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Local Instagrammers' DIY Designs 22

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Prescribing Nature SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

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Gluten-Free Finds

Family 48

Chasing Butterflies


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Inside

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ON THE COVER: Erick Doxey Photo

Etc.

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PG. 8

SUMMER ADVENTURES • DRAGONS AND MERMAIDS • HOMEGROWN SWEET TREATS

Home

PG. 22

BACK TO OUR ROOTS • ADDING FUEL HERBICIDAL HERITAGE • ASSESSING LECTINS

Food

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DELIGHTFUL DIY • INSIDE OUT BUSINESS IS BLOOMING

SPECTACULAR SALMON • SPICE UP THE GRILL GLUTEN-FREE AND EASY

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SAVING THE BUGS • HOWDY! THOUGHTS COUNT

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HEALTHY OUTLOOK: TONI LODGE

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FROM THE EDITOR SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO also at inlander.com/health&home

Stay Connected Email Health & Home Editor Anne McGregor at annem@inlander.com. The conversation continues on the Inlander Facebook page, and stay in touch with us at Inlander.com/Health&Home.

1227 W. Summit Parkway, Spokane, Wash. 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634

EDITOR Anne McGregor

annem@inlander.com

MANAGING EDITOR Jacob H. Fries ART DIRECTOR Ali Blackwood

Paint, Parks and Plants BY ANNE McGREGOR

I

admit to a strong desire to at least attempt almost any project around my house. I’ve painted all variety of surfaces, rearranged and repurposed rooms (usually on a whim late at night), added moldings and removed wallpaper. But even in my most ambitious moments, I could never have imagined the creative projects the local Instagrammers featured in our cover story (p. 22) have undertaken. From crafting a custom built-in, to a low-budget bathroom makeover, to a whole-house transformation with paint, these resourceful women take the job of making a home to a whole new level. Everyone has gone to the doctor and received orders for a particular medication, but I’m willing to bet few of us have received a prescription to spend time outdoors. In his Health story (p. 10), Wilson Criscione takes a look at emerging research that suggests doctors should consider writing detailed “parkscriptions” to help address some of the most urgent health problems patients are facing — things like hypertension, anxiety and depression. And you won’t want to miss Jacob Jones’ story (p.48) about chasing butterflies. Or, more accurately, making sure there’ll be butterflies for your grandkids to chase. Learn about the small things you can do around your home to help our little six-legged friends. Cheers!

EVENTS EDITOR Chey Scott CONTRIBUTORS Stacey Aggarwal, Mandy Braviroff, Erick Doxey, Jackson Elliott, Jonathan Hill, Jacob Jones, Young Kwak, Robert Maurer, Dan Nailen, Carrie Scozzaro, Matt Thompson, John R. White, Quinn Welsch, Samantha Wohlfeil PRODUCTION MANAGER Wayne Hunt ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kristi Gotzian MARKETING DIRECTOR Kristina Smith ADVERTISING SALES Autumn Adrian, Mary Bookey, Jeanne Inman, Rich McMahon, Claire Price, Carolyn Padgham-Walker, Wanda Tashoff, Emily Walden SALES COORDINATION Camille Awbrey DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Derrick King, Tom Stover, Rachael Skipper DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Justin Hynes

CONTRIBUTORS

BUSINESS MANAGER Dee Ann Cook CREDIT MANAGER Kristin Wagner PUBLISHER Ted S. McGregor Jr. GENERAL MANAGER Jeremy McGregor

CHEY SCOTT is the food and listings editor for the Inlander, and has been on staff since 2012. Besides writing about some of her favorite local Instagrammers in this issue, Chey enjoys covering the region’s amazing culinary scene, nerd culture and the arts. She was born and raised in the Inland Northwest and graduated from WSU. Go Cougs!

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WILSON CRISCIONE is an Inlander staff writer, reporting on schools and social services for the Inlander, and a lifelong Spokane native. For this issue’s “Back to Our Roots,” he enjoyed learning that going out in nature is not only good for the soul — it’s also doctor recommended.

Health & Home is published every other month and is available free at more than 500 locations across the Inland Northwest. One copy free per reader. Subscriptions are available at $2.50 per issue: call x213. Reaching Us: Editorial: x261; Circulation: x226; Advertising: x215. COPYRIGHT All contents copyrighted © Inland Publications, Inc. 2019. Health & Home is locally owned and has been published since 2004.

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Summer Adventures BY CHEY SCOTT Spokane in Bloom Garden Tour

Get inspired to garden, landscape and spend more time in your own backyard this summer while touring the stunning local gardens featured this year during the Inland Empire Gardeners’ annual garden tour. This year’s theme for the self-guided tour is “Adventure Awaits!,” featuring 10 gardens at private residences across Spokane’s South Hill. Tickets can be purchased in advance at several garden-related retailers, or the day of at designated gardens. Sat, June 15 from 10 am-5 pm. $15. Locations throughout South Spokane. Details and map at tieg.org. Summer Parkways This annual summer season kickoff invites families and residents of all ages to head out for an evening walk or ride along a designated four-mile, car-free route that passes by both Manito and Comstock parks. In 2019, Summer Parkways turns 10, celebrating a decade of encouraging locals to get outside and bike, walk, skate or otherwise move through the neighborhood. Making stops along the way is encouraged, as both parks are hosting plenty of physical activities such as pilates, yoga, tai chi, martial arts and more. Thu, June 20 from 6-9 pm. Free; all-ages. Spokane’s South Hill; Manito and Comstock Parks. Details and event map at summerparkways.com. Camp Dart-Lo Kids’ Off-Road Triathlon Aspiring triathletes of any age can get their first taste of a three-part race at this annual event hosted by Camp Fire’s Camp Dart-Lo in North Spokane. The fifth annual event challenges kids to complete a lap swim in the outdoor pool — flotation devices are welcome, and kids can pick how far they want to swim based on their swimming skill level — followed by a one-mile bike ride on a gravel road and a 3/4-mile trail run. Register by July 10 to make sure your kids get a finisher T-shirt and medal, and a spot on the race roster. Thu, July 18 from 6-8 pm. $25-$30. Camp Dart-Lo, 14000 N. Dartford Dr. campfireinc.org (747-6191) Crave! Northwest One of the region’s biggest summer food festivals is returning for its third year. Crave! is a three-day celebration of the region’s ever-expanding culinary prowess, featuring some of the area’s best chefs, as well as notable guest chefs from around the U.S. and Pacific Northwest, along with craft beer, wine and cocktails. Daily highlights of the 2019 event include the Seafood Bash (July 11), Fire ‘n’ Smoke tasting (July 12), Foods from Around the World (July 13) and the Grand Tasting (July 13) to close things out. Find ticket packages for one, more or all events online. July 11-13, times vary. $35-$530. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr., Spokane Valley. cravenw.com (621-0125)

