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WHAT NOW? QUESTIONS SWIRL AROUND THE RIDPATH PAGE 13

LOVE CONQUERS ALL BEALE STREET DOES JUSTICE TO JAMES BALDWIN PAGE 34

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INSIDE VOL. 26, NO. 13 | COVER DESIGN: DEREK HARRISON

COMMENT NEWS MILLER CANE CULTURE

5 13 22 25

SNOWLANDER 28 FOOD 29 FILM 34 MUSIC 38

EVENTS 44 I SAW YOU 46 GREEN ZONE 48 ADVICE GODDESS 52

EDITOR’S NOTE

T

hese, my dear friends, are the dark days of winter. The holidays are over. So is college football. Sure, the Zags are playing, but their WCC foes make the games unbearable. But fret not: Embrace the cold. Luxuriate in it. Strap on some snowshoes and trek through the woods. Or answer the siren call of backcountry skiing. Or take up snow bowling at Lookout Pass. (See our SNOWLANDER pull-out guide on page 28.) Still unconvinced? OK, there are two good movies hitting theaters this week (pages 34 and 37). Or you could relive your glory days with REO Speedwagon (page 40). Or buy locally made pasties (page 25). Or revel in the utter dysfunction of the federal government (page 20). This much I know: Slowly, too slowly, the days are getting longer. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT’S THE WORST APARTMENT EXPERIENCE YOU’VE EVER BEEN IN?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Dan Nailen (x239) MANAGING EDITOR/ARTS & CULTURE Chey Scott (x225)

ATHENA BALENZANO

Right now I’m in my first apartment in college. It would have to be that one: It’s simultaneously the best and the worst. So what’s the worst thing about it? My biggest problem is I just have really noisy neighbors, but that’s the case with any apartment. I can hear their conversations basically and they can hear mine.

FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

Nathan Weinbender (x250) FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

Quinn Welsch (x279) COPY EDITOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Josh Kelety (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

ANNABELLE CHURCH

When I was a kid, I lived in a one bedroom tiny kitchenette that didn’t even have like a stovetop. So we had a pullout bed, a microwave, a sink — we didn’t have a shower or anything. What was the most challenging part of that? We just had, like Top Ramen. And I was a child.

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AMY MORFITT

Well, it wasn’t a bad apartment. It was the parking. What was so bad about the parking? It was an extra $50 dollars a month to park in the parking lot next to the apartment. It was kitty-corner to the Onion. It was like 1992. They didn’t tell us the parking was extra.

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PRODUCTION & SUPPORT Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER

2019

KYLE STARK

Does it have to be an apartment? Or can it be a trailer park? It can be a trailer park! We were living in one, and some neighbors started harassing us. They started throwing trash in our yard. My dad was trying to take care of it. The cops ended up getting called one time, and nothing happened. We just ended up moving somewhere else.

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Ali Blackwood (x228) CREATIVE LEAD

Derrick King (x238), Tom Stover (x265) SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Justin Hynes (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Camille Awbrey (x212), Andrea Tobar (x242) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

DAVE CALSYN

I didn’t live in apartments, other than once. I managed them! OK, what was the worst apartment experience from an apartment you managed? The only worse situation we had there was one guy fired a .22 off. Each floor had a shared washer and dryer. And I had just got done walking out of there, as I was washing a coat. And the bullet came through the wall. I actually found it. It was in the living room.

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Prodigal Son

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The new film Vice is yet another reminder of the differences between the two Bushes BY ROBERT HEROLD

S

ince last month, America has been ruminating on the death of George H.W. Bush. We associate him with dignity, the first Gulf War and also a stagnant economy (which should have been more associated with the policies of Ronald Reagan). We also associate Bush I with putting together a generally serious-minded cabinet — except for the appointment of Dick Cheney as secretary of defense. (And don’t forget Dan Quayle!) Well the apple fell pretty far from the tree, as there really is nothing to applaud about George W. Bush. He took a Clinton economy that had produced a surplus and, through tax reductions

for the rich along with a war on regulation, brought on the economic meltdown of 2008. We also associate him with the mess known as Gulf War II. Aside from Cheney — now the subject of his own unflattering movie, Vice — Bush I and Bush II had one more person who figured into both their administrations: Joe Wilson. Wilson was admitted to the London School

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INDIGENOUS PEOPLES MARCH: A march in support of the many environmental activists, traditional wisdom keepers, organizers, tribal leaders, social entrepreneurs, artists, educators, innovators and change makers who are working to give voice to the rights of indigenous peoples around the world. Spokane’s event occurs in conjunction with a national march in Washington, D.C.

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of Economics, but instead he chose the University of California at Santa Barbara because, as he put it, “the surfing was better.” Following graduation, he applied to the UW Jackson School of International Studies. He wound up at Eastern Washington University, where we met. Toward the end of his first year, Wilson joined the Foreign Service and left Cheney. We lost track of Wilson until the run-up to the first Gulf War; turns out he was acting ambassador in the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. Wilson’s first challenge was to free the American hostages Saddam Hussein had taken. With the help of German intelligence, Wilson somehow talked Saddam into releasing them. Later, he became the last American out of Baghdad before the bombing began. Upon his return to D.C., Wilson was welcomed by PresiLETTERS dent George H.W. Bush, who Send comments to personally thanked him. editor@inlander.com. Fast forward to Gulf War II: Oh, how things had changed. The so-called neocons, led by Paul Wolfowitz, had always opposed the decision to end Gulf War I without deposing Saddam. George W. Bush, now president, had selected Wolfowitz to be deputy defense secretary under Donald Rumsfeld. Wolfowitz was finally in a position to exercise more influence. Then came 9/11. Saddam, as we now know, had nothing to do with 9/11. Nevertheless, the George W. Bush administration used the attacks to push harder to invade Iraq. To seal the deal, they steered the ever-compliant W., in his State of the Union, to assert that Saddam was buying yellowcake uranium from Niger to build a nuclear weapon. The CIA, however, was not convinced. About this time, Wilson’s wife, Valerie Plame, then a CIA operative, let her colleagues at Langley know that her husband, by then retired, had spent considerable time in Niger. The CIA asked Wilson to travel there to check on the uranium story. Through his contacts there, he found no evidence of any uranium sale to Iraq. When Joe Wilson heard Bush’s speech, he was infuriated. He wrote an op-ed piece in the New York Times titled, “What I Didn’t Find in Africa.” Then all hell broke loose. Learning that Wilson was the husband of Valerie Plame, Cheney and his adviser Scooter Libby outed Wilson’s wife from her undercover status. They destroyed her career, but even worse, they launched an American military operation under what we now know to be false pretenses. (Valerie Plame later testified before Congress, leading to the conviction of Libby for lying to Congress; Libby was recently pardoned by Donald Trump.) As the movie Vice shows, Bush II turned over the national security establishment to Dick Cheney and Scooter Libby. So it was that Joe Wilson went from American hero under George H.W. Bush to Republican target under the son, George W. Bush. That’s worth remembering as this history is written. n Robert Herold is a retired professor of public administration and political science at both Eastern Washington University and Gonzaga University.

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FROM THE VAULT JAN. 13, 2011: Eight years ago, Eastern Washington University football players were in Frisco, Texas, playing in the FCS Championship against the Blue Hens of Delaware. The Eagles won 20-19, giving EWU its first-ever NCAA championship in any sport. This past Saturday, the Eags were back in Frisco, in their first return to the FCS Championship game, but fell to North Dakota State, 38-24.

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COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A JIM FRANK Winding down a career as a homebuilder, Greenstone’s founder has an affordable housing to-do list for his hometown INTERVIEW BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

J

im Frank’s a Spokanite through and through — Garfield Elementary, Gonzaga Prep, Gonzaga University School of Engineering and Gonzaga Law School. He started his career as an air quality engineer for Spokane County; after earning a law degree via night school, he went into private practice, representing both developers and neighborhoods. In 1983, Frank founded Greenstone Homes; since then, his firm has built homes all over the Inland Northwest, most recently in Kendall Yards. INLANDER: You say you’re “pretty much” retired. What does that mean? FRANK: I go into work every day and pretend to be working, but day-to-day operations have been turned over to my son Joe [since 2014], who is doing a really good job. Joe shares a lot of the values I’ve had, and the company is being run by a new group of young people. I’ve learned that there’s a point where you can’t have one foot in the canoe and one out. You have to make a clean break and let the young people make the decisions. Not long ago, we were writing stories about suburban sprawl and McMansions; now we’re writing about how everybody wants to move closer to the action. What happened? Markets are always evolving, and lots of emptynesters want to be close to urban amenities. Younger professionals… that generation has deferred setting up a household to maybe a decade later. Before they start a family, they like to live in neighborhoods where there’s a sense of gathering. Single women also feel safer in a more urban environment, and are looking for the very same thing as empty-nesters. Those groups are making infill development happen. We all see the headlines about how crazy expensive housing has become in Seattle. We’re a little smug about how affordable our housing is. Should we be? We can’t be smug, no. This is a nationwide issue: We simply aren’t building enough houses to accommodate our population. That’s why we’re seeing unsustainable

XLNY

prices in both homes and apartments. Median house prices are $800,000 in Seattle, and that makes it impossible for a middle-class family to live there. It’s causing a lot of people to leave for Spokane. And that puts pressure on our housing market. The question is, do we have enough inventory? Well, do we? The urban growth boundary is very tight, and the city of Spokane has been very slow to make changes to allow urban housing and infill to occur. So a lot of the housing for the Spokane market is happening on the Rathdrum Prairie in Idaho. Are we pushing our middleclass to migrate to North Idaho? In a generation, I think we’ll see that will have consequences. It sounds like we have a problem… There needs to be revisions to the [state] Condominium Act. Condos have long been the entry to home ownership, but we haven’t built any really since 2009 when the act was revised. Most opportunities for urban infill are in the city of Spokane. Our Comprehensive Plan is fine, but we have been slow to make the changes in the development code to implement it. Take accessory dwelling units — it’s pretty restrictive here. But if you go to Vancouver, B.C., there’s an entire industry doing granny flats. You can’t just allow something. Your development code needs to encourage it. Those are two different things. Right now, they’re updating the downtown comp plan, and housing needs to be the focus. We’ve not followed the recent trend of most major cities that have had significant downtown housing development. We need to understand why. If we don’t get more housing downtown, it’s nothing more than a drive-to employment center. It’s not a mixed-use downtown if it doesn’t have housing. And we don’t need 50 units; we need 5,000 units. n This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

THANK YOU, MARY LOU REED I was just thinking what insightful, informative words have been written by Mary Lou Reed, when I got to her last words, “I end my final column here in the Inlander” (12/27/18) ... So sorry to see her retire, but thankful for all her contributions. MAGGIE MUAT Liberty Lake, Wash. Thank you for your years of dedication to our community and to the Inlander as well. You have been such an inspiration to me and to many of my friends. JOY FITZPATRICK Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Hillyard’s newest draw: The Roxie Spokane.

Readers respond to an Inlander article about the Roxie Spokane’s efforts to revitalize Hillyard into something similar to the Perry District (“Rising Tide,” 1/3/19):

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

PETER HIRE: I’ve been to Hillyard many times over the years, and at this point, the only thing to do is demolish and rebuild. STEPHEN TERRY: Perhaps if you look at the housing near Perry District and compare it with housing around Hillyard, some differences may become obvious. You have to change more than just the business district. RITA VIGIL: Boo to the negativity in the comments. Cheers to the people creating jobs, finding new ways to expand Spokane, and offer more diversity to the landscape of people, activities and commerce. So many people dig in their heels when change comes to Spokane, then when it does well, they hop on and enjoy the ride. Stop resisting good change for our city! SHAUK PRIME: Unfortunately, square footage is not what makes a venue successful. I love the concept on paper but considering you can get full-fledged venues downtown for less money that come with sound, lighting and staff included. I wouldn’t have led with that $2,000 number personally. n

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 11


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HOUSING

Trouble on the Block

The visionary trying to reinvent the old Ridpath Hotel faces a criminal indictment; what that means for the project and the people already living there BY JOSH KELETY

O

ne wouldn’t exactly describe the exterior of the Ridpath — the beat-up hotel in downtown Spokane that’s being renovated into apartments — as vibrant or appealing. You’re more likely to notice boarded-up storefronts, a broken window and sporadic graffiti strewn across the street-level walls. But inside the dreary 118-year-old building, tenants describe an affordable and liveable home with well furnished and modern units that they enjoy. “I’ve lived in here since they opened. I was one of the first people to get approved,” John Lemus, a resident since last April, tells the Inlander while standing outside the Sprague Avenue building entrance. “I have a micro studio. I love it. I’m really proud to live here.” “It’s really nice,” says Ian Larsen, a tenant in a micro studio who moved in last June and uses federal housing vouchers to help pay his rent. “It’s snug, but it’s not bad. It’s all I need really anyway and it’s right downtown so it’s easy to get everywhere.” Larsen and Lemus were some of the first tenants to move into the building when its management started leasing units last spring, despite the fact that construction was ...continued on next page

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


NEWS | HOUSING “TROUBLE ON THE BLOCK,” CONTINUED... still ongoing. At the time, the repurposing of the iconic Spokane building seemed to be on track after years of false starts since the former hotel closed in 2008. Now, however, the project is back in the news under less-than-ideal circumstances. The chief visionary behind the project, well-known local developer Ron Wells, is facing a federal indictment, health problems and has been ousted from his leadership role by Ridpath investors. This, coupled with other issues, has prompted some stakeholders to wonder if the promise of a renovated Ridpath can be achieved. None more so than the people who live there. Their enthusiasm for the project is tempered with a variety of security-related issues ranging from aggressive confrontations with people loitering outside the building to assaults and other disturbances. “There’s drugs, you name it. All kinds of illegal activity,” Ann, another tenant since last summer, tells the Inlander. (Ann lives in a below-market rate onebedroom apartment through federal housing vouchers and declined to give her last name.) “I like my apartment. There’s just quite a bit of underlying stuff.” Nevertheless, the Ridpath’s management team has been relatively successful in filling units in the building, and construction is almost complete, according to Paul Mann, a co-investor in the project. Of the 151 units in the main building, 120 are filled, and leasing will begin soon on the other 55 in the adjacent Y Building, which is also part of the complex. Roughly 80 percent of the total 206 units will be affordable. “We’re 95 percent done. It’s a matter of a few weeks,” Mann says of the construction process, adding that they expect to be at maximum occupancy by spring.

I

n mid-December, Wells, who had shepherded the project as its developer for the past six years, was indicted in federal court on 17 counts related to a complex insurance fraud scheme. (Wells is also reportedly recovering in a rehabilitation facility after going into a three-week medically induced coma following a surgery a few months ago.) The criminal charges stand in sharp contrast to Wells’ reputation as a civic pioneer who took control of the Ridpath and promised to bring vitality to that part of downtown. The push for revamping the 13-floor former high-end hotel located on Sprague between Stevens and Howard streets has been a long time coming. Since going out of busiRon Wells ness roughly a decade ago, the building has been associated with urban blight in downtown Spokane due to vandalism and squatting in the vacant structure. In 2012, Wells stepped in, offering up development plans that would make contemporary urban planners drool: He wanted to convert the dilapidated vintage structure into a eclectic mixed-use residential and commercial building with both affordable low-income housing and penthouse condominiums — including micro studios catering to young urban professionals. His persistence in pushing the vision forward beat out proposals from other developers wanting to create a new hotel and entertainment complex after legal battles on different portions of the property due to scattered ownership of various parts of the building.

14 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

Despite renovations, the Ridpath continues to be a hot spot for 911 calls and disturbances. Following years of legal tussles over ownership of the building, in 2017, Wells secured a $1.75 million investment from the city of Spokane in leftover funds from a federal housing program to help subsidize the low-income units. Construction on the project was repeatedly delayed — the building was once expected to open in the fall of 2017 — but by the spring of 2018, some of the units were getting leased. Meanwhile, local restaurant entrepreneur Jeremy Hansen was working on a gin-focused bar and restaurant in the vacant ground-level commercial space facing Sprague. To the broader community, the project was pitched as a way to revitalize a downtrodden portion of downtown and provide desperately needed affordable housing in the city’s urban core. “They were supposed to have some retail and a restaurant and another little bar. It was supposed to be a mixed-use cool space with some apartments that I thought were going to add to our community,” says Tyson Sicilia, owner of the Observatory bar adjacent to the Ridpath building. However, the Jane Jacobs-esque vision of a mixed-use, mixed-income urban utopia hasn’t exactly panned out. In addition to Wells being out of the picture, Hansen is bailing on his bar and restaurant — he says he’s currently working on getting out of his lease — and disturbances in the area continue to cause problems for local businesses, residents and police.

A

ccording to data provided by John O’Brien, a spokesman for the Spokane Police Department, a large number of calls stem from the Ridpath. Between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31 of 2018, the department logged 94 incidents ranging from assaults to graffiti, and a month-to-month breakdown also shows the number of incidents spiking during the summer months, shortly after the time when the Ridpath started leasing its first units. In comparison, the Metropolitan Apartments on North Bernard Street, just blocks away, only garnered five incident during the same time period, while the M Apartments next to River Park Square logged three. David Singley, police captain of the downtown pre-

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

cinct, says that the block was a high-activity area even before the Ridpath opened. He places most of the incidents occurring on the corner of Sprague and Howard outside of a small corner store called Downtown Groceries. He writes in an email that the concentration is “frequently” related to “groups congregating on the sidewalks at that intersection” and that incidents spike in the spring and summer months.

“This has been a blighted block for a decade and we’re in the process of bringing it back to life.” “When it’s warm out, they’re all out here,” Lemus says, describing an incident where he was recently “accosted” by a group of loiterers while walking home. “I feel like I’ve got to buy a taser or something so that we don’t get attacked while we’re out here.” “It just makes downtown less appealing,” Sicilia says of the project. “People are like, ‘Wow this neighborhood sucks.’ You hear a lot of comments about how bad the neighborhood is.” “The block needs something to help it grow and I think [the project] isn’t helping anything,” Hansen tells the Inlander. “It’s really just kind of regressing, making the problem worse instead of helping it.” In addition to the dynamics on the sidewalks, tenants cite other security-related issues: One is that friends and associates of existing tenants are getting entry codes and entering the building without supervision or badgering residents to let them in — sometimes aggressively. Another is that tenant relations can be rocky, occasionally resulting in conflicts and other disturbances. “There have been some people that are residents that have been assaulted,” says Ann, the Ridpath tenant. She adds that the culprits are usually associates of tenants trying to get access to the building or tenants strung-out on various illicit drugs. “You just use your survival skills


to the best of your ability and then, you know, always expect the unexpected.” Mann, the co-investor in the project, acknowledges that the situation isn’t ideal. But he also says stakeholders need to be patient. “I think it will achieve our objectives. It’s still in the early days yet, but this has been a blighted block for a decade and we’re in the process of bringing it back to life,” he says. “Clearly it hasn’t happened.” (The Ridpath property manager did not respond to multiple requests for comment.) Mann also points out that the property adjacent to the Ridpath on its east side, the Halliday Building, on the corner of Sprague and Stevens, is under separate ownership and hasn’t been revitalized. “That’s not being renovated in any way at the moment and sometimes people look at that and think it’s part of the Ridpath.”

D

espite the news surrounding Wells and the less-thanperky state of the block surrounding the Ridpath, city spokeswoman Marlene Feist also feels that the project is living up to the goals that warranted the $1.75 million public investment last year. “The goals of the project were to remedy the blight of this [block] in the downtown core and create more affordable housing units,” she says. “There’s still some work that needs to be done on the exterior for sure. But it’s no longer a vacant building that people are using to illegally enter. People are not squatting in that building any more.” Mann says that while the building has had security issues, it will soon be outfitted with a key fob system and that will “eliminate the problem” of non-tenants entering the building. He also pointed to a recent meeting between Lemus and the building’s property manager to discuss the various issues. (Lemus tells the Inlander that he viewed the meeting positively and that the company is going to “get on the ball.”) Kay Murano, executive director of the Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium, says that the Ridpath’s management might want to consider hiring a social worker for the property to work on tenant relations and conflict mediation — similar to staffing models employed by Catholic Charities. “With the Ridpath, it’s going through those growing pains to figure out what works best,” she says. (Mann says that the property has no such staff at this point.) Tenants started moving in last spring. But way before that, in July of 2017, restaurant entrepreneur Hansen “started feeling weird” about the Ridpath and the bar and restaurant that he was trying to open in it. He points to the disturbances on the sidewalk outside and internal security issues with the building as his rationale for backing out of the project. (For example, he says his wife found evidence that people were squatting in the restaurant space last October.) “It’s the dynamic of the whole atmosphere of the building itself and what it’s bringing to the block. [It] isn’t really conducive to the style of restaurant that we wanted to put in there,” Hansen says. “The building itself is not that secure and there’s a lot of weird stuff that happens. I don’t want to put myself in a situation where I could get hurt or I have to defend a guest.” Mann largely declined to comment on the specifics of Hansen’s concerns. “He is moving on. We’re going to look for a new tenant,” he says. But for all the hoopla over the Ridpath, tenants themselves don’t hate the building or aren’t desperate to move out; in their view, there are just some things that could be improved upon. “‘It’s not a shithole,” says one Ridpath tenant who declined to give his name. “It’s a nice facility.” He adds that the property management staff are “not slumlords, for sure.” “It’s just a great little community,” Lemus says. “As the building continues to progress and the staff continues to work with us, I think it’ll be a great thing.” Besides, Ann adds, it’s not like the building’s low-income tenants have other housing options. “With the housing market the way that it is? When you’re low income, there is no place to go.” n joshk@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

ONE IS THE LONELIEST NUMBER Last week, Idaho’s Public Utilities Commission joined Washington’s Utilities and Transportation Commission in denying AVISTA’S REQUEST TO MERGE with Canadian utility Hydro One. Like Washington, Idaho’s commissioners cited concerns over Ontario government control of Hydro One, and questioned whether there would be a net benefit to Avista customers. Idaho specifically has a law prohibiting the transfer of Idaho utility assets to the government of another state, and in this case, Hydro One has enough control to disqualify the transfer, the commissioners decided. Days later, on Jan. 8, Washington’s commission also declined a request from the utility companies to reconsider its decision. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

CLIMATE CH-CH-CH-CH-CHANGES High School students in Sandpoint who have been studying climate change causes, impacts and solutions plan to present their team projects for the chance to win $1,000 in prizes at the BIG CARBON FIX event next week. At the evening event, they and members of the community will hear from Steve Ghan, a highly cited climate scientist, and talk about common misconceptions about the causes of climate change. There will be time for questions after a presentation and the awards. The free event takes place at 6 pm, Jan. 16, in the Sandpoint High School auditorium, 410 S. Division, Sandpoint. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

