’ And I think that’s what it’s really all about. Beneath everything else, it’s the person who should be loved.” n Corpus Christi • Jan. 21-Feb. 6 • Thu to Sat at 7 pm; Sun at 2 pm • $25 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third Ave. • stagelefttheater.org • 509-838-9727


SPIFF 2022 INLANDER _January_13_border.pdf

1

1/9/22

2:52 PM

Tim Travers and the Time Travelers Paradox (Screens in Best of the Northwest)

In-Person Screenings* FRIDAY | February 5 7:00pm

The Bing

Best of the Northwest

Schedule Subject to Change SATURDAY | February 5 Magic Lantern 11:00am

+ FILMMAKER Q&A

+ FILMMAKER Q&A

Reclaim Idaho Posterize Exhibit

* In-person events require proof of vaccination or negative COVID test in last 48 hours. Masking will be required.

Virtual Screenings

Re-Opening

2:00 pm

Animation Showcase

SUNDAY | February 6 Magic Lantern

Vinyl Nation 2:00 pm Helene

11:00 am

+ FILMMAKER Q&A

4:30 pm RK/RKAY World Shorts I 7:00 pm Casablanca Beats Magic Lantern Theatre shows have limited capacity. Passes for In-person events are expected to sell out quickly. Individual tickets for In-person shows, if available, for sale on January 15.

4:30 pm

Don’t miss out!

Passes on sale NOW: $149 (All-Access Pass) $99 (Virtual Pass) $ 79 (In-Person Pass)

SPOKANEFILMFESTIVAL.ORG

Virtual Screenings will include all in-person titles plus Any Given Day, Emergence, A Good Enough Day, In the Garden of Forking Paths, LGBTQIA+ Shorts, Sisters Rising, Landlocked, Rez Metal, Spokane+PNW Makers, Take and Run, To Kill the Beast, We Burn Like This, US Shorts, Vinyl Nation, World Shorts II.

Pictured: Casablanca Beats, A Good Enough Day, Jung and Restless, Fishpond: Loko l'a

JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

What really happens behind the scenes.

INSIDE SKINNY

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ACCIO NOSTALGIA It’s definitely not fun to be a fan of Harry Potter anymore. Especially not after a certain author expressed some terrible thoughts and opinions the past few years, making her irredeemable in the eyes of the fan community. However, the Harry Potter reunion special that aired New Year’s Eve made me miss the Wizarding World and the wonderment and excitement that the franchise offered me in my formative years. Return to Hogwarts worked well and gave pretty much what was expected. Seeing the Golden Trio back together again was exciting and heart-wrenching, and the segment memorializing all of the actors that have died in the 20 years since the films debuted was hard to watch — the producers knew where to hit us and just how badly it would hurt when “Hedwig’s Theme” played us out into the credits. (MADISON PEARSON)

Finally, I can tell you what the Inlander is really like BY WILSON CRISCIONE

A

t the Inlander, we are obligated to report the truth. Whether it’s City Hall, a university or a hospital, we always strive to give readers an accurate sense of what’s going on. But you may have noticed that Inlander journalists have been conspicuously silent on one thing: the Inlander itself. I am writing this on my last day at the Inlander, as I’ve taken another journalism opportunity after six years at my favorite Spokane newspaper. It’s late Friday afternoon, the office is empty, and as my final act of journalistic integrity, I’m giving you the scoop on what they’re not telling you about working at the Inlander. You will get a ton of Inlander clothes. At every holiday party, there will be clothes — T-shirts, long sleeves, sweaters, you name it. At this point, half of my wardrobe consists of clothes that say “Inlander.” Are they slowly planting the Inlander brand in our heads so we will be loyal forever? You tell me.

but he gave a speech in which he specifically called out the Inlander for what he felt was dishonest coverage, before pointing me out to the crowd of around 100 people as I sat in the back diligently taking notes. As soon as the speech ended, the crowd — many of them armed — turned and demanded I get out. When I briefly tried to protest, they chased me, and I ran until I was on the highway back to Spokane. You might start to sympathize with grizzly bears. I wrote a story about grizzly bears and visited the bear research center at Washington State University, where a bear licked my hand through a fence. I now love grizzly bears and mostly think of them as big, terrifying, dopey dogs. You may argue with your coworkers about almost everything. I can’t tell you how much time I’ve spent arguing with my coworkers (ahem, Daniel Walters). But these arguments almost never ended badly. In fact, they often inspired the best story ideas.

Your one bad film take can ruin your reputation forever. I once told former film editor Nathan Weinbender that I didn’t really like the movie Moonlight. He never respected my film opinions again. (In my defense, I watched it on a tiny screen with my wife’s aunt and uncle.)

You might resent the I Saw Yous. They’re fun and hilarious and I get it. But there’s nothing more deflating than spending hours and hours writing and reporting a massive investigative story, then, when someone learns you work at the Inlander, hearing only “oh, I love the Inlander. The I Saw Yous are so funny!”

You might get chased by guys with guns. In 2017, I went to an expo in Prosser, Wash., where a bunch of mostly right-wing “preppers” were gathered. I was hoping to get an in-person interview with Matt Shea, then a state representative from Spokane Valley who called the Inlander the “Inslander” and refused to do interviews with us. Instead, not only did Shea decline to talk to me,

You will find it difficult to leave. There’s something about working with a small team, all dedicated to the goal of great journalism, that breeds a sense of kinship. They make you better, and you don’t want to let them down. It’s why instead of rushing out the door and blowing off my assignment on my last day, I’m still here, finishing up a story before I turn off the lights, and going way over my word count. n

30 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

WHEN ARTISTS COLLECT Andy Warhol is a household name when it comes to contemporary art, but did you know he was also a dedicated collector? His trove offered unique insight into the artist, similar to how the MAC’s Continuous Lines show (on display through Feb. 6) amplifies our appreciation for artist Joe Feddersen of the Colville Confederated Tribes (Okanagan and Arrow Lakes). His pieces range from a drawing by his aunt to work by nationally known artists like Jaune Quick-to-See Smith. The show highlights a “chorus of voices,” says Feddersen, versus a singular view of what it means to be Indigenous. Moreover, an adjacent exhibition, Awakenings: Traditional Canoes and Calling the Salmon Home (through Aug. 2), provides vital historical and geographical context about Northwest tribes. (CARRIE SCOZZARO) NOW PLAYING Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Jan 14: THE LUMINEERS, Brightside. ♫ Stomp-clapping out of my bed and I’ve been folking just fine… ♫ FKA TWIGS, CAPRISONGS. While much of the experimental British artist’s new mixtape remains a mystery, the lone song released — “Tears in the Club” (featuring The Weeknd) — suggests she may be trending in a more mainstream pop direction. ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS, The Boy Named If. Costello tackles the theme of boyhood (and men unable to move past it) while he sonically harks back to his organ-infused ’70s rock swing. (SETH SOMMERFELD) n


ALSO OPENING BELLE

A Japanese sci-fi adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, this anime follows a high school girl who becomes a pop star known as Belle in a popular virtual reality world. When a digital monster ruins one of her concerts, she becomes intrigued and tries to get closer to this beast. (SS)

REVIEW

SLASHING GOOD FUN

The new Scream hits all the right notes, paying cheeky homage to its predecessors and the horror genre

Not Ghostface Killah, but Ghostface, killer.

BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

“D

o you like scary movies?” The iconic line heard from a mysterious stranger over the phone was first uttered more than 25 years ago in 1996’s original Scream, a horrifying reminder of our collective aging. Yet with that age comes a new follow-up in that long-running story of the Ghostface killer that, as the film itself cheekily acknowledges, also carries with it a lot of expectations. Whether you want to call it Scream 5 or simply Scream, one thing is certain: This film is a bloody and brash experience, an absolute treat that easily carves out a place as one of the best of the series. This is somewhat shocking as the film is also the first that doesn’t have the horror auteur Wes Craven directing; he died in 2015. Thankfully, the directing duo of Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett, most known for 2019’s glorious Ready or Not, are more than carrying on Craven’s legacy. They’ve made a film with a wicked sense of humor that balances reverence for the material and the genre with a playful edge that isn’t afraid to laugh at itself. Set 25 years after the original, history is repeating as a new killer has put on the Ghostface mask and is wreaking havoc in Woodsboro. The first target is the

young Tara (Jenna Ortega), left brutally injured from the attack. Her estranged sister Sam (Melissa Barrera) must now return to the community, with her boyfriend Richie (Jack Quaid) in tow, to protect Tara and figure out who this new killer is. However, Sam is carrying a secret that continues to haunt her and may offer a clue to the mysterious murders. To say more about the plot would threaten to ruin the fun of seeing it all unravel. It can be revealed that this new Scream brings back original cast members Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox and David Arquette, who all slide back into their roles perfectly, but the movie revolves around the new characters facing down Ghostface. This gives the film a modern focus that reflects on the current state of the horror genre. From multiple jokes about “elevated horror” that takes itself more seriously than a slasher flick, to deconstructions of visual tropes of horror, it all comes from a clear place of love for the genre. That love is seen in every frame and sequence that is in conversation with itself, deploying and then subverting tropes with reckless abandon in the brilliant way that only a Scream film could. The scenes are all well directed, keenly aware of the visual language of horror and our

own expectations. It acknowledges what it is, ensuring it can trick us even more completely. The film is not completely flawless. There are moments of faux sentimentality that ring a little hollow. Though, with this type of film, this may itself be a self-aware setup that wrings humor from juxtaposing the heartfelt declarations of characters against scenes of these same characters being brutally eviscerated. This is all part of the way Scream plays with your mind. It doesn’t hide the strings it’s using to control the story, it calls attention to them so as to manipulate you SCREAM even further. There is no man Rated R behind the curtain, he’s a charDirected by Matt Bettinelliacter smiling right in front of Olpin and Tyler Gillett you the whole time. It is in that Starring Melissa Barrera, Jenna Ortega, David Arquette grand tradition of the series messing with you that the film completely succeeds. It isn’t likely to win over anyone who didn’t already appreciate the specific vibe the series is going for. Though for those of us weirdos who couldn’t get enough of its unique disposition, Scream is about as good of a new entry as you could hope for. n

JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 31


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Monster Mush

Not exactly a graveyard smash.

Transformania finds the Hotel Transylvania animated franchise limping into a fourth installment BY JOSH BELL

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ike its monster main characters, the Hotel There’s more to the plot than in the last Transylvania animated franchise seems to movie (which dared ask the question “What if be unkillable. The fourth feature film in the monsters went on vacation?”), but the core the series, Hotel Transylvania: Transformania, has themes are essentially the same. Even with their survived both the shift from a theatrical release roles reversed, Dracula and Johnny still need to to a streaming premiere on Amazon Prime Video learn to respect and value each other, while Dracand the departure of primary voice actor Adam ula also needs to learn to trust his daughter’s life Sandler (who also co-wrote the second movie). choices. The lessons are half-hearted at best, and Director Genndy Tartakovsky, who helmed the voice actors sound as bored with the material the first three movies, hands off those duties to as Sandler must have been. There’s still plenty Jennifer Kluska and Derek Drymon, directors of slapstick humor for the kid audience, but it’s of last year’s Hotel Transylvania short film Monster mostly repetitive and tedious, without even the Pets, although Tartakovsky remains on board as occasional sparks of quirkiness and creativity that co-writer and executive producer. Tartakovsky initially brought to the material. All this upheaval doesn’t make much of a difAlthough the series has been an unlikely ference in this annoying, formulaic series, which box-office juggernaut, at this point it seems better continues to provide largely the same lessons suited for streaming, where parents can turn it for its main characters. Count Dracula on for their antsy kids and then (now voiced by Sandler soundalike Brian safely ignore it. Transformania HOTEL Hull) still has trouble accepting that his has a clear sense of creative TRANSYLVANIA: vampire daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez) exhaustion, another perfunctory TRANSFORMIA is in love with goofy human Johnny (Andy Rated PG adventure for characters who’ve Samberg), despite three movies of Dracula Directed by Jennifer Kluska long since lost their distinctiveand Johnny fighting and then bonding. ness. The animation is pleasant and Derek Drymon Mavis and Johnny are married with a kid, Starring Brian Hull, Andy but unremarkable, with minimal but Dracula still agonizes over the idea visual flair in the new designs for Samberg, Selena Gomez of leaving them in charge of his monster the transformed characters, who hotel so that he can retire and spend more mostly now look even less aptime with his own human love interest, reformed pealing. Dracula and Johnny go on what’s meant monster hunter Ericka Van Helsing (Kathryn to be an epic journey, but their surroundings Hahn). always look generic, like they were automatically Panicking at the last minute, Dracula lies generated from a file of stock imagery for CGI to Johnny that he can’t legally leave the hotel animated family movies. to a human, so Johnny naturally decides to use Compared to the artistic ambition and emoan experimental “monster ray” to turn himself tional complexity of 2021 mainstream animated into a monster. Thanks to yet more convoluted movies like Luca, The Mitchells vs. the Machines, shenanigans, the ray also turns Dracula and a and Encanto, Transformania looks especially paltry, few of his increasingly superfluous monster pals just an obligatory franchise continuation on the into humans, before ceasing to function. In order way to a new TV series or other brand extento turn everyone back to normal (or abnormal), sion. Adam Sandler isn’t exactly known for his Johnny and Dracula must go on a quest deep restraint, but in this case he made the right call into a South American jungle to retrieve a crystal to step away. Viewers would be wise to do the that can power the monster ray. same. n