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Dragons and Mermaids Arrive

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life-size unicorn looks at once solid and mysterious under flickering purple light. It’s just one part of a reunion of mythical creatures — dragons, krakens, mermaids and giants — gathering at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture this summer. GIANTS, DRAGONS & UNICORNS: THE WORLD OF MYTHIC CREATURES, an exhibit from New York’s American Museum of Natural History, endeavors to illuminate, through models, paintings, textiles and other exhibits, the ways nature has inspired people all over the world to create mythical creatures. It lands at the MAC July 5. “I love the ‘dragons’ section myself,” says MAC Director Wes Jessup. “It’s interesting how some of these creatures have transcended cultures, they speak to people everywhere.” Although the creatures on display arise from cultures all around the world, they show astonishing similarities. Eskimos and European sailors both made statues of women with fish tails. Dragons pervade the mythology of Europe,

Asia and the Americas. A highlight of the exhibit is a 17-foot dragon model that flies overhead, watching visitors with furtive malice beaming from its eyes. A kraken rises from the floor, while mermaids frolic in the waves. Although the exhibit does offer connections to reality — a tentacle from a real giant squid is displayed near the mythical kraken it probably inspired — the exhibit is more about considering connections. “A lot of kids read about [mythical creatures] in school and at home,” Jessup says. “There’s opportunities for kids to connect in a visual way and even in a tactile way to some of these creatures.” — JACKSON ELLIOTT Giants, Dragons & Unicorns: The World of Mythic Creatures runs July 5-December 31 at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, 2316 W. 1st Ave. $10; $8 for seniors and college students; $5 for children 6-17; and free for kids under age 6. www.northwestmuseum.org

FRUIT FIND

Homegrown Sweet Treats

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ne can be forgiven for jumping straight to the third and final section of Tara Austen Weaver’s GROWING BERRIES AND FRUIT TREES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. That’s where you find an eye-catching, salivation-inducing selection of recipes and photos of jams, fruit caramels, crisps, cakes and crumbles. Let’s face it, while some of us enjoy the entire process of growing and tending to fruit trees and berry bushes, a lot of us are mostly interested in the end product, and not just the raw raspberry or apple. We want the berries inside a tasty muffin, or the apples intermingling in a pie (yes, I will have ice cream with that!). Weaver’s book, though, makes pre-eating stages of fruits and berries seem just as appealing thanks to her breezy, highly readable way with words and expertise as both a master gardener and creative cook. The Seattle-based author covers the best time of year for planting a wide array of berries and fruits, and which ones will thrive in the eastern part of the state versus west of the Cascades. Whether discussing blueberries or pears, or more exotic efforts like kiwi berries and quinces, Weaver tackles plant maintenance, pest and disease prevention, harvesting and preserving. Which of course leads us to that delectable final section, where in addition to baked goods Weaver displays recipes for sauces, drinks and fruit leather as well. All of it is illustrated with stunning photographs, making this the kind of book you’ll keep for a lifetime — for yourself or a special green thumb in your life. — DAN NAILEN JUNE - JULY 2019

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ALI BLACKWOOD PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

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Back to Our Roots “Nature prescriptions” could be the next health revolution — and Washington state is an early adopter BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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r. Robert Zarr steps into the patient room and sees a teenage girl. Lately, the 17-year-old has been experiencing repeated panic attacks, giving her so much chest pain that she had to be rushed to the emergency room each time. She’s looking for answers from Dr. Zarr. Instead, it’s Zarr who asks a question. “Do you have a way to spend time outside?” he says. “Well, there’s this hammock at my dad’s house,” she replies. “What about lying there for a while, and just noticing the leaves?” Zarr suggests. The girl says she could do that. So Zarr writes out the prescription: Once a week, on Wednesdays after school, the 17-year-

old is to lie on the hammock and look up at the trees, listen to the wind and feel nature around her. By her next visit, everything has changed. She isn’t going to the ER anymore for panic attacks. Her anxiety is down. She feels confident. These so-called “nature prescriptions” are becoming a new trend in medicine. While it’s not a revolutionary idea for doctors to tell patients to spend time outside, there’s a national movement for a more deliberate, intentional way for doctors to prescribe patients to spend time in nature, much like they would for a drug. The prescriptions include a place, an activity, a frequency and a dose. And as society becomes more glued to their screens, these prescriptions may be more important than ever. ...continued on next page

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Manito Park offers a group of students a natural respite on a spring afternoon. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“BACK TO OUR ROOTS,” CONTINUED... Zarr, a Washington, D.C., pediatrician, is the founder and medical director of Park Rx America, a nonprofit that makes it easier for doctors to prescribe nature. Essentially, Park Rx codifies the concept and creates a universal way for doctors to find a local park, prescribe it, and document in their chart in a way that’s clinically relevant, Zarr says.

“Anybody can do this, anywhere in the country, as long as you have access to nature,” Zarr says.