FRESH EYES ON THE COPS As Spokane Police and the civilian ombudsman continue to butt heads over what POLICE OVERSIGHT looks like, the three mayoral candidates vying to replace outgoing Mayor David Condon are jockeying to distinguish themselves on the issue. In a nutshell, here’s where they stand: Firefighter Shawn Poole is pro-law enforcement and thinks they can hold themselves accountable internally, young progressive Chris Schroll says he would take “any action necessary” to support the work of the ombudsman, and sitting Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart thinks some — but not all — of the issues raised by the ombudsman are warranted. (JOSH KELETY)

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MISSING THE MARK Both KREM and KXLY reported recently that Spokane has the fifth highest HOMELESS POPULATION of urban cities in the U.S., basing the information on a recent report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Both articles generated plenty of interest, spreading quickly on social media and sparking arguments over how local leaders are handling the issue. However, the TV stations misinterpreted the report, says Kelly Keenan, the city’s Community Housing and Human Services director. What those news articles left out is that the category where Spokane ranked fifth doesn’t include any of the 50 largest cities in the country. And it’s not necessarily comparing Spokane to cities of similar size either, Keenan says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

‘The Deep End’ Republicans cut ties with James Allsup

C

iting his involvement with white nationalist groups, Whitman County Republican leaders stripped alt-right activist JAMES ALLSUP of his precinct committee officer seat and voting authority on Saturday, seven months after his uncontested election to the minor party position drew national headlines. John Brabb, state committeeman for the Whitman County GOP, says the former Washington State University College Republican president had “dropped off the deep end” and aligned himself with hate groups like Identity Evropa that do not reflect the party’s values. “Identity Evropa has a policy of … taking advantage of the PCO system and conquering a party from the bottom up,” Brabb says, later reading aloud an interview in which Allsup called the PCO position a “means to an end.” Allsup did not attend the meeting, but later posted his disappointment with local leaders to Facebook: “The future of the American right — if it is to have one — is nationalistic & identitarian in nature.” As a precinct committee officer, Allsup would have performed community outreach and voted on party positions. While party leaders cannot revoke his “certified” status from the election process, they have refused to seat him and plan to appoint a precinct committee captain to take over his duties. In the unanimous vote, several county and state officials condemned Allsup’s attacks on fellow Republicans,

18 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

Alt-right activisit James Allsup

WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTO

his increasing ties to white nationalism and his participation in the 2017 “Unite the Right” march alongside Nazis in Charlottesville, Virginia. “His beliefs have no place here,” Whitman County Prosecutor Denis Tracy said during the meeting. “He’s got no place here. … He should be voted out.” (JACOB JONES)

BUILDING OUR WAY OUT

When Spokane City Council President BEN STUCKART talks about homelessness, he doesn’t just talk about shelters. He talks about housing. “Many of the families on our streets simply cannot find an affordable place to live in our community,” Stuckart wrote in a post on his mayoral campaign site last year. “A shortage of affordable housing units that has left more than 800 of our citizens holding vouchers with nowhere

to spend it.” The need for new housing has meant Stuckart often sings from the same songbook as the conservative Spokane Home Builders Association, championing policies that would strip away regulations. On his campaign site, Stuckart even proposes generally eliminating parking regulations for developments, making it easier for developers to build more housing in a smaller space. “In my perfect world, we’d have no parking requirements,” Stuckart says, while acknowledging that’s not necessarily politically feasible. On Monday evening, the City Council unanimously voted to award multifamily-housing developers extra “points” when they compete for the city’s “projects of significance” funds. When the city refinanced the River Park Square bonds two years ago, Stuckart explains, the city saved $2 million, and put that money into a pool that developers could use for public improvements, like landscaping or utility upgrades. When interested developers, like those rehabbing the Wonder Bread Building, The M and the Ridpath, applied to the city for some of those funds, the city graded each proposal on a 150-point scale. But while the city was awarding developments extra points for, say, building manufacturing instead of retail, Stuckart says, “we noticed that there were no points given if there was housing.” Monday’s vote changes that. And more possible changes are coming: The City Council is planning on increasing maximum heights and loosening parking restrictions in the denser “centers and corridors” of Spokane. Stuckart says that, while the planning commission supports this proposal, it also wants to create mediumdensity “transition zones,” avoiding the aesthetic whiplash that can come from a tall apartment complex being


plopped down right next to single-family homes. (DANIEL WALTERS)

HOME BUILDING

Construction will soon start on a new 48-unit affordable apartment complex in Hillyard aimed in part at housing homeless youth in Spokane, according to nonprofit SPOKANE HOUSING VENTURES. Workers will break ground in March on the complex, called Jayne Auld Manor, says Fred Peck, executive director of Spokane Housing Ventures. He says Spokane Housing Ventures was inspired to build the complex when he learned there were more than 3,000 homeless youth in the county, according to the definition of homelessness used by schools. “A lot of kids are couchsurfing. Kids don’t have stability being in school,” Peck says. “So that’s what got us moving in this direction.” The roughly $10 million apartment complex will be named after Jayne Auld, who helped develop the nonprofit Spokane Housing Ventures and dedicated her life to serving the needs of low-income families. It will be located at 2830 E. Francis near Arlington Elementary School. Residents will consist of workers who earn less than 60 percent of the area’s median income, which for a four-person house is around $65,000 per year. Peck says he thinks it will make a “small, but significant dent” in the issue of homeless youth in Spokane. Kilgore Construction will be the general contractor, Peck says. Spokane Housing Ventures also plans to build several duplexes next to Jayne Auld Manor that are dedicated to housing homeless veterans. The nonprofit announced last month that it was awarded $400,000 for those 10 units, but more funding will be needed to complete the project, says Dave Roberts, senior developer for Spokane Housing Ventures. “This is just the start of these projects,” Roberts says. (WILSON CRISCIONE) n ! ED 5 W D 2 E N AD Y R W O UA H S

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JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 19


NEWS | GOVERNMENT

On the Brink If the federal shutdown continues, impacts could mount for Inland Northwest tribes, parks and vulnerable people BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

ith the federal government partially shut down for the third week, politicians in the nation’s capital were bracing for a high-stakes showdown. President Donald Trump planned an Oval Office address Tuesday night outlining the need for a border wall. Democrats, meanwhile, were pushing back, with even more leverage now that they took control of the House last week. But with all the political posturing, many wondered: what would be the real cost to Americans if federal funding continued to be used as a bargaining chip? Since Dec. 22, roughly 800,000 federal employees have either stayed home on furlough, or gone to work with no idea when they might finally get paid. It looked likely many wouldn’t receive their Jan. 11 paychecks, and that, financial experts and union leaders warned in national interviews, could mark the beginning of evictions, missed car payments and other serious financial hurdles for those who make the federal government run. That’s not to forget that those agencies serve others, and negative impacts have already become evident. Some national parks left open and largely unstaffed have seen overflowing toilets, illegal off-roading and other damage. At some airports, Transportation Security Administration workers who are required to work without pay were calling in sick in larger numbers than usual, CNN reported. It was unclear whether the Internal Revenue Service would be able to hand out tax returns just as tax season started gearing up, and service providers warned that millions of people who receive government assistance for food and housing could be at risk of hunger or eviction if things go on much longer. The demand holding everything up? President Trump wants at least $5 billion for a border wall. Until then, he says he won’t fund the federal agencies that haven’t already received 2019 funding. While some key programs like Social Security and Medicaid/Medicare won’t be affected during the political standoff, major disruptions could be imminent, as Trump has made it clear during negotiations he’s willing to make this shutdown last “months or even years.”

“F

oremost in my mind is just the uncertainty of when the shutdown will end,” says Rodney Cawston, chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, “and where will we be at with operating a lot of programs that are critical to our people and to our tribe and to our communities?” Like many other American Indian nations around the country, the Colville Tribes’ government receives federal money to self-manage programs that benefit members and in some cases, nonmembers. Nearly 1,400 people, including nonmembers, work for the tribe, which operates its offices on a 1.4-million acre reservation in north-central Washington. At least two health clinics in Inchelium and Keller that the tribe operates aren’t fully funded right now, Cawston says. The Indian Health Service (IHS) “continues to pro-

20 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

So far, Glacier National Park has escaped the worst of the partial government shutdown. vide direct clinical health care services as well as referrals for contracted services that cannot be provided through IHS clinics,” writes Asha Petoskey, special assistant to the director of the Portland area IHS, by email. But many administrative tasks are impacted, and IHS is “unable to provide the majority of funds to tribes and Urban Indian Health programs,” according to the Department of Health and Human Services’ contingency staffing plan for 2019. Still, things weren’t dire yet when Cawston spoke with the Inlander on Jan. 3. But that’s largely because the tribes had already received some of the 2019 federal appropriations. So far, the shutdown’s impacts on the Spokane Tribe of Indians have been minimal, Chairwoman Carol Evans says. But the New York Times reported that some tribes have already had to approve stop-gap funding, LETTERS including “one tribe Send comments to of Chippewa Indians editor@inlander.com. in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula” that’s using its own money to cover “about $100,000, every day, of federal money that does not arrive to keep health clinics staffed, food pantry shelves full and employees paid.” When the money runs out for the Colville Tribes at the end of March, there could be a loss of more than $1.5 million every week in federal assistance, and another roughly $400,000 or so per week in timber sales on the reservation. “There’s going to be some hard decisions we may be forced into making if this government shutdown doesn’t end soon,” Cawston says. “It’s not just our tribe and our members, it’s everybody in our communities that’s going to feel these impacts. … We are some of the most economically disadvantaged counties in the state of Washington.” The tribe provides services like snow plowing, education, health care, utility assistance, and more. It could all

NATIONAL PARK SERVICES PHOTO

be impacted, Cawston says, for a border wall, a marker of boundaries that didn’t exist for many indigenous people on either side of the border. “In Mexico as well as along the Canadian border are people [for whom] those international boundaries weren’t our boundaries,” Cawston says. “Native America extends all the way from Mexico up into Canada. When you look at that historically and today, many of those tribes were dissected by that border, but the relationship still exists. That wall will only be a further deterrent to tribes, impacting their relationship with our people.”

A

prolonged shutdown could also impact food and housing assistance. Food assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) could run out in mid-February, short of action to use reserves outside of what’s already been allotted to the USDA, Politico reports; federal housing vouchers should be payable through February, but beyond that it’s uncertain, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, which advocates for affordable housing. Luckily, Glacier National Park hasn’t been experiencing problems like those plaguing parks in warmer climates, says Doug Mitchell, executive director of the Glacier National Park Conservancy, which helps raise money for the park and operates its own visitor center that is still open during the shutdown. “Most of where you could go before the shutdown is still open after the shutdown,” Mitchell says. “We have told the park we’re at the ready if they need additional port-a-potties or pit toilets cleaned out, so the park can have health and safety issues dealt with.” But if the shutdown stretches into the warmer months, when Glacier sees most of its visitors, that could change. “I think at that point, that becomes more likely a larger national discussion for not just Glacier National Park, but parks in general,” Mitchell says. n samanthaw@inlander.com


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JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 21


PREVIOUSLY…

Miller Cane’s stop in Spokane has gotten complicated. The West is shrouded in wildfires, and his mother, who’s losing her mind, has vanished from her nursing home, leaving Miller and his sister Dena to figure things out. Besides, Miller’s got 8-year-old Carleen to take care of while her mother, Lizzie, is stuck in jail for shooting her estranged husband, Connor; that deadbeat suddenly came back into the picture after learning that Carleen will inherit a massive family fortune that he believes is rightfully his. Before all this, Miller had been on the road alone, traveling from mass shooting to mass shooting, comforting and conning survivors to make a buck.

CHAPTER 4, PART 3

T

hey should have hired a realtor years ago. But they’d been pretending — first when they moved her to Dena’s place, then when they moved her to Fairhaven — that their mother would someday move back to the house where she belonged, where she’d raised her family, though none of them had lived there for years. Now that Miller was on massacre sabbatical — which might become permanent — neither he nor Dena could afford to pretend she’d ever move back to their childhood home. And with the housing market heating up, it seemed like the right time to sell. The real estate agent, McKay, wore narrow shoes like Voyageur canoes strapped to his feet. Spokane had never been cool, but over the last few years, cool had been creeping in, breeding craft cocktails and electric scoot-

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

ers and restaurant empires, the art and money people impersonating each other and starting businesses nobody understood — Heath and Bindle and Plonk. Yes, there were still tweakers and car thieves and dive bars and thrift stores, but there was also snow removal and propaganda promoting Spokane to residents of other Western cities. Even with the recent changes, the city remained friendly and weird and a little crime-y, with a good sense of humor, only now with weed shops and excellent restaurants. The schools were good and lots of people were still poor and the suction goat garbage can was still sucking. McKay said something about the house’s bones, which made Miller think of his mother’s bones, which made him wonder where his mother was and what he was doing considering selling her house. What would be left? Carleen pushed her Barbie Care Clinic across the living room floor. “So cute,” McKay said. It wasn’t McKay’s fault that Spokane would someday be as unbearable as Portland. Well, probably never that unbearable. And partially McKay’s fault — the shoes, his name. When Dena had gone through the house last spring, Miller had told her he didn’t want anything except the roll top desk, which he had no use for or space for and never would. Now it was safe in a warehouse downtown. He was grateful to Dena for going through the family possessions, saving important stuff and getting rid of the junk. Seeing the place empty was so much better than seeing and smelling what it had become at the end, but he didn’t want to be seeing or smelling it at all. Where was their mother? McKay asked if Miller planned on having the floors redone. The wood was beautiful, but scratched and gouged. McKay suggested painting the interior, at least

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find them at Miller’s mother’s house. They needed to go before he showed up. They needed to get out of Spokane entirely. But McKay wanted to know about the furnace first and the water heater and the asbestos downstairs. What asbestos downstairs? The asbestos wrapped around the pipes in the basement. Which was going to kill everyone if they didn’t get out of the house immediately. Miller walked upstairs to his old bedroom overlooking the alley out back, the houses the same as they’d always been, only filled with different people now. This room had belonged to Charles first, then Dena, and finally to Miller, the room furthest from their parents’ room at the front of the house. At night, you could crawl onto the roof through the dormer window and smoke cigarettes and see the lights of the city spread out down the hill like jewels.

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downstairs. He was a nice guy and seemed to know what he was doing and the price he recommended listing at — with improvements — was far more than Miller would have guessed the place was worth, and might even keep them afloat for a while if Miller failed to get back on the circuit. Carleen opened her Care Clinic on the kitchen floor. McKay had some questions about the garage. Miller didn’t have a gun and didn’t want a gun and Connor would never be able to track them to Dena’s house because Dena had a different last name and had kept it — Cassidy — after her divorce. But Connor would

PER MONTH PER LINE


THE STORY

A fraudulent historian who makes his living conning the survivors of mass shootings returns home to save the young daughter of the woman he loves, taking her with him on his roadshow across the worn-out heart of America, staying one step ahead of what’s after them.

MAIN CHARACTERS

Miller Cane: A fraudulent historian, who’s been making his living conning and comforting the survivors of mass shootings. Carleen Callahan: The 8-year old daughter of Lizzie James and Connor Callahan. Has no idea she’s

Connor surely knew they were in Spokane — didn’t criminals always return to familiar haunts? Not that Miller was a criminal exactly. Yes, it was possible he was wanted for child abduction, but if the cops were after him, wouldn’t they have picked him up already? It wasn’t the cops Miller was worried about. It was Connor, who’d seen the motorhome with its crazy bumper stickers — jackalopes and John Wayne and Mount Rushmore and Niagara Falls and Muddy Waters and a hundred others — impossible to confuse with any other motorhome. But soon enough they’d be out in the beautiful, clear-aired country, lost to everyone. Miller’s phone vibrated with a text from Dena, probably more bad news. But it wasn’t bad news. Their mother was back at Fairhaven, safe. Just like that. All this time he’d been worrying over nothing, and now everything was back to normal. Not that normal was so great necessarily, but at least his mother wasn’t missing. “Such a beautiful house,” McKay said again, walking them out, and it was, now that everything was gone. Back at Dena’s, Carleen asked for help with the respirator so she could play out back with Baxter. “But just for a few minutes,” Dena said, and once Carleen was outside, she told Miller that nobody at Fairhaven knew how their mom had escaped. She’d made it over four miles, a Fairhaven record, before Spencer found her walking Division in her gardening hat and sneakers, put together pretty well, too, a fit senior strolling the retail hell-strip a half mile from the White Elephant, where Miller and Carleen had spent their morning.

recently become an heiress or that her mother has shot her father. Lizzie James: An artisan jewelry maker, and a baker at the Mount Vernon co-op, currently in Skagit County jail for shooting her estranged husband, Connor.

Connor Callahan: Son and grandson and great grandson of money, which somehow skipped him, going to his daughter instead. George Sampson: Miller’s editor, who works for a textbook publisher in Texas.

“It’s those Japanese floor mats I’m looking for,” she told Spencer when he picked her up. “What do you call those things?” He helped her into the Fairhaven van. “Which things, now?” he said and their mom said, “Which things what?” and by the time she was safe back at Fairhaven, she’d forgotten where she’d been entirely. “Where’s your father?” she asked Dena the second she walked onto the unit. “Golfing,” Dena said, leading her to her room. “Where have you been?” “That place with the little — the tiny little — what is that place?” “I’m not sure, Ma.” “Where’s your father?” “Watch Hill” Dena said, because their mother was often in Rhode Island now, where she’d grown up. “The Bouvier’s had a house in Watch Hill — Jackie’s family — did you know?” “The socialite?” Dena said. “And the president’s wife,” their mother said. “It was a piece of his skull she was after that day in Dallas, climbing the seatback and onto the trunk, reaching and scrambling for a piece of him. William thought Ruby was hired to kill the first one.” “And what do you think?” Dena said. “I think it’s wonderful,” their mother said. “What else would I think?” The nurse walked in and checked her vitals, and afterward their mother sat at her table handling pieces of a blocky puzzle. But she couldn’t settle in. She pushed the pieces around, glancing at Dena, looking away, looking at Dena, glancing away. “Who might you be?” she finally said.

THE AUTHOR

Samuel Ligon is the author of two other novels — Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead — and two collections of stories, Wonderland and Drift and Swerve. He’s artistic director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference and teaches at Eastern Washington University.

“What?” Dena said. “Who are you?” their mother said. “Your daughter,” Dena said. “Dena.” “Hm,” their mother said. Now in her own kitchen, Dena looked at Miller. “And I know you’ve heard that before,” she said. “But I haven’t — not like this. She couldn’t skate across it like she usually does.” “It’s okay,” Miller said. Though he knew it wasn’t. Dena was trying not to cry. “It’s just how empty she seemed. Like there was nothing left.” Miller wrapped his arms around her. They were going to sell their childhood home and never see their mother again, not who she really was, or they’d see her a few more times or a few hundred or a thousand, but probably not a thousand. Still it was encouraging (and troubling) that Fairhaven’s memory unit could not contain Noreen Elizabeth Goodman Cane. “I’ll go over there this afternoon,” Miller said. “Tomorrow,” Dena said. “She’s done for the day.” “Okay,” Miller said. “But did you know the house is full of asbestos?” “Yes,” Dena said. “But it’s not friable.” “I’m not talking about frying it,” Miller said. “The problem is breathing it.” Dena laughed and pulled away. “Take Carleen with you,” she said. “Ma’ll love that.” “I know,” Miller said. “What are you going to do with her anyway,” Dena said. “Once you leave here?” “Who?” Miller said, and Dena said, “Who do you think?” Why was everyone always asking that? “You can’t keep her on the road forever,” Dena said. Miller watched Carleen throw a tennis ball out back for Baxter, yelling encouragement through her respirator. Maybe the rules about what you could and couldn’t do forever no longer applied once you were out on the road in the clean, clear air of America. n

MILLER CANE CONTINUES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER

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FASHION

Nervous About Nipples? Sandpoint-based Pastease has you covered in style BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

S Various designs by Pastease

andpoint-based Pastease makes products that are figuratively above the law when it comes to women’s right to go au naturel with their nipples. In 2003, however, toplessness was not cool in Lake Havusa, Arizona, a popular site for spring break and nude sunbathing where Todd Prather happened to be vacationing. He noticed women were less likely to be arrested if their nipples were covered, so he developed Pastease, which continues to be popular with the festival and rave crowd. ...continued on next page

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | FASHION

Pastease partners Stephanie La Fleur and Todd Prather.

CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

“NERVOUS ABOUT NIPPLES?,” CONTINUED... Pastease is less about skirting decency laws, however, than it is about helping people feel good about themselves, says Prather, whose wife, Stephanie La Fleur, joined the company in 2007. Say the word “sexy” and people think “sexual,” says La Fleur. “It’s confidence, fun, freedom,” and if that’s sexy, OK, she says, but it’s not sexual. Another misconception: that their customers are all erotic dancers. They’re not, nor are they all women. “For the most part it’s the average woman in her 20s and up,” says La Fleur. Couples buy them, too, she says, recalling a man she believed to be in his 80s who phoned his order in year-after-year — a present for his significant other. Pasties have practical applications as well. Athletes use them to prevent nipple chafing during marathons and some women use them to cover scars, says La Fleur, who designed a custom pair for a woman who’d undergone breast surgery. “I always tell women that putting [pasties] on are the equivalent of getting a new bra and panties,” she says. “It’s just for you.” That doesn’t mean you can’t have some fun with their WEEKEND product. Want to get someC O U N T D OW N one’s attention during football Get the scoop on this season? How about pepperoni weekend’s events with pizza pasties? Or show supour newsletter. Sign up at port for the Seahawks yourself Inlander.com/newsletter. with neon green and blue stars. Of Pastease’s 400 designs, top-sellers include four-leaf clovers, black Xs, glittery shells, skeletal hands and marijuana leaves. The skeletal hands glow in the dark, which might have you rethinking that black light from your teenage years. Their pasties come in four sizes, because not all areolas are created equally. They use latex-free, medical-grade, waterproof adhesive designed to last up to a week when applied properly to

oil-free skin. “Like a Band-Aid,” says La Fleur. Pastease also makes merkins, which they market as a covering for the pubic area. They’re popular with women using them as a pantyliner or who want to go “commando,” says La Fleur. The products more or less sells themselves, say the couple,

“I always tell women that putting pasties on is the equivalent of getting a new bra and panties,” La Fleur says. “It’s just for you.”