GLOBAL SOUNDS

808s & Fret Breaks World music guitarist Jesse Cook returns to the stage with classical strumming and trap beats BY SETH SOMMERFELD

W

hen it comes to classical guitar stylings, few can match Jesse Cook’s musical résumé. The Juno-winning Torontonian virtuoso infuses world music flair into his Flamenco fusion sound, often traveling to far-flung parts of the world like Colombia or Egypt to inject the authentic tones of a region’s traditional music into his own sonic blend. So naturally, the genesis of his 2021 album Libre began exactly where you’d expect — in a car listening to a K-Pop girl group. “My daughter and I were driving up to the cottage one day, she’s playing DJ,” says Cook. “I was like, ‘Play me what you like, what are you listening to these days?’ And she starts playing me a K-Pop band called Blackpink. And I have to say, since then I’ve listened to a whole bunch of Blackpink, and most of what they do is really not my kind of music. But they had a bunch of tunes that were totally trap-inspired.” “And, at first, I’m kind of thinking, ‘Ughhh, K-Pop.’ But before I knew it, I was finding myself going, ‘Why am I loving this? This is kind of amazing.’ There were all these kind of little world music themes, like scales you don’t usually hear on a pop tune. And then, of course, the big drop beat on the chorus, where it just suddenly stripped down to this huge 808 kick drum and a great hook. And the thing just makes the whole car vibrate, you know? I really sort of got into it for a while, and then I started listening to all sorts of actual American-style trap music, where it all came from the beginning.” As a result, Libre blends Cook’s playing with the omnipresent rhythmic sound of modern hip-hop and pop music — trap beats created on a Roland TR-808 drum machine. For Cook, it was the perfect playful home studio diversion during pandemic times. To keep creatively sane as the prospect of touring seemed ever pushed back, he turned to his YouTube channel.

S

tarting in January 2021, Cook recorded a new song every week — some of which included the 808s and trap backings — and making videos to accompany them. When management came knocking to make a new record in May 2021, he took some of the material he had been work-

ing on, stripped it to its essentials, and brought in other musicians (including Algerian violinist Fethi Nadjem, Portuguese drummer Marito Marques, and Peruvian drummer Matias Recharte) to breathe new life into the instrumental songs. The result is an album that rhythmically pulsates with a modern energy and even sometimes shredding spirit (thanks to Nadjem) that few classical guitar albums can match. The result is Libre. “[The YouTube versions were] way too kind of trap or pop or something. It just didn’t really seem to kind of connect to me as an artist as much, so I just kind of tinkered,” says Cook. “I needed to actually inject more of myself and the stuff I love: the world music, musicians I love.” “It’s funny because so far people keep telling me it sounds like a real divergence from [my] other music,” he says. “And I feel

like every album has been like that. I try to go somewhere different. [For] Nomad, I went to Cairo and worked with musicians there; or The Rumba Foundation, I ended up working with Cuban musicians and going to Colombia. I try to take what I’m doing to some new place and see if I can create some new hybrid. So for me, it didn’t feel like a change, it felt like this is just the latest destination, right?”

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ook’s tour kicks off Jan. 19 in Spokane, marking Cook’s first time in front of a live crowd since February 2020. While it’s been creatively invigorating for Cook to be back practicing with his band — and he proactively thanks “Spokane for being our first guinea pig” — the COVID break has left even the masterful vet somewhat apprehensive. “It’s been so long since we’ve been in front of an audience. We used to do more than 100 shows a year, and did that for 25 years. So I never would get nervous. But it’s been so long that I’m actually kind of feeling a bit nervous,” says Cook. “Like, is this gonna work? Do I still know how to do this? It’s like riding a bicycle — I kind of hope that when I get up on that stage, all the gears just kind of kick it. I feel like I’m starting all over again.” n Jesse Cook • Wed, Jan. 19 at 8 pm • $25-$45 • All ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com • 509-227-7638

UPCOMING SHOWS SPOKANE SYMPHONY: MASTERWORKS 4 ECKART RETURNS Sat, Jan. 15 at 8 pm & Sun, Jan 16 at 3 pm The Fox $27-$62 LOMELDA, ALEXALONE Sun, Jan. 16 at 8 pm Lucky You Lounge $15-$18 SUBTRONICS Sun, Jan. 16 at 7 pm Knitting Factory $30 BIG HEAD TODD AND THE MONSTERS Tue, Jan. 18 at 7 pm Bing Crosby Theater $29-$49 MILITARIE GUN, SUPERCRUSH, SHINE, LIPSICK Fri, Jan. 21 at 7 pm The Big Dipper $15 HIPPIE SABOTAGE, DAISY GUTTRIDGE Sat, Jan. 22 at 7 pm Knitting Factory $30-$35 HINDER Thu, Jan. 27 at 7:30 pm Northern Quest Resort and Casino $39-$59 Be sure to check with venues about vaccination/COVID test requirements.

Jesse Cook gets free on Libre. MATT BARNES PHOTO

JANUARY 13, 2022 INLANDER 33


MUSIC JOJO’S SHOWSHOW

After making hair bows “a thing” and returning from her stint on Dancing with the Stars, JoJo Siwa is taking North America by storm with a 30-something-stop concert tour. JoJo, who made her debut on Dance Moms when she was 11 years old, has always been a favorite of younger kids with her uber bubbly personality and eccentric outfits; however, she reached a broader audience last January after coming out as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community. Her songs are upbeat, catchy and, honestly, downright addictive. D.R.E.A.M. The Tour kicks off in Spokane. — MADISON PEARSON JoJo Siwa D.R.E.A.M. The Tour • Thu, Jan. 13 at 7 pm • $40-$70 • All ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com • 509-279-7000

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34 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

ARTS HEAR AND NOW

Many of us have been on or near the Spokane River, even underneath its surface for a short period of time, and can recall the sound of waves and splashing. But the Spokane River is so much more. Discover the many songs and voices of that river during a January multimedia and sound exhibition from Laboratory Art + Residency’s current residents: Jeremy Sherrer, who goes by SPKYY, and Eyvind Kang and Jessika Kenney, who collaborate under the name Mill Canyon Sound Actions. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Spokane River Sound Action • Through Jan. 22; open Fri from 4-7 pm and Sat from 10 am-3 pm • Free • Gonzaga University Urban Arts Center • 125 S. Stevens St. • facebook.com/GUUAC