A

s an outdoor enthusiast in Bellingham, Wash, Greg Anderson was as good a candidate as any to start issuing nature prescriptions. Anderson, a family medicine doctor, said he’s known

ever since medical school that prescriptions for exercise were effective. But up until a few years ago, he hadn’t ordered many specific nature prescriptions. That changed when Anderson became part of a pilot from an entity called Recreation Northwest — modeled after Zarr’s Park Rx America. Anderson was encouraged to incorporate nature prescriptions

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(he calls them “parkscriptions”) into his with screen time. Our brains are evolutionpractice. arily adapted to nature, Anderson notes, It’s extremely simple to order a nature and when you remove yourself from nature prescription. Park Rx provides an online then that can cause a cascade of side effects. map of local parks, and the provider can You can manage it through pills, supchoose whichever one they think would fit plements or other substitutes. “Or you can the patient. They click “prescribe,” and the go out in nature and get them naturally,” provider puts in the activity, frequency and Anderson says. duration. They can print the prescription arr knows some doctors are skeptior have it sent to the patient via text or cal of nature prescriptions. During email. speaking events, he often hears the Anderson says he writes them for a same questions: What if a patient doesn’t variety of things: heart disease, depression, want to go outside? What happens in the anxiety, obesity and many other health issues. Some really take it to heart, he says. “If you catch somebody in the right state of motivation, then it clicks with them during that visit and they take that prescription and run with it,” Anderson says. It should be of little surprise that the Evergreen State has been an enthusiastic adopter of nature prescriptions. In April, the state parks system announced the launch of its Park Rx program, offering a series of outdoor activities to encourage people to get outdoors for their health. The 470 combined city, county PUD and state parks in Washington participating in Park Rx contribute to the more than 8,500 parks participating nationwide. “We’re very excited to work with Park Rx America to bring a great tool to healthwinter? Aren’t there more important ways care providers across Washington,” says for doctors to spend time with patients? state parks director Don Hoch. Where’s the science for this? The state Department of Veterans’ “You could think of a thousand reasons Affairs is also a partner in the initiative. why not to do this,” Zarr says. “My job is to “Whether it’s taking a hike, camping navigate through those excuses.” for the weekend or fishing, our natural Most of the excuses are “lousy,” he resources have the power to help veterans says. There are ways to enjoy bad weather, heal,” says Alfie Alvarado, state department and he argues it’s not hard for a medical of veterans affairs director. professional to find a way around that. On As Anderson says, there’s nothing new the flip side, he says prescribing a certain here. What’s new is the emphasis on it. Y R E EV E REE Y Fdo of time in a park — even if it’s as Part of that, Anderson admits, has to DAY A FRRESamount THURS HURSD U -

Z

simple as sitting on a park bench — can be more effective than a provider vaguely telling a patient to eat better, or to exercise more. And then there’s the argument that nature prescriptions aren’t evidence-based. Zarr calls the argument “flimsy.” For one, he says nature and park prescriptions don’t require heavy evidence before a doctor should be OK with prescribing it. It’s not like spending time in nature is risky. “What we know is that you’re likely to move when outside,” Zarr says. “What are the risks of walking in the morning?”

Anybody can do this, anywhere

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in the country, as long as you have access to nature. Still, Zarr points to research showing walks in nature are associated with reduced stress and lower levels of depression, that access to parks reduces the risk of being overweight and obese, and that spending time in “green spaces” lowers cortisol levels and blood pressure. And yes, Zarr is a co-principal investigator on an upcoming randomized controlled trial looking at how park prescriptions can affect obesity, ADHD, diabetes, and other ...continued on next page

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health problems. But for anyone holding off on park prescriptions in the meantime, Zarr says that’s a little hypocritical. Not everything in medicine is evidence-based, and he says he won’t wait five years to make prescriptions for nature because he’s “afraid of common sense. “It’s like saying, ‘I’m not going to eat vegetables until you prove to me, with a randomized controlled trial, that it will cure my disease,’” Zarr says. Anderson says the pushback he often hears has to do with time. Providers only have a limited amount of time during an office visit, and even if it takes just a few minutes to talk about nature, that can be about 15 percent of the office visit. Kathleen Wolf, a research social scientist at the University of Washington, says there’s value to more research on nature prescriptions. Two decades of research has shown that time in nature is good for you, for a variety of reasons. But more evidence is important, she says, because it can teach us about things like dosage — how to optimize the benefit of going outside. The University of Washington has launched a study, with a $1 million grant from REI, to answer many of those questions.

Wolf says two decades ago, she was called a “tree hugger” for being interested in those questions. That has started to change. “I think we’re seeing greater attention to the importance of being in nature,” she says.

I

magine going back hundreds of years in the past, before computers, before heating or air conditioning, before our lives were lived primarily indoors, and telling the humans of that time that in the future, doctors would be prescribing time outside. Zarr says he thinks about that all the time. “This is a crazy world we live in,” Zarr says. “You’ve got to adapt. We’re at a point where people are living a sad, depressed existence. You get up in the morning, eat breakfast, go to work, pick up your kid from school, run home, make dinner, go to bed, and do it all over again the next day.” It makes it that much more crucial that people remind themselves of nature, he says. Along the same lines as park prescriptions, Zarr encourages people to engage in what’s called “forest therapy,” or the practice of spending time in a forested area


for the purpose of enhancing your health. It can be as simple as going to a tree, and jumping around from root to root, losing yourself in a liminal state. Not that he won’t prescribe ritalin for ADD, but he says it’s unwise to ignore a “free and accessible therapy called nature therapy, going outdoors.” To date, Park Rx America has around 200 registered “prescribers” across the country. Anderson, the Bellingham doctor, says for this to really take off, it has to be a community effort. It has to be a part of the culture, including city leaders, and the local parks department to ensure safe access to green areas. Too often, municipal budgets will ignore those things as nonessential, Wolf

CHECK THE RESEARCH

•• A study, published in the journal Environmental Health and Preventative Medicine, found forest environments decrease sympathetic nervous system activity. Looking at forest landscapes also led to lower concentrations of cortisol, lower pulse rate and lower blood pressure. •• A study published in Environmental Science & Technology found that moving from urban to greener areas is linked to improved mental health. •• A 2010 study published in Social Science & Medicine looked at the relationship of physical activity and the accessibility of green spaces. It found that those living farther from green spaces were less likely to meet physical activity goals and more likely to be overweight or obese. •• Proximity to parks and recreational programs is estimated to cause weight decreases among children, according to a paper published in Health & Place. — WILSON CRISCIONE

says. But more research and evidence have helped combat that as well. “Now there’s a recognition of a need to invest in nature because the potential return on investment is huge,” Wolf says. Anderson thinks nature prescriptions are an important part of the future. Eventually, he says he could envision it becoming so ingrained in the culture, that the providers who aren’t prescribing nature will feel left behind. “My hope,” Anderson says, “is that we are at a tipping point.”