26 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

although they do some trade shows and get a marketing and sales boost from their presence on Instagram. Digital technology has been a boon to their business, allowing them to work from anywhere in the world. They chose Sandpoint. While on a 2014 family vacation with their two children to North Idaho, the couple decided to relocate from Nevada, where they were based, and relocated the manufacturing facility to Sandpoint in July 2016. At first they were a little leery of people’s reactions but, taking a cue from their kids — unfazed about their parents’ business — they’ve relaxed a bit. In addition to contributing to the economy — including 8 to 15 employees, depending on the season — they’ve gotten involved in community events. The past two years, for example, they supported Sandpoint’s annual Boobs and Beer 5K Fun Run and Beer Fest, which benefits Celebrate Life and Community Cancer Services. The only downside to the business is the occasional miscommunication about the name of the product, says La Fleur, recalling a frantic phone conversation with a woman in need of a dozen different pasties — spelled the same as Pastease’ products but pronounced differently with a short “A,” as in fast — for Easter dinner. n

PASTIES’ CONTROVERSIAL PAST

Pasties, as the typically circular cover-ups are called, date to the late 1800s when female dancers throughout America pushed the boundaries of public nudity. Later, 1920s legends like the tassel-sporting Carrie Finnell mesmerized audiences with their pectoral prowess. In addition to strategic wardrobe design, pasties allowed burlesque and other performers to skirt decency laws, which can be confusing. Topless.org describes Washington’s laws governing female toplessness as “ambiguous,” while Idaho, in an apparent role reversal, is more liberal regarding nipple exposure. As one might expect, states are all over the board as to whether women’s and men’s nipples should receive equal treatment under the law, and a handful outright ban bare breasts. In the U.S., numerous lawsuits citing gender discrimination and a violation of the 14th Amendment’s “equal protection” clause are pending. But for those who feel the right to bare breasts is no less important than the right to bear arms, it’s one more reason to consider Canada, where toplessness is totally cool. — CARRIE SCOZZARO


CULTURE | DIGEST

BIRTHDAY BITES Maybe you’ve always meant to try that free birthday steak at the Swinging Doors, or maybe you’ve written it off as too good to be true. Either way, let me satisfy your curiosity: First, is it one of those things where you pay to “upgrade” it? Yes, (but it’s not required). Is it worth it? Yes. Even after spending about $7.50 to upgrade from a 6-ounce to a 10-ounce steak, add mushrooms and add cheddar and bacon to my baked potato, the meal, which also comes with a slice of Texas toast and potato fixin’s, was well worth it. The meat was tender and tasty, the serving filling, and if you buy a drink or two while you’re there, you’re still walking out the door having enjoyed what they ring up as a $16 deal on the house. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

More Than Meets the Eye

A

BY CHEY SCOTT

n unlikely entity has taken me fully into its fold. I’m completely obsessed with the Transformers. Unfortunately, I was born several years after Optimus Prime and the Autobots first revealed their presence on Earth with the 1984 debut of the Transformers cartoon series and toy line. By the time I was old enough to have any interest in playing with robots disguised as trucks, cars, jets and other vehicles, the “girl toys” of the early 1990s reigned supreme, and my sister and I chose Pound Puppies, Barbie, Polly Pocket, Legos and Beanie Babies over all else.

THE BUZZ BIN

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Jan. 11. To wit: THE DELINES, The Imperial. The latest project by former Richmond Fontaine frontman and author Willy Vlautin retains the twang-rock vibes he’s known for. THE KENTUCKY HEADHUNTERS, Live at the Ramblin’ Man Fair. If Southern rawk is your thing, few do it better than these cats. TAKING BACK SUNDAY, Twenty. A 21-track retrospective of the emo dudes’ “greatest hits.”

I’ll be 31 soon, yet my love for Bumblebee, Grimlock, Soundwave, Laserbeak, Ironhide, Wheelie, Starscream and literally hundreds of other robot characters is still in its infancy. I was only properly introduced to the Transformers universe a few months ago when my partner Will — who grew up with the toys and the show — nostalgically decided one Saturday afternoon to watch the 1986 feature The Transformers: The Movie. I rolled my eyes at first (a dorky kids’ movie!) but was surprisingly transfixed. I soon discovered that the Transformers are more magical, intricate and compelling than I ever imagined. The first generation robot designs are also adorable. Since that fateful fall day, I’ve watched the entire first season of the ’80s animated series, played through the incredible 2012 video game Fall of Cybertron, read a dozen or so Transformers comic books, learned to play the new Transformers collectible card game, cried three times during the new blockbuster film Bumblebee, and continue to incessantly bombard Will with Transformers memes, quotes, questions, music and general untethered enthusiasm. At the core of this newfound obsession is a simple explanation: the joy of discovery, imagination and escape. Learning about the Transformers and their world — all the character arcs and complex history of the Autobot and Decepticon factions — manifests as the purest form of nostalgic, childlike wonder. Nearly every episode of the cartoon presents new-to-me characters (it was, after all, created to promote the next new toy), sending me online to Transformers wikis to fully immerse myself in their rich backstories. There’s really nothing else that compares to this gleeful early phase of a newfound hobby or learning process, and this time, I’m shamelessly soaking it all up and letting my inner child roam free. Autobots, roll out. n

THE CONVERSATIONS OF THE RED STRINGS CLUB As point-and-click adventure computer games go, few are as bold or interesting as pixelated cyberpunk thriller The Red Strings Club. Sadly, it’s all too short, but the basic premise — which relies on serving powerful industry players drinks that influence their mood — is a fascinating one. What answers can you get out of, say, the cyberpunk equivalent of Elon Musk if he’s feeling manic? If he’s feeling particularly cocky? If he’s feeling particularly like a fraud? It’s the perfect game for anyone who loves to replay conversations in their head, wondering how things might have turned out differently. (DANIEL WALTERS)

THE GREAT ESCAPE After deciphering “ancient” codes and scouring stony walls for clues, we wondered how mystical crowns, skulls and potions could help us in our quest to escape the same curse that had befallen Merlin. Finally escaping indefinite entombment with just minutes to spare, we realized everyone had brought something to the table at PuzzleIQ Escape Room’s latest adventure in Moscow. It was a fun challenge for all of us (adults and teens alike), and definitely worth the visit. Learn more about the Palouse region’s escape spot at puzzleiqescaperoom.com. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

BLIND JUSTICE Netflix has carved out a niche for true crime nuts, and its newest miniseries, The Innocent Man, brings in a titan of the genre: John Grisham. Based on the bestselling author’s sole nonfiction book, the six-parter details the murders of two young women in 1980s Oklahoma, and how local cops possibly conspired to put the wrong men in prison. Directed by Clay Tweel (Gleason), the doc doesn’t exactly reinvent the wheel — it uses pretty much every stylistic trick we’ve seen before — but it’s nonetheless compelling, infuriating and haunting in equal measure. I binged the whole thing in a couple sittings. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | THEATER

How to use

Ron Ford, performing in The Controversy of Valladolid, at Stage Left Theater.

Left Speechless

ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

the author’s intent to get us to put ourselves in the place of these people who have been brought to Spain from the New World.” Whether that was Carrière’s intent or not, casting still proved difficult as a result. Villers likens it to “a bad game of telephone” in which local actors who might have suited the Aztec roles expressed reluctance on account of their mute anonymity. In the end, though, three Native American actors — Darlene McCarty, Newe-Nai’Pi Ridley-Stevens and L. Shane Ridley-Stevens — stepped forward to audition for the parts of the Aztec family. “They have no lines, and that’s upsetting to people. And I can understand that anger. Because without seeing it, it’s very easy to think, OK, here’s another story of conquest told by the conquerors. But it does go deeper than that.” Unfortunately, the one actor who was interested in playing the monastery’s black servant had a schedule conflict, and the role had to be dissolved into the remaining cast of nine. They include Ron Ford as the papal legate, Robert Nelson as the abbot, Steven Schneidmiller as de las Casas, Matt Cordoza as de Sepúlveda and Marek Nelson as a New World colonist.

THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION

Pull down then out

In The Controversy of Valladolid, the characters at the very heart of its debate have no lines NOT a snowboard.

BY E.J. IANNELLI

C

lose to five centuries ago, two men squared off in the Spanish city of Valladolid for a rhetorical showdown. One man, Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda, was there to argue that the natives of the newly colonized Americas were subhuman, worthy only of enslavement and torture. If necessary, their conversion to Christianity should come at the point of a sword. His opponent, Bartolomé de las Casas, advanced the counterargument, on theological grounds, no less. The Dominican monk maintained that, despite huge differences between their culture and that of their colonizers, the indigenous people were part of the natural order. They were children of God, in other words, and should be extended largely the same rights as anyone else. The debate was one of the first — if not the first — to deal head-on with this issue in an official capacity. Though not exactly politically correct, de las Casas’ stance was a radical departure from the prevailing modes of thought. In 1992, the playwright Jean-Claude Carrière reinterpreted this historical debate for French TV as a courtroom drama set in the sepulchral chamber of the Monastery of San Gregorio. His work was later translated into English by Richard Nelson as The Controversy of Valladolid. “Very simply, the one arguing the theological side of it, de las Casas, was defending the Aztecs,” says Maynard Villers, who is directing a new production of the play at Stage Left. “He had spent a lot of time in

28 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

the New World, and he knew the people. He saw what was happening and he was appalled by their treatment. He felt that they were our fellow human beings — as he would put it, our brothers in Christ — and deserving of the same respect that he and his white European fellows deserved.” “De Sepúlveda was arguing the secular side of things. He didn’t exactly deny their humanity but felt that they were a lower grade [of human beings], not deserving of God’s grace or the protection of the Spanish crown. They were placed there by God for the Europeans to use as they saw fit.” The crux of the debate and its contemporary parallels were strong enough to draw Villers into his first direct participation in live theater after a decade-long hiatus. The play, he says, serves as “a good reminder for all of us how easy it is to objectify the ‘other,’ even by those who claim to — and legitimately have — their best interests at heart. Because de las Casas, even though he says on more than one occasion what forcing their religion on [the Aztecs] is doing to them, he is still very much desirous of saving their souls.” If that leaves audience members feeling slightly ambivalent about the play’s ostensible good guy, it might not be the only thing. The Controversy of Valladolid has sparked some of its own controversy in the way it presents its native characters and servants. “They are faceless. They are voiceless,” Villers says. “They don’t know what is happening to them. I think part of that is

NOT ski poles.

Steven Schneidmiller as de las Casas. Aaron Brock is also among them, playing a royal clown who, in a misguided attempt to prove the Aztecs’ humanity, is called in to test their sense of humor. That qualifies as one of the play’s more absurd moments, but it also serves to encapsulate what exactly The Controversy of Valladolid is scrutinizing. “We all see the world through a lens of our own making,” says Villers. “Even if you think you’re a wonderful human being and you do everything possible to make the world a better place, you’re coming at it with your own agenda. If we can realize that, maybe we can brighten the corner where you are with a little more objectivity, rather than objectifying.” n The Controversy of Valladolid • Jan. 11-27; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $20 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third • spokanestageleft.org • 838-9727

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WHERE TO RENT REI SPOKANE 1125 N. Monroe

SPOKANE LIBRARY Any branch

A beginner’s guide for snowshoeing in the Inland Northwest BY QUINN WELSCH

A

dark gray cloud hung over Mount Spokane as we marched uphill in the snow on the Kit Carson Trail. Our pants swishing, our breath huffing, the sound of snow crunching under our snowshoes and then — absolute silence. I love hiking trails, but I’d never done so in the snow. It was my girlfriend’s third snowshoe trip, but it was my first. Regardless, we were total pros — and I don’t mean that ironically. Snowshoeing is one of the most accessible winter activities one can enjoy during the winter — besides wearing sweatpants and binge-watching your favorite TV show — says Katie Wiseman, the outdoors program and outreach coordinator at REI in Spokane. Unlike snowboarding and skiing, most people already have the gear required for a day of snowshoeing, she says. “It’s becoming apparent how easy it is to get involved in snowshoeing,” she says. “It’s definitely growing in popularity.” The hardest part, at least for me, was strapping the shoes onto my feet. (I ate a hearty breakfast just before embarking on our trip and I may have barfed in my mouth a little after leaning forward to strap them on.) Wiseman’s been on five snowshoe hikes this year already, so I asked her for some tips to make my next snow hike even more successful. Wiseman’s advice is simple, but easy to forget: Bring the right gear, dress appropriately and plan. Let’s start from the top:

CLOTHES

SHOES: Warm. Dry. Tall. Don’t wear anything fancy and don’t bring ankle boots. You’re going to strap snowshoes onto your boots and they are going to get

MOUNTAIN GEAR 2002 N. Division wet. Wear hiking boots that you can actually hike in, Wiseman says. Also, she adds, go with wool socks if you can. BOTTOMS: Wear a base layer under your pants, such as leggings or thermals. Over that, find some good snow pants, Wiseman says. “I like to wear a softshell pant. Something breathable that stretches a lot.” Jeans aren’t going to cut it. TOPS: Wear a base layer on top as well. Throw a midweight fleece or a “breathable warm jacket” on top, Wiseman says. Add a down vest on top of that to keep your core warm, but still allowing for flexibility, she says. Additionally, she says to bring a rain shell or large winter jacket just in case. Ultimately, what you wear depends on your comfort level and the weather, but you also want to be prepared. “The most important thing is to pay attention to how much you’re sweating,” Wiseman says. “As soon as you get hot, layers need to come off, and as soon as you get cold, layers need to come on — if not before.”

EQUIPMENT

“The question I get a lot is whether you want trekking poles,” Wiseman says. “The trekking pole is not a barrier to entry, but it changes the feel of the activity.” For instance, poles can help you keep balance in the snowpack, which is often uneven. They also help move some of the stress from your lower body to your upper body, she says. Other good items she recommends snowshoers bring with them: a headlamp (if it gets dark), a thermal blanket to sit on (or sleep with if you get stranded), sunglasses (for snow glare) and water.

FITNESS FANATICS Selkirk Lodge, Mount Spokane GONZAGA OUTDOORS 702 E. Desmet Ave. (students only) WHITWORTH REC CENTER 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (students only) QUINN WELSCH PHOTO

PLANNING

The first thing Wiseman tells me is to prepare for parking. I bought a seasonal Sno-Park pass during my visit, which is worth it if you plan to go more than once. You’ll likely need a Sno-Park pass in addition to your Discover Pass for Washington State Parks. Idaho has similar parking permits for its snow parks as well, Wiseman says. The days are shorter in winter, so you’ll also want to get a good head start. Snowshoeing a couple miles takes a lot longer than hiking a normal trail, which is another good reason to bring a headlamp. However, there’s an upside to getting up early. “If you’re one of the first people there on fresh snow, it’s amazing,” Wiseman says. The experience can be “magical” when you’re hiking on top of the snow, as tall as the trees, she says. “The moment that you’re in the trees in this snowy wonderland, it’s just really special,” she says. “In the winter, I think snowshoeing is one of the most enjoyable activities. It makes the short afternoons really enjoyable.” n Snowshoe Basics • Tue, Jan. 15 from 6-7:30 pm • Free • REI Spokane • 1125 N. Monroe • Find more workshops at rei.com/learn • 328-9900

INSIDE

ADVENTURE IN JAPAN 4 SKI GUIDES 6 BACKCOUNTRY 8 EVENTS 10 LAST RUN COVER ILLUSTRATION BY TOM STOVER

15

JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 3


GETAWAY

WORTH THE WAIT Getting there was hell, but skiing in Japan didn’t disappoint

S Turn after turn of over-the-head deep powder.

4 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2019

HOWARD STODDARD PHOTOS

kiing Japan has been on my bucket list for years. The north island of Hokkaido gets an average of 45 feet of snow a year. So light and fluffy, it beats the pants off Utah’s claim of “the greatest snow on Earth.” Light snow, people, the culture and of course the many face-shots are what I love about skiing, and Japan was the place. I rallied my wife and two good buddies to head over to the land of the deep. We knew it was going to be a long flight but what we didn’t expect is that our actual travel time would last for days. We left on an early flight from Spokane to Seattle, then onto Tokyo with our final flight to Sapporo. After a delay in Tokyo because of weather, we were Sapporo bound. The flight went quick as we were full of smiles and ready to ski. Out the snowy window we could see the

BY HOWARD STODDARD

lights of Sapporo. Hearing the landing gear deploy, we could hardly contain our excitement. But then, we started to climb. The pilot got on the intercom and in broken English, said, “Well, folks, it appears Sapporo airport is closed due to the large amounts of snow.” After arriving back late in Tokyo, the airline booked us a hotel to crash before our rescheduled flight the next morning. With a quick four-hour nap, we were back at the airport, just to sit and wait on the weather again. Half the day went by, then they gave us the green light to depart for the north island. Just as we were about to land, it happened again! The plane pulls up and we are heading back to Tokyo. When we arrived, the nearly empty airport from the night before is now jam-packed with people trying to reach Sapporo. As it turns out, it had been days since a


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"ITS LIKE A WHOLE NEW SKI AREA"

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flight had actually landed. I have never seen so many people in one line all waiting to reschedule flights; the whole town of Sandpoint could have been in that line trying to get to Sapporo. There has got to be a better way, we all thought, we’re never going to get there waiting in this line! So we started to throw out ideas. My brilliant wife heard a rumor about a train. We had nothing to lose at this point, so we bailed for the Tokyo train station. Navigating the crowded Tokyo subway system with ski bags was an adventure all by itself. They were literally stuffing people into the subway car in order to shut the doors. I’ve never felt like a sardine in a can before that moment. Somehow we were able to purchase the last few tickets available and we were off on a bullet train flying at over 100 miles an hour through beautiful Japan. After a few really close transfers, trading a bullet train for old wooden seats, and about 14 hours, we woke up to snow white. The whole city of Sapporo was buried in snow with more falling. Finally we grabbed the transport up to the resort town of Nesiko. The falling snowflakes were the size of pingpong balls. On the way, the banks were so high, it was like traveling through a tunnel of snow. When we arrived at the hotel, we downed some coffee and jumped in our ski gear to hit the slopes — after three exhausting days of travel! On the lift at Moiwa Ski Resort, we were all smiles, discussing which run we should take first. We heard the sacred trees were the place to ski. Our first run was perfectly gladed. Turn after turn it was over-the-head deep, basically skiing by braille, hoping to not hit a tree. I couldn’t stop laughing! Is this some kind of joke?!

This winter enjoy

&

new runs

additional

acres of scenic new terrain Bottomless snow in Japan. On the chairlift ride back up, we could have been an advertisement for your local dentist with our big powder-eating smiles. We forgot all about our crazy travels. The rest of the day it was snowing hard with free refills. That night we met up with my friend Andy of Soul Powder Guide, who was our ski guide for the rest of the week. He and his wife took us to this small famous Japanese restaurant. His wife is from Japan, so she ordered some traditional dishes, along with some questionable ones. From cow tongue to fish pancakes our bellies were full and spirits were high after numerous bottles of sake. The week didn’t let up — it just kept on snowing. Every day Andy took us to different ski resort. Moiwa, Niseko Village, Kiroro Snow World, Niseko Annupuri, Kokusai, Rusutsu and night skiing at Grand Hirafu. We skied so much powder it was a blur. The sun did come out for an hour that week when we were skiing in Annunpuri. I finally got some blue sky powder shots and it felt good to have some sun warm the face. My favorite resort was in Rusutsu. The trees turn into mushrooms, the pitch was steeper and the snow was bottomless. The whole week was like being in a snow globe and someone just kept on shaking it. Welcome to JaPow! n Howard Stoddard has traveled the world in search of powder and epic photos. He once owned the Alaska Backcountry Adventures heli operation and now splits his time between Sandpoint and Driggs, Idaho.

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JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 5


FIRST PERSON

OFF THE

GRID

The serious responsibility and epic joys of a backcountry ski guide BY JOHN GROLLMUS 6 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2019

T

he sun is just beginning to inch over the Montana peaks and sparkle off the mirror-smooth lake surface as I stomp my way through the boot-deep powder in the currently deserted mountain village. In these early morning hours before the first of the maintenance crew has arrived to clear the snow, before there’s a single car in the lot and before any ski racks or signs have been set out, the village often resembles some kind of winter war zone. Finally entering the comfort of the Schweitzer Mountain day lodge, I gather with my fellow guides, snowcat drivers and desk staff to formulate step one of today’s plan. Back outside now there’s more light reflecting off the lake as my assistant guide and I sweep the six fresh inches from last night’s storm off our snowmobiles. We make the radio call to mountain ops clearing our uphill travel, “Two snowmobiles first aid to top of the quad.”

The author, right, and fellow ski guides. Then we’re off, heading 2,000 or so vertical feet up to the Selkirk Powder Company guide lodge near the top of Schweitzer Mountain Resort located just 100 or so yards from the top of the Great Escape Quad and newly built Sky House. Ducking low on our machines to sneak under the rope line that define where public skiing at Schweitzer stops and our terrain begins, we pull to a stop and unload supplies for the day. Before we enter the lodge, the assistant guide begins the always unenviable task of shoveling the place out and then I head in to start on daily weather reporting. From inside, I record the current temperature as well as the low temperature from last night, current wind speed along with the high wind from last night and barometer reading. Next up, I head back outside with the tools of the trade, shovel, thermometer, snow crystal card and weather


ops clipboard. After an awkward trudge through the deep snow, I arrive at our snowfall recording boards and note that the snow here is significantly deeper than at the base, maybe 10 inches total. There are several daily snow measurements to be taken once I reach the boards: 24-hour depth, storm total depth, season snow depth, 10 centimeters below surface depth temperature, snow crystal size and shape, foot penetration depth, current sky cover and precipitation. Back on the snowmobile I head out to do some conditions investigating. With a little over 4,000 acres of skiing to consider, there’s never enough time to gather data on all of it, so I draw on past experience to decide what zones to inspect. Since the cat hasn’t yet been out to groom these roads today, I encounter deep snow drifts and frequently strain against the steep inclines and weight of the machine.