MUSIC DOUBLE DUTY

When is one band actually two bands? Austin-based indie songwriters Hannah Read and Alex Peterson provide the answer. The duo share the same five-piece band with one of them stepping back to a supporting role when the other one leads. Read leads Lomelda (pictured), whose soft songs take a slightly off-kilter melodic approach centered on her delicate, open-hearted warble. Peterson writes similarly tender songs for alexalone, but presents them as far noisier rock tunes. Together, acts tread similar ground with the same folks, while offering two different sonic tastes that pair great together. And if nothing else, the arrangement makes fitting into one van for touring easier. — SETH SOMMERFELD Lomelda, alexalone • Sun, Jan. 16 at 8 pm • $15-$18 • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511


VISUAL ARTS INDIE AS FOLK

Folk art is one of those tiptoe terms that art institutions often employ to describe artwork by makers who were self-taught versus academy- or college-educated, including those who may not have considered themselves artists. It also loosely referred to certain art media, like quilting or carving, and style, like the simplistic works made famous by Grandma Moses, who began painting at 78. WSU’s Indie Folk offers a contemporary understanding of “folk” with an emphasis on independence, especially from conventional materials and artistic approaches. Fun, funky and for the people, this show of more than 50 works from mostly Pacific Northwest artists has an added bonus of a curated playlist of similarly fun and funky PNW music. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Indie Folk: New Art and Songs from the Pacific Northwest • Jan. 18-May 21; open Tue-Fri from 1-4 pm, Sat from 10 am-4 pm • Free • Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU • 1535 NE Wilson Rd., Pullman • museum.wsu.edu • 509-335-1910

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COMEDY LAUGHTER LIFER

Comedians love to talk about their funny childhoods, but no one can claim quite the same standup jumpstart as Pauly Shore. He may be best known for his surfer-dude character “The Weasel” that landed him a longtime MTV gig and several ’90s film roles, but Shore was born into making people laugh on stage. His mom, Mitzi, is a legend and founder of Los Angeles’ Comedy Store, the Sunset Strip launching pad for a who’s who of standup royalty. And his dad, Sammy, opened years of tours for Elvis. Pauly’s kept working nonstop since his years in the spotlight, doing reality TV, documentaries and always hitting the stage for standup gigs. This weekend, he’s doing a ticketed, free Q&A focused on his movies (Jan. 15 at 2 pm) and two “storyteller” shows in which he’ll talk about his life on the road and growing up in Hollywood (Jan. 14-15 at 7:30 pm, $25), in addition to the three standup shows noted below. — DAN NAILEN Pauly Shore • Thu, Jan. 13 at 7:30 pm and Fri-Sat, Jan. 14-15 at 10:30 pm • $25-$33 • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub. com • 509-318-9998

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STILL THINKING ABOUT OUR BRIEF ENCOUNTER I saw you at Wal-Mart, the one on Sprague. We both comment on our good-looking appearance. You were looking marvelous in the dress or the dress was looking marvelous on you, but I am still thinking about that moment. I was so taken away by your total beauty (I wish I could have seen your eyes hiding behind stylish sunglasses) that I paid your bill. I hope you see this and respond; I want to continue our encounter.

YOU SAW ME I SAW YOU HIT AND RUN We saw you and so did other good citizens. Shame on the uninsured “electrician” that totaled my son’s car then left the scene. On Wed Dec 29th @ 9am my son was on his way to work heading east on West Fifth (getting on I90 East), and an older white E350 Econoline van (two fiberglass ladders attached to roof) was traveling north on Walnut and ran a redlight and totaled my son’s car. Thankful my son was not more injured than he was. My son is a hardworking 19-year-old, and an irresponsible con artist man in his late 60s who claimed to own an electrical business and was on his way to work was operating a company vehicle without insurance. The man apologized and admitted he ran the redlight and offered to pay for tow fees and to fix the car, but when I arrived on scene and asked for proof of insurance etc., he refused to produce these. I told him I was calling the police, and he left the scene of the accident and paid for nothing. There were witnesses that saw the accident and stopped, but due to the chaos we were unable to get everyone’s contact info. Anyone who witnessed this accident or has further information, please contact hitrunwhitevan1229@ yahoo.com

SOUND OFF

DIRECTIONS TO DIVISION You approached me in the parking lot of Value Village and asked me how to get to Division; after I provided them, as you began to pull away, you complimented me, stopping again when I thanked you. I answered your very personal questions, and we made arrangements to meet up at a different location. ACE HARDWARE PARKING LOT You were very pretty with a great smile, and you drove a red Toyota Corolla (I think.) You came out of Ace hardware at Sullivan and Sprague on Saturday 6/26 as I was getting out of my truck, and you said, “Sorry I didn’t park so well with the lines,” and I said, “It’s OK; they’re only lines.” I should have asked you out on the spot, but I did not.

CHEERS SNOW BLOWING SAINT Thank you so much to the person who snow blows the block just north of Wellesley on Maple. It has been such an extreme blessing to discover this already done. I hope you know how much your actions mean to those around you. LORAX You have given me the answer to a question I’ve been asking for a while, that being what I could write

about. Well, former friend of 25+ formative years, real life seems to be turning into an epic read, thanks to your blast stains of presence that did cause me for the first time to doubt my sense of optimism for my fellow man. You hurt me deeply with your betrayal, yet I rise. I don’t allow

an older woman standing in line who had a plate of food right in front of where you serve up your items; she had her mask down and was eating off of her plate and licking her fingers and continued to leave her mask down as she was walking through the line and using the utensils to serve herself. So

You hurt me deeply with your betrayal, yet I rise.

treacherous humans to get me down. I take all the lessons and use them for my highest good. You are reading this sitting next to your new boyfriend, my ex-husband, and maybe wonder if this is about you. Rest assured, it is...thanks for an epic story that I could never have considered writing if it hadn’t really happened to me. LIFESAVERS AT OCTAPHARMA PLASMA I saw you at Octapharma Plasma saving lives! We appreciate every single one of you who comes in and donates plasma at our facility. It is people like you who are responsible for creating lifesaving therapeutics around the world and here at home. Every donation you make gives someone out there a better life. The plasma that is collected every day is used in so many great things from treating trauma to severe burns to mother/ baby compatibility and so much more. You are making a difference every single day, and we couldn’t do it with out you. I truly thank you for all you do!

