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JANUARY 3-9, 2019 | HAPPY NEW YEAR!

INSLEE 2020 COULD THE GOVERNOR REALLY MAKE A RUN? PAGE 13

FILMS OF THE YEAR NATHAN WEINBENDER PICKS 2018’S BEST PAGE 36

PAGE 22


Now that the holiday spending is done, head to BeFinanciallyAwesome.com.

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INSIDE VOL. 26, NO. 12 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: JEFF DREW

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY MILLER CANE

5 13 22 28

CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

30 34 36 40

EVENTS 44 I SAW YOU 46 ADVICE GODDESS 48 GREEN ZONE 50

EDITOR’S NOTE

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eaders of our COMMENT section will notice a few changes beginning this week. We’re printing one column, instead of two, and using that space instead to spotlight short interviews with “newsmakers.” The goal is to introduce readers to even more perspectives and people of interest. This week’s Q&A features Don Kardong, the founder of Bloomsday, who just announced that he’s retiring after one final race in May (page 8). We’re also dropping the syndicated Slowpoke comic so we can more prominently display the work of our staff illustrator, Caleb Walsh. Over the next couple of weeks, we will be trying out a few other things, and we’re interested in any feedback you may have. Please share your thoughts with us at editor@inlander.com. Happy New Year! — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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A legacy of innovation. Since our beginning, Avista has worked with other leading innovators to bring new ideas to life that create a better future for us all, including: – Built the world’s longest electric transmission line in 1903. – Erected Long Lake Dam, the world’s highest dam back in 1915. – Founded Itron, now with 8000 employees in Spokane and around the globe. – Launched the region’s first smart-grid city in Pullman, Washington modernizing electric distribution with two-way communication. – Built one of the first community solar facilities in the Spokane area to serve residential customers interested in green energy. Also constructed the state’s largest solar farm in Lind, Washington to supply commercial customers. – Installed 482 electric vehicle chargers in eastern Washington. – A founding partner of Urbanova in 2014, which created a “living laboratory” in Spokane to design cities of the future. – Now creating Five Smartest Blocks, a sustainable and energyefficient new model for urban neighborhoods that will share renewable energy.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT PROGRESS DID YOU SEE IN SPOKANE IN THE LAST YEAR?

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ISAAC WEIL

It’s starting to feel much more like an actual city, rather than a disparate collection of parts. I go to school down at WSU, and every time I visit, it seems to get a little bit better. What would you say is contributing to that? Probably all the new businesses, and the people coming in. It’s also nice that the city has been spending a lot more resources to make the city seem nicer.

JEFF WALLACE

I’m a mental health therapist, so I’d like to say the construction of the new mental health hospital near the freeway. What do you think that will do to improve the community? I think it’s going to provide the most up-todate opportunity to heal.

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I’m a small business owner, and there’s been a lot of cool collaborative art shows. My sister and I, our business is a small online boutique, and we got scouted for Fashion Week at the RAW Art show. It’s just been cool to see a lot more art things going on, and more culture coming into Spokane.

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ARI NORDHAGEN

I think that the restaurant scene in Spokane has boomed. We moved here about three and a half years ago, and it didn’t seem like there was anything good here. But now there’s restaurants everywhere, and really good ones. What’s your favorite new restaurant? There’s one in Kendall Yards called Park Lodge, an amazing restaurant. And then Cochinito Taqueria on Post Street.

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NAOMI SAITO

I’m an urban designer, so the development of Riverfront Park has been really interesting to watch. It’s really well-designed. That’s where I always take people when they visit Spokane, so it’s nice that it’s being updated, and it’s just really beautiful.

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How being angry might make for a happier new year BY ZACH HAGADONE

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ewspapers and websites around the world — or at least the part of the world that each year spends $9.9 billion on “personal development” — are telling us that only 8 percent of people who make New Year’s resolutions succeed in meeting them. They tell us this every year and sometimes offer helpful tips on how we, too, can join that graceful 8 percent. In this way the self-help industry is selfperpetuating. What we’re really trying to buy with those $9.9 billion every year, but failing to collect 92 percent of the time, is a measure of historical revision. We want to undo the 20 years’ worth of cigarettes we smoked or erase the plaque in our arteries or otherwise make up for a lifetime of regrettable work, relationships or emotional deci-

sions that delivered us into the arms of an existential crisis on Christmas morning when we unwrapped a copy of You Are a Badass and realized that we were not, by dint of receiving the book, a badass. We’re seeking evidence that future events are not assured, but also that we can direct their trajectory. George Bailey gets to live his “wonderful life” not only again but better, and even Scrooge side-steps the Ghost of Christmas Future. These are fundamentally historical ideas,

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Washington State Rep. Marcus Riccelli, speaking about the governor’s prospects as a potential presidential candidate. See story on page 13.

6 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/ getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.


taught in graduate school as “contingency” and “agency,” which show us how and why things do or do not change over time. Read hundreds of history books and you’ll end up adding shades of nuance to a raft of clichés: “Nothing gets better until it gets worse”; “There’s nothing new under the sun”; “Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it.”

“Expressing anger resulted in all parties becoming more willing to listen, more inclined to speak honestly.” Admittedly, it’s hard to maintain hope when you look too closely at history — even our own personal histories can seem desperately depressing when we get too “mindful” of them, as the self-help books suggest we do. Yet, there is a lot of contingency and agency in the world right now. Despite my aversion to New Year’s predictions, I have no doubt that 2019 will bring some historic changes. The tendency is to look to the past as prelude and shrug, “The more things change, the more they stay the same,” but people are pissed these days. That’s a big deal. The January/February edition of the Atlantic magazine carries an interesting piece titled “The Real Roots of American Rage: The untold story of how anger became the dominant emotion in our politics and personal lives — and what we can do about it,” by Charles Duhigg. The piece opens with a psychology professor named James Averill, who in 1977 questioned residents of a small town in Massachusetts about how often they were angry. He found most people were “mildly to moderately angry” a fair amount of the time, but not aimlessly so. Their anger was targeted at specific people in specific instances, and rather than suppressing it, they let it out in “short and restrained conversations.” This wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. According to Duhigg, “In the vast majority of cases, expressing anger resulted in all parties becoming more willing to listen, more inclined to speak honestly, more accommodating of each other’s complaints. … They felt relieved, more optimistic about the future, more energized.” That sounds like the preferred outcome of a self-help book to me. It’s a long piece full of insights, but a big takeaway is that channeled anger, rather than inarticulate rage, is a form of communication that frequently makes things better. Which might make for an interesting resolution. So, rather than wishing for a “happy” New Year, maybe we should aim for a “productively angry” New Year. I’m hopeful that more than 8 percent of us can achieve that. n Zach Hagadone is a former co-publisher/owner of the Sandpoint Reader, former editor of Boise Weekly and a current grad student at Washington State University.

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‘HOUSING AND THE HOMELESS’: Looking back a decade to the first issue of 2009, we’re struck by the depressing realization that Spokane’s current housing crunch is, in fact, not really new. As we wrote in our Jan. 1, 2009, issue: “The low-income housing crisis from the latter half of 2007 has rippled throughout all of 2008.” We also had a book review of a new collection of travel stories edited by none other than Anthony Bourdain, may he rest in peace.

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COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A DON KARDONG Bloomsday founder Don Kardong passes the baton — but not until one last race in May INTERVIEW BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

A

counselor gig at Camp Reed with his Stanford track teammate Steve Jones introduced Don Kardong to Spokane, and he’s never left. He was one of those lone joggers you’d see around town in the 1970s; what set him apart, however, was that he was actually training for the Olympic marathon after his teaching day ended at Loma Vista Elementary in North Spokane. (He finished fourth at Montreal in 1976.) After the Olympics, he had a chance meeting in an elevator at City Hall with Mayor David Rodgers. His idea for a race through downtown was born, and it hasn’t stopped since that first starting gun in 1977. After a career teaching, writing, owning a running shop and as race director for Bloomsday, he’s retiring at age 70 — just after this May’s 43rd run. INLANDER: Running has gone from the lone runner — like Forrest Gump — to a very social sport. How’d that happen? KARDONG: Like in The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner [a 1962 film based on the Alan Sillitoe short story], that was the ethic for a long time — a solitary pursuit. But in reality, it’s always been both social and solitary. I still do most of my running alone, but when you get together with a team, it’s special. Sophomore year in college, we were second in the nation. We just go together, 50 years later, and it was so great to hang around those guys again. What is it about Spokane and big events? In a bigger city, it can happen, but it just doesn’t happen as often. In a smaller city, there aren’t enough people. Spokane’s size and being a little bit isolated has helped develop an ethic here about, “We’re going to do great things for this city.” We really rally around events. And volunteers are the key… People know there are a lot of volunteers at Bloomsday, but when we tell them there are about 5,000, they’re stunned. And our board of directors, they each take a huge chunk of the event. That’s the

XLNY

only way we can do it. You’ll be saying goodbye soon… Oh, I’ll still be around… …So what memories will you take with you? The first year was hard to beat. You have to understand, this was a brand new thing. Here we were running down Riverside, and I led all the way. To have this huge crowd come down really gave me a thrill. We crossed the Maple Street Bridge, through the old toll booths. The fact that it all came together is pretty memorable. Even now, that same collective adrenaline is fun to be part of. The evolution from that fateful elevator ride to tens of thousands crowding the streets every first Sunday in May has been immense. What’s coming next for Bloomsday? We’re looking at social media enhancements and other new technology to draw more people in. People say, “Hey, I’m not a runner.” Well over half of Bloomsday entrants are walkers. The challenge right now is to try to get our numbers on an increase again. Bloomsday just announced that local attorney and Bloomsday board member Jon Neill will take over as race director after this May’s race. [Neill moved up from Pullman to go to Gonzaga University; he became a Bloomsday intern in 1995 and has been involved with the organization ever since.] Sounds like you’re leaving it in good hands. For a while we talked about a national search, but once we knew Jon was interested, we thought, “Why look anywhere else?” Jon’s very passionate, brings a lot of energy, and he’s been involved for so long in so many areas of Bloomsday. He’ll have his own style, his own ideas… he’s the right person, right now. n

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

THE ySO-CALLED ‘HAPPY HOLIDAYS’ wish for this holiday season, all the time really, is that we be kind

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to each other. All of us have problems, many of which may not be visible. Even the most prosperous, happy-seeming person could be suffering from depression, grief, loneliness or other pain. It could be someone you know. A kind word, a smile and an affirmation can help lift spirits and possibly even save a life. My idea of the best gift possible is to reach out to others, let them know you see them and care about them, and spend time with them if you can. The so-called “happy holidays” LETTERS aren’t happy for many people. KindSend comments to ness can help turn that around. So editor@inlander.com. please, offer a little extra kindness to strangers and to your own family members, friends and co-workers. Whether they are in pain or not, you will help brighten their day. Best wishes for a peaceful holiday season. KAREN SHILL Spokane, Wash.

Readers respond to a story about Gonzaga’s president denying any knowledge of criminally accused priests being housed on campus:

KELLI CRAWFORD: Didn’t ask, didn’t check. What an embarrassment to our community. DAN KERNS: This is a huge embarrassment to the university. A further investigation needs to be done. Emails looked at from everyone involved. Including the university president. Pretty messed up. n

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Richard Sovenski was found guilty of committing misdemeanor battery but not of felony malicious harassment, a hate crime. See story on page 20.

Readers respond to an Idaho man not convicted of a hate crime after yelling racial slurs at a group of teenagers in a Coeur d’Alene McDonalds:

RICHARD ROLLAND: This guy should do time. His sidekick, too. This is not the Idaho I grew up in. TOM HEARN: I wonder about this verdict but I also have a huge respect for the jury system. They had more information than the general public and I assume that they had a good reason to acquit him of the more serious charge. JEFF FERGUSON: What’s the point in having a law if you don’t enforce it? How much [more] hateful did he have to be? Those kids will never forget that day for the rest of their lives. As he, I’m sure, has already moved on to hate again. n

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12 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


POLITICS

The Problems with “Inslee 2020” Seven hurdles standing in the way of Jay Inslee becoming the Democratic nominee for president BY DANIEL WALTERS

A

year ago, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee dodged the issue of his presidential aspirations with a half-joke. Yes, Inslee said, he could imagine running for president, the same way he could “imagine replacing Russell Wilson for the Seahawks.” But as silly as it sounds, it’s not entirely impossible: After all, back in 1969, Inslee was the varsity quarterback for Ingraham High School in north Seattle. And the chance he’ll run for president is looking even more likely: He’s meeting with big-money donors, has raised more than $100,000 in his presidential PAC and has been blowing through his security-detail budget with out-ofstate travel. In fact, a little over a year ago, columnist Josh Barro was wondering why, as chair of the Democratic Governor’s Association, Inslee wasn’t being talked about as a viable contender for president. “Because he’s not a great politician,” tweeted Nate Cohn, the New York Times’ data guru who grew up in Washington state. Still, people thought Inslee wouldn’t win when he first ran for governor either, says Washington state Rep. Marcus Riccelli (D-Spokane). “If there’s one thing Jay Inslee knows how to do, it’s win elections,” Riccelli says. “I would not count him out of anything.” So does he have a shot? Well, he has the look at least. He stands at a perfectly presidential 6-foot3. He’s got presidential hair. His jawline projects ...continued on next page

At least he has the right look to be president. WASHINGTON STATE GOVERNOR PHOTO

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 13


NEWS | POLITICS

8:00 AM - 2:00 PM With the field getting a little crowded, Jay Inslee has work to do to stand out as a candidate.

WASHINGTON STATE GOVERNOR PHOTO

“THE PROBLEMS WITH ‘INSLEE 2020’,” CONTINUED... gravitas, yet compassion. He has the advantage of being the governor of Washington, a state that has a booming economy, a low unemployment rate, a thriving tech sector and a high-minimum wage. But height and hair aside, Inslee faces a few huge potential issues if he wants to win the Democratic nomination.

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1. THE WHO-THE-HELL-ISJAY-INSLEE PROBLEM

You, a savvy Inlander reader, know who Jay Inslee is. (The governor of Washington state, it turns out.) But to even begin to compete in a field already crowded with massive crowd-drawing names like Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden and Beto O’Rourke, Inslee has to find a way to stand out. There’s no #InsleeWouldaWon hashtag. There aren’t any Onion articles riffing on the hard-rocking exploits of “Diamond Jay.” There are very few swooning national magazine profiles or shockingly sexually explicit viral tweets about Inslee.  Still, Inslee has seemed to have figured out a method to get noticed: Hit Donald Trump with a punchy phrase. “Less tweeting, more listening,” Inslee told Trump during a conversation about gun violence last year. That made headlines. Not a surprise then that after Gen. Jim Mattis resigned as defense secretary last month, Inslee tweeted how it was “a predictable consequence of narcissistic incompetence.” And what do you know, that very morning Inslee was being interviewed on BuzzFeed.

2. THE POLLUTED ENVIRONMENTAL RECORD PROBLEM

Last month, Rolling Stone interviewed Inslee, highlighting his ambition to tackle climate change. This, Rolling Stone implied, could be Inslee’s best shot to distinguish himself from the rest of the Democratic horde. But here’s the challenge: Inslee’s asking you to believe that he’ll be able to sell climate change legislation to America, when he can’t even do so in liberal, forest-fire-choked Washington. His cap-and-trade bill couldn’t get through the Democratic-controlled House. A Thurston County judge nixed his executive order mandating carbon cuts. Washington voters have crushed carbon tax initiative proposals not once, but twice.

And to Eastern Washington environmentalists like former Center for Justice Director Rick Eichstaedt, Inslee has been “mediocre” on the environment, bending over backwards to cut certain big business polluters slack. It was Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency that had to force Inslee’s Ecology department, Eichstaedt says, to adopt tougher limits on cancer-causing river pollutants.  On the other hand, as Riccelli notes, Inslee has had to contend with a Republican-controlled state Senate for most of his tenure. This year, he had bigger margins than he’s ever hard. While he’s not proposing another attempt to level a carbon tax, he has presented an ambitious climate change plan this year, including moving the state to eliminate all fossil fuels from its power grid by 2045. By the time Democratic primary season starts in earnest this summer, Inslee’s resume may look a lot more impressive.

3. THE POOR-PUNISHING TAX CODE PROBLEM

Sick of snooty Washingtonians cooing about how progressive their state is? Point out that Washington state has the most regressive tax code in the country. You see, when you saddle your poorest residents with a sales tax instead of taxing income, folks who have to shell out a big percentage of their paycheck to survive every week suffer. But where some Democratic politicians, like former Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown, passionately argued the state needed to adopt a more equitable income tax, Inslee has said he doesn’t support an income tax.  And yet, this month, Inslee is introducing a new budget that calls for a big tax hike on the wealthy, including a new capital gains tax and a shift to make the real estate excise tax more progressive. Even if it doesn’t pass — or get struck down as illegal under Washington’s state’s constitution — the attempt is something Inslee could point to on the campaign trail.