“I yodel from time to time to help the guests keep a bead on my location...” As I speed through the backcountry maze of roads I’ll drag my foot through the fresh snow to check for crust and consistency and, from time to time, hop off and post hole out into one of our named runs to get a closer look at how things are shaping up. Since job No. 1 for a backcountry ski guide is to ensure the safety of the guests, my final task is to identify a slope which could be an avalanche hazard and dig a pit to take measurements and test the stability of the snowpack. After recording the results into an app which is shared by all of our guides, I climb back aboard my trusted steed once more and speed back to the Selkirk Powder guide lodge. Back inside, again I confer with my driver and assistant guide and lay out the morning ski plan. The snowcat is dispatched to the first run pick up and we head out the door to arrive at the top of Schweitzer’s Great Escape Quad chair in time to greet our guests for the day as they unload the chair. Once we’re all gathered and introductions are made, I spend the next few minutes going over safety and procedural aspects developed to ensure all our riders have a fun and secure day of shredding untracked snow. A host of issues are covered, including how to use the buddy system, what to do in the event of a tree-well accident, how to travel safely in our backcountry playground, what steps to take in the unlikely event of an avalanche and much more. After a final check to be sure that each and every person in the group has a functioning and well-charged transceiver as well as proper knowledge of how to use it, we’re finally ready to let gravity take over and begin the fun task of putting smiles on faces. Following a brief but detailed description of the run, I shove off and drop into the old growth forest. The clouds have all but vanished from the sky and the sunlight on the freshly fallen snow sparkles as I carve a heavenly path through the untouched canvas. The stress of the morning tasks fades away now as the fluffy crystals float up from the surface and dance lightly just over the tops of my thighs. I yodel from time to time to help the guests keep a bead on my location, but they can almost certainly follow the singular trail my skis have etched among the forest of giants. Finally sliding gently onto the cat road at the run’s end, I belt out a scream of childish glee. I may have skied thousands of other powder runs but the joy of one more never grows old. As the guests begin to arrive, there’s hoots and high fives all around. Once we are all present and accounted for, I announce happily in an almost fiendish and certainly sarcastic tone, “Please accept my apologies ladies and gentlemen but we’re going to have to do that another 10 or so times before you’ll be allowed to go home.” Climbing into the cat to head up for another run, I can’t help but think this might just be the best job a person could dream of having. n John Grollmus is an avid skier, local restaurateur and professional lead ski guide with Selkirk Powder Guides.

THURS Sept. 6: Falcons at Eagles - 4th St. Sept. 10th: Sept. 17th: Sept. 24th: Oct. 1st: Oct. 8th: Oct. 15th:

Jets at Lions, Rams at Raiders - 4th St. Seahawks at Bears - 4th St. Steelers at Buccaneers - 4th St. Chiefs at Broncos - 4th St. Redskins at Saints - 4th St. 49ers at Packers - 4th St.

THURS Oct. 18: Broncos at Cardinals - Post Falls Oct. 22nd: Oct. 29th: Nov. 5th: Nov. 12th:

Giants at Falcons - 4th St. Patriots at Bills - 4th St. Titans at Cowboys - 4th St. Giants at 49ers - 4th St.

THURS Nov. 15: Packers At Seahawks - 4th St. Nov. 19th: Nov. 26th: Dec. 3rd: Dec. 10th: Dec. 17th: Dec. 24th: Jan. 5: Jan 12: Jan. 20:

Chiefs at Rams - 4th St. Titans at Texans - 4th St. Redskins at Eagles - 4th St. Vikings at Seahawks - 4th St. Saints at Panthers - 4th St. Broncos at Raiders - 4th St. Playoff Wild Card - 4th St. Divisional Playoff - 4th St. AFC/NFC Championship - 4th St.

Feb. 3: SUPERBOWL - 4th St. JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 7


MOUNTAIN PEOPLE

Mike Brede, along with Larry Banks, started an online community for people to meet and share information on the local backcountry scene at panhandlebackcountry.com. LARRY BANKS PHOTO

LIKE-MINDED SOULS Getting to know the local backcountry scene BY CARL SEGERSTROM

A

few years ago, I was living in Coeur d’Alene and flush with cash from a good restaurant serving job. Having always wanted to ski backcountry, I kicked down the hundreds of dollars it took to turn my regular ski setup into a backcountry rig. With an avalanche beacon, climbing skins and more, I was ready to take on the local backcountry. There was only one problem: I don’t know the first thing about avalanche safety and I didn’t have any friends to show me the ropes. I thought about signing up for an avalanche safety course but ended up staying in-bounds all winter. Fast-forward to this winter and my gear has been collecting dust for years. But now, as the snow has started to fly, I’m ready to finally make it happen. Luckily for me, and anyone else trying to get into backcountry skiing and snowboarding in the Inland Northwest, five years ago Mike Brede and Larry Banks started an online community for people to meet each other and share information on the local backcountry scene. In the five years since its creation, panhandlebackcountry.com has grown from the brainchild of a couple of skiing buddies to a community of more than 1,100 members sharing trip reports, meeting touring partners and connecting each other to local resources like avalanche forecasts, safety classes and used ski gear.

8 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2019

“I’m surprised at how big we’ve become,” says Brede. “There’s a lot of interest in just seeing what people are skiing around here.” Brede says the website has attracted users from as far away as New Zealand and averages about 2,000 unique visits a month. In building the website and local backcountry scene, Brede and Banks have tried, and so far succeeded, in steering the group away from two major pitfalls of extreme sports: hypermasculinity and context-free stoke. “For the last four years we’ve worked on women-specific backcountry projects,” Brede says. The website has partnered with the women-centered She Jumps organization to help promote women-specific avalanche classes. Melissa Hendrickson, who helped teach a backcountry awareness class for women last year and is teaching an avalanche safety class this winter, is an active member of the Panhandle Backcountry community and an avalanche forecaster for the Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center (idahopanhandleavalanche.org). By teaching and presenting at local events, she helps women get into the sport as a female face for the backcountry community. “The website is a great way to meet people,” Hendrickson says. But, she also recommends taking one of the handful of local avalanche safety classes listed on the website as a great way to learn what it takes to stay safe

in the backcountry. While Panhandle Backcountry introduces people to the inherently adrenaline-fueled world of backcountry skiing, it also takes steps to make sure people realize the risks of heading out onto unpatrolled and remote slopes. On the website, getting people stoked on “sick lines” and “gnarly terrain” takes a back seat to more practical knowledge about snow conditions and avalanche dangers. In the trip report section, which doesn’t allow peeking by snoopers because it requires users to sign-up for a free account and make a brief personal introduction, the site moderators ask users to help build the knowledge base of local conditions around the region. By including information like snowpack stability and any signs of local avalanche behavior, users of the site can know what to expect and which areas to avoid when they head out for turns. In addition to serving as an informal venue for sharing information on local snow conditions, Panhandle Backcountry partners with and helps raise money for the professional forecasters at the Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center, which issues avalanche forecasts for the region on Tuesday and Friday mornings. In October, Panhandle Backcountry raised money for the forecasters at the premiere of an ecologically and culturally driven snowboard movie Yugen Film at the Garland Theater.


After a couple storms rolled in, and in anticipation of this article, I reached out to Brede and Banks to learn more about the website and community they’ve helped create. Just days after talking with them, I got a text from Banks asking if I was interested in a backcountry trip on the first weekend in December. An offer too good to pass up. So there I was, dusting off my languishing backcountry gear, checking the batteries on my avalanche beacon and getting stoked on the prospect of some early season turns. The trip, out of Wallace and up to the Glidden Lakes area, wasn’t without a few fumbles and rookie mistakes — accidentally jamming the throttle and forcing us to bail once on the snowmobile ride out and not understanding how my touring bindings worked — but at the end of day I was like a kid in a candy store skiing untracked lines on either side of a ridge that splits Montana and Idaho. With a decent snowpack in the high country and plenty of winter ahead of us, there’s no better time to get out into the backcountry. And thanks to a couple friends, who helped build a community for people who love the sport, you don’t have to go it alone. n Carl Segerstrom is a journalist who covers the environment and communities of the American West. He is a contributing editor for High Country News magazine. Follow him on Twitter @carlschirps.

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JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 9


WINTER EVENTS JANUARY

ICE SKATING LESSONS Join experienced instructors for beginner lessons on the ribbon every Saturday and Sunday between 11:30 am and 1:30 pm. Come early to the Sky Ribbon Café to reserve your spot. Skates and helmets are provided; sessions are open to 15 guests per 30 minute slot. Ages 5+. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. riverfrontspokane. com (625-6600) NIGHT SKIING This year, Mt. Spokane’s night skiing schedule is expanding to offer twice weekly night rides under the lights, with the resort’s full-service cafeteria staying open late and live bands playing on Saturday nights. Offered Wednesday and Saturday from 3:30-9:30 pm through Sat, March 2. $22. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) THURSDAY THEME NIGHT Come dressed to impress in themed attire for a $1 discount off Ice Ribbon admission, along with food specials, music and more. Thu, from 5-9 pm through Feb. 28. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. riverfrontspokane.com (625-6600) PLOGGING WITH ATHLETA This Swedish fitness craze is a combination of jogging while picking up litter. Athleta at River Park Square hosts this weekly winter running club starting and ending at the Sky Ribbon Cafe party room. Coffee and hot cocoa is provided post run. Tuesdays from 5-6:30 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. riverfrontspokane.com (625-6600) LADIES ONLY DAY Spend a day with female coaches from the Mt. Spokane Mountain Sports School. Packages include three hours of instruction, breakfast, lunch, a lift ticket and apres party and door prizes. Add rental equipment for $22. Offered Jan. 11, Feb. 8 and March 8. $69. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane. com (238-2220) JACKASS DAY Celebrate Silver Mountain history during this annual commemoration of the mountain’s founding more than five decades ago as the Jackass Ski Bowl, with retro-priced lift tickets of $12. Fri, Jan. 11. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg. silvermt.com (866-344-2675) CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AT FRATER LAKE Explore this beautiful snowy glacial lake that’s part of the eight lakes of the Pend Oreille Lake Chain. Attendees should have basic crosscountry skiing skills. Fee includes staff, roundtrip transportation (departs from Mountain Gear, 2002 N. Division), equipment (if needed) and fees. Bring your own lunch and water. Location subject to change due to snow conditions. Pretrip information emailed after registration. Ages 18+. $45. Sat, Jan. 12 from 9 am-4 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) MT. SPOKANE SNOWSHOE TOUR Learn the basics of snowshoeing during a guided

10 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2019

From egg-carrying to wife-carrying, the Winter Carnival at Lookout Pass is full of events. hike on snowshoe trails around Mount Spokane State Park. Pre-trip information is emailed after registration. Includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation (from Yoke’s, 14202 N. Market). Ages 13+. $29. Offered Jan. 12 and 26; Feb. 23; and March 3, from 10 am-2 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) NIGHT SKIING AT SILVER Coast down the mountain under the lights during this special night session, offering lift tickets for $12. Other events on the mountain include a canned food drive, a retro outfit contest (8 pm) and live music (6-9 pm). Sat, Jan. 12 at 3 pm. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg. silvermt.com (866-344-2675) FAMILY NORDIC WEEKEND Kids under age 18 get a free trail pass and equipment rental when accompanied by a parent/ guardian. Jan. 12-13. 49° North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649) LOOKOUT WINTER CARNIVAL The mountain’s annual midwinter celebration includes the famous wife-carrying contest, three-legged race, egg carrying contest, snowman/snow sculpture building contest and more.

Sun, Jan. 13. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) SNOWSHOE + WINE TASTING Enjoy a day of snowshoeing the trails of Mt. Spokane before stopping for a wine tasting at Townshend Winery. Snowshoes, guides, walking poles and transportation (departs from Yoke’s at 14202 N. Market, Mead) included. Additional information emailed after registration. Ages 21+. $39. Offered Jan. 13, Feb. 10 and March 10 from 10 am-3:30 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) SPOKANE NORDIC SKI ASSOCIATION WINTERFEST The annual event offers free and low-priced options for the public to learn about and experience winter recreation activities such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, skijoring and more. Rentals available on site; or bring your own. Sun, Jan. 13 from 9 am-3:30 pm. $5-$25/demo; free to attend. Mt. Spokane State Park, Selkirk Lodge, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane State Park Dr. spokanenordic.org SNOWSHOEING BASICS Join experienced REI staff for a class on the basics of snowshoeing. The session focuses on the appropriate selection of gear, as well as the

LOOKOUT PASS PHOTO

basics on what you need and where to go to get started. Tue, Jan. 15 from 6-7:30 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe. Register at rei.com/ spokane WOMEN’S SKI & SNOWBOARD WAXING WORKSHOP In the company of other adventurous women, learn how to wax your skis/snowboard and how to choose the best wax for the conditions, with expert guidance as you clean and wax your personal equipment. $35/members; $55/ nonmember. Wed, Jan. 16 from 5:30-7:30 pm. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe. Register at rei.com/ spokane WINTER ADVENTURE CLASS Learn the basics to make your winter outdoor activities more enjoyable and accessible for everyone. Where to go and what to do is discussed, along with how to dress for the weather and much more, with Ascent Recreation owner Scott McDonald. Free. Wed, Jan. 16 from 6:30-7:30 pm. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. scld. org (795-1942) BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR Presented by Mountain Fever are three nights of films celebrating high octane mountain fun. Not rated. Jan. 18-20 at 6 pm. $16-$20. Panida


Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-255-7801) DESCHUTES WOODY WAGON WEEKEND The Bend, Oregon, brewery heads to North Idaho to pour cold pints of its seasonal brews at the Village from the barrel-shaped “Woody Wagon.” Jan. 18-21. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208255-3081) NORTHERN LIGHTS The annual mid-winter celebration during MLK Day weekend festivities (Jan. 19-21) features the torchlight parade, fireworks show, live music and a party in Taps. Participants over 18 can register online to be in the parade (70 spots). Sat, Jan. 19 at 6 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208255-3070)

Nurture

your

Nature

SNOWSHOE MOONLIGHT HIKE + DINNER Travel through the winter landscape of Mount Spokane by the magic of moonlight before returning to Selkirk Lodge for a meal from Greenbluff Fresh Catering Company. Includes guide, snowshoes, headlamp and meal. Directions emailed after registration. Sno-Park and Discover Pass required. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Ages 18+. $49. Offered Jan. 19 and Feb. 16 from 6-9 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) ...continued on page 12

Snow’s already flying at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, and Sandpoint’s gearing up for a big winter! Get prepped for fun adventures ahead - tune up your boards and skis, make lodging reservations, and check out the buzzed-about cultural scene in Sandpoint! We’re the place to be with fine restaurants, new breweries, and festive events downtown.

See you on the slopes!

Get visitor information at 800-800-2106 www.VisitSandpoint.com

WOMEN’S SNOWSHOE TOUR Tour the trails of 49° North with a guide offering tips on how to have better control and more fun on your snowshoes. Hike is followed by lunch in a yurt. Includes trail pass, guide/instructor, poles, snowshoes and lunch. Ages 15+. $39. Offered Jan. 19, Feb. 17 and March 2 from 10 am-1 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) NIGHT SKIING AT 49° Head up mountain after sunset during one of four night skiing sessions scheduled this season. Bring three or more cans of food to support the Chewelah Food Bank and get a lift ticket for only $5. Offered Jan. 19 and Feb. 16, from 4-8 pm. $15. 49° North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649)

Get your head in the game?

Ski and Stay in Whitefish, MT! MAKE THE PINE LODGE YOUR HEADQUARTERS THIS WINTER! The White Glove Experience has it all! Complimentary Shuttle to Downtown Whitefish Complimentary Hot Breakfast Outdoor Hot Tub and Outdoor Heated Pool Complimentary Transportation to Whitefish Mountain Resort

Rocky Mountain Lodge 6510 Hwy 93 South, Whitefish, MT 59937 Phone: (800) 862-2569 rockymtnlodge.com Each Best Western® branded hotel is independently owned and operated.

Slope Packs

Boot Dryers Available

Lift Tickets for Purchase at the Front Desk

Complimentary Snowshoes & Fat Tire Bikes

Indoor/Outdoor Heated Pool & Hot Tub

Complimentary Ski Van Service to/from the Mountain

Ski Room for Equipment Storage

The Den: Pool Table, Shuffleboard & an 80 inch TV

S’mores Kits & Fire Pits

Hot Cocoa Bar, Cookies & More!

920 Spokane Avenue, Whitefish, MT 59937 (877) 342-0751 | ThePineLodge.com

JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 11


WINTER EVENTS CROSS-COUNTRY SKI LESSONS (MT. SPOKANE) Learn the basics of cross-country skiing at the Mt. Spokane Selkirk Nordic Area, taught by Spokane Nordic Ski Association and Spokane Parks and Recreation cross-country ski instructors. Fee includes skis, boots, poles, fees, instruction and transportation (departs from Yoke’s, 14202 N. Market). Ages 13+. $49. Offered Jan. 20; Feb. 9, 23; and March 3 from 9 am-3 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489)

Register at rei.com/spokane

GONE TO THE DOGS SKIJOR DAY Dogs are allowed on the lower trail system for a day of skijoring when accompanied by a human with a trail pass. Sun, Jan. 20. 49° North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649)

SKI & SNOWBOARD WAXING WORKSHOP Learn how to wax your skis or snowboard in this hands-on workshop. You’ll learn how to choose the best wax for the conditions, and have expert guidance as you clean and wax your personal equipment. Bring your own gear to this workshop; no prior experience needed. Offered Thu, Jan. 24 and Wed, Feb. 13 from 5:30-7:30 pm. $35/$55. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe. Register at rei.com/spokane

MOONLIGHT SNOWSHOE HIKES (SCHWEITZER) Schweitzer Activity Center staff lead guided tours through the old growth forest under the light of the moon. Hike is followed by a meal at Gourmandie, with optional wine flights ($10). Ages 13+. $40. Offered Jan. 20 and Feb. 11 from 4-8 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer. com (208-255-3081) MOONLIGHT SNOWSHOE HIKE (MT. SPOKANE) Quietly explore the meadows and woods around Mount Spokane. Guides, transportation (departs from Yoke’s, 14202 N. Market, Mead), headlamps,

WOMEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING BASICS Join REI staff as they share information and tips for getting into cross-country skiing. Topics covered include fundamental differences between backcountry, telemark and touring ski styles, along with proper clothing and where and how to get started in this winter activity. Free. Wed, Jan. 23 from 6-7:30 pm. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe. Register at rei.com/spokane

Bust out your fat-tire bike and take advantage of two free state park days in January. walking poles and snowshoes all provided. Additional information emailed after registration. Ages 16+. $29. Offered Jan. 21, Feb. 18 and March 17 from 6-9 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) FREE STATE PARK DAYS The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission is offering two free days in January, when visitors to state parks will not need a Discover Pass for day-use visits: Jan. 21. Includes

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

access to Mt. Spokane, Riverside and Palouse Falls state parks. parks.state.wa.us WINTER CAMPING WORKSHOP In this hands-on workshop, learn how to manage freezing temperatures and stay comfortable outside in the cold. Includes tips for setting up camp in the winter and sleeping warm, even on the chilliest of nights. All gear provided; no experiences necessary. $20/$30. Tue, Jan. 22 from 5:30-7:30 pm. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe.

WINTER TRAILS DAY Schweitzer’s contribution to this national event includes free access to the snowshoe trails and the Nordic ski trails. In addition, there are multiple hosted snowshoe hikes going throughout the day. Contact the Activity Center to reserve a spot. Sat, Jan. 26 from 9 am-3:30 pm. Free. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-255-3081) ...continued on page 14

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T i m e l e s s Ta l e s o f S p o k a n e a n d t h e I n l a n d N o r t hwe s t , Vo l u m e 1 EDITED BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

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f you call yourself an Inlander, you need to know the stories. Do you remember those ancient ivory tusks pulled from a farm down on the Palouse? What happened after fur trappers set up their first trading post on the Spokane River? Or how a local basketball team captivated the nation? What about “The Biggest Thing That Man Has Ever Done”? A World’s Fair? Those are just a few of the tales that define the rich history of the Inland Northwest — stories that were first retold in the pages of the Inlander newspaper starting in 1993. In Inlander Histories, you’ll meet Nell Shipman, the silent film star who launched her own studio on the shores of Priest Lake. You’ll hop a flight over Mt. St. Helens on a particularly memorable day. And you’ll learn how Walt Worthy kept the dream of Louis Davenport alive in downtown Spokane. Noted local historians Jack Nisbet, Robert Carriker and William Stimson join Inlander staff writers, including Sheri Boggs, Andrew Strickman and Mike Bookey, to take you on a tour of some of the most important moments in the region’s past. Collected together for the first time, Inlander Histories pieces together the tapestry of Eastern Washington and North Idaho culture, creating a rare document of life in the “inland” part of this corner of the continent. $14.95

COVER DESIGN BY CHRIS BOVEY

inlanderbooks 12 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2019

SPOKANE,WASHINGTON INLANDER.COM/BOOKS


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Commitment to character. In the ‘30s local skiers discovered good skiing on the “big mountain” north of town. Since then we’ve been committed to a life of good times,

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Packs of Tickets available LOCATED IN THE COLLVILLE NATIONAL FOREST

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ski49n.com 509-935-6649

Adult, College and Youth Packs Available JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 13


PH: Henry Georgi & Raven Eye Photography

WINTER EVENTS

GREAT NEW SNOW IN THE NEW YEAR!

FIND NEW ADVENTURES NORTH OF “THE NORMAL”

SKI & STAY 4 NIGHTS GET 4TH NIGHT FREE

$138

per person* per night plus taxes

Must book by Feb. 28, 2019. Some restrictions apply.

SKI & STAY 4 NIGHTS GET 4TH NIGHT FREE

$100

per person per night plus taxes

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI LESSONS (49° NORTH) Learn to cross-country ski and tour the trails of 49° North’s Nordic area with the mountain’s certified ski instructors. Ticket includes equipment, trail pass, instruction and transportation (departs from Wandermere Rite Aid, 12420 N. Division). Additional information emailed after registration. Ages 13+. $49. Offered Jan. 26 and Feb. 3 from 8 am-4 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) KAN JAM ’19 A two-day festival on the mountain with events each day in the terrain park, and prizes for top finishers in competitions for all ages. Jan. 26-27. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) MT. SPOKANE BREWFEST The third annual beer fest inside Foggy Bottom Lounge celebrates local beer vendors during a Rail Jam contest in front of the lodge. Sat, Jan. 26. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

Bead Lake just north of Newport and offers amazing views of the lake from the trail. Guides, snowshoes, transportation (from Yoke’s at 14202 N. Market, Mead) and walking poles provided. Additional information emailed after registration. Ages 18+. $39. Sat, Jan. 27 from 9 am-4 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org (755-2489) MOUNTAIN BREWFEST & SNOW BOWLING CONTEST The object of snow bowling is to push the sledder towards pins without the pusher crossing the fault line. The sledder then heads towards the 10 inflatable pins and knocks down as many as possible. Each team gets two runs; helmets required. Open to kids and adults. Lookout also hosts a beer fest with Ballast Point Brewery in the lodge, from 10 am-1 pm. Free. Sun, Jan. 27. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan. skilookout.com (208744-1301) BARKERBEINER SKIJOR RACE The second annual skijor race features Nordic skiing humans being pulled by their four-legged partners! The BarkerBeiner is a fun, familyfocused skijor event that is geared to all levels of competitive interest, with

four races offered. $20. Sun, Jan. 27 from 11 am-4 pm. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org/barkerbeiner WOMEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY SKI GLIDE WAXING WORKSHOP Cross-country skis should be hot waxed at least once a season. Come join other adventurous women in this hands-on workshop where you’ll learn how to select the best wax for your conditions, how to apply a fresh coat of wax, and how to ensure you have a great day on the trails. Bring your own set of waxless or waxable cross-country skis. $35/$55. Wed, Jan. 30 from 5:30-7:30 pm. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe. Register at rei.com/spokane WINTER WILDLANDS ALLIANCE BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL The 14th annual festival benefits the Spokane Mountaineers Foundation. The lineup of award-winning films includes adventure, environment and climate, youth outdoors and ski culture. Doors open at 6 pm for pre-show event. $12. Thu, Jan. 31 at 6 pm. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. winterwildlands.org/backcountryfilm-festival (720-373-0795) n

B I G W i n t e r S a l e! Must book by Feb. 28, 2019. Some restrictions apply.