JEERS BAD NEIGHBORS Earlier this year, Idaho Republican Doug Okuniewicz of Hayden got his wish to basically punish out-of-state [Washington]

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

36 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

outdoors enthusiasts by doubling fees for us at nearby popular state parks. Now, Washington hospitals are seeing an influx of Idahoans with COVID. At the same time, Idaho Gov. Brad Little refuses to enforce safety measures regarding the spread of the virus, claiming President Biden is “out of

touch” when challenging mask and vaccine mandates from the federal level. Out of touch? Really? Here’s an idea: Charge the sick Idahoans double for their hospital stay in Washington, that is, if they even pay at all, seeing as how many don’t have insurance. But if they don’t pay, let’s at least call it what it is, in the eyes of such people — socialism. So Idaho, you can come to Washington with your “fake” virus, not get billed twice, or even anything, but admit it — you are receiving free medical care, and that, by your definition, is socialism. LEVEL OF IGNORANCE IS UNREAL! At a chain restaurant a family of four walks in right past all the signs on the door that say a mask is required, yet the puzzled look on the wife’s face saying she didn’t realize they had to wear masks. Their kid looks like he was running a fever, and he was wiping his nose with his arm. So if your kid is sick and you won’t protect yourself or others by wearing a mask, then you shouldn’t be going into places like that because you’re going to end up killing people by spreading this disease!!! The restaurant did supply them with a mask so they put them on and they were them down on their chin?! You might as well not wear one you flippin’ moron!!!! Then there was

I would highly recommend if you are someone with a weak immune system, please stay away from places like this. I even said something to management, and it’s sad because there are signs everywhere that say you must keep your mask on the entire time you are in the restaurant except if you are at your seat. Those reckless people are the ones that are spreading this disease because they also are not vaccinated and they don’t care. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS A B S O R B

M S H I O N H OR T S A T E S V E R E D E L S O D OR A T D O A S E N L C C OR P OR A H E E B R A I S K A S D A S W E A R

E I R A G O T OR Y A W OR L I A T T O H E E R A W T E L H E E E E K N S S

P R I R O D R A I X E N A

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E C I P A S I M A S E C OR D O I P L O L OR E R I T P H E W O M I A L E N H E R O M G U E E T

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

PAULY SHORE Shore tasted super-stardom in 1990 when his MTV show “Totally Pauly” hit the airwaves to major fan approval. The show ran for six years, leading him to numerous television and film roles. Jan. 13-14 at 7:30 and 10:30 pm; special benefit Q&A Jan. 15 at 2 pm. $25-$33. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com NEW YEAR, NEW YOU Tell the Blue Door Theatre players your New Year’s Resolution and they’ll show how it’ll play out in this completely improvised show. Rated for general audiences. Fridays in Jan. at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (509-747-7045) SAFARI A “Whose Line”-esque, fastpaced short-form improv show with a few twists and turns added, based on audience suggestions. For mature audiences. Saturdays at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (509-747-7045) JON “POLAR BEAR” GONZALEZ This stand-up comedian, podcaster and entertainer is from the heart of Texas. After getting involved in the local comedy scene, Jon quickly found success through the release of multiple comedy skits which went viral on TikTok. Jan. 16, 7:30 pm. $29-$39. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) BRYAN CALLEN Callen is an American actor, comedian and podcaster most known for his recurring role as Coach Mellor on ABC’s Schooled and The Goldbergs; which he’s played since 2014. Jan. 20-22, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 10:30 pm. $25-$50. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) PHILLIP KOPCZYNSKI Stateline Comedy, in partnership with The Draft Zone at Vaporland, present local comedian Phillip Kopczynski. Hosted by Rob Wentz and also featuring Charles Hall Jr. Jan. 20, 7-10 pm. $15. The Draft Zone, 4436 W. Riverbend Ave. facebook.com/ events/454729306346700

COMMUNITY

LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY: TREASURES FROM THE DRIEHAUS COLLECTION A celebration of the artistry and craftsmanship of the Tiffany artworks from Chicago’s distinguished Richard H. Driehaus Collection, highlighting masterworks never before presented in a comprehensive exhibition. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 13. $7-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) ONLINE STORYTIME Children have fun learning while reading stories, singing songs and sharing fingerplays during storytime. For ages 2-5 and their families. Registration required. Weekly on Thursdays from 6:30-7 pm and Fridays from 9:30-10 am. Register at scld.org BUILDING WITH BOOKS: LEGO STORYTIME Enjoy listening to a fun read-aloud story. Afterwards, recreate a part of the story using LEGO bricks or other craft materials at home. Registration required. Jan. 18, 4-4:45 pm. scld.evanced.info/signup/ list?df=list&nd=150&kw=LEGO GOLDEN HARVEST: FLOUR SACKS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

The MAC’s collection of cloth flour sacks offers a unique window into the early development of Eastern Washington’s wheat industry, which today contributes billions of dollars to the state’s economy. The sacks are also a tangible reminder of the mills that played a critical role in Spokane’s early growth. Jan. 22-May 15, Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm. $7-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org WINTER OPEN HOUSE Join the West Valley Outdoor Learning Center for frost-covered fun. Play games, meet and learn about the animals that live on-site and wander a wintery-science wonderland. Walk-ins welcome; masks mandatory. Jan. 22, 10 am-1 pm. $5 suggested donation. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. olc.wvsd.org (509-340-1028)

FILM

TRIVIA: BROOKLYN NINE-NINE Trivia covers fun facts about New York’s wackiest precinct. For adults; registration required. Jan. 13, 6:30-7:30 pm. Register at scld.evanced.info/signup/ list?df=list&nd=150&kw=trivia DRIVEWAYS The story of a lonesome boy who accompanies his mother on a trip to clean out his late aunt’s house, and ends up forming an unexpected friendship with the retiree who lives next door. Jan. 15, 7:30 pm and Jan. 16, 2:30 pm. $7-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) UNITED BY WATER In conjunction with the MAC’s exhibit “Awakenings,” are regular public screenings of the documentary “United by Water” created by the Upper Columbia Unified Tribes (UCUT). The film follows the first tribal canoe journey and gathering at Kettle Falls, Washington, since the Ceremony of Tears in 1943. Saturdays at 1 pm; first and third Wednesdays at noon. Included with admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) THIRD THURSDAY MATINEE MOVIE: F FOR FAKE Shaun Higgins revives his Thursday afternoon classic movie series featuring four films from different genres that focus on art, and in a couple of instances, museums. This odd and playful docudrama is about art forgery, art dealers, art appreciation and illusion. Jan. 20, 1 pm. $7. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-363-3575) BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL The Banff World Tour celebrates amazing achievements in outdoor storytelling and filmmaking worldwide. Jan. 21-22 at 7 pm and Jan. 23 at 6 pm. $19$24. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191)

FOOD & DRINK

WINTER STEWS & RAGOUTS TO WARM YOUR SOUL Learn to prepare classic food items to warm your spirits in January including Boeuf Bourguignon from France, South American pork stew and a hearty Italian tortellini soup. Substitutions to accommodate dietary restrictions available. Jan. 13, 6-8 pm. $69. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. campusce.net/ spokane/course/course.aspx?c=1152 (509-279-6144)