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Children with hearing impairments worked with artists to create these birds, as part of Fitting Together Art. PHOTOS COURTESY OF FITTING TOGETHER ART

Adding Fuel Fitting Together Art empowers children with disabilities BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

J

ennifer Lunzer never felt like she fit in at school. “Art was my safe place where I was good at something and did not have to feel embarrassed about my work,” says Lunzer, who has dyslexia. “And growing up dyslexic, no one told me to set my sights high.” Now as an artist and also the owner of a successful small business, Josefine’s Salon Concepts, Lunzer has incorporated her experiences to create Fitting Together Art. The concept is to design an art project in which children, re-

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gardless of their abilities, can experience success. Then the children’s artwork is augmented by artists for inclusion in a fundraising project, and proceeds are donated to a charity of the kids’ choosing. Last year for their inaugural project, Lunzer and Melissa Klindtworth, an artist and FTA board member, who co-owns Northern Metal Design with husband Ryan, designed an ocean-themed project for a group of children with autism. They cut fish, turtles, a seahorse and octopus

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shapes out of wood for the kids to paint. Then Northern Metal Design added metal embellishments. FTA held a silent auction at Josefine’s for several months, during which they sold all the artworks, which were priced from $45-$150. The group kept 10 percent to help fund future projects and FTA was able to donate more than $2,200 to the Isaac Foundation in 2018. For 2019, FTA focused on hearing loss, tapping into Klindtworth’s involvement in the deaf community as a sign language interpreter. “What I learned is it’s less of a disability than it is a language,” says Lunzer. Ten children, 7-15 years old, with hearing impairments painted all manner of birds — from smaller songbirds to flying geese. The finished pieces were then embellished with mosaic glass and epoxy, making them look like fused glass artworks, and were displayed at Ben Joyce Studios. Lunzer hosted Joyce’s artwork at the opening of her salon in 2011 and counts Joyce as a good friend. The artworks have since been relocated to Josefine’s, where they continue to sell for $75 to $150. In addition to raising funds for the continued operation of FTA, the sale of artworks will aid other hearing-impaired children, something the participating children voted on. “I want to empower kids with the idea we all can do something, and helping others is fun and rewarding,” says Lunzer. “I love art and my hope is I can inspire a couple kids to love giving too.”

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Learn how you can help: providence.org/GivingEWa or 509-474-4917 Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center | Providence Holy Family Hospital | Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital Providence Mount Carmel Hospital | St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute | Providence St. Joseph’s Hospital

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cebo. Approximately four out of 10 patients did report a gastrointestinal side-effect such as distension, diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain. These issues were generally very mild and did not result in the patient discontinuing the medication. The outcomes are the most exciting part of this story. In the clinical trials evaluating this medication, six out of 10 adults experienced at least a 5 percent weight loss. The average weight loss was 10 percent of body weight or about 22 pounds. Also about one out of four patients lost an average of 14 percent of their body weight or 30 pounds. These results are quite extraordinary compared to most other weight loss medications. Given the very acceptable side-effect profile and the positive results that most people experience when taking Plenity, it is likely to be a quite successful medication for many people. — JOHN R. WHITE

PILL FOR POUNDS?

New Weight Loss Assistant Can you tell me about the new drug for weight loss that was recently approved by the FDA?

Y

es. This medication is called Plenity. It is quite unique in some regards as, unlike many previous weight loss drugs, it’s not a stimulant and it does not have central nervous system side-effects. That means it can be used regardless of an individual’s blood pressure, cholesterol issues or type 2 diabetes, something previous medications didn’t offer. It should, however, be used in combination with diet and exercise. The medication has a unique mechanism of action. It contains a cellulose (which is of course found in plants) and citric acid

(found in citrus fruits). The capsules are taken with water before lunch or dinner. Once in the gastrointestinal tract, the capsules release the ingredients, which rapidly absorb water, form cross-links and swell up. The resulting aggregates of gel have a very similar consistency to plant-based foods and “trick” the body into feeling full. The active ingredients are not absorbed into the body and because of this there are fewer concerns with side-effects. Also, the active ingredients are compounds that we frequently consume with vegetables and fruits. Most reported side-effects with Plenity occurred at rates similar to those seen with pla-

John R. White is chair of the Department of Pharmacotherapy at WSU-Spokane.

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Herbicidal Heritage Risks of exposure to Roundup may persist for generations BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hat your grandmother and great-grandmother were exposed to could affect everything from your ability to reproduce to your likelihood to be affected by kidney disease or obesity, according to a first-of-its kind study from Washington State University. For the study, researchers including Michael Skinner, a WSU professor of biological sciences, exposed pregnant rats to

just half the rate of Roundup considered okay for exposure. What they found could change the way governments set health limits for chemicals. Chemically known as glyphosate, Roundup is the most commonly used herbicide in the world, accounting for almost 72 percent of pesticide use, according to the study, published in the journal Nature. Most people are exposed to it because it gets sucked up by plants that we eat. While neither the mother rat nor her baby had health problems from the exposure, 90 percent of the next two generations developed health problems in their youth, including kidney disease, obesity and reproductive issues. About a third of the future generations had miscarriages and/or died during pregnancy. All that despite the only exposure to glyphosate happening to the initial pregnant rat. Skinner says this is just the latest of several studies he’s worked on looking into generational toxicology — essentially examining how the sperm and egg can get

changed, passing negative health impacts onto subsequent generations. Looking just at direct exposure, the limits for glyphosate and many other chemicals would be considered fine, because the rat that was actually exposed wasn’t harmed. But looking down the line, Skinner says it’s clear there’s a larger concern with generational impacts. “It’s something we’ve never focused on before,” Skinner says. “If we focus on just direct exposure everything is just sort of hunky-dory fine. But we now know that we could be influencing our future generations.”