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LAST RUN

For the sake of fun — and safety — best not to run alone.

SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

THE BUDDY SYSTEM It’s just better with friends

I

BY ALEX SAKARIASSEN

t’s the first evening of the New Year and I’m sitting on a stool at a local brewery with my buddy Mike. Our conversation takes the usual turns, from journalistic shoptalk to Netflix recommendations, with an abrupt about-face into the latest political buzz. Buried in all this is a brief exchange that, after a decade of friendship, hardly warrants vocalizing.

“So, skiing this weekend?” I ask. “Hell yeah. Sunday work?” Mike replies. I nod, the plan is set, and we’re back to pontificating about Mitt Romney’s 2020 ambitions. Some skiers and snowboarders probably don’t mind riding the chairlift alone. As the saying goes, there are no friends on a powder day. Personally, though, the season

just wouldn’t feel complete without a close clutch of kindred spirits to share powder stashes with. What good is stomping a jump or shredding some harrowing chute, after all, if there’s no one to back your story in front of the après crowd? Ski buddies are more than mere witnesses to our daring-do. When we head up into the mountains in search of a day’s thrill, a lot can go wrong. Maybe we get in over our heads on tough terrain and need a trusted voice to coach us down, or tweak an ankle during a crash and need a friend to flag down help. I know that every time I switch on my avalanche beacon before trekking into the backcountry, I’m comforted to know Mike’s beacon is active only a few feet away. However hard we ride, skiing and snowboarding tend to inspire deep bonds. They can also deepen existing ones. About 16 years ago, my father and I joined the National Ski Patrol together. Four years later, my kid sister followed our lead. The experience of training together, working together, caring for other skiers together, all brought a new dimension to our shared skiing experience. In the waning days of 2018, I found myself tail-roping for my sister as she ran a loaded toboggan. Our communication was instinctive, our turns and speed an exercise in synchronicity. I realized during that ride just how much she’d improved as a skier over the years. I know full well I’ll wind up riding solo a few days this season. Work happens, life happens, schedules don’t always line up. But the bulk of my powder turns will come between rollicking conversations with friends high above the snow. We’ll swap stories about face shots, snow snakes and near misses on car rides home. Because while others may think of winter as dark and dreary, we riders know better. n

JANUARY 2019 SNOWLANDER 15


16 SNOWLANDER JANUARY 2019


Himalayan salt blocks can be used both for hot cooking and cold serving.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

COOKING

WORTH ITS SALT Salt blocks can be used as a versatile cooking alternative BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

S

alt is an essential element for all animal life, including humans, who long ago realized the naturally occuring substance was an effective preservative and flavor enhancer. In addition to the ubiquitous table salt, variants include kosher salt, sea salt, Celtic salt, fleur de sel, and so-called Himalayan salt. The latter of this list is the only type, however, that has evolved as a tool and technique in food preparation, especially cooking. WHAT IT IS: Himalayan salt hails from an ancient mine in the Punjab region of northern Pakistan, which, according to local lore, was discovered by Alexander the Great in 327 BC. Evidence supports the mine’s operation in the 13th century, but it wasn’t until the 18th century

that the conquering Brits struck gold, so to speak, bringing modern methods of excavation and collection to the site. In the 20th century, marketing did its part to elevate Himalayan salt, first in the 1980s, when chunks of the dense, pinkish material that resembles alabaster marble were hollowed out to create supposedly health-yielding salt lamps. That, says semelier, or salt expert, Mark Bitterman, may have led to the idea of cooking directly on a salt slab. Bitterman, the James Beard Foundation awardwinning author of Salted, championed salt block cooking with his 2013 tome offering techniques for searing, serving, grilling and more. It was a hit. WHY SALT BLOCKS? In addition to being

visually appealing, local chef Lesa Lebeau found that salt blocks can be a good tool to reduce added sodium, especially when cooking for her husband who has health issues. And she really likes the taste. “It almost has a umami flavor,” the chef says. Lebeau graduated from the Academy of Culinary Education in Los Angeles, eventually working with famed chef Wolfgang Puck and cooking for a plethora of celebrities before relocating to Coeur d’Alene four years ago. She now teaches cooking classes at the Culinary Stone, including one on salt block cooking. Trace minerals in the salt — potassium, magnesium, calcium — are responsible for the block’s flavor, while ...continued on next page

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 29


FOOD | COOKING

FOOD | TO-GO BOX

Sneak Peek Preview menus for Inlander Restaurant Week 2019, plus more food news

H

ungry already for the seventh inception of Inlander Restaurant Week, happening Feb. 21 through March 2? Get the first taste of some of this year’s menus, and the first look at the 2019 event guide, at the second annual First Bite for Second Harvest on Thursday, Jan. 31. Tickets ($31; ages 21+ only) are now on sale at InlanderRestaurantWeek.com. In addition to small bites from several IRW 2019 participating restaurants, the event includes samples from Washington state-based creameries, including plenty of artisan cheese. Each ticket includes one glass of wine from host venue Barrister Winery (additional wine is available for purchase) and unlimited samples. Proceeds support Second Harvest. (CHEY SCOTT)

Chef Lisa Lebeau teaches classes on salt block cooking at the Culinary Stone.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“WORTH ITS SALT,” CONTINUED... iron oxide gives Himalayan salt its unique pinkish color. Those same trace minerals are alleged to be part of Himalayan salt’s superior health benefits and even curative powers, few of which have been scientifically substantiated (the U.S. National Institutes of Health has studied sea salt, but not Himalayan salt). Meanwhile, other health experts pooh-pooh the notion that Himalayan salt is outright healthier, yet generally concede that it’s less processed than typical table salt, which contains an artificial anti-caking agent to absorb moisture. Even though most salts, including Himalayan, only contain about 40 percent sodium overall, total daily intake of sodium, versus the salt itself, is still the number to watch, healthwise. The recommended daily allowance is between 1,500-2,300 milligrams, depending on the health organization, translating to no more than a teaspoon of salt of any kind or source daily. The average American consumes 3,400 milligrams per day, reports the American Health Association, with most of that coming from processed foods versus salt used when cooking. A McDonald’s Big Mac, for example, has between 970-1,700 milligrams of sodium. The most salty foods? Pizza, yeast breads, cold cuts and cured meats and cheese. Yet with salt block cooking, says Lebeau, you don’t need to add any seasoning, including salt. “If you do, use seasoning that is void of any sodium,” says Lebeau, who is teaching her next salt block cooking class at the Culinary Stone on Feb. 9. “I started the class because people get these as gifts and don’t know how to use them,” she notes. HOW TO USE IT: Salt blocks can be used hot or cold, says Lebeau. In her own kitchen, she often uses two slabs just for serving cold food, and two more for cooking in the oven or on the grill. When preparing a steak or tenderloin Lebeau

30 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

puts her salt block into a cold oven, turns it up to 450 degrees and lets the slab get really hot. Once she removes the hot block from the oven and places it on a trivet or towel, she “cooks” the room-temperature steak on the scorching salt block. For a rare prep, the meat only needs two minutes of cooking per side, depending on thickness, and four to six minutes for medium to well. Because they’re so dense, salt blocks not only hold their temperature a long time, but can withstand extreme temperatures of up to 700 degrees, says Lebeau. This allows for ENTRÉE very fast cooking, Get the scoop on local which is ideal for food news with our weekly searing meat and Entrée newsletter. Sign up vegetables, as well at Inlander.com/newsletter. as seafood like prawns, which Lebeau typically cooks shell-on to actually diffuse saltiness. With cold food, such as fruits or salads, Lebeau refrigerates her slabs for two to four hours (or freezes it between three and six hours) prior to serving food. In both hot and cold applications, Lebeau only leaves the food on the block a short period; the longer it remains on the block, the more the block sweats and the saltier the food tastes. Accumulated liquid can also erode the block’s surface faster. Lebeau likes to pair saltiness with unexpected ingredients, including sweet fruit. Her pineapple-salted ice cream is a twist on salted caramel; the intense heat of the salt block caramelizes the pineapple slice and gives it a faint salty taste at the same time. To clean a salt block, let it cool first, wipe it clean (scrape the surface if there’s residual cooking material) let it dry thoroughly, wrap in a towel and store in a cool, dry place. Salt blocks are naturally anti-microbial and virtually germ-free. n

Lots of change is in store for Jeremy Hansen’s restaurants.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CHEF JEREMY HANSEN’S GIN BAR HEADS TO IPK

Though the future has officially closed for chef and restaurateur Jeremy Hansen’s planned gin bar and brasserie inside the former Ridpath Hotel building (see more on page 13), the concept is being reborn, sort of, at Inland Pacific Kitchen. Starting this week, IPK has transformed into Squid & Bull Gin Lounge, featuring a menu of panAsian food by chef Chong Vang and gin-centric craft cocktails by Simon Moorby. Hansen says the restaurant isn’t permanently taking on this new moniker and theme, but is focusing on the concept for the next several months as traditionally has been done with Inland Pacific Kitchen’s past themed, rotating menus. Squid and Bull’s menu is available Wednesday through Saturday from 5:30 pm to close. (CHEY SCOTT)

ARLO’S RISTORANTE RESETTLES AFTER RELOCATION

There’s a Grinch where Arlo’s Ristorante used to be, but it’s not what you think. The Sandpoint restaurant’s owners are using a large wooden sign painted to look like the Dr. Seuss character to direct customers to their new location at the corner of Second and Lake Street (124 Second Ave.). The unexpected order to bug out came after the First Avenue building Arlo’s occupied for 17 years was condemned this past fall. This wasn’t the first time owners Tom and Lisa Guscott have experienced building issues; in 2008, a fire in an adjacent business shut them down until repairs could be made. This time, however, repairs to the structure were more than cosmetic, requiring the longstanding Italian restaurant to search for a new home. The Guscotts found it in the former Loaf & Ladle restaurant location, which has also been a sushi place, Greek restaurant and popular breakfast joint, where they’ll continue to serve flatbread pizzas, pasta dishes and other Italian fare, including their popular veal saltimbocca. (CARRIE SCOZZARO) n


You’re so money. financial educ ation presented by stcu.

Get it together. How to organize your finances and simplify your life. Safeguard your records. A credit union or bank vault is a secure place to keep key documents like original copies of your birth certificate, as well as contracts and leases, professional licenses, passports, and titles and deeds. Include a copy of your household inventory, and your will. Not interested in a safe-deposit box? Invest in a fireproof safe. Start a financial notebook.

H

ave you ever been late paying a bill because it got lost in a pile of papers? Could your family make sense of your finances if you became seriously ill?

If someone became seriously ill or died, would your loved ones know how to handle your finances? Putting together a financial notebook can help. It should contain: · Personal records, such as birth certificates. · The location of important documents. · Insurance and health records. · Information about your loans and financial accounts. · Your latest tax forms. · Your inventory of personal property. · A list of your real estate holdings, vehicles, and investments. · Retirement planning documents. · All your important estate planning documents, such as a copy of your will, advance directives, and powers of attorney.

Organizing your finances and important documents helps ensure you'll be prepared for whatever life throws your way. Here are tips for getting organized: Manage your bills. Whether you're a paper person or you like to manage things electronically, gather all your bill-paying materials in one place. Organize your bills according to when they're due. Then file bills according to whether they're outstanding or paid. You can simplify this system by using your financial institution's online banking and bill-paying program. Sign up for electronic statements and take advantage of direct deposit and payroll deduction. You'll have less paper to file, access to years of account history, and less need to write checks. Secure your tax documentation. Throughout the year, place records of donations, medical expenses, local fees and taxes, education expenses, and other information in one spot. Add your W-2s and tax documents when they arrive. That way, you'll be ready for income tax season.

Inventory your personal property. Make a comprehensive list (with photos) to document everything in each room of your home in case of disaster or burglary. This list should include things like furniture, jewelry, electronics, appliances, and tools. Record model numbers and serial numbers. Communicate with your family. Once you've gotten organized, let key people in on your system. And be sure to tell those you trust where to find your financial notebook. It'll give them peace of mind.

Check out more practical financial tips at stcumoney.org. paid advertisement

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 31


FOOD | PROFILE

In a Word: Work Old-fashioned values drive Sandpoint’s European-style Cedar Street Bistro into its next decade BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

t seemed like a good fit at the time. Manuela and Tim Frazier, who met in Europe, wanted to open a Europeanstyle café in a unique and storied Sandpoint structure fashioned after a similar bridge in Italy. In 2007, the Cedar Street Bridge Public Market, as it’s now called, had just been remodeled after Coldwater Creek vacated its longstanding digs, and the building’s new owners envisioned a unique retail and restaurant venue. But then the economy tanked, leaving the Fraziers wondering: What next? “It’s a lot of work,” says Manuela, who lets out a little laugh and shrugs. Seated towards the back of the Cedar Street Bistro & Coffee Shop she and husband Tim opened in 2008, Manuela has a perfect view to the past 10 years. The bistro is the first business visitors see when entering from Cedar Street, and is located inside the south-facing, open-air portion of the market’s lower level overlooking Sand Creek. Businesses on this side of the Bridge, which now has 16 tenants, are demarcated not by physical walls, but rather railings, equipment, furniture, signage and, in the bistro’s case, a wraparound area of counterR E S TA U R A N T FINDER top and Looking for a new place to display eat? Search the region’s areas most comprehensive bar packed and restaurant guide at full of Inlander.com/places. homemade gelato, scratch-baked goods, salads and ready-to-serve items. Tim, who’d been working for Diedrich Roasters, was initially inspired to open the bistro at coffee-roasting seminars where attendees shared stories of coffee shops they’d visited. He also has a business background that the couple felt they could build upon with a shop of their own. And build they did. The Fraziers also operate two additional businesses on the north side of the Bridge: Huckleberry Depot and Uniquely Sandpoint, which sell themed items and offer

32 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

The Sandpoint cafe, bistro and wine bar is now celebrating its 10th year in business. browsing opportunities for those awaiting one of the Bistro’s artisan coffees, grilled sandwiches or wraps, daily soup, stonebaked pizza or crepes. The recipe for their now-proven business model? Serve the best quality they can and know their price point. “We also listen to our customers,” Manuela says. “Families come in with kids and we have something for everyone.” The Bistro’s menu is displayed on a meticulously lettered chalkboard, which can be revised as needed, and often is. “We couldn’t just have coffee,” notes Manuela. Over the years, the couple continued to tinker with the menu, steadily expanding it according to not just customer input, but also their employees. “We encourage our employees to bring in recipes to try out,” says Tim, who credits those employees, especially longtime manager Maggie McCallum, with helping to evolve the business. Fully staffed, the Bistro has 11 employ-

CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

ees in winter and upwards of 17 during the summer, Tim says. Reliable staff has allowed the couple to take time off, in turn giving them opportunities to see what else is happening in the restaurant industry. When they come to Spokane, for example, the Fraziers like to visit the Wandering Table in Kendall Yards, as well as Clinkerdagger, which Manuela says reminds her of her native Germany. As for longer trips or even the prospect of retirement, someone has to stay on-site, says Manuela, who adds that many are in awe that she and Tim are such hands-on owners. “Guess who does dishes when it’s busy?” she asks rhetorically. “Tim.” Dishes, cleanup, hours of prepwork, serving, whatever it takes, Manuela says. They do it all. n Cedar Street Bistro • 334 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • Open daily 7 am-5 pm; wine bar Fri-Sat 5-9 pm • cedarstreetbistro. com • 208-265-4396


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JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 33


LOVE CONQUERS ALL Barry Jenkins beautifully adapts James Baldwin in If Beale Street Could Talk BY JOSH BELL

B

arry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel If Beale Street Could Talk is a story about injustice, about institutional racism, about the cycles of poverty. But above all it’s a love story, a celebration of romance and family connections in the face of constant adversity. The romance between childhood friends Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James) is so overwhelmingly beautiful that it nearly makes all the forces aligned against them fall away. And even though their love is not strong enough to actually defeat those seemingly immutable forces, Jenkins never lets his film be similarly overpowered. Set in Harlem in 1974 (the same year Baldwin’s novel was published), Beale Street starts with Tish telling Fonny that they’re about to have a baby, and it tells the story of their relationship in nonlinear fashion, jumping back and forth between their blissful early courtship and the more trying times as Fonny is in jail awaiting trial for a crime he didn’t commit. Just 19, Tish finds herself carrying the burden of their burgeoning family disproportionately on her own, although Fonny is far from a deadbeat dad. One of the most refreshing and joyful aspects of the story is the way that Tish’s unplanned pregnancy at such a young age is largely treated as a blessing, regardless of the circumstances. A new life is about to be brought into the world, and Tish, Fonny and Tish’s family all embrace the prospect with affection and hope. That doesn’t mean they don’t agonize over the challenges ahead of them, though. Tish’s mother Sharon (Regina King) travels all the way to

34 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

Puerto Rico to track down Fonny’s accuser, a woman who’s been coerced into going along with a racist police officer’s preferred (false) narrative, and Jenkins makes sure to give the victim a chance to speak her piece. Fonny’s own mother and sisters aren’t particularly sympathetic to his plight, although his short-tempered father (Michael Beach) makes some hard sacrifices for his son. An early scene showing the contrast between how Tish’s and Fonny’s families take the pregnancy news provides an elegant illustration of their different upbringings. James (most recently seen in the Amazon series Homecoming) and newcomer Layne make for a wonderful central couple, with a heartfelt, relaxed chemistry, and they’re aided by an excellent supporting cast, especially

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

Rated R Directed by Barry Jenkins Starring KiKi Layne, Stephan James, Regina King, Colman Domingo

King as the steely, unflappable Sharon, who takes every setback and unexpected development in stride. Dave Franco (as a Jewish landlord who tries to give Tish and Fonny a break) and Brian Tyree Henry (as an old friend of Fonny’s who’s recently been released from prison) make memorable impressions in their brief appearances, and Jenkins depicts every minor character with care and understanding. As he did in his Oscar-winning Moonlight, Jenkins captures romantic longing with warm sensuality, conveying the bond between Tish and Fonny even in scenes that just feature them looking at each other. He also retains a substantial amount of Baldwin’s prose via voiceover narration from Tish, which can sound a little florid in comparison to the more grounded realism onscreen, but which contributes to the lyrical timelessness of the central romance. Jenkins has cited Hong Kong filmmaking legend Wong Kar-wai as a major influence, and Wong’s sumptuous, colorful romances like In the Mood for Love and Chungking Express clearly shaped the way that Jenkins interprets Baldwin’s book. Baldwin’s work always balanced artistry and activism in its exploration of the black experience in America, and with Beale Street, Jenkins does the same. It’s impossible to watch these tender, fragile, indomitable characters and not empathize with their experience, whether that’s falling in love or facing injustices that persist to this day. n


FILM | SHORTS

A Dog’s Way Home

OPENING FILMS A DOG’S WAY HOME

A plucky canine is separated from its owner, and makes a dangerous crosscountry trek to get back to him. If you saw the trailer, you’ve basically seen the whole movie. (NW) Rated PG

BEN IS BACK

A teenage boy returns home unexpectedly for Christmas after abandoning his family, looking to reconcile as he recovers from drug addiction. Lucas Hedges and Julia Roberts star. (NW) Rated R

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

Barry Jenkins’ follow-up to Moonlight is a tender adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel, a touching drama about a young couple separated by imprisonment as they prepare to welcome a baby. It balances artistry and activism in its exploration of the black experience in America. (JB) Rated R

ON THE BASIS OF SEX

After the success of the documentary RBG, we now get the Hollywood dramatization of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s trailblazing legal career. It’s well intentioned, but it’s also pretty forgettable and clumsily told. (JB) Rated PG-13

+

REPLICAS

Keanu Reeves stars as a scientist who goes full-on Frankenstein, bringing his dead wife and kids back to life with predictably harrowing results. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE UPSIDE

A remake of the French hit The Intouchables, starring Bryan Cranston as a cantankerous, paralyzed millionaire and Kevin Hart as the troubled man who becomes his caretaker. (NW) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING AQUAMAN

The half-man, half-fish superhero gets his own vehicle, in which he inherits the Atlantean throne and fights with his evil brother. It’s got some crazy visuals and hammy performances but still manages to be kind of a slog. (JB) Rated PG-13

a teenage outcast (Hailee Steinfeld). Unlike its Michael Bay-directed predecessors, it coasts by on low-key charm. (NW) Rated PG-13

CREED II

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

The Rocky saga continues with Adonis Creed preparing to fight the son of Ivan Drago, who killed his father in the ring all those years ago. It hits all the plot points you expect, but the formula still works like gangbusters. (NW) Rated PG-13

BUMBLEBEE

In this Saw/Cube hybrid, a group of strangers are drawn to an escape room that promises a reward to whoever can get out. No surprise — it turns out to be deadly. About two-thirds of a compelling thriller. (NW) Rated PG-13 ...continued on next page

The band Queen and late frontman Freddie Mercury (played by Rami Malek) get the biopic treatment, and the results won’t exactly rock you. It takes a disappointingly conventional approach to a wildly unconventional figure. (JB) Rated PG-13 A surprisingly fun Transformers origin story, with the yellow Autobot coming to Earth in the ’80s and befriending

Find National and International News on inlander.com every day, now powered by The New York Times

ESCAPE ROOM

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 35


NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, JAN 11TH – THURS, JAN 17TH TICKETS: $9

NOW SHOWING

GREEN BOOK, VICE THE FAVOURITE, FREE SOLO

COMING SOON COLD WAR, IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK, SPIFF 2/2-2/8 MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS For Movie Times, Visit:

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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING THE FAVOURITE

In 18th-century England, two women jockey for a position of power within the coterie of an ailing Queen Anne. A lacerating, cutthroat dark comedy with great performances from Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone. (SS) Rated R

GREEN BOOK

A white driver (Viggo Mortensen) ferries a black jazz pianist (Mahershala Ali) through the American South in the 1960s. Its racial politics are undoubtedly simplistic, but its central performances more than make up for it. At the Magic Lantern. (MJ) Rated PG-13

HOLMES & WATSON

Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly team up again to play literature’s most famous detective duo, bumbling through a murder case at Buckingham Palace. (NW) Rated PG-13

with Broad Comedy

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK VARIETY (LOS ANGELES) TIMES

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

AQUAMAN

55

BUMBLEBEE

66

ESCAPE ROOM

49

THE FAVOURITE

91

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

87

ON THE BASIS OF SEX

60

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

87

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

melodrama that offers both the glitter of escapism and the grit of serious issues. (EB) Rated R

VICE

Adam McKay’s follow-up to The Big

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

Short is another experimental dark comedy, this one following the career of Dick Cheney (an unrecognizable Christian Bale). The gimmicks and gags feel limp and unfocused this time around. (JB) Rated R n

MARY POPPINS RETURNS

In this long-awaited sequel to the Disney classic, the magical nanny lands again in London to again help out the Banks children, now adults and with kids of their own. A slab of candy-coated excess that laboriously tries to copy the original’s charm. (JB) Rated PG

MORTAL ENGINES

January 26, 2019 8:00 p.m.–10:00p.m. Bing Crosby Theater Get tickets at: bit.ly/broadspokane19

Help Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho give care. No matter what.