ROCKET WINE CLASS Rocket Market hosts weekly wine classes; sign up in advance for the week’s selections. Fridays at 7 pm. Call to reserve a seat, or register online. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket. com (509-343-2253) MAC & CHEESE FESTIVAL Celebrate a childhood favorite dish at the fifth annual event offering cheesy variations prepared by Coeur d’Alene-area chefs. Attendees make their way through downtown Coeur d’Alene enjoying samples of cheese-filled dishes, optionally paired with craft beer. Vote for your favorite dish for the People’s Choice Trophy. Jan. 15, 12-6 pm. $12-$35. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com (208-209-5031) OLD-SCHOOL ITALIAN FEAST Tavolata Spokane is hosting an old-school Italian feast with a menu featuring calamari fritti, heirloom tomato bruschetta, Nonna’s Lasagna and tiramisu. Jan. 16, 6-9 pm. $55. Tavolata, 221 N. Wall St. ethanstowellrestaurants.com (509-606-5600) WINTER MARKET Sip on local beer and shop from local vendors at Lumberbeard’s seasonal indoor market, happening select Sundays through March. Upcoming dates: Jan. 16 and Jan. 30, 2-4 pm. Free. Lumberbeard Brewing, 25 E. Third Ave. lumberbeardbrewing. com (509-381-5142) KILL THE KEG & SERVICE INDUSTRY NIGHT This weekly special includes $2 off select GHP beer, $1 off select guest beer and a 20% discount for service industry patrons. Tuesdays from 3-9 pm. The Golden Handle Project, 111 S. Cedar St. goldenhandle.org (509-868-0264) MEDICAL PERSONNEL APPRECIATION NIGHT: All medical and healthcare-related personnel, students, staff and professionals receive a 20% discount off all GHP beer and food. Wednesdays from 3-9 pm. The Golden Handle Project, 111 S. Cedar St. goldenhandle.org (509-868-0264) TAPHOUSE BEER DINNER Kick-start 2022 with a beer dinner featuring Wallace Brewing. Tickets include five craft beer tastings and four chef-curated courses, complete with shared knowledge and conversation from brewery representatives. Jan. 20, 5:30 pm. $50. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com (208-209-5031)

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NICKELODEON’S JOJO SIWA D.R.E.A.M. THE TOUR The JoJo Siwa show originally scheduled for June 2021 is rescheduled for this date. All tickets purchased for the originally scheduled date are still valid. Jan. 13, 7 pm. $40$70. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) DJ NIGHT ON THE ICE Get your ‘skate’ on with DJ A1 for themed nights, music, lights, contests and more every Friday from 6-9 pm, through Jan. 28. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. riverfrontspokane.com SATURDAY WITH THE SYMPHONY: A CHILDREN’S PROGRAM Come join members of the Coeur d’Alene Symphony on the third Saturday of the month for some music-filled fun. Next event is Jan. 15, 11 am-noon. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org/library-events/januarysymphony/ (208-769-2315)

Out-of-the-Box Sports • PAGE 8 Mexican Street Corn • PAGE 28

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess NEEDY GONZALES

AMY ALKON

I’ve saved some of your columns about how women evolved to seek successful men who seem commitment-minded (more likely to stick around and provide). I’ve noticed that women in pop culture (movies and books I’ve read) constantly choose the bad boy (the “jerk”) over the guy next door (the “nice guy”). This doesn’t seem to make sense, given a woman’s evolutionary desire to find a mate who a) won’t leave her and b) will provide for her offspring. Do the “jerks” get the girl, or does it just seem that way? —Curious

Though some women go through a bad boy phase — sometimes for decades — women, in general, aren’t seeking a “jerk” but a man whose assertiveness role model isn’t a plastic container of hummus. Bad boys, in the extreme, are feral, rule-breaking, narcissistic rebels with the air of someone who’s been in prison — or probably should be. Women of course don’t make “My Perfect Man” checklists like: “Lying, womanizing, bar-fighting jailbird who’ll put $2K in booze and strippers on my debit card.” However, the fictional women you bring up are a special category and choose bad boys for good reason. Consider the novelist’s challenge: keeping the reader’s attention. This takes conflict — constant obstacles to a character getting what they want. If a fictional woman does get a “happily ever after” — the bad boy realizes he can’t live without her and vows to go good — it can’t come in Chapter Two. Over here in real life, there’s this idea that only “damaged” women choose bad boys. Nuh-uh. In fact, many strong, emotionally together women are drawn, at least initially, to the bad boy — though not because he’s bad. “Bad boys tend to have lots of positive traits that come along for the ride” with the badness, cognitive scientist Scott Barry Kaufman explains. “When women say they like ‘bad boys,’ they seem to mean ... men who are exciting”: extroverted, fearlessly assertive, unpredictable thrill-providers. In short: Women don’t want jerks; they want guys who aren’t boring. Bad boys are also fiercely masculine, and there’s nothing that makes a woman feel uber-feminine like her polar opposite. Women don’t lust after these renegade misfits because they’re into being mistreated. In fact, evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller notes that “Around the world, women list ‘kindness’ as one of the most desired traits in a boyfriend” (in a massive global study by evolutionary psychologist David Buss). Miller drills down on the sort of kindness that’s the biggest draw: “Displays of real altruism — empathy, thoughtfulness, generosity and self-sacrifice.” That said, the motivation behind this matters. The lady-pleasing guy gives to make things better for others who are struggling. The needy beta boy gives to get, hoping he can bribe a woman into wanting him by becoming her never-say-no choreslave. In other words, though “nice guys” lament that they’re just too considerate, generous, and decent to get the girl, they’re wrong. It isn’t nice guys women reject, but overly nice guys: weaselly suckups who need the companion app to “Find My iPhone,” “Find Me Testicles!” Bad boys have special appeal for two groups of women: women who just want some hot hookuppy fun and women with high levels of “sensation seeking.” The term, coined by social psychologist Marvin Zuckerman, describes a personality trait marked by a longing for novel, varied, intense experiences and a willingness to take risks to have them. Certain contexts — like war, famine, or constant gang violence — can shift bad boys into consideration as possible romantic partners. Evolutionary anthropologist Jeffrey Snyder and his colleagues find that “the greater a woman’s self-perceived vulnerability to violent crime,” the stronger her preference for a mate who can protect her: a big scary-dude human hammer other men know better than to tussle with. However, that preference “can be a double-edged sword,” because “the use of aggression for personal gain outside of the home is one predictor of partner abuse.” Ultimately, the answer to your question, “Do the jerks get the girls?” is: Often, yes — often temporarily. Bad boy qualities like narcissism — playing out in selfishness, attention-seeking, and an overblown view of one’s own greatness — are obviously undesirable in a long-term relationship. However, narcissists rule at first impressions, exuding confidence and charisma and drawing on what psychologist Gregory Louis Carter describes as a “‘used-car dealer’ ability to charm and manipulate.” The dark side isn’t without a bright side. Bad boys often become teaching tools for the women who’ve been burned by them — though the takeaway is not “Just gotta find me a wimpy suckup” but to hold out for a strong, confident man with signs of good character. (The meek, sadly, will inherit the trowel — and the privilege of drywalling a woman’s house while she’s off having sex with the guy who tried to cheat on her with her sister.) n ©2022, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