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Assessing Lectins Does science support banishing lectins from your diet? BY STACEY AGGARWAL

I

n a conversation at dinner, a friend who works as an excavator recently asked me a curious question: “Have you heard of lectins? They might be making you sick.” Admittedly, I hadn’t. It seems we’re constantly bombarded with new diets and eating strategies that promise to solve our struggles with weight loss and chronic disease. Many new diet trends seem to center around cutting out something to reap the amazing benefits. However, these “restrictive” diets don’t agree on what exactly should be cut out: Meat? Carbohydrates? Gluten? Lectins? The lectin-free diet has found its way into the spotlight through the work of ex-heart surgeon Dr. Steven Gundry. Here are the basics: Lectins are sugar-binding proteins found in many plant foods such as grains, potatoes, beans, squash, tomatoes, peppers and fruit. The main argument against lectins revolves around the idea that the modern diet has devastating consequences for the gut, one of which is allowing lectins from the foods we eat to cross into the bloodstream. Once in the blood, they wreak havoc throughout the body. Gundry links the consumption of lectins with the manifestation of cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, diabetes and even cancer. He suggests that by cutting out foods that contain lectins, these health issues can be avoided. However, Korrin Fotheringham, a registered dietician nutritionist and owner of Northwood Nutrition, is skeptical. “Unfortunately, a lot of the nutritional research that’s published is about foods that are bad for us,” she says. “This creates a fear perspective around these foods. I think lectins can be wrapped up in that category as well.” Research on lectins hasn’t yet been done in large-scale human studies. Fotheringham

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points out, “Most studies are done in situ, meaning that they’ve extracted the lectins from the plant and conducted studies either on animals or in the lab.” This type of study misses the mark on a very important concept in nutritional science, says Fotheringham. “If you isolate lectins, you might see some not-so-great side effects in the lab. But, when the food is eaten in its whole form, it can be metabolized very differently in the body.” While research in a lab is a good way to learn about very specific effects and interactions, it’s not enough to make conclusions on how these proteins will behave in our bodies. Patrick Crosswhite, Ph.D., an assistant professor of human physiology at Gonzaga University, agrees. He points out, “When you remove large groups of healthy vegetables and healthy fruits from your diet, most people are at risk for some kind of nutrient deficiency.” He advocates for a balanced diet built on variety, rather than restriction. “When you talk about removing lectins, you’re talking about reducing the amount of fiber you get, the amount of B vitamins and the nutritional variety of your food,” Crosswhite argues. “Lectins are broken down with heat,” he says. So if you’re interested in reducing your lectin intake, just cook lectin-rich foods before you eat them. Both Fotheringham and Crosswhite agree that more extensive research on lectins is needed before any negative effects of these proteins are established. Every individual metabolizes food differently, and restrictive diets, like the lectin-free diet, can cut out important sources of nutrients. In fact, even Dr. Gundry admits this, which is why he sells a large selection of supplements to accompany a lectin-free diet. However, Fotheringham argues that supplements aren’t usually needed with a balanced diet, “The majority of people can get all of their nutrition from food.”

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@livingwithlady Instagrammer Shannon Morscheck painted her dining room’s fireplace a deep blue and then decided to add a matching board and batten topper. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

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Delightful

DIY

Meet three Spokane women whose home design Instagram feeds inspire thousands of devoted followers BY CHEY SCOTT

H

ousehold do-it-yourself projects -- big or small -- can seem daunting. So much so that it often appears safer, and tidier, and just plain easier not

to do anything at all, or, if necessary, to hire someone else to do it for you. It doesn’t have to be this way. Three Spokane women who share their do-it-yourself triumphs — and struggles — with devoted Instagram followers are proving that with a little elbow grease, lots of paint, and a healthy dose of patience and thriftiness, dramatic transformations are possible, even on a budget. ...continued on next page

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A custom, DIY built-in concealing a drop down TV/ movie screen is the subject of the most-loved post on @livingwithlady. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

“DELIGHTFUL DIY,” CONTINUED...

Meet your DIYer Shannon Morscheck @livingwithlady livingwithlady.com What’s your top piece of advice for DIY projects? Just go for it. I feel like a person’s home should reflect their personality and it can always be changed or fixed if you don’t end up liking it. What is your favorite current trend? I love the bold pieces of furniture. If you would have asked me five years ago, ‘Would I have this bright green chair?’ No. I’m a neutral person, but I am loving the statement-piece furniture. What are some favorite home and DIY Instagram accounts? @myhouseof8 (Coeur d’Alene), @nestingwithgrace

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@livingwithlady When the Morscheck family of five moved into their Five Mile home five years ago, Shannon Morscheck was eager to start transforming it into a space that felt like theirs. Armed with her most trusty DIY tool — paint — a creative vision and determination to do as much of it themselves as they could on a budget, the Morscheck family’s traditional-style, six-bedroom home is now almost aesthetically unrecognizable from the day they moved in. Morscheck shares exactly how she does it all on her Instagram account @livingwithlady, which has more than 21,800 followers, as well as her lifestyle blog, livingwithlady.com. “When we moved into this home, I wanted to make it feel ours, but I didn’t want to just fill it full of stuff,” Morscheck says. “I wanted it to be things that I loved, and wanted to get the look for less, and that resulted in doing projects ourselves and learning how to do them.” Morscheck and her husband J.D., who have three kids ages 9, 7 and 3, started out small. Their first project was to design and build some custom shelving for their older son’s room. Not long after, they realized they were ready to tackle something much bigger: A complete rebuild of their back deck. “The deck is by far the biggest, and that started on a whim,” Morscheck says. “One day [J.D.] said, ‘What if I rebuild it?’ and I entertained the idea. The next day he was tearing down the old one and I was like, ‘Whoa, hold on!’” The couple was able to complete the deck project in about a month, and ended up saving around $20,000 by not hiring the ...continued on page 26 work out.


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“DELIGHTFUL DIY,” CONTINUED... While not exactly the most beginner-friendly DIY, Morscheck shares all levels of projects on her blog and Instagram stories, from simple handmade pieces and seasonal decorating tips to other custom finishes, like a stunning, built-in bookshelf she and her husband installed at the end of 2018. This centerpiece of the family’s living room also conceals a projector screen for watching TV and movies from the cozy, pillow-laden sofas and chairs filling the space.

“Adding paint can really transform something ... it doesn’t take a lot of time or money to do it.”