The writers of the Lord of Rings films adapt Philip Reeves’ futuristic novel in which all the world’s cities are now steampunk behemoths on wheels. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE MULE

Clint Eastwood squints and scowls his way through this thriller, inspired by the true story of a WWII veteran transporting cocaine for a Mexican drug cartel. (NW) Rated R

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET

This animated sequel finds Wreck-It Ralph exploring the vast unknown of the internet in an attempt to stop the shutdown of his friend’s video game. When it isn’t retreading the original, it relies on pop culture references that already feel dated. (JB) Rated PG

SECOND ACT

Through a series of comic misunderstandings, a blue-collar college dropout (Jennifer Lopez) fudges her way into a high-profile job on Madison Avenue. (NW) Rated PG-13

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

Spider-Men from various dimensions converge in the world of a teen web slinger, and they help him find his powers. A brilliant and funny animated feature that looks and feels like a comic book come to life. (SS) Rated PG

A STAR IS BORN

This third remake of the classic ragsto-riches story finds a booze-soaked musician (Bradley Cooper) eclipsed by his protege and lover (Lady Gaga, who can really act). An engaging rock

36 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

NOW STREAMING SUPPORT THE GIRLS (HULU)

This indie charmer is set in a Hooters-style restaurant in suburban Texas, and follows the harried manager (Regina Hall) as she tries putting out fires both at work and in her personal life. Writer-director Andrew Bujalski takes the basic form of a boisterous studio comedy and injects it with humanity and melancholy. (NW) Rated R


FILM | REVIEW

Holding Court

Surely Ruth Bader Ginsburg deserves a more complex, thoughtful biopic than On the Basis of Sex.

Daniel Stiepleman) manufactures extra drama to add tension to an otherwise straightforward and somewhat dull story. The landmark case, in which a single man caring for his ailing mother was denied a tax deduction available only to women, indeed set the stage for Ginsburg’s later courtroom victories for gender equality, but its details aren’t particularly compelling. The movie throws some rote obstacles in Ruth’s way, all of which are easily cleared in time for her to give a fiery speech as the intrusive, bombastic score swells. the only female students at Harvard Law School in the The dialogue is full of expository declarations (the 1950s, her struggles to land a job after graduation, and phrase “on the basis of sex” is uttered numerous times), her mostly happy family life, even as she supports her which the actors handle with varying effectiveness, and husband Marty (Armie Hammer) through grueling the direction from journeycancer treatments. ON THE BASIS OF SEX woman Mimi Leder is bland The cancer scenes are especially gratuitous, and basic, adding to the Rated PG-13 providing some shameless tear-jerking moments network-TV-movie feel of Directed by Mimi Leder that have little bearing on the main story. The bulk Starring Felicity Jones, Armie Hammer, the story. Ruth and her allies of the narrative takes place more than a decade are fighting such obvious Justin Theroux, Sam Waterston later, in 1970, when Marty has established himself injustice that it’s easy to root as a top tax lawyer in New York City and Ruth is for them, and Stiepleman a law professor at Rutgers University. There, she teaches and Leder occasionally manage to make tax law surprisstudents about the emerging field of sex discrimination ingly rousing. The relationship between Ruth and Marty law, and when Marty discovers a tax case with the potenis also quite charming, although the use of their teenage tial to reverse decades of court decisions against equality daughter Jane (Cailee Spaeny) as a generational mouthfor women, Ruth decides to take it on herself. piece is pretty clumsy. As an academic rather than a trial lawyer, she draws Ginsburg is (justifiably) a hero to many, and fans on help from the boisterous, supportive Marty, as well as of “Notorious R.B.G.” memes will probably be suitably the ACLU’s Mel Wulf (Justin Theroux), who’s initially hyped-up by this crowd-pleasing movie. It’s perfectly skeptical of adding women’s rights to his organization’s adequate as a feel-good rallying cry, even if it’s cinematimission. The conflict between Ruth and Mel is just one cally pedestrian, dramatically forgettable and politically area where the film (written by Ginsburg’s own nephew, unsophisticated. n

On the Basis of Sex gives Ruth Bader Ginsburg the basic biopic treatment BY JOSH BELL

S

upreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the subject of one of 2018’s most successful and acclaimed documentaries, Betsy West and Julie Cohen’s RBG, so a narrative film focused on an important early case that Ginsburg argued might seem a bit redundant. And while On the Basis of Sex details a case that doesn’t get its due attention in RBG, both movies are rather superficial, uncomplicated portrayals of their subjects, with upbeat, boosterish tones that don’t allow for anything unexpected or unconventional. They even both end with treacly inspirational closing-credits ballads performed by pop stars: In RBG, it’s Jennifer Hudson singing “I’ll Fight”; in Basis, it’s Kesha singing “Here Comes the Change.” At least RBG has the advantage of showcasing the real person. Ginsburg herself shows up at the end of Basis in a painfully heavy-handed cameo, but for the most part she’s played by Felicity Jones, sporting an awkward Brooklyn accent and channeling some of the grit and determination she showed in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. The movie spends its first half-hour on a bunch of throatclearing backstory, showing Ruth’s early days as one of

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 37


COUNTRY

Story Songs

Canadian cowboy Corb Lund digs into personal history and family folklore in his Western tunes BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

C

orb Lund has always kept one scuffed, dustcovered cowboy boot in the twangy sounds of traditional country-western music, and the other in, well, the weird. His output is decidedly retro in style, channeling the country story songs of yore, but there’s also a sense of modern adventurousness to it. What might be most surprising, though, is that he’s also got a fondness for straight-ahead rock ’n’ roll, having played in a metal band called the Smalls in the ’90s. “It was a real indie, underground thing, and in that world, you’re encouraged to be as unique and different as you can,” Lund tells the Inlander. “That’s kind of how my songwriting was forged. I think my musical style is … really deep family history mixed with indie-rock quirkiness.” Regardless of how you’d describe it, one thing’s certain: Lund’s music is a far cry from the impersonal, assembly line country-pop you hear on mainstream

38 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

DENISE DEBELIUS PHOTO


radio, and he surely couldn’t see himself ever working out of the songwriting factories of Nashville. Based in Alberta, Canada, Lund comes from a long line of cattle ranchers, and that background is baked into his work. His first exposure to country music was through the Old West ballads his grandfathers used to sing to him, which led to an obsession with singing cowboys like Marty Robbins, who was able to distill an entire narrative arc into a matter of minutes. “I’m a story-song nut, guys like Kenny Rogers and Johnny Horton and Jerry Reed,” Lund says. “I’m all over that stuff.” He also points to the work of singer-songwriter Bobbie Gentry, whose music often possessed a playful sense of experimentation and a morbid sense of humor. Lund brings up her 1968 song “Casket Vignette,” in which a woman is picking out a coffin for her recently deceased husband. “The funeral director is consoling her and comforting her because her husband died,” Lund says, “but at the end, it turns out she’s happy that he died. And they’re picking out the color of the interior of the casket. I mean, who thinks of that? It’s awesome.” Like Gentry and other singing storytellers of country music’s past, Lund’s lyrics have a specificity to them, and they create specific characters and explore their inner turmoils.

“I’ve got a whole cast of characters ... great-grandpas and uncles who were all ranchers and rodeo people, bootleggers and card cheats.” In “S Lazy H,” a rancher watches as his family dissolves and his land is sold out from under him. “Student Visas” is inspired by a conversation Lund had with an American soldier about his involvement in the anti-Contra operation in 1980s Nicaragua (“Did Reagan give the order? / Did cocaine pay the bills?” Lund wonders). “Bible on the Dash” is decidedly more upbeat, chronicling a traveling country band consistently dogged by the cops as they zip across state lines. He’s also inspired by his own family lore, by the ancestral tales that grow taller as they echo their way down through generations. Right now, he’s working on a song about an uncle who used to go to dances with his spurs on and start fights, and another about a great-grandfather who opened a saloon on the outskirts of a dry county in Utah. “I’ve got a whole cast of characters to draw from,” Lund says. “Grandpas and great-grandpas and uncles who were all ranchers and rodeo people, bootleggers and card cheats.” Lund has been playing with the same three-piece backing band, dubbed the Hurtin’ Albertans, for years now. They’ve developed, as he describes it, a “musical ESP.” “We don’t even use a set list anymore,” Lund says. “I have hand signals for which song we’re going to play next.” It’s obviously working: They’re playing bigger venues each time they make their way back to the U.S., and they’ve sold out their upcoming Bartlett concert. “In Canada, we’re a little more well known,” Lund says. “We play small hockey arenas and stuff up here, whereas in the States we’re still doing bars. But it’s definitely growing. We’ve been around for ages in Canada, but in the States in the last few years people have just discovered us.” And while that discovery continues, Lund hopes he can expand his audience with the intimate, personal music with which he’s become a Canadian favorite. “I would like my career to grow, but I don’t want to have a big career doing something I don’t want to do,” he says. “It would have to grow on my own terms.” n Corb Lund with Caleb Caudle • Fri, Jan. 11 at 8 pm • All ages • Sold out • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | CLASSIC ROCK

They still can’t fight the feeling: Soft rock legends REO Speedwagon bring all their ’80s hits to Northern Quest next week.

Rolling Through Changes REO Speedwagon has worked nonstop for a half-century, and they’re not slowing down any time soon BY DAN NAILEN

R

EO Speedwagon’s monster chart-topping power ballad “Can’t Fight This Feeling” has been stuck in my head since junior high. So ubiquitous was that song during the mid-’80s — on MTV, pop radio and the sound system of every schooldance deejay — that it blinded me to just how massive REO Speedwagon was before that song arrived. For me, REO Speedwagon was all about just that song, and asking a girl named Kristy to slow-dance to it at an Omaha “sock hop.” It was all very Midwestern. She said yes, and I give all credit to REO’s schmaltzy tune and their popularity at the time. And clearly I wasn’t alone in tapping into singer Kevin Cronin and Co.’s smooth rock moves for romantic inspiration. For more than 50 years, the Illinois-bred band has delivered bombastic rockers and swooning power ballads for audiences spanning the globe. REO’s tunes like “Keep on Loving You,” “Roll with the Changes” and “Riding the Storm Out” remain staples on classic-rock radio. During their career, they’ve persevered through several lineup changes (although none since the late ’80s). They’ve enjoyed hit albums and massive radio and MTV popularity bookended by periods of, shall we say, commercial obsolescence. And they’ve remained a

40 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

consistently successful live act even when they don’t have new music to play. “We’ve never stopped touring,” says keyboardist Neal Doughty, the only original member remaining from REO’s first gig in 1967, by way of explaining their ongoing appeal. “This has been a constant for 50 years. We’ve never taken a year off of touring. “As long as the audiences are unbelievably good, we can’t stop.” By that metric, don’t expect REO Speedwagon to quit any time soon. The band’s show at Northern Quest Resort & Casino sold out well in advance, and they have tour dates already scheduled into the fall of 2019. Doughty says the only way he can see the band slowing down is if audiences stop showing up, and when a band’s catalog of hits is deep enough to thrill several generations of fans, there’s no real good reason not to continue playing gigs with your buddies. “There are kids who aren’t even teenagers yet, and not only are they there [at the shows], they’re singing along with every song and they know all the lyrics,” Doughty says. “We feel very lucky. We do not take that for granted.” Besides, the five guys in the band are having the time of their lives when they’re on stage. As Doughty puts

it, there are “no ego battles” going on because “friction in a band usually happens when you’re making a new album.” While REO occasionally produces a new song, their last proper album (not counting a 2009 Christmas collection) was 2007’s Find Your Own Way Home. That’s not to say people aren’t buying REO Speedwagon albums: They’re just still buying the albums that made the band superstars in the ’80s. Hi Infidelity — REO’s 1980 album and home to hits like “Take It on the Run” and “Don’t Let Him Go” — was in 2017 certified “diamond status” by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling 10 million copies. Talk about a slow burn. Hi Infidelity is noteworthy not only for its commercial success, but for the fact that success came on the band’s ninth album. Can you think of another band MORE EVENTS whose biggest hit came Visit Inlander.com for 13 years into its career? complete listings of Reflecting on that local events. album all these years later, Doughty still recalls how making Hi Infidelity felt different right away, in a good way. “Usually when we finished [recording] an album, by the time we were done I was just sick of the thing,” Doughty says. “I didn’t want to hear it again for a year. But when we were done with Hi Infidelity and I listened to the whole album, it was immediately my favorite.” A lot of REO fans no doubt feel the same, although I’d have to vote for Wheels Are Turnin’ from a couple years later. You know, because it has that one song that… just… won’t… stop… playing… in… my… head. n REO Speedwagon • Thu, Jan. 17 at 7:30 pm • Sold out • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2100


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JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK BARTLETT FIFTH ANNIVERSARY

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/10

BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown BOLO’S, Jan Boogie with Cary Fly J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Open Mic J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen COEUR D’ALENE EAGLES, KOSH CRUISERS, Open Jam Night DARCY’S RESTAURANT & SPIRITS, Old School Dance Music and Karaoke w/DJ Dave FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Country Dance THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary and the Songsmith Series MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Bright Moments Jazz MOON TIME, Kori Ailene NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Kylie Morgan; PJ Destiny O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, O’Pen Mic Thursdays THE PIN, Wreck Room Takeover with Ephex, Meraki, Raskl, Ove POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Justin James THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, Music Challenge ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 01/11

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, The Company Band 219 LOUNGE, The Wow Wows BABY BAR, Quayde LaHüe, Pit J J THE BARTLETT, Corb Lund (see page 38), Caleb Caudle BIGFOOT PUB, NightShift

42 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

SKA REEL BIG FISH

I

t’s been five years since the Bartlett first opened its doors, becoming one of downtown Spokane’s most popular all-ages music spots. As owners Caleb and Karli Ingersoll prepare to unveil their second venue — the Lucky You Lounge — they’re set to celebrate the milestone of their pioneering venture, and two Bartlett regulars are taking the stage next week to commemorate the anniversary. First up is the sisterly trio Joseph (pictured), and their haunting but propulsively catchy folk-pop has sold out the room on Wednesday night. The following evening, Seattle singersongwriter Noah Gundersen will perform, and tickets are still available. If you can’t make either of those dates, electronic act Water Monster and hip-hop artist T.S the Solution will play a free show next Friday. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Joseph with Marshall McLean • Wed, Jan. 16 at 8 pm • Sold Out • Noah Gundersen • Thu, Jan. 17 at 8 pm • $25 • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

I

f you were alive in the ’90s, you no doubt recall the ska boom; whether or not you remember the craze fondly is another story. But it goes without saying that Reel Big Fish is one of the grandaddies of the genre, and they’re still going strong all these years later. The Orange County outfit just released a new album called Life Sucks… Let’s Dance!, and anyone expecting a major stylistic departure just doesn’t know Reel Big Fish. It’s a reliable collection of danceable reggae-inspired beats, bright horn lines and wry humor, exploring the band’s pet subjects of booze, partying and the inevitable morning-after regret — oh, and as is customary, a couple unexpected cover songs. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Reel Big Fish with Mest and Bikini Trill • Tue, Jan. 15 at 8 pm • $22.50 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

BOLO’S, Mojo Box BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Theresa Edwards Duo CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Casey Ryan CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Sam Leyde CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Into the Drift CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary DARCY’S RESTAURANT & SPIRITS, Karaoke and Dancing w/DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Ron Kieper Jazz J J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Little River Band (see page 45)

IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Mike & Shanna Thompson J J JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Friends of the Guitar Hour feat. Larry Almeida THE JACKSON ST., Elisha and the Loose Change Band JOHN’S ALLEY, Laney Lou and The Bird Dogs LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MARYHILL WINERY, Scott Linklater & Pete Cowger MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Harold’s IGA MAX AT MIRABEAU, Tuck Foster & The Tumbling Dice MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Ron Greene Trio

MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Truck Mills NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Kylie Morgan; Gigawatt NYNE, StepBrothers feat. Jennifer Kemple PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis In Transit PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bright Moments THE PIN, Verbal Assault 7 with Spindle, Juto, Dirty Savage, NKNGS, Treezy, Buddha THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler

SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT (NOAH’S), Son of Brad SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

Saturday, 01/12

219 LOUNGE, The Groove Black J BERSERK, Double Bird, The Shirkers THE BIG DIPPER, Acoustic Apocolypse feat. Tyler Alai, Skunktopus & Retro Roger BIGFOOT PUB, NightShift BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., BG3 BOLO’S, Mojo Box CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Casey Ryan


J CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, The Stylistics COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Justin James IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Firshi IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Eliza Catastrophe THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, The Maple Bars LAUGHING DOG BREWING, Crooked Fingers LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J THE LOCAL DELI, Ally Burke MARYHILL WINERY, Eric Neuhausser MAX AT MIRABEAU, Tuck Foster & The Tumbling Dice MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Little Wolf & Brendan Kelty MULLIGAN’S, Ron Greene NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Kylie Morgan; Gigawatt THE OBSERVATORY, Helm, VII Chains, Dark White Light, Wretched F--PACIFIC PIZZA, Haley and the HitchHikers PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Dwayne Parsons POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade

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THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, Vain Halen and Pipers Rush Tribute Show J THE SHOP, Telepathic Station Nine SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT (NOAH’S), Tod Hornby SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Son of Brad ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

Sunday, 01/13

THE BLIND BUCK, Show Tune SingAlong Sundays CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Tommy G LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY, Kori Ailene MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Ken Mayginnes NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Kylie Morgan O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with Peter Lucht STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 01/14

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic

CHECKERBOARD BAR, Open Mic Night CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 01/15

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J BABY BAR, Zeta, S1ugs J J THE BARTLETT, The Yawpers, Blackfoot Gypsies BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J J KNITTING FACTORY, Reel Big Fish (see facing page), Mest, Bikini Trill LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MOOSE LOUNGE, Pamela Jean RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT AND TAP HOUSE, Pat Coast THE VIKING, Songsmith Series feat. Bryan Warhall ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites with Greg Mahugh

Wednesday, 01/16

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills & Ali Thomas J J THE BARTLETT, Joseph (see facing page), Marshall McLean CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night Hosted by The Jam Band GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Open Jam THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Nick Grow J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 THE OBSERVATORY, Tigerblood, Rampage, Crooked, Aggressive Behavior J RED DRAGON CHINESE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J J THE BARTLETT, Noah Gundersen (see facing page), Jan. 17 J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, REO Speedwagon (see page 40), Jan. 17 J THE BIG DIPPER, Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds, Balance Trick, River City Roots, Jan. 18 J CHATEAU RIVE, An Evening with John Sebastian, Jan. 18 J KNITTING FACTORY, Jacob Banks, Jan. 18 THE OBSERVATORY, Hip Hip Apocalypse, Jan. 18 J THE BARTLETT, Cursive, Summer Cannibals, Campdogzz, Jan. 23

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219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR • 4720 Ferrel, CdA • 208-274-0486 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 381-5489 OMEGA EVENT CENTER • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 43


Learn cross-country skiing at Winterfest.

EVAN SUNDERMAN PHOTO

OUTDOORS SNOW MUCH FUN

Cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and even being pulled by your dog on skis — an activity called skijoring — have seen significant rises in interest the last several years. Locals can learn all about these winter-rec opportunities from friendly members of the Spokane Nordic Ski Association, who share their passion for being active throughout the cold months at the nonprofit’s annual Winterfest celebration. The day of demos and affordable introductory lessons is open to all ages and skills. Cross-country skiing lessons are only $5, and are offered in 45-minute sessions throughout the day. If you don’t have skis of your own, rentals are available on site, or plan ahead and rent equipment from REI, Mountain Gear or Fitness Fanatics. Other clinics planned for the festival include backcountry skiing ($10) and skijoring ($25). — CHEY SCOTT Winterfest • Sun, Jan. 13 from 9 am-3:30 pm • Free to attend; some events require fee • Selkirk Lodge, Mt. Spokane State Park • 26107 N. Mt. Spokane State Park Dr. • spokanenordic.org

COMEDY MAN OF MANY VOICES

Although he started in stand-up, Frank Caliendo’s career really took off when he joined the cast of the raucous sketch comedy show MADtv. He became a breakout star for his uncanny impressions of larger-than-life figures — Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Jay Leno. He also had a Donald Trump impersonation in the years before Alec Baldwin took it on. But it was his beloved take on husky-voiced sports commentator John Madden that got Caliendo the most attention, as well as a gig on Fox NFL Sunday. Expect Madden and his celebrity cohorts to make cameos at Caliendo’s upcoming Northern Quest appearance. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Frank Caliendo • Fri, Jan. 11 at 7:30 pm • $49-$69 • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 877-871-6772

44 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

ARTS NO LIMITS HERE

Channel your inner Bob Ross and paint some happy little trees during the next Paint it Forward Night at downtown Spokane paintand-sip studio Pinot’s Palette. Attendees of the event, which is open to 60 artists of any skill level (ages 21+ only), will be painting a beautiful scene inspired by a serene sunrise view at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. And yes, there are happy trees. In addition to the guided painting, guests are treated to Bob Ross trivia (with prizes!) and the chance to purchase some PBS-related memorabilia. Proceeds from the event support the Inland Northwest’s KSPS Public Television station. In the words of the late, great Bob Ross, “Believe that you can do it, because you can do it!” — CHEY SCOTT PBS Nerd Paint ’n’ Sip Party • Sun, Jan. 13 from 2-4 pm • $54 • Ages 21+ • Pinot’s Palette • 319 W. Sprague • ksps.org or pinotspalette.com


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

RESERVE YOUR SEAT FOR

THE BIG GAME! FEBRUARY 3RD Party & Win Prizes with Rock 94 1/2 from 2:30pm to 5:30pm Lots of Food & Drink Specials 50 TVs to watch the game

1018 West Francis Ave • Spokane • 509 326-6794

www.theswingingdoors.com

ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR MATEUSZ WOLSKI, VIOLIN SPOKANE SYMPHONY CHORALE EASTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SYMPHONIC CHOIR

ARTS TEAM EFFORT

The works in the new Social Space exhibition opening at WSU’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art offer various printmaking techniques from four renowned American artists: Mark Bradford, Leonardo Drew, Julie Mehretu and Wangechi Mutu. All of them work in abstract imagery while addressing concrete issues ranging from race to labor to conflict. As you roam the show in the new “Crimson Cube” on WSU’s Pullman campus, you’ll find works created by found objects as well as ornate representations of human migration and violence. Curated from the collection of the museum’s namesake, expect a revealing collection of pieces all created between 2003 and 2018. — DAN NAILEN

Spokane Symphony Concertmaster ˇ Mateusz Wolski performs Dvorák’s Violin Concerto. Rachmaninoff’s choral symphony, The Bells, is loosely based on a poem by Edgar Allan Poe.