38 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

EVENTS | CALENDAR SPOKANE SYMPHONY MASTERWORKS 4: ECKHART RETURNS Conductor Laureate Eckart Preu (2004–19) returns to conduct Wagner and Bruckner. Jan. 15, 8 pm and Jan. 16, 3 pm. $19-$48. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (509-624-1200) MATTHEW LEVINE SONGWRITING CLASS Matthew Levine’s career has seen him writing songs of many styles: choral, cabaret, pop, gospel, musicals, etc. Musicians of any level can learn new songwriting tools during his 8-week class at Clearwater Music. Tuesdays from 4-5:30 pm, Jan. 10-Feb. 28. $20/lesson; $120 prepay for all 8. Clearwater Music, 9107 N. Country Homes Blvd. clearwatermusicserves.com (661472-9920) BIG HEAD TODD & THE MONSTERS Big Head Todd and The Monsters have quietly become an American institution following three and a half decades of writing, recording, and touring (totaling over 3,500 performances Jan. 18, 7 pm. $29-$49. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater. com (509-227-7404) WEDNESDAY EVENING CONTRA DANCE Join the Spokane Folklore Society each Wednesday for contra dancing. First-time dancers get a coupon for a free dance night. Contra is danced to a variety of musical styles: Celtic, Quebecois, Old Time, New England, or Southern Appalachian music from live bands. All dances are taught and walked through, then called to live music. Events feature a different band and caller each week. Come 15 min. early for a lesson. Proof of Covid-19 vaccination required. Wednesdays from 7:30-9:30 pm. $7/members; $10/general (18 and under free). Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane. org (509-869-5997) CLASICA An evening featuring classical and Spanish music and dance, plus some of the best Flamenco performers from across the country. Jan. 22, 7-9 pm. $25-$35. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. quieroflamenco.com (509-313-2787)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON (MT. SPOKANE) Learn the basics of crosscountry skiing at Mt. Spokane. Lessons are taught by Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s certified instructors. Additional information emailed after registration. Sessions offered on select dates through March, from 10 am-2 pm. $34/$59. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. Register at spokanerec.org (509-755-2489) JACKASS DAY 2022 An annual tradition celebrating Silver’s roots. In 1967, Jackass Ski Bowl opened on Wardner Peak with a Riblet chairlift that is still in use today as Chair 4. Celebrate by donning your best vintage ski gear and enjoying retro-priced lift tickets for only $18. Tickets are limited and must be reserved in advance. Jan. 13. $18. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) NIGHT SKIING SESSIONS Mt. Spokane kicks off night-skiing sessions, which run every Wed-Sat from 3-9 pm through March 12. $32. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com

WINTER CAMPING BASICS Camping in the winter offers year-round access to natural spaces, and the beautiful calm that comes with the coldest nights. In this presentation by REI camping experts, learn trip planning, setting up camp and how to stay warm. Jan. 13 and Jan. 27 from 5-6:30 pm. Free. Online; register at rei.com/events/98191/ virtual-winter-camping-basics FRIDAY NIGHT CLUB SHRED Bring your kids to this new event, offering a chance to learn and practice ski skills. They’ll get ski instruction and take part in activities such as snow fort building, games, crafts, movies and more. Each Friday night includes a kids-only dinner. Skiers level 1 and 2 only, ages 4-10. Fridays from 5-8 pm through Feb. 25. $39. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (509-238-2220) MLK WEEKEND AT SCHWEITZER Annual MLK weekend highlights include the Northern Lights fireworks show and more. Jan. 14-17. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer. com/event/mlk-weekend SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. EVERETT SILVERTIPS Special: Seattle Kraken ticket sweepstakes. Jan. 14, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) TURNS UNDER THE LIGHTS Twilight skiing is offered via the Basin Express high-speed quad and Musical Chairs double, plus in the Stomping Grounds Terrain Park as well as beginner terrain off Musical Chairs. Fridays and Saturdays from 3-7 pm through March 5; also Sun, Jan. 16 and Sun, Feb. 20. $20/$40. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. KAMLOOPS BLAZERS Special: Numerica piggy bank giveaway. Jan. 15, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) SPOKANE NORDIC WINTERFEST Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s annual cross-country skiing event offers a free waxing clinic and treasure hunt, as well as ski lessons to nonmembers of all skill levels for $10. Jan. 16, 9:30 am. Free. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org MT. SPOKANE SNOWSHOE TOUR Learn the basics of snowshoeing during this guided hike on snowshoe trails around Mount Spokane. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Fee includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation. Ages 13+. Jan. 17, Jan. 29, Feb. 6, Feb. 13, Feb. 21 and March 5 from 9 am-1 pm. $25/$29. Register at spokanerec.org (509-755-2489) CHEAP SKATE TUESDAY Free skate rentals are included with each paid admission, every Tuesday (10 am-9 pm) through Feb. 22. Masks required. $5.95$7.95. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. riverfrontspokane. com (509-625-6600) GET READY TO SLED Join REI and learn tips and tricks to stay warm, eat well and slide fast on your favorite local sledding hill. Jan. 19, 12-1 pm. Free. Online; register at rei.com/events/98510/ virtual-get-ready-to-sled SKATE FOR A CAUSE A new program allowing local nonprofit organizations to retain 30 percent of public admission fee for their unique needs. January’s featured organization is the Women Helping Women Fund. Jan. 19, 4-8 pm.