4. THE CORPORATE WELFARE PROBLEM

Washington’s booming business climate is one of Inslee’s greatest assets — for the general election. But Bernie Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren have both been bashing Amazon for its labor practices. But Inslee? When Trump was slamming Amazon, Inslee rode to the defense of the


trillion-dollar corporation helmed by the richest man in modern history. “A big part of Washington’s economic success is due to Amazon’s 40,000+ employees in our state and the small businesses they empower to sell to the world,” Inslee tweeted. And that’s not even including Inslee championing Boeing’s record $8.7 billion in tax incentives over 16 years — among the biggest corporate tax breaks in U.S. history.  Still, Inslee can point to his more left-leaning record as a congressman before he was a governor: He voted against the economic bailout of 2008 and opposed the wars in Iraq and Libya. And his attorney general just won a massive lawsuit against the recent corporate villains of the moment, Google and Facebook, for campaign finance violations.

5. THE THIEF PROBLEM

In 2014, Washington state had the worst property-crime rate in the nation. It’s still in the top five. And it’s not like Jay Inslee doesn’t know what’s wrong. Inslee’s own Justice Reinvestment Task Force fingered the problem in 2015: Washington is the only state in the nation that generally doesn’t supervise its propertycrime felons after they get out of prison. But since then, Inslee has publicly showed little interest in trying to fix the problem, even as Spokane’s local representatives have tried to cobble together solutions. Forget competing with Donald Trump over who’s “tougher on crime?” Can Inslee even claim that he’s been “smart on crime?”  On the other hand, it’s violent crime, not bike wheels being stolen outside of River Park Square, that tend to star in presidential races. When challenger Bill Bryant barely hit the governor on the state’s dismal property crime record in 2016, why would anyone in 2020?

6. THE SAFETY NET PROBLEM

Washington state has among the highest rates of unsheltered homelessness in the country. A recent report by the Office of the Family and Children’s Ombudsman found the state’s foster care system was dismal, particularly for children of color. When Mental Health America ranked the states on how well their mental health services were meeting the states’ needs, Washington state came in 39th. Inslee’s entire tenure has been dogged by one embarrassing headline about Western State Hospital after another: patient escapes, fire hazards, the loss of $53 million in federal funding because of violations. Just this year a nurse got part of her ear bitten off. If this is supposed to be evidence of how well a progressive state cares for the needy, it’s not a particularly pretty one.  However, in December, Inslee rolled out a plan for a $675 million bill overhauling the state’s mental health system, including plans for seven new facilities and 500 new mental health beds statewide. And when it comes to health care, Rep. Marcus Riccelli thinks that state Democrats have a chance to pass a “public option” bill, letting a government-run insurance plan compete with private companies, ideally driving down premiums. And that might catch primary voters’ attention.

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7. THE EXTREMELY WHITE MAN PROBLEM

The good news for Inslee: There is a political party composed predominantly of white men. The bad news: It ain’t the Democratic Party. Increasingly, the Democratic coalition has relied on the votes of women and minorities, and Jay Inslee very clearly isn’t either one of them. “Put a white man in charge, yet again” might not be the hope-and-change slogan Democrats are craving right now.  Still, early polls have other white bros like Bernie, Biden and Beto off to early leads. Rep. Marcus Riccelli argues that what Democrats want isn’t about identity so much as who has the best message and resume to win. What they want is simple, Riccelli says. “They want somebody who can beat Donald Trump.” n danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | ONLINE

VIRAL HITS MARK ADDY PHOTO

THE TOP 10 STORIES ON INLANDER.COM IN 2018 YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

FROM LEFT: Jeremy Morris’ home dressed for Christmas (see No. 1); Tyson Sicilia, owner of the Observatory bar, who’s spoken out against Proud Boys (No. 5); and Elizebeth Troudt, who was forced to confront memories of being raped (No. 7).

T

he proof is in the numbers. People come to Inlander.com for a multitude of reasons — for hard-hitting journalism, readerwritten rants and tips on what’s happening this weekend. But when it comes to viral sensations, the stories generating the most clicks tend to involve elements of culture and conflict, injustice and outrage. At least that was true of what trended in 2018. 1. “HOW ONE MAN’S QUEST TO SPREAD CHRISTMAS CHEER LED

TO A MISERABLE FOUR-YEAR WAR WITH HIS NEIGHBORHOOD” By Daniel Walters, 11/29/18 The story about Jeremy “Mr. Christmas” Morris and his epic battle with his Hayden, Idaho, neighbors over his outlandish Christmas light show quickly shot to the top of the charts.

16 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

2. “NORTH IDAHO MAN HURLS RACIAL SLURS, PROFANITY

AT TEENAGERS GETTING ICE CREAM AT MCDONALD’S” By Mitch Ryals, 7/18/18 This actually involved another Hayden man, Richard Sovenski, who was charged with a hate crime after an incident under the golden arches. (Sovenski was recently found guilty of misdemeanor battery, but not the hate crime. See story on page 20.)

3. “IN NORTH IDAHO, LEADERS BRACE FOR RAPID POPULATION GROWTH” By Wilson Criscione, 1/11/18 The two previous stories about Idaho followed this January report detailing growth in the Gem State, largely driven by people leaving

California and other Western states for Idaho’s cheap cost of living and conservative politics. 4. “‘TWEAKER BLAST’ FACEBOOK PAGES EXPOSE THE UGLINESS OF SPOKANE — IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE” By Daniel Walters, 9/6/18 The article detailed efforts on social media to shame and out homeless and vulnerable people and, in the view of organizers, sound the alarm about what’s happening on Spokane’s streets. 5. “HOW SPOKANE’S DOWNTOWN BAR SCENE IS REACTING TO A LOCAL CHAPTER OF PROUD BOYS” By Samantha Wohlfeil, 11/29/18


We introduced Spokane to its new chapter of the Proud Boys, the controversial right-wing men’s group, and how downtown businesses were grappling with their presence. 6. “NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN GO MISSING AT SHOCKING RATES; THESE WOMEN WANT TO CHANGE THAT” By Samantha Wohfeil, 2/8/18 We spotlighted efforts to call attention to the missing and murdered indigenous women throughout the U.S. and Canada (using #MMIW). 7. “SHE WORKED FOR YEARS TO ESCAPE HER PAST, BUT A ROUTINE LETTER FROM THE POLICE SENT HER BACK” By Mitch Ryals, 5/14/18 The article detailed how one woman worked to turn her life around, only to have the horrors of a previous rape come rushing back. 8. “LOCAL BAR OWNER TELLS WOMAN ‘THIS ISN’T THE IMMIGRATION CENTER,’ THEN POINTS TOWARD THE DOOR” By Mitch Ryals, 2/7/18 The story captured an ugly situation inside a Garland District bar. 9. “AFTER FUSE RELEASED ITS SECRET RECORDING, A HACKER WITH A RUSSIAN IP TRIED TO BREAK INTO ITS WEBSITE” By Daniel Walters, 10/31/18 The report dug into the attempted hacking of Fuse, the liberal advocacy organization that sent the Rachel Maddow Show an audio recording secretly taken from a Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ fundraiser. 10. “AFTER THE 2018 SPOKANE WOMEN’S MARCH WAS

SUDDENLY CANCELED, ACTIVISTS SCRAMBLED TO RESURRECT IT” By Daniel Walters, 1/5/18 The story detailed how local activists rose to the occasion to save Spokane’s Women’s March. — COMPILED BY JACOB H. FRIES

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Feeling the Fine Local Dems get dinged by the state AG

T

he Spokane County Democratic Party will have to pay the state at least $36,000 in fines and $11,300 in attorney fees and court costs for violating state campaign finance law. The Spokane County Democratic Central Committee failed to file at least 180 disclosures of contributions ($104,190) and expenditures ($110,554) with the state in a timely manner, according to the state Attorney General’s Office. Some reports were filed more than a year late, and some weren’t filed until after the AG’s office filed a lawsuit in May 2017. In settlement agreements signed in Thurston County in December, the Spokane Democrats were fined $72,000, with $36,000 of the fine suspended for four years. If the party doesn’t have another campaign violation during that time, that portion will be dismissed. Former party chair Jim CastroLang will also pay a $1,500 penalty, and former treasurer Justin Galloway will pay $500. The money goes into the state Public Disclosure Transparency Account.

Former party chair Jim CastroLang will pay a $1,500 penalty as part of a settlement with the state AG’s office. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO Current Spokane Democrats chair Ed Wood says the violations didn’t happen on his watch, but the party had hired an attorney, reached a settlement agreement, and “it is what it is.” “It’s up to me to raise the money to pay the fine,” Wood says. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

STOPPED SHORT

A planned behavioral health building for veterans in Spokane has been halted because federal officials pulled funding for the project, Spokane’s veteran hospital announced last week.

“After further examination and project prioritization, the final list of approved projects was reduced to ensure successful execution of all remaining construction projects,” says Robert Fischer, Mann-Grandstaff Veterans Affairs Medical Center director. “Unfortunately our mental health building required removal from the list.” The announcement comes on the heels of a U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report last week that slammed the Department of Veterans Affairs for its diminishing efforts to reduce suicide among veterans. Though preventing suicide is one of the VA’s highest priorities, the GAO report says the VA’s outreach activities “dropped off” in the last two years, and that “the office responsible for these activities lacked consistent leadership.” The VA, responding to the report, concurred with the GAO assessment on suicide prevention outreach. But the VA noted that the number of veterans receiving mental health care from the VA doubled over the past 10 years. “Now we are helping over 1.7 million veterans with their mental health concerns,” the VA wrote. Though the Spokane veterans hospital isn’t getting the mental health building anytime soon, Fischer says he hopes it will be funded in the future. The VA did approve several other projects in Spokane, however. Those include a $19.9 million boiler plant, a $15.4 million primary care building, a $5.5 million dollar operating room and surgical suite and a $2.7 million dollar sterile processing suite expansion. Mann-Grandstaff was also selected as VA’s “pilot site” for a project to modernize its electronic health records. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

WHAT ARE NUMBERS, REALLY?

According to the Spokane Police Department’s latest year-end crime stats, violent crime is up and property

+

Now on Inlander.com: National and international stories from the New York Times to go with the fresh, local news we deliver every day

18 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


crime is down — at least in comparison to last year. The law enforcement agency reports that between Jan. 1 and Dec. 22, 2018, most violent crime categories increased over the 2017 rates, while all property crimes — except for commercial burglary — decreased over the same period. Specifically, this year there were nine homicides (compared to last year’s five), 57 more rapes, 67 more aggravated assaults, and 79 more reports of domestic violence. In contrast, there were fewer property crimes this year LETTERS by slim margins of roughly 2 Send comments to percent to 10 percent. (The outeditor@inlander.com. liers were commercial burglary, which increased by 1 percent, and arson cases, which dipped by almost 20 percent.) But like any statistical finding, these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt, and aren’t a clear indicator of a new crime wave sweeping the Lilac City. According to Michele Anderson, the city’s public safety spokeswoman, part of the reason for the bump is that “simple assaults” are now being classified as more serious “aggravated assault,” boosting the number of included violent crimes. Additionally, if you go back several years, any potential drastic trends pulled out of this year’s data don’t hold up well. For example, according to SPD data pulled from between Jan. 1 and Oct. 1, 2016 — its incident collection period differed that year — property crime was up slightly alongside violent crime, driven entirely by bumps in vehicle theft and larceny. (All other property crimes were down that year.) The previous year, Jan. 1 through Dec. 26, 2015, both violent crime and property crime decreased substantially (despite a whopping 16 homicides compared to the previous year’s nine), according to SPD’s numbers. But even these comparisons are problematic. SPD moved to the National Incident Based Reporting System in late 2016, which gathers more detailed data than its predecessor, the Summary Reporting System. (JOSH KELETY) ! ED 5 W D 2 E N AD Y R W O UA H S

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NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE

AVAILABLE HERE Richard Sovenki was captured on video calling a group of Spokane teens “half-breeds.”

Mixed Messages ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR MATEUSZ WOLSKI, VIOLIN SPOKANE SYMPHONY CHORALE EASTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SYMPHONIC CHOIR Spokane Symphony Concertmaster ˇ Mateusz Wolski performs Dvorák’s Violin Concerto. Rachmaninoff’s choral symphony, The Bells, is loosely based on a poem by Edgar Allan Poe.

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A jury verdict in an Idaho hate crime case sends the wrong message, a victim says BY JOSH KELETY

T

he message from an Idaho jury has been received loud and clear by people of color — you’re not safe in North Idaho, says Jose Ceniceros. Ceniceros led a Spokane church youth group to Coeur d’Alene last summer only to have Richard Sovenski, a 52-year-old Hayden man, hurl racial slurs at him and the teenagers at a local McDonald’s. The July 12 incident was captured on a video that went viral around the globe, but on Dec. 20, a Kootenai County jury found Sovenski guilty of committing misdemeanor battery but not felony malicious harassment, a hate crime. “Justice was not at all obtained,” Ceniceros tells the Inlander. “There’s video tape of him doing it and they let him go.” Ceniceros, who served as Immanuel Church’s youth community director at the time, had taken the kids to Coeur d’Alene that day to hear a preacher speak prior to going to the McDonald’s for ice cream, during which Sovenski allegedly punched him and hurled slurs — such as “half-breeds” — at the kids. (The slurs and profanity were caught on the video recorded by Ceniceros, who says he started filming after he was punched.) He adds that the verdict shows that the justice system won’t serve people of color fairly if they do encounter bigotry and wish to pursue charges in the courts. “If you’re a person of color, you can’t go to Idaho because something like this might happen,” Ceniceros adds. “I think it sends a clear message that a person of color [should] think twice about going to Idaho because you’re going to be treated differently.” Tony Stewart is secretary for the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations — an anti-racism group that was formed in 1981 — and he has a slightly more positive spin on the case’s outcome.

“There was a conviction for the battery and that’s important and that sends a message,” Stewart tells the Inlander. “Of course we agree with the prosecutor’s charges, all of them, but we do have to recognize our system and how it works.” Stewart notes, however, that this is the first case in Kootenai County that he can remember where a felony malicious harassment charge — which was developed by lawmakers in 1983 in response to domestic terrorism by the white supremacist group Aryan Nations in North Idaho — wasn’t upheld. Kootenai County Prosecutor Barry McHugh declined to comment on the verdict Richard Sovenski or the trial itself since Sovenski has yet to be sentenced. (KHQ TV reported that Sovenski’s defense attorney argued during the trial that his client lost his cool and didn’t intend to commit a hate crime.) As for the kids who were subjected to Sovenski’s behavior during the incident, Ceniceros says that they’ve reacted to the verdict similarly to him. “They’ve had injustice happen to them before and it’s nothing new to them.” In fact, Ceniceros had been working with an attorney to file a civil lawsuit against the city of Coeur d’Alene over their alleged mishandling of the entire case. However, in light of the verdict, Ceniceros says he opted not to pursue litigation. “Seeing how this turned out, I doubt … I’d be able to have it [go] in my favor,” he says. A date for Sovenski’s sentencing on the misdemeanor battery charge has yet to be set, according to Kootenai County Prosecutor McHugh. n joshk@inlander.com


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22 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


WSU REFLECTS ON THE “CRIMSON CUBE”

The exterior of the new Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art on WSU’s Pullman campus is dramatic, offering crimson-soaked reflections of the sky, the surrounding campus community and every face that walks by. It was designed, according to architect Jim Olson, to give students “the opportunity to see themselves in the building.” Inside, of course, is an even more striking change from the old WSU art museum. The new $15 million museum — $5 million from Jordan Schnitzer — gives curators seven galleries to work with instead of just one, with nearly 15,000 square feet in gallery space total. Inside those galleries, visitors will encounter artwork from around the world, and from their own Inland Northwest art community. “You come to a museum like this and you see some different things you’ve never thought of, and it challenges you in different ways,” says WSU President Kirk Schulz. (DAN NAILEN)

WSU PHOTO

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 23


The Hollywood version...

SPOKANE GOES HOLLYWOOD

In June, the rest of America found a second reason to care about Spokane — the set-in-Spokane movie TAG hit multiplexes. (The first reason the rest of America cares about Spokane? The Zags.) The real-life story of 10 friends from Gonzaga Prep who never quite grew up and still play an elaborate game of tag every February landed on the front page of the Wall Street Journal and then at Warner Brothers. “I travel a lot for work,” says Tag Brother Mike Konesky, “and I’ve seen people watching TAG on airplanes. I’ll tap them on the shoulder and ask what they think. People just love the story, the message of friendship.”

... and the real Tag Brothers. Prior to the premiere, the Tag Brothers made the national media rounds, giving Spokane even more juice in the process — Lester Holt, James Corden, Megyn Kelly. “Through all the interviews and media, hopefully we represented Spokane well,” says Konesky. And now that the dust has settled, Hollywood’s happy with Spokane and its quirky pastimes, too. The film took in nearly $90 million worldwide, against its $28 million budget. So perhaps TAG 2: The Retagging is not so far-fetched after all? (TED S. McGREGOR JR.)