Social Space • Jan. 15-March 16; Tue-Sat from 10 am-4 pm • Free admission • Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU • 1535 NE Wilson Rd., Pullman • museum.wsu.edu • 335-1910

Sponsored by: Maxine Kopczynski / Doug and Gail Belanger

CHAMBER

Soirée

JAN 29-30 2019 • 7:30PM

HISTORIC DAVENPORT Gallery & Table Seating Available

Enjoy Stravinsky, Brahms and more... introduced and performed by various ensembles from the Spokane Symphony

MUSIC REMINISCENT

Is there another band that’s sold more than 30 million albums worldwide that we talk about less than Little River Band? For most of us, the name only comes up when you hear the band’s biggest hit, “Reminiscing,” on a late-night commercial or tucked on a movie soundtrack. That’s not really fair, considering they had no less than 10 Top 20 hits in the U.S. alone, and even more in their native Australia. No doubt one issue with remembering LRB is that the lineup of the band has gone through no less than 30 members, and currently includes none of the guys who were there during the band’s ’70s heyday. Even so, if excellent harmonies and yacht-rock are your musical jam, this show is for you. — DAN NAILEN Little River Band • Fri, Jan. 11 at 8 pm • $35-$70 • All ages • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

M ARTIN WOLDSO N THE ATER AT THE FOX TICKETS | 509 624 1200 | spokanesymphony.org

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU NOT SO LUCKY St. Patrick’s Day didn’t turn out to be so lucky. I saw you in my life forever. Held you on a pedestal like no one else I’ve ever encountered in my life. I loved you like no other person... gave you a piece of myself I’ve never shared in my adult life. All you had to say is “I really do wish you the best.” What if you were supposed to be part of my best? I’m hurt and I’m sad, but I know this ending will just open up opportunities for me to find the person who wants to love me the way I want to be loved... something you couldn’t offer me. RED HEAD MAN OF ALL TRAITS I remember seeing you at Riverfront Park and knew we were in trouble. You put a spell on me and love me every minute we get to spend together. We have had lots of adventures but this last one, me lying in the hospital bed for months preparing for my last breath, YOU were by my side every time I woke up. I would just look at you and feel safe... we didn’t have to say anything... words will never really say how I feel. HISTORY NERDS I saw you at the Sunday night showing of Mary Queen of Scots. You were one of the only other people in the theatre that knew the history behind the film and we enjoyed the hilarious commentary of the youth in front of us. Popcorn on me, next time?

LOST HAT — FOUND! I saw you on Saturday in your snowshoes as you were coming down the trail. You said you had lost your special hand-knit hat that your friend had made you in blues and greens. I told you I would watch for it. I had you dial my phone number so my cell would have a record of how to reach you but we didn’t realize my phone didn’t get reception up there on Mt. Spokane. I never got your number and don’t know how to return your beautiful hat to you. Call me. I have it.

I SAW YOU RE: BREAKING THE CYCLE OF HOMELESSNESS Yes, Spokane has a huge homelessness problem. You are right, giving cash handouts to homeless addicts is probably not going to do much good. In fact, it may enable a homeless addict to continue the destructive path of substance abuse. However, it’s completely contradictory to discourage the generosity of our compassionate community and support the work of the Union Gospel Mission. UGM, as you stated, does not receive any federal or state funding and depends SOLEY on the generous contributions from our community. UGM provides emergency shelter for men, women and children in our community and provides life recovery programs for people willing to submit to strict guidelines. Without the generosity of the community, hundreds or women, children, and men would be left without a safe and healing environment to find refuge. Through revenue from UGM’s thrift stores, countless lives are being healed and families are being reunited and strengthened. As a resident of UGM’s Center for Women and Children in CDA, I can personally attest to the huge impact UGM has had on my life, and want to thank all of the generous members in our community for supporting the mission, whether it be through volunteering, donating goods, or donating money. Without our generous community, my complete recovery would not be possible. Best wishes. NEW YEAR ANGEL You were dancing the night away at Fizzie Mulligans on New

Year’s Eve, then the countdown started into the New Year and you noticed I was alone. You came over to me, a complete stranger, kissed me on the cheek and wished me a happy new year. At that moment I realized that I didn’t ring in the

NOT A SEAT CUSHION Jeers to the members of a local fitness club that use the swimming kick boards as seat cushions in the dry and steam saunas. Keep in mind where a person’s face is when they use the kick boards for their intended

about how those anti-homosexuality passages were a product of their time and can be ignored? LGBT community bitches about the pastors who don’t. Bakers happily make cakes for gay weddings? Couples find a baker who says no,

How can you say the LGBT community is fighting for acceptance when they can’t even accept each other?

New Year alone, but had an angel by my side for at least a moment. Thank you for being that angel that warmed my heart.

CHEERS MY SICKNESS FIGHTING SUPERHERO You are my hero. Thank you for being a pillar of strength, compassion and patience in my life and that of our kids. You have been so supportive and helpful as we have been battling this horrible flu. I couldn’t do this without you. I love you more. KXLY WEEKEND CREW Been thinking for a long time why I always tune in to KXLY weekends. Today, Saturday 12:30, I realized that it is because of the professional, informative yet friendly attitude of the three ladies. All of them set a perfect example for all other local TV reporters.

JEERS GUNS VS VIOLENCE I’m glad you’re prepared but I hope I never run into you in a crowd where a balloon pops. JEERS TO JEERS Who gets to use this a personal column for a diatribe on guns? Three columns allowed to go on ad nauseam!?!? Come on Inlander don’t be so stupid.

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

purpose. And news flash - you don’t need the extra cushion back there. THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Shame on all politicians that play with people’s lives just to feed their egos. Since the government is not fully running, we as the people should only have to pay limited taxes. For every day that the parts of the government are closed we should deduct $50 off of our taxes. If the loss of revenue does not wake up the politicians, then noting will. NO TAXES for Limited Government. WHY WASTE THE MEAT? Jeers to “twelve good men and true” in Franklin County who equate being ill and torn to pieces before an audience of teenagers as the equivalent of euthanasia. Clearly there was more than one sick puppy in that classroom. WHY I’M NOT LEAVING THE CLOSET Why do I stay in my closet? The LGBT community, guys. That’s why. Oh, I get that they’re fighting for equality. And in many ways, they’ve won. Same-sex marriage is legal. Brokeback Mountain isn’t the only gay romance movie anymore (and some even have happy endings!). I can walk down the street in a Pride shirt and get little more than eye-rolls and maybe a snide comment or two, which will be balanced out by smiles and encouraging nods. But that’s not enough for my fellow LGBT folks. Pastors preach

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THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS A V I A S

N I N T H

A L E C

B O N O

S C A B

C A V A

N A T I K Y M K A I N D G A N S O M L A I O K C E E A B B B A L E N U S K E

G E E O L D I M E N I G N D H O A A W Y T H A L A L Y L E D M S V E T S

I D O O T R O I O

B I L L

A L O U

D O G E

E T E O S P N A R I U U M U U M O M S P A I A L M L A Y I

A M S O

L E S S

U N C A P

S O T T O

H A M M

T E N A C R E

S M A C K D A B

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Got Scrap? Get Cash y FASTy

It’s always sunny in Browne’s Addition.

tell them to bake a cake, whine to the media when baker says no, take baker to court, and force them to begrudgingly make a cake — when they could have just gone to a different baker who would have put their heart and soul into a cake for them. “But they’re fighting for acceptance!” you say. “They have a right to be angry! They need to call out bigotry where they see it!” Bull. If they were really interested in acceptance, they’d work on getting people within their ranks to accept bi and ace people. Instead, bi people are told they don’t belong because they have the “ultimate passing privilege” and asexuals are told their suffering doesn’t count because trans and gay people have it worse. How can you say the LGBT community is fighting for acceptance when they can’t even accept each other? n

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

PBS NERD PAINT ‘N’ SIP PARTY Share an afternoon with other PBS nerds and join KSPS in celebrating public television painters like Bob Ross, Jerry Yarnell, and Wilson Bickford. Ticket sales benefit KSPS Public TV. PBS apparel and Bob Ross memorabilia is also available with trivia prizes. Ages 21+ Jan. 13, 2-4 pm. $54. Pinot’s Palette, 319 W. Sprague. ksps.org (443-7700) VOLUNTRIVIA: VOLUNTEERING + 80S TRIVIA Participate in a volunteer food sort activity, then head back to the Second Harvest Kitchen for 80s trivia night hosted by Colin Burk. Light snacks provided, with beer and wine available. Dress in your best 80s attire for a chance to win a special prize. Jan. 17, 5:30-8 pm. $25. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org GLOBAL-GOAT PINT NIGHT FEAT. DARIO RE Iron Goat will donate $1 to Global Neighborhood for every IG pint sold. Includes live music by Dario Re. Global Neighborhood’s Job Readiness Program offers on site job training to former refugees that includes everything from teaching the workplace expectations in the U.S. to preparing people for interviews and helping people create resumes. Jan. 18, 5-9 pm. Iron Goat Brewing Co., 1302 W. Second. global-neighborhood.org/events/ (474-0722)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) FRANK CALIENDO The comedian and impressionist is best known for his work on the Fox Network television series MADtv and Fox NFL Sunday. Jan. 11, 7:30 pm. $49-$69. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (242-7000) I SAW YOU! Join the BDT Players as they pull the comedy from the weekly readersubmitted section of the Inlander. Guests are encouraged to bring their favorite (family friendly) posting to the show. Fridays at 7:30 pm through Feb. 8. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com (838-6688) DENNIS REGAN Dennis has been on nine late night TV shows, as well as starred in movies and plays. Sara Brown is singing before the show. Jan. 12, 6-10 pm. $20. Bridge Press Cellars, 39 W. Pacific Ave. (209-1346) SAFARI The BDT’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced short-form improv show that’s generally game based and relies on audience suggestions. Ages 16+. Saturdays at 7:30 pm through March 30. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com (822-7938)

MONDAY NIGHT COMEDY Hosted by Jared Chastain, with local acts followed by open mic. Mondays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Etsi Bravo, 215 E. Main, Pullman. etsibravo.com (715-1037) OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com COMEDY NIGHT Comedy night returns with feature comedian Chelsea Tolle and headliner and musical improv talent Michael Glatzmaier. Hosted by Mark Morris. Jan. 17, 8-9:30 pm. $10. Brothers Bar, 111 W. Shaffer Ave. (509-258-8875) MARK MORRIS COMEDY NIGHTS: Featuring Chelsea Tolle and headliner and musical improv talent Michael Glatzmaier. Jan. 18, 8-9:30 pm. $10. American Legion Post 143, 1138 E. Poleline Ave. postfallspost143.org (208-773-9054) GOOD TIMES AT GOODTYMES Mark Morris comedy returns with featured comedian Chelsea Tolle and headliner and musical improv talent Michael Glatzmaier. Jan. 19, 8-9:30 pm. $5; two-drink min. Goodtymes Bar & Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (509-928-1070) COMEDY SHOWCASE The Monday night showcase lets the audience help pick the “Best Set” of the night from among four local comedians. Third Monday of the month, from 8-9:30 pm. No cover; two-item min. purchase. The Buzz Pizzeria, Bar and Lounge, 501 S Thor St. thebuzzspokane.com (340-3099)

COMMUNITY

SHOWING UP FOR RACIAL JUSTICE Join PJALS and members of the community to continue our work fighting white supremacy, supporting racial justice organizing led by people of color, and deepening our understanding of race locally. Meets second and fourth Thursday of the month, from 5:30-7 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. pjals.org THURSDAY EVENING SWING Learn how to swing dance in 2019 at classes/dances each Thursday night at 7 pm. $35/$40 per class. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane. com/classes.html (838-5667) DROP IN & RPG If you’ve ever been curious about role-playing games, join us to experience this unique form of game-playing, and build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination, and rich social interaction. Ages 5-105. Priority seating provided for participants age 17 or younger. Held on the second and fourth Friday of the month, from 4-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org LAUNCH 2019 Hear stories from some of the most notable leaders in the world as they describe in detail how to live a healthy and fulfilling life while pursuing big ideas with passion. See link for details. Jan. 11, 6 pm. $5-$10. The Innovation Den, 415 E. Lakeside Ave. facebook.com/ InnovationDen (208-818-0654) BEGINNING TAROT WORKSHOP Learn to do the Past-Present-Future spread even if you have never picked up a deck before. Meet people who are also interested in tarot, and learn from an experienced reader. Jan. 12, 2-4 pm. $25. Rocket Bakery, 3315 N. Argonne Rd. misstilneytarot.com (509-462-2345) DROP IN & READ Read great books from Spark’s collection to inspire your own stories, crafts and drawings. Par-

ticipants may read at their own pace and then choose from writing, arts or crafts activities based on what they have read. Grades K-8. Second Saturday of the month, from 2:30-4 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central. org (279-0299) ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE A tradition carrying from the era of Jane Austen novels to the present day. All dances are first taught, then danced to delightful music played by a live band. Sponsored by the Spokane Folklore Society. No experience needed; come single or with a partner. Jan. 12, 7-10 pm. $8/$10. East Spokane Grange, 1621 N. Park Rd. (443-2710) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 12, 10:30-11:30 am. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. scld.org (509-893-8340) DOLLARS & SENSE: NAVIGATING YOUR CREDIT Learn how to get free access to and understand your credit report in this workshop from SNAP Spokane. Explore ways to improve your score, establish good credit, and deal with collection agencies. Jan. 15, 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (509-893-8350) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 15, 10:30-11:30 am & 4-5 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (509-893-8350) HOME BUYING 101 WORKSHOP Discuss factors to consider when you’re deciding whether to buy a home or continue to rent. Hosted by STCU. Jan. 15, 6-7 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5300) THE BIG CARBON FIX Dr. Steve Ghan is a world-renowned climate scientist, IPCC contributor, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Fellow (retired). He’ll address common misconceptions about the human role in climate change and, with the help of local students, explore how we can move beyond them to find common-ground solutions. Jan. 16, 6-9 pm. Free. Sandpoint High School, 410 S. Division. cclsandpoint.org (208-2633034) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 16, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Medical Lake Library, 3212 Herb St. scld. org (509-893-8330) LEVEL UP CREATIVITY Join Spark for daily activities to ignite your creativity, innovation and imagination with science, writing and art projects. Wednesdays at 3:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org BUDGETING 101 Take control of your financial life with a budgeting plan that’s simple, reasonable, and effective. Registration is required for all STCU workshops at stcu.org/workshops. Jan. 17, 6-7 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. stcu.org/workshops MARTIN LUTHER KING CELEBRATION AT WSU New York Times best-selling author Ibram X. Kendi delivers the keynote address at the 32nd annual Martin Luther King Celebration on the Pullman campus, with the event livestreamed to

other WSU locations. Jan. 17, 7 pm. Free. WSU Compton Union Building, 1500 NE Terrell Mall. mlk.wsu.edu/home/ THURSDAY NIGHT LIVE! The museum hosts a monthly, rotating mix of programs including music by local artists, happy hour, gallery talks, Art@Work exhibition openings, films, courses, lectures and more. Third Thursday of the month, from 6-9 pm. $5. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (363-5324) FRIENDS OF THE SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY BOOK SALE Proceeds from the sale of used books support various library programs and services. Jan. 18 from 3-5 pm; Jan. 19 from 9 am-3 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scldfriends.org/events (893-8400) GEM OF THE VALLEY AWARDS GALA A celebration of excellence at the 16th annual Greater Spokane Valley Chamber’s Gem of the Valley Awards Gala. The event features raffle items, a live auction, dinner and awards program honoring the Citizen of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Businesses of the Year and more. Jan. 18, 5:30-8:30 pm. $55/person. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. business. spokanevalleychamber.org (924-4994) CODE KIDS Get a passport to discover new computer science concepts, and a new sticker for each concept you master. Sign up online; grades 3-6. Jan. 19, 10 am-noon. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org (279-0299) DROP IN & SCIENCE Spark’s resident mad scientist shares experiments from the gross to the glorious, inspiring a sense of wonder. All ages welcome, but children under 6 years old should be accompanied by an adult willing to participate. Third Saturday of the month from 3-4:45 pm Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org WOMEN+S MARCH SPOKANE 2019 An all-inclusive, non-partisan, issue-driven event to rally the community together for the good of all women+ and allies. Includes a volunteer action fair, rally with speakers and music, march through downtown and post-march activities. Jan. 19, 10 am. Free. Downtown Spokane, n/a. bit.ly/2Rcnk0e CLIMATE JUSTICE PRESENTATION Suzanne Marshall is a historian who taught Environmental History at universities in Alabama, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Oregon. She’s also a scholar-activist who conducted research, wrote, and organized around Environmental Justice issues for over 25 years. She currently lives in Coeur d’Alene and is a member of Kootenai Environmental Alliance and its Climate Action. Jan. 21, 1-2:30 pm. Free. Human Rights Education Institute, 414 W. Fort Grounds Dr. hrei.org DOLLARS & SENSE: NAVIGATING YOUR CREDIT Learn how to get free access to and understand your credit report in this workshop from SNAP Spokane. Explore ways to improve your score, establish good credit, and deal with collection agencies. Offered Nov. 13 and Jan. 22, from 6-8 pm. Jan. 22, 6-8 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld. org (509-893-8400) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 22, 4-5 pm. Free. Fairfield Library, 305 E. Main St. scld.org PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE A panel discussion on the impact of bail

and incarceration in Spokane. The event will also unveil a new initiative with The Bail Project - an organization that pays bail for folks in poverty who are in pretrial. In Cataldo Hall Globe Room. Jan. 22, 6-8 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. facebook.com/spokane. naacp (919-3042)

FILM

BECOMING ASTRID A Swedish biopic film about author Astrid Lindren, who faced many challenges as a young, single mother. Not rated. Showing Jan. 10-13; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) BOY ERASED The story of Jared, the son of a Baptist pastor in a small American town, who is outed to his parents at age 19. Jan. 10-13; times vary. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208882-4127) INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: THE GUILTY When police officer Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren) is demoted to desk work, he expects a sleepy beat as an emergency dispatcher. That all changes when he answers a panicked phone call from a kidnapped woman who then disconnects abruptly. Jan. 15, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR Presented by Mountain Fever are three nights of films celebrating high octane mountain fun! Not rated. Jan. 18-20 at 6 pm. $16/$20. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208255-7801) WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL The 16th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival comes to Moscow with a selection of 14 adventure and conservation films that will excite, challenge and inspire you. Presented by the Idaho Chapter Sierra Club, the films combine beautiful cinematography and storytelling to inform and ignite solutions to ensure the conservation of wild and scenic places we all love. Jan. 18, 6-10 pm. $10. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org

FOOD

FRIED CHICKEN & LOCAL BEER: 2ND ANNIVERSARY The monthly event from Chef Adam Hegsted celebrates its second anniversary with brews from Post Falls Brewing Co. and a fried chicken dinner with all the fixins. Jan. 10, 6:30 pm. $35. The Yards Bruncheon, 1248 W. Summit Pkwy. theyardsbruncheon.com GAMACHE VINTNERS WINE DINNER The Gamache family is known for creating distinctive whites and memorable reds from prime grape-growing spots in the Horse Heaven Hills and Red Mountain AVAs. Pair them with five courses of chef Tanya’s creative seafood and Prime beef. Jan. 10, 6 pm. $85. Northern Quest Resort, 100 N. Hayford. northernquest.com SCOTCH & CIGARS Select a flight of whiskey, scotch or bourbon paired with a recommended cigar during an event on the outdoor patio. Thursdays, from 6-10 pm. $15-$25. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. facebook.com/Prohibition. Gastropub.Spokane1 THURSDAY WINE SOCIAL The weekly complimentary wine tasting event features different themes and samples of the shop’s gourmet goods. Thursdays, from 4-6 pm. Free. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. gourmetwayhayden.com/wines

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 47


NEWS

Pardon Me Governor Inslee wants to cut some slack to people with marijuana misdemeanor convictions BY QUINN WELSCH

B

usted for pot before it was legal? The governor wants to set things straight. People with marijuana misdemeanor convictions in Washington state could get a pardon under Gov. Jay Inslee’s Marijuana Justice Initiative, the governor announced last week. The plan only applies to people who have an otherwise clean criminal record but were convicted of a marijuana misdemeanor between Jan. 1, 1998 and Dec. 5, 2012. As many as 3,500 could be eligible for the pardon, the Governor’s Office states. The initiative aims to remove burdens on Washington residents who have been penalized for something that is now legal. “For decades, people have faced criminal prosecu-

Gov. Jay Inslee

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

tion for behavior that is no longer considered a crime in Washington. Inslee believes that forgiving these convictions will allow people to move on with their lives without these convictions causing additional burdens on people, their families, their employers and their communities,” the governor’s initiative states. “This is a small step, but one that moves us in the direction of correcting injustices that disproportionately affected communities

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of color. A successful pardon of a marijuana possession conviction can assist with barriers to housing, employment and education.” Similar bills have been enacted in six other states that have legalized marijuana around the country. Most recently, California enacted legislation in late 2018 that could expunge hundreds of thousands of marijuana convictions, according to the National Organization of the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML. “Branding these individuals, many of whom are at an age when they are just beginning their professional careers, as lifelong criminals results in a litany of lost opportunities including the potential loss of employment, housing, voting rights, professional licensing and student aid and serves no legitimate societal purpose,” NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano says in a release about the governor’s pardon initiative. “It makes no sense to continue to punish people for actions that are no longer considered to be criminal in nature.” The news about Inslee’s push to pardon past marijuana convictions also follows national stories about the governor’s ambitions as a potential candidate for the 2020 presidential campaign. However, Inslee’s history with legal marijuana isn’t as straightforward. During his 2012 run for governor, the Democratic governor was opposed to Initiative 502. n Are you or someone you know eligible for a pardon? Visit governor.wa.gov/marijuanajustice to fill out the application.