An open-book wall hanging required more than 100 nail holes to install, but one follower declared it, “The most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen.” The Morschecks did all the work on their deck re-build themselves, saving an estimated $20,000. Inspired by a Pottery Barn fixture, Shannon Morscheck created her own wood-bead chandelier. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

“My goals in decorating are to have it be cozy and comfortable, and functional,” Morscheck says. “which is why [the built-ins] were so appealing because we had extra storage, seating and it also served a purpose.” That project began with a sketch. The unit was then created with prebuilt cabinets along the bottom, and topped with custom shelving that frames a cushioned bench beneath an open space for the retractable screen. Materials for that project cost about $1,500, and Morscheck notes that a friend with a similar custom built-in paid around $8,000 to have it done professionally. Simpler DIY efforts have transformed other areas of the Morscheck home. Earlier this spring, Morscheck updated the dining room fireplace mantel with a coat of deep cobalt paint and a custom board and batten frame above. “Adding paint can really transform something ... it doesn’t take a lot of time or money to do it,” she notes. After seeing a wooden-beaded chandelier at Pottery Barn, Morscheck found beads online and made her own version for the master bedroom. Despite the carefully curated presentation of photos on her Instagram feed, Morscheck is honest with followers that not every room in her house is perfectly styled and updated (or always spotlessly clean). The kitchen will be a bigger undertaking and probably not completely DIY, as the couple plan to remove a wall and reconfigure the room’s layout. “We live in these homes, too. Just like anyone else, we have toys on the floor and all the things that everyone else does,” she says. “When we’re working on a project other things get ignored.” ...continued on next page 30

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Newly Remodeled

COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

New Owners,

New Restaurant, Menu & Chef! Same Great Views!

Squeezing the Most Out of Summer

Where to go, what to see and do for the quintessential summer experience in North Idaho

T

he days are long, but summer is short, so make the most of it. Here are 32 ideas to make the most of it this year.

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Health& Home

GET ON THE LAKE. Take a cruise — check cdacruises.com for themed cruises like the Bands on Boats series featuring beloved local groups like the Rub or a Fourth of July cruise with epic views of the fireworks over the lake. Or go solo on a paddleboard, personal watercraft or even parasailing like you’re one of the eagles gliding over the lake. No gear? No problem. Check out Coeur d’Alene Boat Rentals or Fun Unlimited for rentals. Pack a picnic and head for the beach (insider tip: get there early and stake a claim where Spokane River meets the lake for a view of both). Treat yourself to a lakeside meal: Cedar’s; Beverly’s and the Dockside, both at the Coeur d’Alene Resort; or further out on Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, the incomparable Tony’s on the Lake. If you’d rather take home a tasty souvenir of your lake visit you caught yourself, stop by Fins and Feathers for the latest on fishing equipment and advice. DO DOWNTOWN. Pick any time of day, any day of the week and there’s something going on downtown. Wednesday? Farmer’s

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Market, Live After 5 concert series, and trivia at Moose Market. Friday? A vibrant ArtWalk that is truly walkable: Two to three blocks of places to experience art, live music, socialize and grab a bite to eat. Or make your own itinerary: Coffee and a light bite with the morning paper, pampering yourself with a pedicure, late-night cocktails and live music, or browsing the shops for something fresh and fun to wear on your next outing. Visit cdadowntown. com for more downtown happenings. MAKE IT EVENTFUL. Mark your calendars for these events: Car d’Lane downtown (June 14-15), Father’s Day weekend at Silverwood and the newly opened Boulder Beach (June 15-16); Half-Ironman Triathlon throughout Coeur d’Alene (June 30), Fourth of July parade followed by a party in City Park and fireworks at night over the lake (July 4), Brewfest at McEuen Park (July 6), Art on the Green and street fair at North Idaho College and downtown (Aug. 2-4), North Idaho State Fair at Kootenai County Fairgrounds (Aug. 21-25), Antique Wooden Boat show at the resort marina (Aug. 24-25). MAKE TIME TO EXPLORE. Your North Idaho visit isn’t complete without an exploration


of the region’s numerous trails and wild spaces. Take an epic — yet easy — bike ride on the old railroad rail system with the Route of the Hiawatha. Go looking for a huckleberry picking spot! Embrace the historic past with a visit to Wallace for the day and swing through Kellogg for the Crystal Gold Mine tour or a gondola ride up Silver Mountain (June 28 is their inaugural Ride and Dine… up the mountain for barbecue dinner, live music and a view you’ll never forget).

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Upcoming Events

Wynonna & the Big Noise JUNE 7

Wynonna’s rich and commanding voice has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide. This summer she brings her undeniable talent to the Coeur d’Alene Casino’s Coeur Jams Concert Series. $30-$60; 8 pm; Coeur d’Alene Casino.

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Musical

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Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre presents the “tale as old as time” — based on the Academy Awardwinning animated Disney feature. $49

adults, $42 senior, $27 child; ThursdaySaturday 7:30 pm; Saturday-Sunday 2 pm.

Ironman 70.3 JUNE 30

Some of the world’s best athletes descend on Coeur d’Alene for Ironman 70.3 the last Sunday in June but only 30 will advance to the world championship in Nice, France. Be inspired AS you watch them compete.

Go to visitcda.org for the race schedule and route.

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White paint throughout the home allows indie.boho.nest Instagrammer Gianna Caputo to showcase plants and textural elements in her designs. GIANNA CAPUTO PHOTOS

@indie.boho.nest

Meet your DIYer Gianna Caputo @indie.boho.nest What’s your top piece of advice for DIY projects? Be patient and have fun with it. Give yourself time and know that it can’t all happen as quick as you want it to.