24 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


AUTHORS AND ARTS RAKE IN ACCOLADES

Spokane novelist STEPHANIE OAKES received a Washington Book Award for her young adult saga The Arsonist, the story of two contemporary teenagers trying to solve a historical murder. It’s not the first time one of Oakes’ books has garnered attention: Her 2015 novel The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly was adapted into a series which premiered in mid-2018 on the video on-demand service Facebook Watch. LILAC CITY LIVE, the monthly talk show filmed at the downtown library, was named one of the year’s top innovators by the Urban Libraries Council. The brainchild of the library’s community engagement manager and host Ryan Dean Tucker, the show has attracted audiences since late 2017 and has featured local politicians, artists, musicians and business owners as guests. And speaking of libraries, Spokane voters overwhelmingly passed the PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND, which will fund a number of renovation and expansion projects in most of the city’s library branches. The annual literary festival GET LIT! ended its second decade in 2018, continuing a legacy that has brought a number of acclaimed writers — everyone from Kurt Vonnegut to Salman Rushdie and Jane Smiley — to the Inland Northwest. The upcoming festival kicks off April 22, and will be headlined by writer Roxane Gay, whose work encompasses fiction, critical analysis and even Black Panther comics. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

University of Washington medical students hard at work on the Gonzaga University campus. UW PHOTO

SPOKANE DRAWS NEW BLOOD

Not long ago, the University of Washington and Washington State University feuded over which would have a medical school in Spokane. But now, both universities have a medical school presence in the city, and Spokane has become the most popular choice for new students — even more popular than Seattle. Yes, a majority of the 2018 incoming University of Washington School of Medicine students preferred to study in Spokane — where UW partners with Gonzaga to deliver medical education — over Seattle. Between UW’s program and the WSU Elson S. Floyd School of Medicine, there are more first- and second-year med school students here than in Seattle. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

Lilac City Live’s Sean Glasow, left, and Ryan Tucker inside the downtown Spokane library. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

A facelift and a whole new name.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WELCOME TO THE FIC

Technically, the First Interstate Center for the Arts isn’t a new addition to Spokane, but the building formerly known as the INB and the Spokane Opera House sure feels fresh. That’ll happen after a six-month, $23 million renovation that was completed just in time for the launch of this fall’s Best of Broadway season. While many of the improvements are behind the scenes — replacing the entire electrical system, adding a backstage elevator — some make the visitor experience decidedly better than the old days. Among those are larger seats in the auditorium, a new sound system and the addition of a dramatic art piece, Opening Act by artists Bill and Karma Simmons, that hangs from the lobby ceiling. (DAN NAILEN)

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 25


Monroe reopened in September.

SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL PHOTO

MONROE GOES ON A DIET

Few traffic-planning decisions have been as controversial as the city’s plan to reduce the number of lanes on North Monroe Street between Kiernan and Indiana avenues. For three years, fights over Monroe Street have left the business district — and the city — bitter, with some business owners hoping the change would usher in a new era of flourishing pedestrian-friendly businesses and others predicting it would jam traffic and bankrupt local stores. The project was finally completed in September. The result? Monroe traffic moves at a slower, steadier clip. The street looks a lot prettier. There’s more room to park and there’s more room to walk. That’s not to say everyone loves it: Plenty of people complain about the frustrations drivers have over merging, being caught behind buses or trying to finding a gap to cross Monroe during rush hour. Still, the businesses appear to have survived — while the anger that once defined the issue has all but disappeared. (DANIEL WALTERS)

Joe Albi’s days are numbered.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

BOND... SCHOOL BOND

Spokane Public Schools was in desperate need of more classroom space, especially as the district looks to expand middle schools to include the sixth grade. And in November, voters agreed to give it to them. Roughly two-thirds of voters approved a $495 million bond for three new middle schools and other facility improvements. It was a result of an unprecedented partnership between the district and the city of Spokane, which agreed to let the district use city-owned space for the new schools. As part of the bond, the district will also receive $31 million to demolish Joe Albi stadium and rebuild it at its current site, though voters rejected the idea to put the new stadium downtown instead. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

26 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

Yep, Amazon breaks ground in the West Plains.

A ROSE BLOOMS

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

For months, there was speculation about what the massive West Plains building code named Project Rose would be. By summer, the best guess was confirmed: e-commerce giant Amazon would be bringing a new fulfillment center and about 1,500 jobs to the Spokane area. Refuting national criticism of its warehouse working conditions and pay, Amazon has said that the yet unannounced wages at the facility will be competitive for the area and that employees will get generous health benefits and leave. With four stories and a roughly 600,000-square-foot footprint, the building at 10010 W. Geiger Blvd. had already seen significant progress in its construction by the end of 2018, with plans to staff it up by fall 2019. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

Idaho’s not so conservative when it comes to health care.

EMILY STRIZICH PHOTO

IDAHO, OF ALL PLACES, VOTES TO EXPAND MEDICAID

The citizens of Idaho have always hated Obamacare. But, as we learned this year, it didn’t hate one of the biggest parts of Obamacare: the Medicaid expansion. Over 60 percent of Idaho voters supported expanding Medicaid this year. “We expected it to do well, because we knew there was a groundswell of support for Medicaid expansion in Idaho,” says initiative organizer Luke Mayville. “But it was a big surprise how spread-out the victory was geographically.” Not only did Medicaid expansion win in the five most populous Idaho counties, like Mayville expected, it actually won in the five least populous counties, showing that some issues transcend the urban-rural divide. (DANIEL WALTERS)


THE REGION’S RESTAURANT AND CRAFT BEVERAGE INDUSTRY CONTINUES TO BOOM The Inland Northwest continues to carve out a name for itself as a drinking and dining destination in the greater Pacific Northwest. Throughout 2018, Spokane and the surrounding area was recognized on several big “best” lists by national publications, touting what most locals already know — that we have great craft beer, coffee and chef-owned restaurants contributing to a regional “foodie scene.” With so much going on, from Food Network appearances to restaurant openings, it can be hard to keep track of it all. So here’s an overview of some notable milestones from the past year. At the start of the year, the STEAM PLANT KITCHEN + BREWERY reopened after a half-year, $4 million remodel and complete menu overhaul. Shortly after that, Spokane chef Travis Dickinson debuted COCHINITO TAQUERIA, serving street tacos, small plates and other Latin-inspired dishes downtown. In Airway Heights, THREE PEAKS KITCHEN + BAR, the flagship restaurant of the new Spokane Tribe Casino, debuted under the leadership of chef Blerita Kaba. Also in Airway Heights, MOVIE & DINNER, the region’s first dine-in movie theater, opened up at Northern Quest Resort & Casino. Spring’s renewal brought the debut of family-owned American fusion spot ELLIOTTS, AN URBAN KITCHEN in the North Monroe Business District. In Kendall Yards, the chef-owned fine dining spot PARK LODGE debuted in May, and has since delighted neighborhood residents and foodies alike. Meanwhile, owners of THE LOGAN TAVERN, a casual pub near Gonzaga University, revived a favorite corner hangout with all new food, drink and vibe. After plenty of anticipation, the new bakery and brewery co-op THE GRAIN SHED also launched mid-year in South Perry. In Coeur d’Alene, chef and restaurateur Adam Hegsted unveiled his latest project, HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB, in a storied downtown space. The first of many planned locations of Hegsted’s fast-casual burger spot,

INCREDIBURGER & EGGS, also opened at the start of 2018. Other notable newcomers in 2018 include Kendall Yards’ UMI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR, the Cajun-inspired TEN/6 in Coeur d’Alene, downtown Spokane bars THE TINY TIKI and BERSERK and new pub NORTH HILL ON GARLAND. In the world of coffee, the region saw a spate of new cafes, including spring debuts of WHITE PINE COFFEE SHOPPE in Midtown Coeur d’Alene and ARCTOS COFFEE & ROASTING CO. in Spokane’s Logan Neighborhood. INDABA COFFEE ROASTERS expanded its reach with new locations, including the Riverside store featuring a menu of artisan toast. Also serving toast topped with tasty spreads on Riverside, yet on its west end, is the new LADDER COFFEE & TOAST. Roast House Coffee also opened its downtown tasting room and cafe, FIRST AVENUE COFFEE, in mid summer. In the spirits sector, DRY FLY DISTILLING announced a massive expansion and new distillery facility north of downtown to allow its products to be exported to countries along the Pacific Rim, starting with South Korea. Craft beer connoisseurs celebrated the arrivals of HUMBLE ABODE BREWING in North Spokane, along with MOUNTAIN LAKES BREWING downtown and Sandpoint’s UTARA BREWING and MATCHWOOD BREWING. Several local chefs spent time in the national spotlight throughout 2018. Featured on a new episode of Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives was chef TONY BROWN’S Ruins restaurant. Fleur de Sel owner LAURENT ZIROTTI also appeared on Fieri’s Guy’s Grocery Games. Late in the year, Spokane pastry chef RICKY WEBSTER was twice seen on Food Network for its Christmas Cookie Challenge, for which he took home a championship title and $10,000, and on the Holiday Gingerbread Showdown. We’ve got it on good authority that 2019 is aiming to be just as packed with progress, too. (CHEY SCOTT) n

The Steam Plant reopened after a $4 million remodel. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 27


PREVIOUSLY...

Miller Cane is on the road with 8-year-old Carleen, and they’ve stopped at his sister Dena’s house in Spokane. They planned to check on Miller’s ailing mother, but she suddenly vanished from her nursing home. Carleen is in Miller’s care because her own mother, Lizzie, is in jail for shooting her estranged husband, Connor; he suddenly came back into the picture after learning that Carleen will inherit a massive family fortune that Connor believes is rightfully his. Before all this, Miller had been making his living comforting and conning the survivors of mass shootings, a calling he found after his brother Charles and nephew Billy were killed.

CHAPTER 4, PART 2

A

ccording to Dena, Miller was to finish his errands. Yes, their mother was missing, but the cops had been notified and extra staff had been brought in to look for her and apparently this kind of thing happened from time to time. Dena was going to take a cab over there to be a grounding influence once they brought her in, and since it was unlikely their mom would even recognize Miller, he and Carleen should just finish their Barbie shopping and meet with the realtor. There was nothing Miller could do about any of it except worry and wonder if his mother had finally disappeared for good. She’d only shown glimpses of herself at Christmas, mostly when Dena put on Dean Martin, waking as she swayed to the music. “What are you doing here?” she’d say to Miller, taking his hand. “Visiting

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

28 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

you,” he’d say, and after a while, she’d disappear again. Maybe today’s escape was merely the final phase of her disappearance, a horrible thought, Miller casting her as a beloved dog crawling away to die. The money he’d spent on Fairhaven wasn’t enough. He should have visited more often, to be there when she surfaced, however briefly. She’d looked after her own mother for years, flying back and forth between Spokane and Providence, and it was only after Grandma died that she allowed herself to hope she might still dodge the dementia that ran through her family. Would Miller and Dena dodge it? Charles had, the only bright side of the Sunny Day Massacre. Carleen was quiet on the ride to the White Elephant, a cavernous store on the north side of Spokane devoted to toys and models and camping and fishing and boating and bear spray and guns you could look at while you waited to purchase your toy. There were cases of revolvers and semiautomatics, racks of rifles and shotguns, and once when a younger Miller was studying the handguns laid out under glass, a salesman pulled down a rifle and said, “This might be just what you’re looking for, son,” talking to Miller’s dad really, but looking at them both. “Perfect for plinking and small game,” he said, and Miller imagined shooting cans and bottles in the woods — he’d shot twenty-twos at Camp Reed — but his dad shook his head and the salesman walked away. Miller’s friend Bryce went hunting with his dad and told Miller how you had to get up early and freeze your ass off and how you’d disappoint your old man with your pathetic weakness and complaining, but how you might also watch him cut open a deer or elk and help lift the steaming organs from the animal, which was

horrible and cool and awful, but the meat was so good — Miller knew that, because he’d eaten it at Bryce’s house, venison sausage and elk steak and moose and a deer heart. Miller himself had never wanted to kill or skin anything, but he remained entranced by the White Elephant’s guns — beautiful objects, harmless it seemed — and he still dreamed about them sometimes, assault weapons in nightmares and semiautomatics in good gun dreams, a calm settling over him as he took a nine from its Crown Royal bag, popping and unloading and reloading its clip, the calm lingering even after he woke and the dream dissolved. Not that he really wanted one. But the dream had to mean something. He hated himself for having such dreams after everything he’d seen. “Are we here to look at guns?” Carleen said, and Miller led her past the camping and survival equipment to the other side of the store, where there were Popstar Barbies and Pediatrician Barbies and Harassed Personal Assistant Barbies, but no Barbie Castles. “Let’s go somewhere else,” Miller said after they exhausted the Barbie aisle, but Carleen pulled a big box from the bottom shelf, which proved to be a Barbie Care Clinic — an ambulance that opened into a hospital, complete with reception desk, waiting room, exam table, eye chart, gift shop, and Ebola victims scattered dead on the floor (if you imagined them). “Do you want to look at this?” Miller said, and Carleen said, “I am looking at it,” and Miller said, “I mean out of the box.” “I don’t think we’re allowed,” Carleen said, and Miller said, “I think it’s okay.” He opened the box and handed Carleen the ambulance, which she transformed into the Care Clinic. She studied the plastic furniture and waiting room magazines and medical implements, so fixedly examining each


object that Miller stepped away to browse the knives on the other side of the store, until Carleen tracked him down, and said, “Can I really get this?” “You really can,” Miller said, and Carleen said, “What if it’s too expensive,” and Miller said, “We can afford it.” He’d never seen her so hungry for anything. “Mom thinks new toys are a waste,” she said, “especially plastic, because they’re made of oil and will never break down and are as good used as new.” “But birthday presents can be new,” Miller said, “and since I didn’t get you one — ” “You got me a Barbie Styling Head,” Carleen said. Was that really something he’d have gotten her? “But maybe this,” Carleen said, “could be an early Christmas present?”

How much money could you accumulate before you started to believe you actually deserved it?

WHAT A BEAUTIFUL PLACE TO LIVE

“Sure it could,” Miller said. “Do we need a new Barbie, too?” “I don’t think so,” Carleen said, and Miller said, “How come?” “Something more might spoil it,” Carleen said. “It’s just so perfect as it is.” Thank god she didn’t know about the money yet. And once she did, Miller wondered how much of herself she’d lose to it. Not that it was his business. And not that she’d be better off poor. But was it possible to remain unruined by a billion dollars? Three quarters of a billion? Five hundred million? How much money could you accumulate before you started to believe you actually deserved it? Not that a Barbie Care Clinic would ruin anyone. Carleen was practically vibrating with the pleasure it was already bringing her. The thing about a gun, though — if Connor came after them armed, for instance: what if it was the only way to protect her? And what if he didn’t have one when Connor came for her with his? Miller had never been at a massacre from the beginning. Did he really want to train for that? What if the shooter was a kid? Miller wondered if his brother knew how far gone Billy was the morning he shot up Sunny Day, if that’s why Charles got there so fast — to try to stop him — before the cops killed them both in the cafeteria. n

WITH WHAT HAPPENED LAST NIGHT.

Last year in Kootenai County, Safe Passage served more than 1,300 women and children who were victims of sexual or domestic violence. But there were many more victims who didn’t report. With your help, we can heal their pain and make this a beautiful place again, for everyone.

Donate at safepassageid.org 24-hour hotline: 208.664.9303

MILLER CANE CONTINUES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER

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Call now to reserve your seat! JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 29


The game room at the Roxie Spokane in Hillyard.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

NIGHTLIFE

RISING TIDE

With space to spare, the Roxie Spokane hopes to help Hillyard become the next Perry District BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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ive jazz tickles its way through the glass doors at the Roxie event center, where there’s a surprising number of people inside drinking and having a good time for a Monday night in mid-December. Slip past the private party revelers into the next room, and there’s an adults-only arcade, filled with pool tables, shuffleboard and video games for the 21-and-older crowd to enjoy. Dip around the corner through a narrow hall, and a handful of people sit sipping their drinks and watching sports in the Northern Rail pub. But that barely covers what’s happening just on the ground floor of the nearly 40,000-square-foot space, once a Masonic temple. Back on the Market Street side of the building, head upstairs and there’s another bar on the mezzanine, where more private party guests mingle, perhaps unaware that the floor above them opens into a massive space that can comfortably hold 500 people. In just a few days, the community will fill that room for the Roxie Family Country Christmas meal, with 125 tickets donated to

30 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

lower-income families in the area. Meanwhile, in the basement, three of the building’s four owners help a showrunner prepare for an EDM (electronic dance music) show set for Friday night. It’s a mix of events, people and sounds that only a space as big as this can really accommodate. And with their sights set on giving back to the community while giving Hillyard a good name, the Roxie’s owners hope to help do for their street what other restaurants and businesses did for the Perry District and Kendall Yards. “I feel like we’re championing the neighborhood,” says Gil Rivas, one of the co-owners and the main music and private-event booker. “The perception of Hillyard has to change, and you have to have one hard-charging venue that helps change that, and that’s us.”

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hen Dwayne Alexander bought the building about two years ago, he says there was a church leasing the basement, but the upstairs had gone largely unused for decades.