$10. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. my.spokanecity. org/riverfrontspokane 34TH ANNUAL INLAND NORTHWEST RV SHOW The Northwest’s largest RV show hosts multiple dealers throughout all nine buildings of the fairgrounds. Vendors showcase RVs, accessories, tent trailers and more. Free parking. Jan. 20-22; Thu 12-8 pm; Fri-Sat 10 am-8 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm. $10 weekend admission; kids 12 and under free. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanervshow.com WINTER SURVIVAL BASICS Join experienced REI staff for a presentation on the basics of winter survival. Jan. 20, 5-6:30 pm. Free. Online; register at rei.com/events/98386/virtual-wintersurvival-basics PBR PENDLETON WHISKY VELOCITY TOUR The PBR’s Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour brings the excitement of cowboy and bovine talent that fans have come to expect from the sport to cities across the United States. Jan. 22, 7 pm. $17-$207. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com

THEATER

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Featuring a talented cast, lavish orchestra and stunning movement and dance from Israeli choreographer Hofesh Shechter, based on the original staging by Jerome Robbins, Fiddler introduces a new generation to the uplifting celebration that raises its cup to joy! To love! To life! Jan. 11-15 at 7:30 pm, also Jan. 15 at 2 pm and Jan. 16 at 1 and 6:30 pm. $42-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com/events/detail/ fiddler-on-the-roof CORPUS CHRISTI A moving and thoughtful story of faith, redemption, love and betrayal. Lead character Joshua, struggles with his identity, not only as a gay young man, but as a Christlike figure which some have come to follow as the messiah. Jan. 21-Feb. 6, Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$25. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. stagelefttheater.org (509-838-9727) STAGED READING: MAD UNDERGROUND Join Spokane Playwrights Laboratory for a fully-acted staged reading of “Mad Underground” by local playwright Sandra Hosking. Then grab a drink and join in a live “talk back” session with the playwright. Jan. 20, 7:30 pm. Free; donations accepted. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific Ave. spokaneplaywrightslaboratory.com ALMOST, MAINE One cold, clear, winter night, as the northern lights hover in the star-filled sky above, the residents of Almost, Maine, find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and hilarious ways. Performed by Spokane Civic Theatre Academy Students. Jan. 22-23 at 2 pm. $10. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside Ave. spokanecivictheatre. com/productions/almost-maine

VISUAL ARTS

MYA CLUFF: WHERE DO I END, AND YOU BEGIN? As a mother and an artist, Cluff searches for the beginnings and endings of self-hood as she navigates the relationships she has with herself, her children, her family and society within a maternal context. Mon-Fri from 8:30 am-3:30 pm through Feb. 8. Free.


Have an event?

SFCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3410 W. Whistalks Way, Bldg. 6. spokanefalls.edu/gallery THE FIRST TIME I EVER HEARD THE BLUES Karen Christeson-Swanson makes paintings, drawings and mixed media artworks. Her new collection depicts women’s struggles and honors them. Jan. 14, 21 and 28 from 4-8 pm. Free. Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams St. kolva-sullivangallery.com JANUS, SPIRIT OF THE OPENING Featuring the artwork of Travis Chapman, Roch Fautch, Jesse Swanson, Darrell Wilcox, John Thamm, Matthew Wolf, Audreana Camm, Rick Davis and Hank Chiapetta. Fridays 5-8 pm and Saturdays 12-4 pm through Jan. 29. Free. Shotgun Studios, 1625 W. Water Ave. (509-688-3757) SARANAC ART PROJECTS PRESENTS: PRESENCING Featuring recent works by Emily Somoskey, Mana Mehrabian, Ellen Picken, Lena J. Lopez Schindler and Hannah Koeske. Open Fri-Sat from 12-8 pm through Jan. 29. Free. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main Ave. (509-350-3574) SECOND FRIDAY ARTWALK Stroll the streets of downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy locally- and nationally-acclaimed artists, along with local shops, restaurants and businesses. Jan. 14, 5-8 pm. Free. artsandculturecda.org DAILY DRAWING WITH MEGAN PERKINS Four sessions with artist Megan Perkins during which she demonstrates drawing techniques, styles and tools to inspire you to draw daily. Online class, meets Saturdays from 6-8 pm, Jan. 15Feb. 5. $80. spokaneartschool.net ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS WITH HANNAH CHARLTON In this class, students create small illuminated manuscript pages from famous fairy tales. For adults. Meets Jan. 15 and 22 from 9-11:30 am. $65. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spoakneartschool.com INDIE FOLK: NEW ART & SONGS FROM THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST The Pacific Northwest is home to a unique artistic ecosystem involving craft traditions, preindustrial cultures, and Indigenous and settler histories. Like folk art, the works featured here are handmade, straightforward, and often blur the line between functionality and aesthetics. Jan. 18-May 21; Tue-Fri from 1-4 pm, Sat from 10 am-4 pm Free. Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, 1535 NE Wilson Rd. museum.wsu. edu (509-335-1910)

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DRINKABLES

No Hangovers Here Cannabis-infused mocktails for a booze-free buzz

Ray’s Lemonade offers a different kind of buzz.

BY WILL MAUPIN

J

anuary is known to many as “dry January,” a month of abstaining from alcohol after perhaps over-imbibing during the holiday season. Whether you’re taking part in that or not, you don’t need to go all month without enjoying a relaxing drink. And you don’t need to break the dry January fast to catch a buzz from a beverage. Here are three nonalcoholic, cannabis-infused mocktails to sip when you want the buzz but not the booze.

SPIKED SPARKLING LEMONADE

Local producer Dogtown Pioneers’ brand of infused beverages, Ray’s Lemonade, is a staple on dispensary shelves around the region. They’re perfect for experimenting thanks to the broad range of flavors: from classics like strawberry, regional favorites like huckleberry, adventurous tastes like tiger’s blood, and of course the traditional plain old lemonade.

40 INLANDER JANUARY 13, 2022

Once you’ve chosen a flavor, combine one 10 milligram dose with 12 ounces of your preferred brand of sparkling water, on ice. The delicate, dry flavor of brands like La Croix creates a nice balance with the sweet punch from the Ray’s Lemonade.

INFUSED APPLE GINGER

If you’re looking for something a bit more complex than the two-ingredient sparkling lemonade, look no further than Green Med Lab’s Happy Apple, an infused cider made with Washington apples. It provides a spark that takes a traditional ginger ale and apple cider mix to the next level. Add 1 ounce — one 10-milligram dose — of Happy Apple to 3 ounces of quality apple cider, on ice. Then, add 4 ounces of ginger ale. My personal preference is a ginger ale on the dry side of things, rather than the sticky-

sweet soda machine varieties. Freshen things up with a slice of apple and cinnamon stick garnish. If you don’t have sticks in the pantry, powdered cinnamon works, but take care not to overdo it.

CANNABIS HOT COCOA

What’s better than warming up with a hot beverage in the middle of winter? Warming up with a hot beverage that will get you high in the middle of winter, of course. Left-Handed Brand’s line of infused seasonings includes an infused sugar offering and an infused cinnamon-sugar mixture, perfect for dissolving into warm drinks. Whip up a thermos full of your best hot chocolate and simply stir in one four-gram sugar packet containing 10 milligrams of THC. And since getting high is supposed to be fun, don’t forget the marshmallows, whipped cream and sprinkles on top. n


NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

Marijuana use increases the risk of lower grades and dropping out of school. Talk with your kids.

GET THE FACTS at learnaboutmarijuanawa.org

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