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What is your favorite current trend? Basket walls. What are some favorite home and DIY Instagram accounts? @deneisebuckophoto, @saltdesignbuild (Spokane); @ispydiy, @42_designs

Until about 10 months ago, Gianna Caputo could only do so much DIYing in the rental she and her husband Mark Braun lived in before purchasing their first home, a 1954 rancher on the border of the Shadle Park and Indian Trail neighborhoods in North Spokane. She could paint and decorate and hang curtains, but that was about it. In the new home, however, the DIY possibilities for the self-taught interior designer and home stager are now endless. The first thing that she had to change? Paint colors, of course. When the couple bought it, the midcentury home’s interior was stiflingly dark, with lots of deep burgundy paint — including on the brick fireplace — emerald


green countertops and dark wood finishes throughout. Painting the entire house a clean, neutral palette of white gave Caputo a fresh canvas for her Scandanavian, boho and midcentury inspired decor style that fills each room. Many of these transformations are featured as striking before-and-after photos on her Instagram, @indie.boho. nest. Through frequent posts shared with her more than 2,700 followers, Caputo documents her DIY journey and offers decorating tips using the cozy, textural and sunlit spaces of her home as an example. “I love seeing pretty pictures in my feed, and I wanted to contribute and see what the response was, and be a part of that community,” she says of the decision to share her home and bits of her personal life on social media. Caputo also runs a vintage and thrifted fashion resale shop on Etsy called Blue Pea Shop. Her love of thrifting for unique fashion pieces at a bargain translates to her decorating aesthetic. Many pieces throughout the couple’s home were found at local thrift stores. Beyond easy updates like painting and using decor to modernize each room of the house, Caputo and her husband have tackled a few bigger projects since moving in, like installing new hardwoods in the living room and renovating the kitchen. They didn’t change the kitchen layout, and didn’t do all the work themselves (tiling the backsplash and installing new countertops), but the results of the mostly cosmetic overhaul

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“DELIGHTFUL DIY,” CONTINUED...

Removing cabinets above the sink made room for functional open shelving to accommodate everyday items. GIANNA CAPUTO PHOTO

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made a massive difference in creating a cohesive space that reflects Caputo’s personal aesthetic. A few upper cabinets above the sink were removed to allow for open shelving, which, here, aren’t just for looks. Caputo says most of the pieces on the shelves are things the family uses every day — cutting boards, bowls and glassware. To keep their costs down, the couple kept the home’s original cabinetry but repainted it — the uppers are white, while the lowers are a pale green — and installed new contemporary brass hardware. “Sometimes I still question the painting of the cabinets, but I don’t regret it,” Caputo says. “I think if you choose something you’ve gravitated towards for a while you’ll be happy” with the outcome. One dated feature they still hope to change someday is to replace the original hoodless oven and range. Until then, Caputo’s creativity has skillfully worked around this detail by making aesthetic changes elsewhere a focus. On refreshing a home in general, Caputo advises sticking to a tight color palette throughout the home, whether that’s paint, rugs, linens or other finishes. “I think if you just pick two or three colors that you like and those are your main theme, your house will be more cohesive,” she says. “It does limit you, but sometimes that’s a good thing.”


@themindfulhaven Decorating and DIY-ing is Danielle Loft’s zen mode. The mother of three young boys uses her Mead-area home as a constant creative outlet, whether that’s renovating a definitely outdated basement bathroom for around $400 or repainting thrifted furniture she found on Craigslist. “My therapy for balancing motherhood is projects and crafting and anything DIY,” Loft says. “I just hung hanging planters last night and it made my whole mood better. Some people like to read a book or take a bath or buy new shoes, and I like to make stuff and make things pretty.” Loft shares her creative pursuits, DIY tutorials and snippets of family life on Instagram as @themindfulhaven. She and her husband Ryan purchased their 1985 home in the Fairwood development in Mead four years ago, and knew making it their own would be a continuing process. Nothing had been updated since it was built. “Every square inch of this house I painted myself. Every room needed the carpet ripped out, wallpaper torn down and walls retextured,” Loft recalls.

Danielle Loft transformed a secondhand dresser with new hardware and chalk paint, while air plant shelves in the nursery cost about $20. DANIELLE LOFT PHOTO

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Meet your DIYer Danielle Loft @themindfulhaven What’s your top piece of advice for DIY projects? You don’t have to have a million bucks to have your space look like a million bucks. What you need is to shop smart — choose pieces as you find them on sale, thrifted, etc. What is your favorite current trend? Probably midcentury. I really love it and got into that style in the last year. What are some favorite home and DIY Instagram accounts? @angelarosehome, @chrislovesjulia, @cynthia_harper_

“DELIGHTFUL DIY,” CONTINUED...

Rather than installing new tile, Danielle Loft painted the linoleum in her basement bathroom, part of a $400 makeover. DANIELLE LOFT PHOTO

While they replaced the carpet in the living room with hardwoods to match what was already in the entryway and kitchen (a space still on their renovation to-do list), Loft got creative and used black and white paint and a stencil to update and add interest to the dining room tile. “I didn’t want to redo the flooring because by the time you put money in and update it, it’s literally out of style,” she notes.

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Besides adding a fresh coat of paint whenever possible, Loft’s go-to strategy is shopping at thrift shops and garage sales, and scouring Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist for cheap furniture and decor pieces with hidden potential. “My motto is I don’t pay retail for anything, and if I can make it, I will, for way less. I always compete with myself to create a look for less,” she says. This decorating and DIY philosophy means Loft isn’t constantly spending money on expensive new pieces to update her home to reflect the latest design and decor trends. Plus, she has young kids who aren’t easy on the furniture. Of the many projects she’s completed so far, Loft’s favorite and most meaningful is her 3-month-old son’s nursery, which she designed and renovated while pregnant. She chose an unexpected yet affordable flooring option; 8-inch plywood planks painted white. “Originally the floors were supposed to be whitewashed, but something went wrong and they turned yellow so that’s when I painted them white,” she explains. Almost everything else decorating the baby’s room was repurposed, thrifted or handmade for under $500. “I usually grab things when I find them and then find a place for it after,” she says. “If I don’t use it, I stage it nice or paint it and make some money off it.” Throughout the home, Loft’s decorating style is a blend of boho, midcentury and contemporary. She recalls that when she and her husband were house shopping, they looked at countless homes with basic, builder-grade finishes. They realized that an older, more outdated home would be a blank canvas they could customize over time. “I’m OK with a project house,” she notes. “It’s extremely time consuming, but I like doing it. I trade what other people do in their free time for redoing my house.”

For just $6, Danielle Loft created the black and white mobile to complete her nursery design. DANIELLE LOFT PHOTO

“My therapy for balancing motherhood is projects and crafting and anything DIY.”