“When I got it, all the walls were painted black and these giant doors were laying on the ground in a big puddle of water with tarps around ’em,” Alexander says, gesturing to massive wooden doors that once again stand ready to separate the largest upstairs event space into two rooms. The church moved out, and he set to work replacing and repairing the plumbing and electrical, and installing sprinklers where needed. He also acquired the connected Northern Rail pub and its large patio out back. Alexander decided to name the space after his mother, Roxie, who lives in Asotin. “My mom just has always been behind me,” he says. “She’s a strong person, someone who believed in me.” The goal for the Roxie Spokane is to host at least one major music event each month — everything from jazz and blues to country, grunge and dance music — and then get outside event runners to offer even more entertainment by renting spaces and promoting their own shows. The venue has hosted everything from wakes and


weddings to mixed martial arts and boxing matches, Alexander says. “We’re in the square-foot business,” Rivas says, noting their space is the largest of its type in Spokane. Uniquely, Rivas and Alexander say, they’ll let people “spend down” the cost of renting out the space. “So if you rent the venue for $2,000, and then your bar and your food bill rings out at $1,500, you only owe us $500,” Rivas says. In addition to repeating some of their successful shows from 2018, including a popular country festival in March, Alexander says this summer the Roxie will also host outdoor concerts and free family movie nights in a park space he owns about a block away.

The Roxie served up a Christmas meal for area low-income families.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

There’s something going on every night of the week, from karaoke to a shuffleboard league. One of the most popular events has been a quarterly music challenge that gets local artists to compete for the chance to win a trip for two — most recently to Cancún. “We’re an eclectic venue,” Rivas says. “You can do so many things here. The Fox and the [Bing], those are bigger in terms of seating for concerts, but that’s the only thing they do there. They can’t host all the things we do.”

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ost recently, the Roxie’s owners have focused on building out a full-service kitchen to cater to events in the building, and serve a restaurant they hope to open in the spring. “If you’re not in the mood for Chinese food, you’re pretty much out of options as far as what you can eat in this area,” explains Hector Torres, one of the owners and the chef spearheading the restaurant. Torres, who is Cuban-American, says he wants to focus on making healthy food that is sustainable and accessible to people. “The vision is to be able to be the standard in the community for good food, not just in quality, but also in sustainability as far as where we’re sourcing our products,” Torres says. “I want to teach people to eat things as they come in season, what comes in season at fall and why is our menu different in the fall than it is in the spring. This is part of the sustainability.” He envisions that once the restaurant opens, there’ll be a one-page menu of staples, and a rotating fresh sheet with seasonal dishes. The restaurant will be just the latest push at the Roxie to help revitalize Hillyard. With nearby North-South Freeway construction pushing ahead, and area streets and sidewalks already upgraded, Hillyard is primed to drop its reputation for poverty and crime, and Rivas says the Roxie is poised to help make the tides rise for all neighboring businesses. “All the things that happened that turned Perry around are happening here,” Rivas says. “When people hear Hillyard, they still crinkle their nose. That’s a perception battle, and the Roxie is helping turn around that perception.” n samanthaw@inlander.com The Roxie Spokane • 5201 N. Market St. • 475-2500 • theroxiespokane.com or Facebook.com/TheRoxieSpokane

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE FIXERS Netflix’s new half-hour comedy The Fix tasks teams of hilarious people with fixing the world’s serious problems. Each episode, host Jimmy Carr leads the guests in discussing a single topic before each team makes their best pitch. For example, how do you fix gentrification? Comedy heavyweight D.L. Hughley, a team leader every episode across from Katherine Ryan, suggests making the Dakotas sound super hip by rebranding the region as SoCaBo (South of the Canadian Border) to draw hipsters away from the urban coasts. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

Five ’09 Series Worth Revisiting

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BY BILL FROST

arack Obama was sworn in as president. King of Pop Michael Jackson passed away. The secondgreatest film in cinematic history, Crank 2: High Voltage, was released. Now-decade-old 2009 was an auspicious as hell year. TV had a pretty, pretty, pretty, pretty good 2009. Here are five iconic-to-obscure shows that debuted 10 years ago to stream while pondering what the hell you’ve done with your life. PARKS & RECREATION (Amazon Prime and Hulu) Community — which also premiered on NBC in 2009 — may carry more cred with smug culture nerds, but Parks & Recreation is as warm and timeless as a Li’l Sebastian snuggie. Leslie Knope, Ron Swanson and the rest of Pawnee, Indiana’s finest created a bottomless pit of quotable memes over 125 perfect episodes, best enjoyed with a chilled tumbler of Snake Juice.

THE BUZZ BIN ARCHER ( Hulu) There’s no tighter animation voice cast than that of Archer — though star H. Jon Benjamin’s other cartoon, Bob’s Burgers, is close. As international superspy Sterling Archer, HJB has swaggered/drunkenly stumbled through the hilariously profane and smack-talking series with no lessons learned, except for maybe phrasing (wait, are we still doing that?). Better than Bond. NURSE JACKIE (Netflix) During the heyday of the male antihero (think Breaking Bad, Californication, Rescue Me, et al), ex-Sopranos star Edie Falco came out of nowhere as a pill-popping, adulterating, morally ambiguous New York City nurse spinning more sketchy webs than Tony Soprano. It’s a tense drama, but Nurse Jackie also delivers laughs (thanks to breakout co-star Merritt Wever).

WHERE’S WHITNEY? Oops, BBC series Bodyguard isn’t the Whitney Houston flick that gifted the world her cover of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You.” Guess what? You should watch it anyway! The British miniseries now streaming on Netflix manages to pack a whole lot of intrigue in its six episodes. A PTSD-stressed veteran-turned-security agent is assigned to protect a controversial (and sexy!) politician whose pro-surveillance and pro-war views make her a target of a constellation of enemies both inside and outside the British government. It’s a bit like Homeland and a bit soap opera-ish at times, but Bodyguard moves fast and mostly keeps you guessing. (DAN NAILEN)

UNITED STATES OF TARA (Hulu) Writer Diablo Cody (Juno, Jennifer’s Body) took a swing at TV with 2009 Showtime dramedy United States of Tara, starring international treasure Toni Collette. Tara (Collette) is a suburban mom with dissociative identity disorder, a condition that leaves her randomly switching between four wildly different personalities. One of her kids: future Captain Marvel Brie Larsen. PARTY DOWN (Hulu) It’s a cult favorite now, but Party Down, a comedy about nobody L.A. actors and writers (including Lizzy Caplan, Adam Scott and Jane Lynch) working in catering, was an initial fail. Starz canceled Party Down after 20 episodes, but it holds up far better today than its polar Hollywood opposite, Entourage. Seriously — screw Entourage. n Visit billfrost.tv for more trenchant television coverage.

32 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

A COLD DAY IN HELHEIM The library of games available to download on Xbox’s Game Pass ($10 a month) improved dramatically in 2018, and to close out the year with a bang Xbox added Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice. You play as Senua, a Celtic woman battling schizophrenia, who must venture into the Nordic lands of Hel. Combat can be a bit repetitive, but cinematic cutscenes, Norse mythology and a powerful storyline make up for it. Hellblade is also a testament to the potential indie games can achieve. (QUINN WELSCH)

SURVEY SAYS Billboard magazine tallied up the best-selling albums of 2018, and here’s your top 5, which includes some releases from 2017 with serious staying power: 1. TAYLOR SWIFT, Reputation 2. DRAKE, Scorpion 3. POST MALONE,

beerbongs & bentleys 4. VARIOUS ARTISTS, The Greatest Showman soundtrack 5. ED SHEERAN, Divide

WHO WON? WHO’S NEXT? YOU DECIDE! One of the best creations to ever be born of the internet is coming back in 2019: Epic Rap Battles of History! The series’ sixth season drops in spring, but to tide fans over until then, creators Nice Peter (Peter Shukoff) and EpicLLOYD (Lloyd Ahlquist) launched an epic new contemporary rap battle, Elon Musk vs. Mark Zuckerberg. Seriously, go watch the savagery on ERB’s YouTube if you haven’t yet, and get ready for more sick beats and burns coming soon. (CHEY SCOTT)


CULTURE | BASKETBALL

Ladies (in) First

Gonzaga women’s basketball coach Lisa Fortier.

Gonzaga’s women could be on the verge of creating their own March Madness magic BY ROBERT HEROLD

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he Gonzaga women ended last year’s successful season on a downer, losing in the first round of the NCAA Tournament at Stanford and being thoroughly out-hustled and outrebounded in the process. Fast forward to this season and what looked like a rebuilding year for the Zags. Jill Barta, last season’s West Coast Conference player of the year, decided to forego her senior year, and their best defensive player, Emma Stach, graduated. Yes, the talented Wirth sisters (Jenn and LeeAnne) are still here as sophomores. Jessie Loera is still the quickest guard in the WCC. Jill Townsend returned after a good freshman year and transfer Katie Campbell is back, too, but hadn’t shown much last year. To make things even more challenging, GU beefed up its schedule. The WCC is a liability when March rolls around. The Zags could win the conference but if they lose the conference tourney, they might still miss the NCAA tournament. So Gonzaga went out and scheduled a tough preseason, including games against the reigning NCAA champion Notre Dame and the

nationally ranked and always challenging Stanford. Coach Lisa Fortier’s young team breezed through their early matchups. Then came Notre Dame, and the Irish won by 16 points. Rebounding still needed serious work. A few successful weeks later No. 7-ranked Stanford came to town. Would we see the GU WEEKEND team that C O U N T D OW N looked Get the scoop on this so bad weekend’s events with against our newsletter. Sign up at Stanford Inlander.com/newsletter. last March Madness, or the team that a few months previous had actually defeated the Cardinal in Palo Alto? What we got was a team better than either Zags iterations from last year. But why? First of all, Fortier and her staff had addressed the rebounding problem. And second, her younger players obviously had talent and had come a long way. Consider Katie Campbell. From an un-

GONZAGA UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS PHOTO

sung player who did little last season, she’d become a star, a consummate three-point shooter, a very good defender and great foul shooter. She rains down threes, and if she has a split-second, she gets her shot off. And on defense, well, it turns out this slight drink of water can also guard and rebound. In fact, she led the team in rebounds against Stanford. The Stanford game seemed like two or three games in one. GU got off to a good start, and slowly but surely expanded its lead. Fortier’s attention to rebounding was paying off, to the seeming surprise of Stanford. Stanford eventually changed up its defense and started hitting shots, but Gonzaga held them off for a 79-73 win, ultimately outrebounding the Cardinal 38-24. Fortier gave the team a “B,” noting that the Zags “still have a few things to clean up.” That focus on consistent excellence could mean trouble for the Zags’ WCC foes. Gonzaga finished its pre-conference slate with wins against Missouri State, Washington State and Idaho. Along the way, they’ve gotten major contributions from the likes of Laura Stockton and Chandler Smith. Rather than focus on one or two star players, though, these Zags seem to be finding the kind of teamwide balance that can truly make them something special come March. The conference season is just starting, but this is already shaping up to be one of the most intriguing Gonzaga women’s teams we’ve ever seen. n Gonzaga’s women host Saint Mary’s Thursday, Jan. 3, at 6 pm, and host Pacific on Saturday, Jan. 5, at noon.

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 33


Foodie friends, activate! (From left) Kacey Rosauer, Ashley Buckner, Rob Peterson, Erin Peterson and Colby Rosauer.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

INDUSTRY

Elevating Excellence The Spokane Culinary Arts Guild curates local dining recommendations and fosters appreciation for the region’s service industry BY CHEY SCOTT

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hen Erin Peterson realized an important element was missing from the Inland Northwest’s culinary scene, she set out to fix it. In the modern age of online restaurant reviews from predominantly amateur critics, and many more likely to rant than rave, Peterson craved a resource for local diners and travelers alike to find authentic, honest recommendations for where to drink and dine in the region’s burgeoning industry. “Specifically I noted there was, in our area, a lot of excellence hidden in pockets, and the reviews on different websites didn’t always reflect what I was able to find,” Peterson says. “We really wanted to honor the restaurants and the chefs and the hospitality professionals who were doing excellent work above and beyond what’s expected.” So after plenty of planning and reaching out to friends and fellow foodies, Peterson and her husband Rob founded the Spokane Culinary Arts Guild in mid-

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2017. In the time since, the organization has amassed hundreds of critiques from its resident “tastemakers,” a volunteer group consisting of nearly three dozen local food bloggers (Peterson formerly wrote about food on her blog “Plately Northwest”), food-focused social media influencers and frequent diners chosen by Peterson to provide regular feedback. “I knew there were so many of us out there doing this same thing, and individually our voices were kind of dispersed,” Peterson explains. “Collectively we could come together and showcase restaurants around a common goal, and not as paid content, but authentic content that wasn’t compromised.” Rather than submit open-ended reviews as published by sites like Yelp, Google and Facebook, the Guild’s tastemakers are asked to follow a set list of questions and scoring categories that Peterson then compiles into spreadsheets to track details like high and low performance and frequency of reviews per venue. The collec-

tive scores are then used to select category winners for the Spokane Culinary Arts Guild Awards; 2018’s winners are being recognized at a Jan. 8 gala. On a busy Saturday morning at Madeleine’s Cafe in downtown Spokane, Peterson pulls out her phone and scrolls through the standardized form tastemakers fill out within 48 hours of dining somewhere. It covers areas like service, appearance and flavor, with space at the end to leave additional praise or criticism. Peterson asks tastemakers, who dine on their own dime, to visit a minimum of 12 local restaurants each year, though most review many more. While Spokane is in its name, Guild members consider North Idaho and other surrounding areas for coverage. “We all do this as volunteers because we would do it anyway,” Peterson says. “It’s almost like a really great supper club; we get together and hang out and we love supporting each other and we’ve become great friends.” In keeping with traditional food critic practices, taste-


FOOD | OPENING makers are not allowed to alert a restaurant that they’re coming in, and restaurants can’t pay the Guild to be reviewed. The Guild does, however, offer paid services to local hospitality industry clients, such as event coordination and social media management. “We want to get an authentic experience that a diner would get walking in off the street,” Peterson emphasizes. “That particular idea of calling ahead and requesting compensation; none of that will ever happen with us.”

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fter a full year collecting tastemakers’ feedback on dining establishments of all types across the Inland Northwest, the Spokane Culinary Arts Guild is celebrating with its first awards gala. The industry event includes awards for 2018’s top-scoring restaurants in nearly 40 dining categories, along with people’s choice awards and accolades for best chef, best bartender, best food event, food writer (disclosure: I am a nominee for the Inlander) and restaurateur. “We are going to try and do this [event] every year,” Peterson notes. “This year is kind of a litmus test for how well it will be received. We want people to walk away feeling honored and celebrated.” Though it didn’t host a reception last year, the SCA Guild presented a smaller batch of 2017 awards to top eateries after the organization’s first six months of reviewing. And while its reviews aren’t publicly posted, Peterson says the Guild’s goal is to present its annual nominee and winners lists to the public as a way of showing which establishments its tastemakers endorse. Guild-recommended restaurants are also regularly showcased on its website (spokaneculinaryartsguild.com) in featured posts, and on its Facebook and Instagram accounts. Considering that the Guild’s tastemakers adhere to several ethical practices of restaurant criticism, what happens when a local eatery scores poorly? Nothing, Peterson says. Poorly reviewed restaurants are simply ignored. “We would want our silence to speak as loud as our words. If I am a local chef and I’m not getting any press, what am I doing wrong?” explains Guild co-founder Rob Peterson. “I would love to be a critic, but I can’t,” adds Erin. “We are food evaluators and we’re not going to share our thoughts individually, but off the record and privately. We’ve had great meals and not-so-great meals in Spokane. We are educated on what to expect and we want to be respectful of the current climate.” The couple mainly worry that any negative criticism from the Guild would harm locally owned, family food businesses. If a restaurant is struggling with customer reception and wants to improve based on feedback the Guild may have, however, the couple is willing to help provide that insight. “It’s a really fine line of being true to the experience and true to the restaurant, but also saying things that are not detrimental to the business,” Rob says. “It’s extremely tough.” As the Guild continues to grow and establish itself as a trusted resource among diners, the Petersons hope to increase its charity work supporting the region’s sizeable hospitality industry. Last year, Second Harvest was a charity partner, and in 2019, the Guild has chosen industry-supporting charity Big Table as a beneficiary. “We care about being true to our values,” Erin summarizes. “I know what we’re doing is important work, and we’re here for the long haul.” n cheys@inlander.com Spokane Culinary Arts Guild 1st Annual Awards Gala • Tue, Jan. 8 at 6 pm • $150 • MAX at Mirabeau • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • spokaneculinaryartsguild.com

Union Tavern’s basket of battered fish.