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here is no gray area in the language of Washington state law when it comes to being stoned and driving. You can’t do it. But an impractical DUI testing system has made it difficult to pinpoint just when exactly cannabis can be seen as an obvious impairment. In a study conducted with colleagues at the University of California and Bastyr University Research Institute, Washington State University’s associate professor of psychology Carrie Cuttler found that over half of marijuana users surveyed believe that driving under the influence of cannabis is safe. “As the trend towards the legalization of recreational cannabis continues across the country,” Cuttler said, “we need to do a better job of communicating these risks without blowing them out of proportion.” In the survey conducted from 2013 to 2014, over 52 percent of users interviewed also admitted to driving within an hour of getting high. The study highlights a concern about the lack of education on the effects and risks of cannabis for drivers. “The hope is that demographic information we LETTERS collected for this study will help Send comments to identify groups of people to editor@inlander.com. target with educational initiatives and other interventions to reduce rates of driving under the influence of cannabis,” Cuttler said. The Washington Traffic Safety Commission highlighted in 2016 an increase in cannabis being found in drug tests for those involved in deadly car crashes. The issue remains in discerning the level of impairment to THC levels as well as interpreting THC levels in relation to the time of last use. Unlike alcohol, which is processed through the liver at a relatively consistent rate of one drink per hour, THC can linger in body fat, which leads to an unreliable reading of impairment. With a lack of reliable testing and even self-assessment, the importance of self-awareness of the risks of stoned driving becomes paramount. n

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EVENTS | CALENDAR 49° NORTH ICE LOUNGE HAPPY HOUR Participants (21+) receive one free raffle ticket with every happy hour drink purchased, with two winners each week receiving a pair of 49° North lift tickets. Winners do not have to be present. Fridays from 5-8 pm through Feb. 22. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (625-6600) HANDMADE PASTA: ORRECHIETTE Learn how to make infused pastas, particularly the orrechiette, in this hands-on cooking class. Class culminates in a family-style meal. Jan. 11, 6-9 pm. $50. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com WINE TASTING Taste the wines of Walla Walla’s Isenhower Cellars. Includes cheese and crackers. Jan. 11, 3-6:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com SIP AND SAMPLE The market’s weekly afternoon tasting, featuring 1-2 wines and something to munch on. Saturdays from noon-4 pm. Petunias Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison St. petuniasmarket.com (328-4257) JANUARY BEER DINNER The restaurant’s second beer dinner with beer from Fremont and Firestone Walker and a guest chef-inspired six-course menu with beer pairings from both breweries. Jan. 14, 5:30 pm. $70. JJ’s Tap & Smokehouse, 8801 N. Indian Trail Rd. bit.ly/2LUFtdL (509-467-4267) BODEGA CATENA WINE DINNER Chef Jeremy Hansen has arranged for six courses to pair with the range of wines produced by this visionary winemaking family of Mendoza, Argentina. Reservations required. Jan. 15, 6 pm. $100. Santé Restaurant & Charcuterie, 404 W. Main Ave. santespokane.com (509-315-4613) COMMUNITY COOKING CLASSES The Kitchen at Second Harvest provides nutrition information, scratch cooking skills, budgeting, and more. Free hands-on cooking classes in the kitchen teach low-income families how to prepare nutritious meals while making optimal use of their limited resources. See website for dates and times; typically meets Tue and Wed from 5:30-7 pm. Free. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org (252-6249) FOCACCIA: THE ANCIENT BREAD Focaccia is thought to have originated with the Etruscans or Ancient Greeks. The yeasted flatbread comes from the northern shores of the Mediterranean. This class offers a twist on this classical antiquity with balsamic caramelized onion and goat cheese. Jan. 17, 6-9 pm. $50. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com SHREDDING THE CELLAR The bar brings out a collection of barrel aged beers its cellar, offering a taster special with all five beers and individual 10 ounce pours. See link for featured beer list. Community Pint, 120 E. Sprague. bit.ly/2CTvT7Z WINTER BEER FEST The 6th annual beer fest features 28 winter beers from 24 regional breweries, along with live music each night. Jan. 17-19 from 4-10 pm. $15. The Lantern Tap House, 1004 S. Perry St. bit.ly/2Fdfc9Y (315-9531)

MUSIC

CELLOBRATION SPOKANE Hear more than 50 cellos perform together at this annual festival. Jonah Kim, guest art-

ist, performs Kodaly’s Sonata for Solo Cello. In the Music Building recital hall. Jan. 12, 7:30-9 pm. Free; donations accepted. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE The Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the band Redwood City and caller Susan Dankovich. No experience necessary; beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Jan. 16, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. myspokanefolklore@gmail.com LILAC CITY LIVE! The monthly awardwinning “late-night” talk show celebrates local talent at the downtown library, with drinks, music and more. January’s event features special guest, Teacher of the Year Mandy Manning. Jan. 17, 7-9 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5300) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY CLASSICAL FAMILY FUN CONCERT A program featuring Bolero, the Mother Goose Suite and more with the North Idaho Youth Symphony. Jan. 18 at 7:30 pm, Jan. 19 at 2 pm. $10-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasymphony.org (208-765-3833) LOCAL ALTERNATIVE BAND VIDEO SHOOT Alternative rock band Sciandra’s Game is shooting a video at the Pin and is seeking audience members. Includes a giveaway of fifty posters and a free digital download of the new 10 song album. Jan. 21, 7-11 pm. Free. The Pin, 412 W. Sprague. (499-3717)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

THURSDAY THEME NIGHT Come dressed to impress in themed attire for a $1 discount off admission; includes food specials, music and more. Thursdays, from 5-9 pm through Feb. 28. See link for details. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/ riverfrontpark/calendar/ CROSS COUNTRY SKI FRATER LAKE Explore this beautiful snowy glacial lake that’s part of the 8 lakes of the Pend Oreille Lake Chain. Attendees should have basic cross country skiing skills. Fee includes staff, roundtrip transportation, equipment if needed, and ski area fees. Bring your own lunch and water. Location subject to change due to snow conditions. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Ages 18+. Jan. 12, 9 am-4 pm. $45. Mountain Gear, 2002 N. Division. spokaneparks.org (509-755-2489) ICE SKATING LESSONS Join experienced instructors for beginner lessons on the ribbon every Saturday and Sunday from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Come early to the Sky Ribbon Café to reserve your spot. Skates and helmets provided; open to 15 guests per 30 min. slot. Ages 5+. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontpark/calendar/ (625-6600) SNOWSHOE TOUR MT. SPOKANE Learn the basics of snowshoeing during a guided hike on snowshoe trails around Mt. Spokane. Pre-trip info emailed after registration. Includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation (from Yoke’s in Mead). Ages 13+. Jan. 12 and 26; Feb. 23 and March 3, from 10 am-2 pm. $29. Mt. Spokane State Park. spokaneparks.org (755-2489)

JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 51


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess GRAMPING HER STYLE

My friend just joined a dating site for elite creative professionals. Unfortunately, it grabs your age from Facebook, so you can’t shave off years. At 50, she’s outside of most men’s search parameters — even older men’s. What gives? —Concerned Aging is especially unkind to straight women on dating sites. At a certain point (usually age 46 on), women find their options narrowed to men who wear jewelry — the kind that sends the message, “I’ve fallen, and I can’t get up!” AMY ALKON A study by psychologist Jan Antfolk and his colleagues looked at sex differences in the preferred age of romantic partners. They found — as have other researchers — that “women are interested in same-aged to somewhat older men” throughout their lives. Men, on the other hand, “show a tendency to be sexually interested in women in their mid-twenties,” a preference that emerges in their teen years and (sorry, ladies!) remains consistent as men age. And age. And age. Men’s continuing attraction to 20-something women makes evolutionary sense, as, the researchers note, “the highest fertility” in women “has been estimated to occur in the mid-twenties.” However, when older men are asked to think practically — when asked not which women are running naked through their mind at the checkout stand but whom they’d have a relationship with — women more similar in age have a shot. For example, research led by evolutionary social psychologist Abraham Buunk found that “men of 60 years old would marry a woman of 55.” Unfortunately, the online dating world — with the seemingly endless stream of hot 20-something women — is not exactly fertile ground for practicality and realism. It isn’t that men on dating sites who are aging into the grandpa zone could necessarily get the 20-something chickies. But I suspect that these women’s mere presence — hordes and hordes of them — has what’s called an “anchoring effect.” This is a term from research on decision-making by psychologists Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman. They found that a person’s “initial exposure” (to a particular price, for example) “serves as a reference point and influences subsequent judgments about value.” Accordingly, in online dating, I suspect there’s a reference point that gets set — and it is 22 and bombshellicious and has yet to have a whole lot of meaningful contact with gravity. Putting this in a less depressing way, in seeking male partners, context matters. Your friend will have more interest from men when she’s in a room — in real life — where the female competition is limited in number and is around her age. She might have better luck in online dating at a site specifically for older people. Sites that aren’t for the over-50 crowd only are likely to be a continuing disappointment — along the lines of “Hmm...could it be that I accidentally set my preferences to ‘wants to die alone in an avalanche of her own cats’?!”

DEBT VALLEY

I’m a single chick in my early 30s, and I’m having financial difficulties. I got laid off, and depressingly, it’s really hard to find work. Though I want to talk to my friends about it, I’m afraid they’d think I was trying to borrow money, so I’ve been keeping to myself. — Unemployed When you’ve been unemployed for a while, it becomes awkward to propose gettogethers: “Hey, wanna go out on Friday night for a glass of air?” However, avoiding your friends is probably making things worse — or at least keeping you from feeling better — because social relationships seem to buffer stress, including stress from one’s currently grim “socioeconomic status.” This term, explains social psychologist Emily D. Hooker, refers to “an individual’s relative rank in society based on their income, education, and employment.” Hooker notes that lower socioeconomic status — whether measured by such things as income and occupational prestige or mere perception of one’s own status — is associated with higher mortality and poorer health. (Great, huh? You’re not only short on cash; you’re being rushed into an urn.) But there’s good news from Hooker’s research. When participants were exposed to social stress in a lab situation, those who perceived themselves to have lower socioeconomic status but felt they had social support from others in their lives had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol (as compared with those with a more “Eek! I’m all alone!” orientation). As for you, guess what: People who care about you want to know what’s going on with you. Ask your friends to join you in activities that don’t cost money, like gallery openings, and they’ll get that you’re just looking for company, not moocher-tunities. You really can have both the support and fun of friendship and a bank account that resembles one of those shells of a building in the Old West with a few tumbleweeds blowing through it. n ©2019, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. TRI-CITY AMERICANS Promo night is the Numerica jersey piggy bank giveaway. Jan. 12, 7:05 pm. $11-$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena. com (279-7000) WINTER SURVIVAL OPEN HOUSE Partake in activities to look at animals’ unique adaptations that help them to survive in the cold. Also includes a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new iguana enclosures and treats for sale. Jan. 12, 10 am-2 pm. $5 suggested donation. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. (340-1028) SNOWSHOE + WINE TASTING WITH TRANSPORTATION Enjoy a day of snowshoeing the trails of Mt. Spokane. Then, stop for a wine tasting at Townshend Winery. Snowshoes, guides, walking poles and transportation (departs from Yoke’s in Mead) included. Additional information emailed after registration. Ages 21+. Offered Jan. 13, Feb. 10 and March 10 from 10 am-3:30 pm. $39. spokaneparks.org (755-2489) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sundays, from 4:30-7:30 pm, and Wednesdays, from 7-10 pm. $5+/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. spokanebadminton.com WEST CENTRAL TABLE TENNIS The local ping-pong club hosts open dropin sessions on Tuesday, 6:30-9:30 pm ($3), and league play on Sundays, 1-4:30 pm ($5) at the Girl Scouts Center. Girl Scouts of Eastern Washington and N. Idaho, 1404 N. Ash St. westcentraltabletennis.com (342-9322) WINTERFEST Spokane Nordic’s Winterfest features activities for all ages and levels of cross-country skiers, including the return of discounted beginner and intermediate lessons and FREE lunch for all. Jan. 13, 8:30 am-4 pm. Free to $25. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org/winterfest (509-238-2220) CHEAP SKATE MONDAY A weekly discount night at the Ice Ribbon. Pay full price skate admission and receive one free skate rental. Not valid with other discounts. Mondays from 5-9 pm through Feb. 25. $5-$7. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. (625-6600) GROOVY SHOES: SHADLE VS. NORTH CENTRAL The annual GSL rivalry spirit game; games at 5 and 7:30 pm. Jan. 15. $5-$7. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) PLOGGING WITH ATHLETA Plogging, a Swedish fitness craze, is a combination of jogging with picking up litter. Athleta at Riverpark Square hosts this weekly winter running club starting and ending at the Sky Ribbon Cafe party room. Coffee and hot cocoa provided post run. Tuesdays from 5-6:30 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontpark/ calendar (625-6600) STINKY SNEAKER: CENTRAL VALLEY VS. UNIVERSITY The annual GSL rivalry spirit game; games at 5 and 7:30 pm. Jan. 16. $5-$7. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com WINTER ADVENTURE CLASS Learn the basics to make your winter outdoor activities more enjoyable and accessible for everyone. Where to go and what to do is discussed, along with how to dress for the weather and much more, with Ascent Recreation owner Scott McDonald. Jan. 16, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (795-1942)

RUBBER CHICKEN: FERRIS VS. LEWIS & CLARK The annual GSL rivalry spirit game; games at 5:30 and 7:30 pm. Jan. 17. $5-$7. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. VANCOUVER GIANTS Promo night with the Coeur d’Alene Casino. Jan. 18, 7:05 pm. $11$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) 50TH ANNIVERSARY SNOWSHOE SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT A game of softball on snowshoes began as a challenge between the younger and older men of the Priest Lake community in 1969 with four teams; its since grown to 12 with participants from around the Northwest. Jan. 19-20 and 26-27. Hill’s Resort, 4777 W. Lakeshore Rd. hillsresort.com (509-435-2920) CROSS COUNTRY MOONLIGHT SKI & DINNER Includes ski equipment, dinner and guides. XC skiing experience recommended. Sno-Park and Discover Pass permits required. Ages 18+. Jan. 19, 6-9 pm. $49. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokaneparks.org (755-2489)

THEATER

THE CONTROVERSY AT VALLADOLID A courtroom drama with a decidedly different spin… imagine a time when the Catholic Church had the right to determine whether or not you were human. Jan. 11-27; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org LIVING VOICES: OUR REVOLUTION The story of one of many common citizens who fought to bring the words “All men are created equal” to life, words with even greater meaning to an African American soldier in 1776. This moving live performance is visually supported by a video presentation of historic document and depictions. Jan. 11, 7 pm. $5-$15. Heartwood Center, 615 S. Oak St. artsinsandpoint.org SHE LOVES ME A warm romantic comedy with an endearing innocence and a touch of old world elegance. Jan. 1127; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $23-$25. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. facebook.com/lakecityplayhouse (208-673-7529) MET LIVE IN HD: ADRIANA LECOUVREUR For the first time at the Met, Anna Netrebko sings the title role of Adriana Lecouvreur, the great 18th-century actress in love with the military hero Maurizio, sung by Piotr Beczała. Jan. 12 at 9:45 am and Jan. 14 at 6:30 pm. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

ARTS

MODERN MASTERS: GROUP F/64 Nearly 50 works from five of Group f/64’s members, now known as some of the most influential artists of the twentieth century: Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Willard Van Dyke, Brett Weston and Edward Weston. Through Feb. 3; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; until 8 pm third Thu. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org REMELISA CULLITAN-STILLINGER & JESSICA EARLE January brings two new exhibitions to SAP: “A Life of Rice and Bread,” a visual bi-racial narrative by Remelisa Cullitan-Stillinger, along with a mixed media interactive installation, “They Could Begin To Thrive

Again,” by invited artist, Jessica Earle. Jan. 4-26; open Thu-Sat. Remelisa Cullitan-Stillinger’s “Ask Me Anything Session,” Jan 26, 4-8 pm. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main. saranacartprojects.org RURAL ALLIANCE MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW An annual showcase of the best paintings, drawings, pottery, collage and sculpture created by 60 local middle and high school students from schools in Colfax, GarfieldPalouse, Oakesdale, Rosalia, and St. John-Endicott. Jan. 5-11. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us RYAN! FEDDERSEN: PHANTOM LANDS Through interactivity, scale, and intimacy, Feddersen forms connections between U.S. history, her Okanogan heritage, and current events to ignite conversations on place, use of space, and our relationship to the environment. Through Jan. 20; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; until 8 pm third Thu. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First. (456-3931) HIBERNATE Featuring art by Roin Morigeau, Kate Lund, May Kytonen and Jen Erickson. Reception includes music by the Frantz Coeurtet and refreshments. Jan. 11, 5-8 pm. Free. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth St. emergecda.org SOCIAL SPACE Featuring the work of four renowned American artists: Mark Bradford, Leonardo Drew, Julie Mehretu, and Wangechi Mutu. The artists share a commitment to abstraction, not only as a means of powerful image making, but also as a politically conscious act. Jan. 15-March 16; Tue-Sat 10 am-4 pm. Tues.-Sat.. through March 16. Free. Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, 1535 NE Wilson Rd, Pullman. museum.wsu.edu

WORDS

RESTORATION EFFORTS ON THE PALOUSE Brian Bell, ecologist with the Whitman Conservation District, discusses current and future conservation projects in an informative and engaging community program. The “Science on the Palouse” series continues on the second Monday of the month with regional experts exploring new topics and issues each month. Jan. 14, 5-6 pm. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (509-397-4366) DROP IN & WRITE Aspiring writers are invited to be a part of Spark’s supportive local writing community. Tuesdays from 5-6:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org KUTAPULONG: STORIES & IMAGES OF THE ROHINGYA REFUGEE CRISIS World Relief staff members share from their experience in the Kutapulong refugee camp in Bangladesh. Learn how their trip connects to the larger global refugee crisis and the resettlement of refugees in Spokane. Jan. 15, 6-7:45 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org POETRY RISING A new monthly program featuring poetry and prose readings and music and art presentations. Jan. 15, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. (444-5300) EWU VISITING WRITER SERIES: BONNIE NADZAM Bonnie Nadzam is an American writer whose first novel, “Lamb,” was recipient of the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. The book was made into an award-winning independent film. Jan. 18, 7:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkcentral.org n


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JANUARY 10, 2019 INLANDER 53


COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

More Please

Second annual Mac & Cheese Festival offers more chefs, dishes and events for your enjoyment

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avory melted cheese mixed into perfectly cooked pasta makes for a perfect pairing of ooey and gooey, and if that were all the MAC & CHEESE FESTIVAL offered, it would be enough. But wait, there’s more. Participating chefs will delight diners with interesting additions — barbecued beef, different types of cheese, an unexpected twist on the “pasta” — as they vie for the Golden Noodle and People’s Choice awards. And this year brings even more ways to enjoy this wildly popular event. On Jan. 19, from noon-6 pm, Coeur d’Alene becomes mac and cheese central with venues throughout Coeur d’Alene — ALL THINGS IRISH, CRICKET’S, WOOPS! BAKESHOP and more — including the RESORT PLAZA SHOPS. Adults, get the Mac Pack of six tasters ($20) and check out what your favorite chefs from RUSTIC, SWEET LOU’S, PARAGON BREWING, BARDENAY and more have cooked up. Add four tasters for the kids, ages 12-andunder ($10). Or do the Mac & Beer package C O E U R

($30), including eight 4-ounce pours and a commemorative pint glass. Stay overnight for the VIP treatment with two Mac & Beer packages plus unlimited Gourmet Mac & Cheese prepared by the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s culinary team in the VIP LOUNGE at the RESORT’S CONVENTION CENTER and room accommodations for either Friday Jan. 18 or Saturday Jan. 19. Starting at $239. Looking for a unique way to experience the one-day event? Get a jump on your culinary adventure with a DINNER CRUISE featuring Italian, Mexican and American cuisine. Tickets: adults $35; seniors 55+ $33; children ages 6-12 $25. And for an even more elevated experience, visit BEVERLY’S on the seventh floor of the Coeur d’Alene Resort. Reserve your spot for the MAC & FROMAGE WINE DINNER. This is a gourmet, five-course meal prepared by resort chefs and expertly paired with select wines, served both Friday Jan. 18 and Saturday Jan 19. Tickets $99.

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Upcoming Events

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Jackass Day JANUARY 11

Fifty years ago, Jackass Ski Bowl opened its solitary riblet ski lift and gave birth to what would eventually become Silver Mountain. Celebrate Jackass Day with retro-priced $12 lift tickets all day.

Music Walk

JANUARY 11

Music Walk returns to Coeur d’Alene. Enjoy the sounds of talented local singersongwriters as you explore downtown. Free, 5-8 pm; go

to visitcda.org for participating locations.

Comedy Nights at the Inn JANUARY 11-12

Start the new year laughing with back to back comedy nights at the Inn. Friday’s show features Melissa Shoshahi and Collin Moulton. Saturday’s lineup includes Greg Freiler and headliner Jon Stringer. Tickets $17.50; doors open at 7 pm, show starts at 8 pm.

TEDXCoeurdAlene JANUARY 12

The third annual TEDXCoeurdAlene promises to inspire, captivate and invite new ways of thinking when 10-12 speakers take the stage to discuss an eclectic set of topics. Tickets are $55 and include lunch; 9 am-4 pm, Salvation Army Kroc Center. Go to visitcda.org to purchase tickets.

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay. 54 INLANDER JANUARY 10, 2019

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JANUARY AUGUST 24, 10, 2019 2017 INLANDER 55


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