Signs of the Future

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Like the neighborhood around it, the Union Tavern offers a mix of new and old in a casual setting BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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alk into the old palmistry building on East Sprague these days and you’re more liable to catch someone palming a basketball on one of the eight flat-screen TVs than glimpse someone deciphering the future written in delicate lines on patrons’ hands. While much of what’s now in the recently opened Union Tavern is new — the roof that was caving in was replaced, as was the floor — the tavern is also filled with reminders of the past, with vintage beer signs on the exposed brick walls and repurposed materials used to create tables and the bar. “We had to start from scratch, it was just a shell when we bought it,” says owner Dale Kleist, who purchased the building in January for $150,000. “So everything’s brand new, but we tried to give it kind of an old feel.” The palmistry signs were salvaged. One now lines the hallway to the bathroom in the building’s roughly 1,000-square-foot addition, which also made room for a kitchen and storage. The other hangs above tables made from salvaged wood from the bleachers at Gonzaga’s old Kennel. Kleist found a massive wooden-back bar for sale on Craigslist, and after getting it here from Montana and making some modifications, the nearly 40-footlong wooden arches now frame shelves of liquor and beer along one of the bar’s long brick walls. The former owner of Fast Eddie’s and Famous Ed’s, Kleist has taken some of the tried and true elements of his former establishments and put them in place at the Union Tavern. There are hot dip sandwiches, served with Ed’s sauce, which the chef describes as a tomato-based barbecue-like sauce that’s “a little sweet, a little smokey, a little hot.” Then there’s Power Hour, when pints of most craft beers are just $2 and it’s only $1 for domestics,

from 3 pm to 4 pm Monday through Friday. But drinks are also fairly affordable on a regular basis, with a tall glass coming in at just 50 cents more than a pint, beers and ciders on tap typically range from about $4.50 to $6.50 depending on the size and type you order. The menu, full of sandwiches, a smash-style burger, salads and other typical bar fare, also features housemade potato chips and an appetizer of Sonnenberg’s sausage from just up the street. The fish and chips have been hugely popular, Kleist says. While the tavern opened just the day before Thanksgiving, things have been fairly steady during the day as nearby workers hit up the new lunch spot, he says. “You know, there’s a lot of blue-collar industry around here,” Kleist says. “It’s amazing. We pack it out for lunch. Yesterday there wasn’t a seat to sit in.” The new bar sits along the stretch of Sprague that the city gave a fresh look in 2017, with new sidewalks, lights and plants, and a narrower road that makes the area friendlier to pedestrians and parking for businesses. Had it not been for that revitalization work, Kleist says he likely wouldn’t have bought the building. But the price was right, and things are looking up for the area. “Before that, it was kind of the bad part of town. But now it’s going in the right direction,” he says. “You know, people need to jump on this area now before it gets too expensive, if anybody’s looking for a location. There’s a lot of store fronts that are empty, or boarded up.” n To see a full menu or get more information on hours, visit search the Union Tavern (Spokane) on Facebook.

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 35


BEST OF 2018

CINEMATIC RICHES Our picks for the best films of 2018 BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

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hat more is there to say about 2018? With its neverending political chaos and celebrity scandal, it sure seemed to last a lot longer than 12 months. But at least the movies were mostly pretty good, and the box office receipts were record-breaking. Winnowing my year-end list of favorites down to just 10 movies was a real challenge, but the titles I selected were thrilling, original, inventive and ambitious, and they haven’t left my brain since I first saw them. As is the case every year, some acclaimed films — Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk, the Polish drama Cold War, the Palme d’Or-winning Shoplifters — haven’t hit town yet, but even without seeing those, I still had a lot to work with. Without further ado, here are my 10 favorite films of the last year.

HEREDITARY

10. 2018 was a good year for horror, and Ari Aster’s punishing, wildly insane supernatural thriller was at the top of the heap. Despite its debts to Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist, it has a remarkably surefooted vision for a debut feature, and Toni Collette’s ferocious central performance as a grieving, possibly unstable, mother is a masterclass in expertly controlled histrionics.

SUPPORT THE GIRLS

9. This indie charmer is set in a Hooters-style restaurant in suburban Texas, and follows the harried manager (the great Regina Hall) as she tries putting out fires both at work and in her personal life. Writer-director Andrew Bujalski takes the ba-

sic form of a boisterous studio comedy and injects it with humanity and melancholy, touching on the same socioeconomic anxieties and sexual politics that made Magic Mike a sleeper critical darling. Don’t sleep on this one.

ANNIHILATION

8. Paramount had so little faith in Alex Garland’s heady follow-up to Ex Machina that the studio dumped it onto Netflix in pretty much every country but the U.S. No wonder, because it’s far more cerebral and challenging than your typical multiplex fare, a genuinely horrifying and intelligent piece of sci-fi action. Its mostly wordless final act is one of the biggest narrative and stylistic gambles of the year, and it pays off.

Roma

36 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


BURNING

7. Korean auteur Lee Chang-dong’s first film since 2010’s masterful Poetry is an adaptation of a Haruki Murakami story, and it beautifully captures the author’s fascination with mundane lives being interrupted by the unexplained and otherworldly. It’s an ever-evolving organism, a romance that develops into a love triangle that then morphs inexorably into a chilling mystery, and it’s beguiling and enigmatic even as it creeps past the two-and-a-half hour mark.

LEAVE NO TRACE

6. As she did in her 2010 breakthrough Winter’s Bone, Debra Granik sensitively considers the lives of the displaced in Leave No Trace. The story of a man and his adolescent daughter living off the grid deep in the Oregon woods, it says more with a glance than most movies could with swathes of explanatory dialogue. Ben Foster is expectedly intense and studied as the father, an Iraq War veteran living with PTSD, but it’s relative newcomer Thomasin McKenzie who’s the wounded, searching soul of the film.

SHIRKERS

5. One of the best behind-the-scenes documentaries of recent years, in which director Sandi Tan reflects on the feature film she and her teenaged friends made guerrilla-style on the streets of 1990s Singapore. That story would be enough to make a fascinating doc, but it’s what happened after filming wrapped up that’s strange, unsettling and, in the end, weirdly inspirational. The archival footage from the ’90s (which functions as an accidental snapshot of a Singapore that no longer exists) is amazing, and Tan’s reflective, self-deprecating approach is refreshing. It’s now streaming on Netflix.

WIDOWS

4. Not only did Steve McQueen’s muscular heist thriller fail to find an audience, it’s mostly being overlooked in the year-end shuffle. That’s a shame, because it’s the kind of movie Hollywood should be making more often. On a superficial level, it’s a smart and twisty action film, but it’s also grappling with big ideas about the machinations of political dynasties, race and social strata, and the unpredictability of grief. McQueen’s visual experimentation is exciting and his cast — Viola Davis! Elizabeth Debicki! Daniel Kaluuya! Brian Tyree Henry! — is at the top of its game. What’s not to like?

THE FAVOURITE

3. The films of Yorgos Lanthimos (Dogtooth, The Lobster) are shot through with the impending threat of violence, though it tends to be more emotional than physical. That’s certainly the case with The Favourite, a 17th-century period piece whose weapons of choice are withering

First Reformed

scorn and lacerating wit. In examining the vicious power struggles within the coterie of an ailing Queen Anne, Lanthimos’ primary artillery is a trio of show-stopping performances — Olivia Colman as the monarch, Rachel Weisz as her back-biting confidante and Emma Stone as the tenacious handmaiden with a thirst for sovereignty. This is comedy that leaves a bruise.

FIRST REFORMED

2. Since he first gained attention with his scripts for Taxi Driver and Raging Bull, Paul Schrader has often focused his work on the emotional brittleness of seemingly resolute men. First Reformed, the best film he’s directed in decades, finds a terminally ill priest (Ethan Hawke, never better) questioning the very notion of a benevolent creator in a fractured world, and realizing his earthbound and spiritual concerns are troublingly intertwined. This is a challenging and elliptical exploration of religion and the state of the planet, and how they’re often at odds with one another.

ROMA

1. It seems that Alfonso Cuarón’s career has been building slowly but surely to Roma, an extraordinary vision that has the sweep of a great novel and the precise focus of an intimate character study. What begins as a modest drama about the quotidian routines of the live-in maid for a wealthy family (Yalitza Aparicio, in a stellar first-time performance) soon morphs into something much grander, a cutting commentary on class divide and a picaresque allegory about the political upheaval in early 1970s Mexico. Photographed in lustrous black-and-white by Cuarón himself — and just about every shot is loaded with rich detail — Roma has the haziness of the director’s own childhood memories, but they’re recalled with the clarity of a seasoned artist in complete command of his medium. I’ve seen it twice — once on the big screen, once at home on Netflix — and its power hasn’t diminished. HONORABLE MENTIONS: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, BlacKkKlansman, Black Panther, Can You Ever Forgive Me?, Eighth Grade, First Man, Game Night, Mission: Impossible — Fallout, Paddington 2, Private Life, The Rider, Sorry to Bother You, Tully and Won’t You Be My Neighbor? n

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 37


FILM | SHORTS

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38 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

Escape Room

OPENING FILM ESCAPE ROOM

In this Saw/Cube hybrid, a group of strangers are drawn to an escape room

that rewards $1 million to whoever can get out. No surprise — it turns out to be deadly. (NW) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING AQUAMAN

The half-man, half-fish superhero gets his own vehicle, in which he inherits the Atlantean throne and fights with his evil brother. It’s got some crazy visuals and hammy performances but still manages to be kind of a slog. (JB) Rated PG-13

BUMBLEBEE

Early word suggests this is the best

Transformers movie. Or, rather, the only decent Transformers movie, an ’80s-set origin story of the VW bug that’s more than meets the eye. (NW) Rated PG-13

CREED II

The Rocky saga continues with Adonis Creed preparing to fight the son of Ivan Drago, who killed his father in the ring all those years ago. It hits all


the plot points you expect, but the formula still works like gangbusters. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE FAVOURITE

In 18th-century England, two women jockey for a position of power within the coterie of an ailing Queen Anne. A lacerating, cutthroat dark comedy with great performances from Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone. (SS) Rated R

GREEN BOOK

A white driver (Viggo Mortensen) ferries a black jazz pianist (Mahershala Ali) through the American South in the 1960s. Its racial politics are undoubtedly simplistic, but its central performances more than make up for it. At the Magic Lantern. (MJ) Rated PG-13

HOLMES & WATSON

Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly team up again to play literature’s most famous detective duo, bumbling through a murder case at Buckingham Palace. (NW) Rated PG-13

MARY POPPINS RETURNS

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK VARIETY (LOS ANGELES) TIMES

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

AQUAMAN

55

CREED II

67

THE FAVOURITE

91

MARY POPPINS RETURNS

65

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET

71

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

87

VICE

59

DON’T MISS IT

VICE

WORTH $10

Adam McKay’s follow-up to The Big Short is another experimental dark comedy, this one following the career of Dick Cheney (an unrecognizable Christian Bale). The gimmicks and gags feel limp and unfocused this time around. (JB) Rated R

WATCH IT AT HOME

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, JAN 4TH – THURS, JAN 10TH TICKETS: $9

NOW SHOWING

GREEN BOOK, THE FAVOURITE FREE SOLO

COMING SOON STAN AND OLLIE MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS COLD WAR, SPIFF For Movie Times, Visit:

MagicLanternOnMain.com 25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

SKIP IT

WELCOME TO MARWEN

Inspired by the documentary Marwencol, the victim of a head injury escapes into elaborate miniatures of a made-up WWII town. Because it’s directed by Robert Zemeckis, expect a lot of CGI. (NW) Rated PG-13 n

with Broad Comedy

In this long-awaited sequel to the Disney classic, the magical nanny lands again in London to again help out the Banks children, now adults and with kids of their own. A slab of candy-coated excess that laboriously tries to copy the original’s charm. (JB) Rated PG

MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS

A study of the personal relationship and professional rivalry between the dethroned Mary Stuart and the steely Queen Elizabeth I. Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie star. (NW) Rated R

January 26, 2019 8:00 p.m.–10:00p.m. Bing Crosby Theater

MORTAL ENGINES

The writers of the Lord of Rings films adapt Philip Reeves’ futuristic novel in which all the world’s cities are now steampunk behemoths on wheels. (NW) Rated PG-13

Get tickets at: bit.ly/broadspokane19

THE MULE

Clint Eastwood squints and scowls his way through this thriller, inspired by the true story of a WWII veteran transporting cocaine for a Mexican drug cartel. (NW) Rated R

Help Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho give care. No matter what.

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET

This animated sequel finds Wreck-It Ralph exploring the vast unknown of the internet in an attempt to stop the shutdown of his friend’s video game. When it isn’t retreading the original, it relies on pop culture references that already feel dated. (JB) Rated PG

SECOND ACT

Through a series of comic misunderstandings, a blue-collar college dropout (Jennifer Lopez) fudges her way into a high-profile job on Madison Avenue. (NW) Rated PG-13

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

Spider-Men from various dimensions converge in the world of a teen web slinger, and they help him find his powers. A brilliant and funny animated feature that looks and feels like a comic book come to life. (SS) Rated PG

NOW STREAMING AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (NETFLIX)

The year’s biggest movie — both in scope and box office returns — is now on small screens, so you can remind yourself of all that happened before the sequel hits theaters in April. It might be overstuffed and overlong, but it’s a lot of CGI-heavy fun, with a now-famous ending that will no doubt be reversed almost instantly. (NW) Rated PG-13

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 39


ART

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS Thomas Ruble, John Choma, Alex Mann and Anne-Claire Mitchell offer a demonstration of their interactive music sequencer Organisynth.

Organisynth explores the potential of science fiction through music and collaboration BY QUINN WELSCH

I

n the 1970s, NASA commissioned artwork of advanced space colonies that could house and support as many as 10,000 people. What emerged were renderings of massive tubular structures with sprawling habitats, including rivers, mountains and towns. Sure, it’s science fiction, but it’s based in reality: As we inch closer to the singularity — that moment where technology overcomes the limits of humanity — and as our planet’s health declines with each passing day, the human experience is destined for dramatic change. It’s only as dystopic or utopic as you want it to be. When Alex Mann saw the NASA concept art, he wondered: “What kind of society emerges from that

40 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

technological and environmental condition?” He and two other music-minded artists responded with Organisynth, an interactive audiovisual art installation in Spokane that combines the spark of human creativity with the inevitability of technology. More plainly, Organisynth is an electronic music sequencer that people can play together. Think of the electronic memory game Simon with its blinking lights and tones, but blown up to fit an entire room. Its central figure resembles a flower, each petal containing two knobs that users can interact with. Users can walk directly up to the central “flower table” and begin twisting knobs to produce different sound effects. Everything is sequenced in the same key, so there’s no way to screw anything up. The project’s creators say the goal was to build something that multiple people without musical experience could use to create harmonies and, ultimately, just have fun. Organisynth is about creativity and collaboration, they say, and music, especially electronic music, is fundamental. “There comes an intrinsic sense of happiness and joy from being able to play a musical instrument in a setting

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

with your friends,” says Anne-Claire Mitchell, who took a curatorial role with Organisynth. “It’s not about the product being made — it’s the interaction.”

O

rganisynth began through an artist residency last year at Laboratory Spokane, which specializes in interactive digital media. It was unveiled last fall and has since appeared at art and music events around the city, such as the Dark Wave Disco, an electronic music show at the Washington Cracker Co. Building in November that celebrated “all things synthesizer.” (It’s not currently on permanent display, but you can look for updates on Instagram @organisynth.) The idea began with a house party. Or rather, a theoretical house party where, after a few hours, the host brings out a guitar and starts playing. It’s fun, but unless you’re holding an instrument and have some knowledge of how to use it, it’s a mostly passive experience. This is the antithesis of Organisynth. “[Organisynth]’s intended to get you into making music very easily, as a communal experience, but in its music it’s supposed to make creating music accessible,” says


Mann, the project designer. “It’s nice that it sounds good, but it’s more important that you’re doing it together.” Organisynth was one of the more ambitious projects that Laboratory ever produced, says Mitchell, who also co-founded the Richmond Arts Collective. The team took the concept of a synthesizer and turned it into a room-sized installation, she says. One component controls the beat, one controls the melody, one controls the pitch, etc. “They were using completely experimental technology, built from scratch, to a fully functional concept in three months,” she says. “It was incredible.” Originally, Mann and Thomas Ruble, the project engineer, pitched a similar idea using smartphones. Essentially, users would be able to open a program on their phones that would allow them to communicate musically with each other. “We did that and it just wasn’t fun enough,” Ruble says. “The problem is, you get someone on their phone and they are just too isolated.” They needed to go bigger. Ruble says the actual construction of the project was “whipped together” on a deadline during some late nights spent soldering wires together underneath the flower table. “It’s hard to synchronize all of this stuff. I had to write some real sweaty code to get all these wireless things to work with each other,” Ruble says. “We essentially wrote our own synthesizer software. It was a feat of software engineering.”

Alex Mann turns on a knob on the machine’s central unit, altering its sound.

O

rganisynth lights up like a spaceship, with its blinking lights and changing colors. Faces light up in blue, pink and green as visuals are projected onto the walls around them. It’s built for the curious. Much of Organisynth’s inspiration comes directly from science fiction, a la Star Trek: The Next Generation, Ruble says. The television show about a diverse group of people exploring the galaxy, working together, accepting one another, solving problems with shared responsibilities all in the name of discovery and curiosity was such an idealistic vision of the future for him. “There is a celebration of pluralism, and an add-on to that, the sense of infinite mystery,” he says. “The sense that space is out there waiting for us, to witness — not even interfere with.” The idea of a space colony also isolates the human experience in ways that reflect technical necessity, but also social organization, Mitchell says. Modern vernacular increasingly relies on digital communication, whether it’s a text message, fine art or video game, and music is no exception. “The infinite potential with electronic music to experiment and to respond to and to reflect to the issues of our time is bound up in the conversation between a person and machine,” she says. Similar to Organisynth, the Spokane electronic music nonprofit Technological Taxidermy built their own interactive synth-based installation at Terrain last year. With the Sonic Touch Wall, users could manipulate sound by touching reactive paints on the wall. Like the Organisynth team, Tech Tax is also trying to introduce more people to the world of electronic music, and to encourage people to “make weird stuff” on synthesizers. “I just don’t want people to be afraid of trying,” says Chelsea Hendrickson, who works with her husband, Tobias Hendrickson, at Tech Tax. “I love the Organisynth concept of ‘just come touch it and see what happens.’ I want people to see it and try it. Maybe they’re not going to be super excited about it or maybe their mind will be blown.” n

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

JAZZ NORTHWEST OF NEW ORLEANS

T

here are few places in the world with sights and sounds as rich as those of New Orleans’ French Quarter, though most of us currently enduring icy Inland Northwest winters don’t have the luxury of traveling down to the bayou on the regular. Thank your lucky stars, then, that the Bartlett’s Northwest of New Orleans series is still going strong as a monthly concert showcase highlighting jazz and swing classics. The shows are fronted by the long-running collective Hot Club of Spokane (pictured), and they bring in a revolving door of artists and work through setlists of beloved favorites and deeper cuts. Like the venue’s Grand Ole Opry-style Northwest of Nashville series, it has the energy of a variety show and the intimacy of an impromptu living room jam session, so expect a rollicking good time. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Northwest of New Orleans with Hot Club of Spokane • Tue, Jan. 8 at 8 pm • $10 • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane. com • 747-2174

ELECTRONIC DANCING PLAGUE

I

n the guise of his solo project Dancing Plague, Spokane native Conor Knowles crafts dark, evocative soundscapes, moody and swirling synth arrangements punctuated by the occasional ringing guitar flourish, with Knowles’ Ian Curtisinspired baritone echoing as if he’s howling from within a tomb. And yet his songs are loaded with unexpected hooks and beats; check out his album Pure Desperation, released early last year, and try to avoid that titular affliction. Despite the one-manband aspect of Dancing Plague’s live performances, they aren’t merely a guy slouching over a laptop: Knowles, who has also performed with the electropop duo Sea Giant, brings a jittery energy to the stage, often accompanied by projections of haunting images from classic foreign and silent films. It’s the perfect marriage of sound and vision. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Dancing Plague with Portable Morla and Moonchyld • Fri, Jan. 4 at 9 pm • $5 • 21+ • The Observatory • 15 S. Howard • observatoryspokane. com • 381-5498

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/3

BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CRUISERS, Open Jam Night DARCY’S RESTAURANT & SPIRITS, Old School Dance Music and Karaoke w/DJ Dave THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary and the Songsmith Series

42 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Steve Wayne J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic Hosted by Scott Reid NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny THE OBSERVATORY, Reverend Yo’s Blues Hour THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, The Rock Jam Series

ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 01/4

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Justin James J BIG BARN BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Into the Drift CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Bill Bozly CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary

DARCY’S RESTAURANT & SPIRITS, Karaoke and Dancing w/DJ Dave J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY, Lucas Brookbank Brown HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, Front Porch Trio IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Bright Moments Jazz THE JACKSON ST., Working Spliffs MARYHILL WINERY SPOKANE, Spare Parts Duo MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade

MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Pat Coast NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom J THE OBSERVATORY, Dancing Plague (see above), Portable Morla, Moonchyld J OUTLAW BBQ & CATERING MARKET, Songsmith Series PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, The Ronaldos PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic J THE PIN, New Years Artist Festival


MUSIC | VENUES

Saturday, 01/5

49 DEGREES NORTH, Dave DeVeau 219 LOUNGE, Red Blend J J THE BARTLETT, Bob Riggs Album Release Show with Kevin Morgan CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Into the Drift COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Charisa Bareither GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Slow Cookin’ HONEY EATERY AND SOCIAL CLUB, Mark Holt IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Justin Lantrip

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kori Ailene MARYHILL WINERY SPOKANE, Nicolas Vigil MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Big Phatty and the Inhalers MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Echo Elysium NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom THE PIN, JVST SAY YES with Cjay, Grant Ekdahl, Macfie, Carbon 12, Davos, Klay, Housed THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SILVER FOX, The Wild Card Band SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Sharky and the Fins STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, The Cronkites

Sunday, 01/6

THE BLIND BUCK, Show Tune SingAlong Sundays CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Ken Mayginnes O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with John Brownell STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 01/7

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Open Mic Night CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 01/8

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of New Orleans with Hot Club of Spokane (see facing page) BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, The ShuffleDawgs Blues Power Happy Hour RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing THE VIKING, Local Lounge Night

IMBIBE MAGICAL the

Upcoming Events JAN

30 JAN – FEB

TUES – SUN

DINNER, DRINKS, MAGIC

SPOKANE CHIEFS -V- PORTLAND WINTERHAWKS TOUR Alpha Omega Tours and Charters: 4:30pm - 11:00pm / Tickets: $59 Includes transportation, game tickets, hot dog, drink and popcorn.

SPOKANE ART SCHOOL CLASSES

Classes include: Art History, Drawing Using Charcoal, Intro to Digital Photography, Intro to Photoshop, Painting with Oil, Pen and Ink Drawing, Pottery, and much more. Classes available various days. prices vary.

CAT TALES

Open Tuesday through Sunday: 10:00am - 4:00pm Tickets: $10 Adults / $8 Students / $5 Seniors (55+)

JAN

5-6 TICKETS: Online: $6 At Show: $8

Spokane County Fairgrounds – 1/5: 10a - 6p / 1/6: 10a - 4p

All Classes FREE with paid admission. Sign up for classes NOW! Crossfit events Pickleball Tourney Roller Derby Matches

110 S Monroe St, Spokane Near The Montvale and Ruby Hotels

BUY YOUR TICKETS ONLINE AT

NORTHWESTTICKETS.COM

ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites with Greg Mahugh

Wednesday, 01/9

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night Hosted by The Jam Band GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Open Jam THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J THE PIN, Battery Point, Blankouts RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J THE BARTLETT, Corb Lund, Jan. 11 J JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Friends of the Guitar Hour feat. Larry Almeida, Jan. 11 J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Little River Band, Jan. 11 J KNITTING FACTORY, Reel Big Fish, Jan. 15 J THE BARTLETT, Joseph, Jan. 16

t Plan Your Nex ENCtE ! PlanE XYou PErRINex EXPERIENCE !

feat. YoungSmoke, Crashed Satellite, Datboyrob, Pro Gucci Heem and more PRIME TYME BAR & GRILL, America’s Liquor Down Band THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Stagecoach West ZOLA, The Cronkites

219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR • 4720 Ferrel, CdA • 208-274-0486 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 381-5489 OMEGA EVENT CENTER • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 43


SPORTS THE ULTIMATE SHOWDOWN

Before this season began, Eastern Washington football coach Aaron Best looked back on his first year at the team’s helm in 2017 with pride, even though his Eagles missed out on the FCS playoffs. After a rough start to the season, the team had battled back into contention and by season’s end, Best said, “we had some of our swagger back.” That swagger was back in full this season as the Eagles returned to the top of the Big Sky despite the mid-season loss to injury of AllAmerican quarterback Gage Gubrud. Backup Eric Barriere filled in with style, including a record-setting performance in the national semi-final game against Maine in which he tossed seven touchdown passes. Now the Eagles, 12-2 on the season, will need that swagger and then some in the FCS national championship game as they take on North Dakota State. The Bison are appearing in their seventh national championship game in the past eight years (they won six) — basically they’re the Alabama of the FCS level. The Bison are led by the throwing and running of quarterback Easton Stick, who is 48-3 as a starter and has led NDSU to 20 straight victories heading into Saturday’s showdown. The Eags will have to excel in all three phases — offense, defense and special teams — to have a chance at bringing their second national championship trophy home to Cheney. — DAN NAILEN Eastern Washington vs. North Dakota St. • Sat, Jan. 5 at 9 am • ESPN2

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

44 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

Together, We’re Transforming Health Care WORDS RAISE YOUR VOICE

A lot of people already use the Monday night Spokane City Council meetings as a public forum, sounding off about any number of pressing issues. But now the council’s weekly get-togethers will have a little more artistic flair: In collaboration with Spokane Arts and Spokane’s poet laureate Mark Anderson (above), the Words of Inspiration feature will showcase a local poet each week. You can submit your own work at spokanearts.submittable.com, and you could be called up to read in front the council. Poets are allowed to perform just once a month, their poems must run three minutes or less, and they can’t contain any obscene or objectionable material. It all starts at the first meeting of January. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

Thanks to the generous support of our donors, Providence Health Care Foundation is funding technology, programs and research that saves lives and enriches our community. For more than 130 years, our region has relied on Providence not only for world-class medical care, but to answer the call for help from our less fortunate neighbors. Learn how you can help: providence.org/GivingEWa or 509-474-4917 Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center | Providence Holy Family Hospital | Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital Providence Mount Carmel Hospital | St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute | Providence St. Joseph’s Hospital

Poetry at the Podium • Mon, Jan. 7 at 6 pm • Spokane City Hall • 808 W. Spokane Falls • spokanearts.org

“Devil in the Hot Tub” by Robert Grimes

ARTS ON THE TOWN

This New Year’s Eve was the first since 2001 that downtown Spokane hadn’t hosted the outdoor party known as First Night Spokane, which featured fireworks, live music, art and family-friendly activities. But fear not: There’s still plenty of great art and music to take in on the first Friday of 2019. In terms of art, catch Robert Grimes’ etched paintings at the Kolva-Sullivan Gallery (115 S. Adams), or the absurdist works of Tom Quinn at Craftsman Cellars (1194 W. Summit Pkwy). Iron Goat Brewing (1302 W. 2nd), meanwhile, hosts former Inlander illustrator Jessie Hynes. On the music side of things, singersongwriter Lucas Brookbank Brown will be performing at the downtown library (906 W. Main), and the duo Spare Parts will run through some tunes at Maryhill Winery (1303 W. Summit Pkwy). See downtownspokane.org for a full list of participating businesses. — NATHAN WEINBENDER First Friday • Fri, Jan. 4 at 5 pm • Downtown Spokane • downtownspokane.org/first-friday

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU BREAKING THE CYCLE OF HOMELESSNESS Cardboard signs occupy many street corners in the city of Spokane. Despite the plethora of homeless shelters in Spokane, there always seems to be scores of transients all over downtown. After growing up around this environment, I spoke with, worked with, and made friends with many people in this community. So what is causing homelessness? What is with the increase in cold bodies on the frost covered sidewalks? Some say lack of government funding is the reason. Others, not enough beds. But after asking many homeless folks for their experiences and perspectives, I’ve formed a conclusion that may throw some people; Spokane is too generous. I had the pleasure of being an employee at a thrift store for a couple years. This thrift store is a facet of a local homeless shelter and provides employment for people who are going through the recovery program at the shelter. Every night while closing the store, I would walk down the aisles and be in awe; every single item in this massive store was donated by the people of Spokane. The store averaged about $3,000 or more a day, and the back dock was almost always filled with donations. Spokane is a caring

and giving community. I worked alongside many men and women who had been homeless before going to this mission, and they all told me the same thing; if someone had given them money on the street, they used it to fuel their addictions. More often than not, they would sacrifice the things they needed for a fix. Where the loving people of Spokane believed that they were helping someone get back on their feet, they really were enabling an addict to stay homeless and fall further into their prison of dependency. Imagine the impact that these resources could have if they were put in the right place. In a place that calls for change. Something more than just a warm bed for the night, but something that would turn the lives of the homeless around. Union Gospel Mission has a program that does this, but since it’s a religious establishment, it does not receive any federal aide. If more shelters offered a similar program, it could change the culture of our city. The people need to want the change, which means sacrificing the comfort of feeding off of Spokane’s generosity, and choosing to pick themselves up. The loving people of Spokane need not stop their generosity and care, but place it somewhere it will make an actual difference, and not perpetuate homelessness.

CHEERS ZERO TO HERO Big cheers to the ZeroRez guy that cleaned my mom’s carpets on Southeast Bouevard on December 20th. He saw that I was having a difficult time and he went the extra mile. Even surprising me with a wonderful Christmas gift! You restored my faith in the goodness in people. I hope your Christmas was extra special! I will pay your kindness forward. BLUE CHRISTMAS CHEER Thanks to all who took the time and effort to put up

You know who you are. The driver who thinks in icy, snowy road conditions they can leave late for work and then rush dangerously along the road while everyone else who wants to live is driving for the conditions.

Christmas lights and scenes. You made my “blue” Christmas a brighter!

JEERS DRIVING IN SPOKANE Here comes another jeer about Spokane drivers. Read carefully, though. It might not be about the ones you’re thinking of. If slower traffic is keeping right, what should faster traffic do? (Hint: the words “move” and “left” are part of the answer.) Also, if you ask a cop, they’ll tell you the speed limit still applies in the “fast” lane. So if we’re all going the speed limit (or 5 mph over) we don’t have to help you break the law by moving over. The solution to either of these problems is simple. Step 1: change lanes. Step 2: accelerate. Before you know it you’ll be on your merry way faster than you can say “I really AM from Spokane, and I CAN go around.” You’ll also make the time to contemplate how much stress you just reduced in your own life without much effort. DRIVE SAFELY, LEAVE FOR WORK EARLY You know who you are. The driver who thinks in icy, snowy road conditions they can leave late for work and then rush dangerously along the

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

road while everyone else who wants to live is driving for the conditions. Be responsible and respectful of other people and their lives and your own by leaving home early, so you can drive slow, and be respectful of others who are driving slow. This isn’t time to pretend you’re James Bond. Please take your death wish and selfishness and change them into appreciation for yourself and others. So many drive recklessly, not good for these conditions. Please give others the gift of life by driving wisely and compassionately. Happy New Year. JEERS ON ME Calling myself out and hoping you see this.. Early morning of 12-20 (maybe like 5 am) on the South Hill. I didn’t make a hard enough stop at a stop sign, and that was on me as I thought you had a stop sign as well. But I don’t think you did and we crossed hairs a little too closely. You had a bigger truck of some kind. Possibly company truck as it has a logo on it? I just got off work and I was pretty tired and I send my sincere apologies as I’m sure I pissed you off and started your morning off wrong! Hopefully the day went better than dealing with my dumbass. RE: RE: COWS ETC To the person who wrote the jeers about cows etc., who

46 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

THAI LEMON GRASS BURRITO

TORTILLA SOUP

BULGOGI TACOS

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS J C R E W A L B E E N E I L C R A E C L A R E C O I F E D R H E A Y O U R E O A D S T I N T O S O N I A M H I L L A L I J O I V P E N E T E B A

S P U R N B U O N A

A S S O C

R A H A L M H G O

E R A R T O L L

Y A H N A N S I

O R R I N

F R U S T S H O T U I N I R Y F O R D A I P U N D R S T O I E E S T O U S A P A R

A U T U M N

T E A B A G

E R L S I T O R B I R M A

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Want to break your NY’s resolution already? We can help. 1414 N Hamilton St. | Logan/Gonzaga 509-368-9087 | wedonthaveone.com

obviously is very well educated and brilliant, did you really mean to compare humanity to a nice steaming pile of cow shit? That sounds so crass from someone so smart. In terms of offering someone else to take a big bite, feel free to begin yourself. You sound like you could use a nice helping of cow feces yourself. Perhaps you could show others the proper way to eat a pile of cow dung. Once you get half the pile properly swallowed and get your lips properly dried off, let others know how it tastes so they can make up their minds if they enjoy your referenced excrement pie. You’re such a brilliant expert on humanity, I’m certain you’d be able to show the world how to properly eat crap. Enjoy it for your Xmas dinner. n

1198 E SUMMIT PKWY KENDALL YARDS


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING Donate your Christmas tree to the Ferris High School treecycling event. Drop off at Ferris or call to schedule pick-up. Benefits the Ferris Senior All-Nighter, a fun and safe event the night of graduation. For more info or to schedule pick-up call Paul at 981-9371 or Dave at 414-731-1690. Jan. 5-6 from 10 am-4 pm. $5-$10. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. ferrisallnighter. com PAINT ‘N’ SIP PBS NERD EVENT Share an afternoon with other PBS nerds and join KSPS in celebrating public television painters like Bob Ross, Jerry Yarnell, and Wilson Bickford. Ticket sales benefit KSPS Public TV. PBS apparel and Bob Ross memorabilia is also available with trivia prizes. Ages 21+ Jan. 13, 2-4 pm. $54. Pinot’s Palette, 319 W. Sprague. ksps.org (443-7700)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) AFTER DARK A mature-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday show; on the first and last Saturday of the month, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com FIRE BRIGADE IMPROV The theater’s in-house, family-friendly comedy troupe performs monthly. Upcoming shows: Jan. 6, Feb. 3, March 3. Starts at 7 pm. $5. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. igniteonbroadway.org THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com (509-822-7938) OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com COMEDY NIGHT Comedy night returns with feature comedian Chelsea Tolle and headliner and musical improv talent Michael Glatzmaier. Hosted by Mark Morris. Jan. 17, 8-9:30 pm. $10. Brothers Bar, 111 W. Shaffer Ave. (509-258-8875)

COMMUNITY

COOL CAMP An extension of the City of Spokane Valley’s Parks and Recreation’s summer day camp program. Each day has a fun theme and inside/outside games and activities. Sign up for one or all days. Ages 6-11. Jan. 2-4 from 7:15 am5:45 pm. $35/day. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. spokanevalley.org/coolcamp (720-5200) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Ages 8+. Jan. 3, 4-5 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom St. scld.org (893-8250) WINTER BREAK CAMP: STORYTELLING FOR VIDEO GAMES! Learn the elements of different video game storylines and types, and how to develop characters. Come up with stories and a world for

your very own video game! Sign up online. For grades 4-7. Jan. 3, 10-11:30 am. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org (279-0299) CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING Boy Scouts Troop 400 is recycling natural Christmas trees in two locations of Spokane Valley: Central Valley and University High Schools. All proceeds support scout troop activities, service projects, supplies and more. Home pick-up available. Jan. 5-6, from 9 am-3 pm. $5/drop-off; $10/ pick-up. troop400.net/trees (927-6848) FIRST MONDAY NETWORK FOR SPOKANE ENTREPRENEURS A networking event on the first Monday of the month (5:30-7:15 pm), hosting sponsors and speakers who can help business owners and entrepreneurs take their business to the next level. $10. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. (208-640-1331) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Ages 8+. Jan. 8, 4-5 pm. Free. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. scld.org PROTECT YOUR CREDIT SCORE A good credit score is more important than ever. Learn how a credit score is determined, how to earn and maintain a healthy credit score, and where to go for help. Registration is required for all STCU workshops at stcu.org/workshops. Jan. 8, 6-7 pm. Free. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. stcu.org/workshops (509-893-8260) UNACCOMPANIED REFUGEE MINORS INFORMATION NIGHT An information night for anyone interested in becoming a foster family for refugee youth. LCSNW is looking for families who want to provide a loving and caring environment for these refugee youth coming to the U.S. Second Tuesday of the month, from 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Lutheran Community Services, 210 W. Sprague. lcsnw.org/program/foster-care/ (381-4945) CREATIVE STUDIO FOR VARIOUSLYABLED ADULTS People of all abilities are invited to gather for social interaction and the chance to explore creative interests on the second Wednesday of each month, from 10-11 am. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central. org (279-0299) LEVEL UP CREATIVITY Join Spark for daily activities to ignite your creativity, innovation and imagination with science, writing and art projects. Wednesdays at 3:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org SHOWING UP FOR RACIAL JUSTICE Join PJALS and members of the community to continue our work fighting white supremacy, supporting racial justice organizing led by people of color, and deepening our understanding of race locally. Meets second and fourth Thursday of the month, from 5:30-7 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. pjals.org DROP IN & RPG If you’ve ever been curious about role-playing games, join us to experience this unique form of game-playing, and build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination, and rich social interaction. Priority seating for age 17 or younger. Second and fourth Friday of the month, from 4-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org BEGINNING TAROT WORKSHOP Learn to do the Past-Present-Future spread even if you have never picked up a deck before! Meet people who are also in-

terested in tarot, and learn from an experienced reader. Jan. 12, 2-4 pm. $25. Rocket Bakery, 3315 N. Argonne Rd. misstilneytarot.com (509-462-2345) DROP IN & READ Read books from Spark’s collection to inspire your own stories, crafts and drawings. Participants may read at their own pace and then choose from writing, arts or crafts activities based on what they have read. Grades K-8. Second Saturday of the month, from 2:30-4 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. (279-0299) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 12, 10:30-11:30 am. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. scld.org (509-893-8340) DOLLARS & SENSE: NAVIGATING YOUR CREDIT Learn how to get free access to and understand your credit report in this workshop from SNAP Spokane. Explore ways to improve your score, establish good credit, and deal with collection agencies. Jan. 15, 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (509-893-8350) FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 15, 10:30-11:30 am & 4-5 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (509-893-8350) THE BIG CARBON FIX Dr. Steven Ghan is a world-renowned climate scientist, contributor to the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Fellow (retired). Dr. Ghan addresses common misconceptions about about climate change, including the human role and feasibility of solutions. With the help of local students he explores how we can move beyond these misconceptions towards viable actions. Jan. 16, 6-8 pm. Free. Sandpoint High School, 410 S. Division Ave. TheBigCarbonFix.org FORENSIC SCIENCE MYSTERIES Solve the mystery with forensic science techniques by testing strawberry DNA, analyzing fingerprints and creating different “blood” spatter patterns. Kids program; ages 8+. Jan. 16, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Medical Lake Library, 3212 Herb St. scld. org (893-8330) BUDGETING 101 Take control of your financial life with a budgeting plan that’s simple, reasonable, and effective. Registration is required for all STCU workshops at stcu.org/workshops. Jan. 17, 6-7 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. stcu.org/workshops THURSDAY NIGHT LIVE! The museum hosts a monthly, rotating mix of programs including music by local artists, happy hour, gallery talks, Art@Work exhibition openings, films, courses, lectures and more. Third Thursday of the month, from 6-9 pm. $5. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org/visit/thursday-night-live (363-5324)

FILM

BEAUTIFUL BOY Based on the bestselling pair of memoirs from father and son David and Nic Sheff, this film chronicles the heartbreaking and inspiring experience of survival, relapse, and recovery in a family coping with addiction over many years. Jan. 3-6. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S.

Main St. kenworthy.org/calendar WELCOME TO MARWEN From the director of Forrest Gump is this true story of a victim of a brutal attack victim, played by Steve Carell, who finds a unique and beautiful therapeutic outlet to help him through his recovery process. Rated PG13. Showing through Jan. 4; times vary. $5-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY The film chronicles the years leading up to Queen’s legendary appearance at Live Aid (1985), and the life of its extraordinary lead singer, Freddie Mercury (Rami Malek). PG-13. Showing Jan. 4-6; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida. org (208-255-7801) CRUNCHYROLL MOVIE NIGHT An exclusive sneak peek of the first episode of “Mob Psycho 100 II” (season two), before the episode airs in Japan. Jan. 5, 12:55 pm. $13. Regal Cinemas, 4750 N. Division. fathomevents.com (509-482-0209) BECOMING ASTRID A Swedish biopic about author Astrid Lindren, who faced many challenges as a young, single mother. Not rated. Showing Jan. 10-13; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) BOY ERASED The story of Jared, the son of a Baptist pastor in a small American town, who is outed to his parents at age 19. Jan. 10-13; times vary. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: THE GUILTY When police officer Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren) is demoted to desk work, he expects a sleepy beat as an emergency dispatcher. That all changes when he answers a panicked phone call from a kidnapped woman who then disconnects abruptly. Jan. 15, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127)

FOOD

SCOTCH & CIGARS Select a flight of whiskey, scotch or bourbon paired with a recommended cigar during an event on the outdoor patio. Thursdays, from 6-10 pm. $15-$25. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. facebook.com/Prohibition. Gastropub.Spokane1 (474-9040) THURSDAY WINE SOCIAL The weekly complimentary wine tasting event features different wine themes and samples of the shop’s gourmet goods. Thursdays, from 4-6 pm. Free. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. (208-762-1333) 49° NORTH ICE LOUNGE HAPPY HOUR Participants receive one free raffle ticket with every happy hour drink purchased, with two winners each week receiving a pair of 49° North lift tickets. Winners do not have to be present to claim their prize. Event for ages 21+; Sky Ribbon Cafe is open to all ages. Fridays from 5-8 pm through Feb. 22. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontpark (625-6600) SIP & SAMPLE The market’s weekly afternoon tasting, featuring 1-2 wines and something to munch on. Saturdays from noon-4 pm. Petunias Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison St. petuniasmarket.com SIP OF BEVERLY’S An introductory wine class and tasting event with Beverly’s Sommelier Trevor Treller. Interactive sessions include appetizers and featured wines at discounted bottle prices. First Saturday of the month, at 3 pm. Ages 21+. $25. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. beverlyscda.com (208-765-4000)

CHEF BATTLE SPOKANE Local chefs battle to create the best dish in one hour. General admission includes live entertainment, samples and voting ballots. Guests 21+ receive two sponsored drink tickets. VIP tickets receive reserved seating and four sponsored drink tickets. Partial proceeds benefit the Golden Rule Charity Special. Jan. 6, 1-5 pm. $40-$80. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. bit.ly/2SHF5Sf COMMUNITY COOKING CLASSES The Kitchen at Second Harvest provides nutrition information, scratch cooking skills, budgeting, and more. Free handson cooking classes in the kitchen teach low-income families how to prepare nutritious meals while making optimal use of their limited resources. See website for dates and times; typically meets Tue and Wed from 5:30-7 pm. Free. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org/classes-events SPOKANE CULINARY ARTS GUILD 1ST ANNUAL AWARDS GALA The first annual awards gala celebrates previous and current award winners for 2017 and 2018, respectively. Includes dinner, drinks, live music, keynote talks on issues affecting the local hospitality industry and the honoring award winners. Jan. 8, 6 pm. $99. Max at Mirabeau, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. spokaneculinaryartsguild.com FRIED CHICKEN & LOCAL BEER: 2ND ANNIVERSARY The monthly event from chef Adam Hegsted celebrates its second anniversary with brews from Post Falls Brewing Co. and a fried chicken dinner with all the fixins. $35. The Yards Bruncheon, 1248 W. Summit Pkwy. theyardsbruncheon.com (443-4410) HANDMADE PASTA: ORRECHIETTE Learn how to make infused pastas in this hands-on cooking class. Class culminates in a family-style meal inside the historic Estate’s main venue. Jan. 11, 6-9 pm. $50. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (509-466-0067) FOCACCIA: THE ANCIENT BREAD Focaccia is thought to have originated with the Etruscans or Ancient Greeks. The yeasted flatbread comes from the northern shores of the Mediterranean. This class offers a twist on this classical antiquity with balsamic caramelized onion and goat cheese. Jan. 17, 6-9 pm. $50. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (509-466-0667)

SPORTS

THURSDAY THEME NIGHT Come dressed to impress in themed attire for a $1 discount off admission; includes food specials, music and more. Thursdays, from 5-9 pm through Feb. 28. See link for theme night details. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontpark/calendar (625-6600) YOUTH WINTER ADVENTURE CAMP Kids (ages 9-12) learn to ski at Mt Spokane’s Selkirk Nordic Area and how to snowshoe at 49 Degrees North. Transportation, snowshoes, skiing equipment, trail passes and instruction provided. Jan. 3-4 from 9 am-4 pm. $69. Mountain Gear, 2002 N. Division. spokaneparks.org SNOWSHOE HEADLAMP HIKE WITH TRANSPORTATION Watch the glimmer of your headlamp illuminate the snowy trails as we hike through the quiet forest of Mt. Spokane. Snowshoes, guides, walking poles, headlamps and transportation (from Yoke’s in Mead) provided. Ages 15+. Jan. 4, Feb. 1 and March 1 from 6-9 pm. $23. spokaneparks.org

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess FOUL PAY

I went out with a feminist who was all into women’s empowerment, but when the bill came, she made no effort to chip in. Please explain this type of feminism. Is it somehow possible that she didn’t notice the check? —Incredulous It is possible that she didn’t notice the check. It’s also possible that she likes to take time off from complaining about paternalistic behaviors to sample the ones that work best for her. AMY ALKON While this appears to be a glaring example of selfserving selective feminism, research suggests there’s sometimes a more charitable explanation for absurdly contradictory beliefs and behavior. Though most people believe that there’s a single consistent you (or me) with stable beliefs and preferences, this actually seems to be an illusion. In fact, if there’s one thing that’s consistent about humans, it’s how inconsistent we all tend to be (and — it gets better — how consistent we are in vigorously denying that). Cognitive scientist Colin Martindale theorized back in 1980 that we have a number of “subselves” — sub-personalities with varying beliefs and priorities — that go active or sink into the background depending on the context at hand. In other words, whichever goal is front and center in your mind — like “Fight patriarchal oppression!” or “Take this totally adorbs patriarchal oppressor home to bed!” — drives how you think and behave. Research by neuroscientist Michael Gazzaniga suggests Martindale was right. Gazzaniga’s findings also led him to the conclusion that our mind has a janitor of sorts — a psychological one he calls “The Interpreter” — that tidies up in the wake of our inconsistencies by creating justifications for them. These, in turn, allow us to view ourselves as consistent and rational — instead of laughably hypocritical, like a feminist who, when the check comes, stares skyward, all “Wow! That is one of the most well-preserved examples of the early-’90s popcorn ceiling!” However, again, more charitably, everybody these days is confused about who’s supposed to pay on dates (and when and what it all means). For example, a woman will chip in on the first date because she earns a living, too! — or because the prospect of sex with the dude is akin to “Would madam enjoy her Caesar salad with a light dusting of E. coli?” To suss out where this woman is coming from, you need more information, and to get that, you’ll need further interaction — on the phone or, even better, in person. (Action reveals character.) Sure, she could be a hypocrite riding the patriarchal free dinner train — or maybe she finds it icky to split the check and figured she’d get the next one. It’s also possible she’ll reciprocate with a home-cooked meal — because you picked a place where the water alone costs $11 and she’s busy completing a dog walking internship while moonlighting as a freelance field hand.

KEEPING IT RIO

This girl I’ve been dating for two months is soon going to Brazil for three months! We aren’t officially committed, so it seems unfair to ask her to be monogamous. We plan to stay in touch, but I don’t want to hear about her with other dudes, and selfishly, I don’t want to stay home, all celibate like some war bride. —Realistic Or Cracked? It’s very considerate of you to suggest three months sexually off leash, as she is traveling to the ancestral homeland of male supermodels, where a chunk of the GNP is dependent on Carnival — a weeklong drinking, samba, and sex fest. The problem is jealousy, one of our guard dog emotions. Evolutionary psychologist David Buss explains that jealousy rises up automatically to help us fend off “potential mate poachers” and prevent a mate from “defecting.” Because it’s set on “auto,” it can be hard to override. That said, though you don’t have a committed relationship with this woman — let alone an “open” one — you might be able to make use of a psychological tactic of people in sexually open relationships. It’s called “compersion” — taking pleasure in your partner’s getting pleasure, even if it’s from some other, uh, provider. Granted, this is probably about as realistic for most people as their Ubering to a party via unicorn. However, it dovetails nicely with my fave quote about love, from sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein: “Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person is essential to your own.” Float the idea of planned cooperative ignorance, and ask her to think on it for a few days. (People often have more reasoned responses to hot-button issues when they aren’t expected to reply pronto.) Also, it doesn’t hurt that she’s the one wintering where stone-sober women are tempted to stop men on the street with “Excuse me, but would you mind if I licked black beans off your ridiculously chiseled abs?” n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSONS Learn the basics of cross-country skiing withcertified instructors.Includes skis, boots, poles, ski area fees, instruction and transportation (departs from Yoke’s in Mead, 14202 N. Market). Additional information emailed after registration. Ages 13+. Jan. 5, 6, 20 and Feb. 9, 23 and March 3 from 9 am-3 pm. $49. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokaneparks.org (755-2489) FREE ICE SKATING LESSONS Join experienced instructors for free beginning lessons every Saturday and Sunday from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Ages 5+. Come early to the Sky Ribbon Café to reserve your spot. Skates and helmets provided; open to 15 guests per 30 min. slot. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontpark/ calendar/ SNOWSHOE NEWMAN LAKE Learn the basics of snowshoeing on this beautiful conservation property along Newman Lake. This is a moderate 2-3 mile hike with an occasional steep hill. Transportation (from Albertsons, 8851 E. Trent), snowshoes, walking poles and guides provided. Ages 15+. Jan. 5, 10 am-1:30 pm. $25. spokaneparks.org (755-2489) SPOKANE HEALTH & FITNESS EXPO Get inspired to accomplish your New Year’s fitness resolutions at this expo showcasing fitness classes available in the area, including pilates, barre, yoga, jazzercise, climbing walls, aerial silks, ninja obstacles, disc golf and more. Jan. 5 from 10 am-6 pm and Jan. 6 from 10 am-4 pm. $5-$8. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanehealthfitexpo.com (509-477-1766) SNOWSHOE TOUR MT. SPOKANE Learn the basics of snowshoeing during a guided hike on snowshoe trails around Mt. Spokane. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation (from Yoke’s in Mead). Ages 13+. Jan. 6, 12 and 26; Feb. 23 and March 3, from 10 am-2 pm. $29. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokaneparks.org CHEAP SKATE MONDAY A weekly discount night at Riverfront’s Ice Ribbon. Pay full price skate admission and receive one free skate rental. Not valid with other discounts. Mondays from 5-9 pm through Feb. 25. $5-$7. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. (6256600) CROSS COUNTRY SKI FRATER LAKE Explore this glacial lake that’s part of the 8 lakes of the Pend Oreille Lake Chain. Attendees should have basic cross country skiing skills. Fee includes staff, roundtrip transportation, equipment if needed, and ski area fees. Bring your own lunch and water. Location subject to change due to snow conditions. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Ages 18+. Jan. 12, 9 am-4 pm. $45. Mountain Gear, 2002 N. Division. spokaneparks.org WINTER SURVIVAL OPEN HOUSE Partake in activities to look at animals’ unique adaptations that help them to survive in the cold. Also includes a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new iguana enclosures and treats for sale. Jan. 12, 10 am-2 pm. $5 suggested donation. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. (340-1028) WINTERFEST Spokane Nordic’s Winterfest features activities for all ages

and levels of cross-country skiers, including the return of discounted beginner and intermediate lessons and free lunch for all. Jan. 13, 8:30 am-4 pm. Free to $25. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org

THEATER

FOLLIES The time is 1971, and theatrical impresario Dimitri Weissmann hosts a reunion of ex-Follies performers in his crumbling theatre, setting the stage for a parade of brilliant pastiche numbers. Jan. 4-5 at 7:30 pm, Jan. 6 at 2 pm. $25-$32. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) LIVING VOICES: OUR REVOLUTION The story of one of many common citizens who fought to bring the words “All men are created equal” to life, words with even greater meaning to an African American soldier in 1776. This moving live performance is visually supported by a video presentation of historic document and depictions. Jan. 11, 7 pm. $5-$15. Heartwood Center, 615 S. Oak St. artsinsandpoint.org (208263-8699) MET LIVE IN HD: ADRIANA LECOUVREUR For the first time at the Met, Anna Netrebko sings the title role of Adriana Lecouvreur, the great 18th-century actress in love with the military hero Maurizio, sung by Piotr Beczała. Jan. 12 at 9:45 am and Jan. 14 at 6:30 pm. $15$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org/calendar/adriana

VISUAL ARTS

CUP OF JOY The studio’s fourth annual group invitational of drinking vessels: cup, mug, yunomi, sake, stein, goblet, functional or non-functional. More than 30 invited artists exhibit up to four cup forms. Through 7-Jan 18; Tue-Fri 10 am-2 pm and by appt. Trackside Studio, 115 S. Adams. tracksidestudio.net (8639904) EUROPEAN PRINTS FROM THE AGE OF AUGUSTE RODIN In conjunction with the exhibition “Rodin: Truth Form Life / Selections from the Cantor Collections,” the Jundt hosts a display of European prints featuring works drawn entirely from the permanent collection of the museum which highlight images created in Europe during the last decades of the 19th century and the first two decades of the 20th century, corresponding to the era of Rodin’s own artistic production. Through Jan. 5; Mon-Sat 10 am-4 pm. Free. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet. (313-6843) THE INLAND NORTHWEST & THE GREAT WAR: A CENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION OF WWI While the war was a global conflict, it impacted communities across the U.S., including Spokane. Thousands of residents played an important part in the war effort at home and abroad, and it affected daily life for everyone in the Inland Northwest. The exhibit features artifacts and photographs from the MAC’s collection as well as special programs to mark the centennial of The Armistice. Through Jan. 27; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; third Thu until 8 pm. $5-$10 admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) LA RESISTANCE HOLIDAY SHOW An art show featuring local works all under

$100. Artists include Brian Deemy, Megan Holden, Isaac Denton, Lisa Durham, Jason Bagge, Joseph Tomlinson, Melanie Lieb Taylor and more. Through Jan. 19; Wed-Sat noon-6 pm. Total Trash Records & Vintage, 1601 W. Pacific. bit. ly/2B8qFEG (509-217-8672) MODERN MASTERS: GROUP F/64 Nearly 50 works from five of Group f/64’s members, now known as some of the most influential artists of the twentieth century: Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Willard Van Dyke, Brett Weston and Edward Weston. Photographs are from the Bank of America Collection. Through Feb. 3; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; until 8 pm third Thu. $5-$10/ admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) MOSCOW FIRST THURSDAY The city of Moscow’s monthly community arts celebration, featuring art displays around the downtown area, live music and more. Monthly on the first Thursday, from 5-8 pm. Details at facebook.com/ moscowfirsthursday RODIN: TRUTH FORM LIFE Presenting 22 of Auguste Rodin’s important bronzes modeled between 1860 and 1910, plus three bronzes by Rodin in the permanent collection of the Jundt Art Museum. The display highlights images created in Europe during the last decades of the 19th century and the first two decades of the 20th century, corresponding to the era of Rodin’s own artistic production. Through Jan. 5; Mon-Sat 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet Ave. (313-6843) RYAN! FEDDERSEN: PHANTOM LANDS Through interactivity, scale, and intimacy, Feddersen forms connections between U/S. history, her Okanogan heritage, and current events to ignite conversations on place, use of space, and our relationship to the environment. This exhibition features recent works in a variety of scales and mediums that focus on resistance and resilience in the face of development, displacement, and destruction. Through Jan. 20; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; until 8 pm third Thu. $5-$10. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. (456-3931) WHITWORTH FACULTY EXHIBIT The Whitworth Art Department and the Bryan Oliver Gallery present an exhibit of current work from our faculty. Through Jan. 25; Mon-Fri 10 am-5 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm. Free admission. Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. whitworth.edu/Academic/ Department/Art/OliverGallery/ (7773258) ARTS BUZZ A time to learn what arts and culture-related activities are in the works for the Coeur d’Alene area. Held on the first Friday of each month, at 9 am, in the chamber’s conference room. Coeur d’Alene Chamber of Commerce, 1031 N. Academic Way. artsincda.org (208-664-3194) FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Jan. 5, from 5-8 pm. Free. Additional details at firstfridayspokane.org. REMELISA CULLITAN-STILLINGER AND JESSICA EARLE: January brings two new exhibitions to SAP: “A Life of Rice and Bread,” a visual bi-racial narrative by Remelisa Cullitan-Stillinger,


along with a mixed media interactive installation, “They Could Begin To Thrive Again,” by invited artist, Jessica Earle. Jan. 4-26; open Thu-Sat. Opening reception Jan. 4, 508 pm; Remelisa CullitanStillinger’s “Ask Me Anything Session,” Jan 26, 4-8 pm. Free. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main Ave. saranacartprojects. org RURAL ALLIANCE MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW This annual exhibit showcases the best paintings, drawings, pottery, collage and sculpture created by 60 local middle and high school students from schools in Colfax, Garfield-Palouse, Oakesdale, Rosalia, and St. John-Endicott. Jan. 5-11. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (397-4366)

DROP IN & DRAW Beginning or experienced drawers, painters, crafters and artists of all ages can explore mediums, develop skill and cultivate imaginative thinking. Supplies and projects provided. Hosted by children’s book illustrator Pierr Morgan and retired art teacher Nita Hill. Wednesdays from 4:30-6 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org

WORDS

DIVERSE VOICES WRITING GROUP A writing group for all experience levels that supports and elevates diverse voices. This program is free thanks to community support. Join us for Diverse Voic-

es on the first Thursday of each month at 5:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org FABULOUS ENGLISH GARDENS Local garden columnist, author and blogger Susan Mulvihill recently led a tour of some of the best gardens in England, as well as a visit to the Chelsea Flower Show. Join Susan as she shares the high points of the trip, which included Sissinghurst Castle Garden, Great Dixter, Hidcote, Waterperry Gardens, Nymans, Wisley Gardens, Penshurst Place and Kew Gardens, among others. Jan. 3, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. tieg. org (509-535-8434) BOOTSLAM Spokane Poetry Slam’s all-

ages performance poetry competition with a $50 grand prize. First Sunday of the month; sign-ups at 7, slam at 7:30 pm. Poets have three minutes to read their work and are scored by five random audience members. Also includes the generative “new sh&t” writing workshop from 5:30-6:30. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (509-703-7223) POETRY AT THE PODIUM INAUGURAL READING Hear to Spokane Poet Laureate Mark Anderson read for the first Poetry at the Podium event, a new weekly series featuring local poets each week (application required). Stay to learn about important Spokane City Council matters for 2019. Jan. 7, 6-7 pm. Free.

Spokane City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org (509-755-2489) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM Spoken word warriors battle for Inland Empire supremacy, and a $50 grand prize. Each poem is judged by five audience members, and after two rounds of poetry, the poet with the highest cumulative score is declared winner. Doors open at 7 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. spokanepoetryslam.org BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam. org (509-847-1234) n

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Is your green thumb going to waste?

OLYMPIA

Home-Grown Politics Efforts continue to allow people to cultivate their own weed BY TUCK CLARRY

W

ashington is the only state that has legalized recreational pot yet maintained prohibitions against of-age citizens owning their own plants. Over the last couple of years, advocates have pushed reforms in Olympia to change that, to no avail. The most recent attempt by home-grow advocates had two separate bills with similar language go to each chamber of the Legislature. Ultimately each version of the bill failed in its respective chamber because, seem-

ingly, legislators were either uncomfortable with the prospect of federal intervention or preconceived fears akin to reefer madness or, simply, they don’t like the idea of citizen-owned plants undercutting tax revenues generated by the legal marketplace. It’s believed that legal home grows would cut 4 percent to 6 percent of the market share if legalized. The push for 2019 legislation has already begun, with email chains from activists asking for interested par-

ties to begin contacting legislators to sponsor a new bill in the coming year. The bill language retains many of the goals of previous iterations, with the ultimate hope for citizens to be able to own six plants. Advocacy groups are looking for those interested to speak to their representatives and implore them to help find sponsorship for the bill. The difficulty in changing the language of I-502 comes with the pains of being one of the first states to take action on legalization. Activists and legislators were unsure of how far was too far for voters to quickly bail on the idea of helping make recreational cannabis legal. “Back in 2012, we were careful not to overreach on the issue of legalizing marijuana,” travel writer and National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws board member Rick Steves wrote in an appeal for home cultivation. “Polling also indicates that our populace is now comfortable with allowing personal cultivation of marijuana, with reasonable parameters as set by the state legislature, to be legal as well.” n

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law. 50 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019


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ACROSS 1. L.L. Bean competitor 6. Woman’s name meaning “princess” 11. Diet of Jack Sprat’s wife 14. “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” playwright 15. “The Lord is my shepherd ...,” e.g. 16. Lament 17. “Mr. Supreme Court justice, sit on a corner of a Monopoly board with all your weight!” 19. Tony winner Hagen 20. Prefix with space 21. It’s ripped off at the movies 22. “Pa! That Supreme Court justice pulled the trigger on your wife!” 28. Like salon customers 29. Making a mess of 30. Actress Perlman of “Cheers”

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31. HBO series that won 2018 Emmys for Lead Actor and Supporting Actor 33. Accusation from a justice to a lawyer, perhaps ... or what can be said to 17-, 22-, 48- and 54-Across? 40. “Be ____ ...” (“Help me out ...”) 41. Has a bug 42. Hold back 46. “Meet the Press” guest, maybe 48. “Ms. Supreme Court justice, don’t forget about city chiefs, as well!” 51. Congress, with “the” 52. Grammy-winning singer India.____ 53. Three-time Frazier foe 54. “Mr. Supreme Court justice, give your sphere a break!”

61. Write 62. First in a line of Russian autocrats 63. TWA competitor 64. Printemps follower 65. Washtub 66. Italian city known for its prosciutto and cheese DOWN 1. Month with two natl. holidays 2. The Cavaliers, on scoreboards 3. Stat for A-Rod or Hammerin’ Hank 4. Prey for a barracuda 5. Clichéd company slogan 6. Reject, as a lover 7. Org. 8. Root word? 9. “Solve for x” subj.

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10. Grp. with a co-pay 11. Tutti-____ 12. Fall 13. It gets in hot water 18. English horn, e.g. 21. Male delivery 22. Small salmon 23. In ____ of

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Must be at least 62 years of age. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank,Estate N.A. © Contents 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights BUYING / reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS581479 3/11-6/11 Household Goods

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ANSWERS O 35. 2004-11 Lakers N forward Lamar I SAW YOUS 36 37 38 39 ____ 41 36. Many a one-star Yelp review 46 47 37. Singer with the 4x platinum album “No Angel” 50 38. Italian novelist Vittorini 39. Alphabet trio 42. What a slalom path has 57 58 59 60 43. ____ training 44. Squaring (with) 63 45. It’s nothing 46. “Je vous en ____” (“You’re 66 welcome”: French) “OUT OF ORDER” 47. Depletes 49. One-named New Ager 50. Politico Hatch 24. A long way off 54. Schooner sail 25. Swashbuckling Flynn 55. Inventory at a fertility clinic 26. Explore, as the Internet 56. Gives birth to 27. “____ Silver, away!” 57. Org. with millimeter wave scanners 28. Get blubbery 58. Rower’s blade 31. “____ sera” 59. Place for salt on a margarita glass 32. Georgia’s capital: Abbr. 60. Word after sports or training 34. “I could ____ horse!”

JANUARY 3, 2019 INLANDER 53


COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

Stay active at Silver Mountain

Resolve to Rev Up Your Activity Level Easy and fun ways to incorporate fitness into your 2019 routine

F

or many people, the new year offers an opportunity to reflect on the status quo and search for ways to improve, especially in the area of personal fitness. “My advice to anyone come the new year who is trying to start a healthy routine would be to, at first, try to get moving every day in some way,” says Tonya Taft, a longtime fitness instructor and personal trainer at the Salvation Army Kroc Center. Fortunately, the region is rife with ways to add a workout routine into your daily habit, both indoors and out. “Even when the weather is a little chilly, I quite enjoy bundling up and going for a hike or snowshoe,” says Taft, who also likes cross-country skiing during the winter. Rent the necessary equipment at VERTICAL EARTH at 1323 E. Sherman and find places to do all three activities using IDAHO PARKS AND RECREATION’S detailed website (parksandrecreation.

54 INLANDER JANUARY 3, 2019

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

idaho.gov). “It’s always a good idea to have a friend to work out with to hold you accountable,” says Taft. Get the whole family involved or get together with friends at SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT in Kellogg or SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN in Sandpoint for fitness with a healthy dose of fun. If you’re ready to find new ways to have fun on skis, sign up for NACHTSPEKTAKEL on Jan. 4 at Silver Mountain. Translated from German, nachtspektakel means “night spectacular.” It’s a traditional European ski event that builds bonds through the sport of ski touring. Event tickets are only $25 and include the night tour, drinks and snacks at the Kellogg Peak Fire Lookout. Working out doesn’t have to be an outdoor activity; Coeur d’Alene has plenty of places where you can get moving indoors, too, including several right downtown. CROSSFIT is for athletes of all ages and levels, while PEAK


HEALTH AND WELLNESS has three facilities — Post Falls, Hayden and Coeur d’Alene — and amenities ranging from group cycling and tennis to hot yoga. And with its climbing wall, indoor pool, fitness center, basketball and pickleball courts, and numerous classes, the KROC CENTER offers something for everyone. Working out indoors in a structured environment can be very helpful in maintaining a fitness routine, says Taft, who enjoys yoga Pilates, strength-training classes and cycling indoors. “It adds a great way to be social and helps to motivate you when you’re not feeling so motivated.”

C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events Scenic Hot Cocoa Cruise JANUARY 4-6

Enjoy the splendor of winter on the lake with a hot

F R I D AY S & S AT U R D AY S , J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 9

cup of cocoa in hand. This 90-minute lake cruise features a deluxe cocoa bar, a cozy corner for fun photos and exceptional views. Tickets $15 adults, $10 kids ages 6-12; 11:30 am and 1:30 pm. Go to visitcda.org

Ignite Memories that Last a Lifetime

for tickets.

Military/EMS/Police Days JANUARY 7-10

This January, Silver Mountain wants to celebrate those who serve our local communities with $29 lift tickets to firefighters, EMS, police, active military servicemembers and veterans. Lift tickets can be pre-purchased online, and then present your ID to prove your eligibility when you pick it up.

Packages Starting at

179*

$

Bask in the sheer delight of infinity pool turned hot tub relaxation, frosted views of Lake Coeur d’Alene, and toasty warming fires. Hot Winter Nights is complete with indoor lounge, multiple bars with winter-themed cocktails, snacks, and desserts. Package includes overnight accommodations, two passes to the infinity pool turned giant hot tub and warming lounge. FAMILIES ENJOY THE HOT TUB FROM 4 - 8PM | 21+ FROM 8 - 10PM

Mac & Cheese Festival JANUARY 19

*Based on availability. Certain restrictions may apply. Additional Resort Guest pool passes available for $10 or $5 for 18 and under.

Get your tickets to this delicious celebration of America’s favorite comfort food before they sell out! Regional chefs will compete for the Golden Noodle Award, and we all win when we get to taste their entrees. The Mac Pack ($20) features six tasters, but we recommend the Mac & Beer packages ($30) which include two pints of beer.

For more events, things to do & places to stay, go to VisitCDA.org

COEUR D’ALENE

844.255.1273 cdaresort.com SPONSORED BY THE COEUR D’ALENE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

JANUARY AUGUST 24, 3, 2019 2017 INLANDER 55


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