Living Well in the Health

Home

Inland Northwest Food

Family

People

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Inside Out For artist Kyle Paliotto, inspiration comes from escaping the confines of his home studio STORY AND PHOTOS BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

K

yle Paliotto has a studio behind the Hayden, Idaho, house where he’s lived for 15 years. But that’s not the only place he goes to paint. Often, Paliotto heads outdoors. His mobile studio consists of a large backpack stocked with a tripod and a box that holds his paint and brushes. The slim wooden box unfolds to create a vertical surface which he can clamp onto the tripod and use to hold a 9-by-12-inch canvas board. He grabs his mud cup — a lidded cup filled with turpentine thick with paint from past sessions. And, sticking a

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roll of paper towels under his arm, in less than two minutes, he’s ready to go. As for what to paint, Paliotto is particular. “I’m a firm believer in knowing your subject matter,” says Paliotto, who has been featured in Southwest Art magazine, has exhibited in Coeur d’Alene, and is represented in Colorado, Montana, California and South Carolina. So he makes a circuit along roads within a 10-minute drive from his house: a lake inlet adjacent to the golf course, a barn and surrounding fields where he and his family keep pigs. If it’s wintertime, he might be at Hayden Creek, although he also does travel farther afield to teach workshops or just to paint. How much time does he spend painting outdoors every year? “Not enough,” he quips. For all the time outside, though, Paliotto rarely sells the smallish paintings that result from one to two hours in front of the canvas. Rather, these paintings become the foundation for other paintings, which he develops in his home studio. What he’s interested in, says Paliotto, is translating the experience of having been to a barn or creek or even milling around the chickens he raises. “You’re not painting the image; you’re painting the sense of place.” Once Paliotto has settled on a direction for a painting, he sets up a canvas inside his home studio, which is within shouting distance of the house he shares with his wife and two young children. On warm days, the double-doors are likely thrown open; in colder months, Paliotto stokes the wood stove. The 14-by-24-foot foot space is multifunctional. One area includes Paliotto’s experiments in sculpting, bookshelves bulging with art magazines, and a computer. In the main room, Paliotto has a piano, which he plays occasionally. It doubles as a table, on top of which are sketches, a book open to watercolorist Andrew Wyeth, whom Paliotto admires, a digital camera, a vase of long-dried-out flowers, and a bronze head of a girl by artist Harley Brown, whom Paliotto also admires. Nearby Paliotto has a painting palette similar to his mobile painting setup and a large wooden easel. He can look up at the computer image he sometimes references — he takes his own photos — or behind him in the mirror, which he does to gain perspective, he explains. Sometimes he takes photos of a certain area in the painting, then puts his phone on the floor and looks at the image with a critical eye. “Objective perspective is one of the most important things you can have,” says Paliotto.

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Business is Blooming Flowers brighten your days and elevate home decor BY ANNE McGREGOR

O

ne of the simplest ways to brighten a home is also one of the easiest — add some fresh blooms. Whether a room’s design is getting a little stale, or things could be a little tidier, a bouquet of fresh flowers offers a happy place for your gaze to land and linger. Bringing those happy moments to their clients in the Inland Northwest is the goal of Anthesis Company, a floral design firm started by sisters Lina and Viktoria Ulyanchuk just over a year ago. While the two happily offer flowers for weddings and other occasions, floral subscriptions are one of their favorite parts of the business. Both sisters trained in visual communication design at Eastern Washington University and they incorporate that training into their contemporary floral design. “The placement of blooms and textures of flowers are key,” Viktoria says. Rather than the more common “polka dot” arrangement of

blossoms all around a bouquet, “We place our blooms in ribbons. You’ll see a color flowing throughout the design,” Viktoria says. While floral arrangements can sometimes carry the whiff of a formal, bygone era, the Ulyanchuks emphasize curvy modern designs that can be adapted to a particular home’s style. Or customers can leave it up to the sisters to design something unique for each Monday delivery. Whenever possible, blooms are sourced locally from a 23 farm flower market. “The blooms just look better and blend easier with the environment,” Viktoria notes. Flower arrangements are done in pots, rather than vases, using chicken wire as a support. The wire mesh allows the blooms’ stems to be immersed in water, helping them last longer. And the pot and mesh can be used again for creating your own display. Beth Mort of Snapdragon Flower Farm

also offers flower subscriptions, in addition to selling wholesale to local florists, and, beginning in mid-June, operating a flower farmstand at her Tower Mountain location — all out of her quarter-acre cutting garden. “The great thing about getting to know your local flower growers is you start training your eye to see the common flowers, and the flowers that aren’t bred to travel around the world,” she notes. If a flower arrangement subscription service doesn’t quite fit your budget, “You can grow a super unique tiny, cut flower garden and have things you won’t find in a grocery,” Mort says. What to include in your cutting garden? Mort, who was trained in plant and mushroom taxonomy, says she enjoys working with flowers in the carrot family, which include Queen Anne’s lace and chocolate lace. “They’re really lacy and have an airy quality foliage.” Other fun, easy-grow-

Arranging Ideas

•• Always trim the stem at an angle before placing in fresh water to help ensure there is a maximum amount of surface for water absorption. •• Clean all foliage off of the stem to prevent bacteria from growing in the water. •• When arranging a bouquet, always start with the greenery first. •• Identify a few large blooms and use them as your focal flower when creating your arrangement. — Lina Ulyanchuk, Anthesis Company

A spring bouquet created by Anthesis Company. ALI BLACKWOOD PHOTO

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ing blooms for a cutting garden include cosmos, foxglove, rudbeckia and of course, her business namesake, snapdragons. “The more you cut, the more they bloom,” she says. In addition, Mort has a small business helping people grow more food and flowers on whatever ground they have available. “If they try and it failed, I tell people to put your science glasses on and try to find out why. Don’t be so hard on yourself! We really can grow things!”


We Care Every Day in Every Way® A Cutting Garden

By choosing varieties that mature in 65-75 days, there’s still time to plant for at least one round of blooms this year, and you’ll have a head start for next year. When starting plants from seeds, remember they need to remain moist during germination. Cosmos and Zinnia These are easy to direct seed and bloom continuously. A side benefit is that they attract pollinators to your garden. Rudbeckia As your population of this favorite perennial flower gets established, they will cross-pollinate and you can end up with really stunning varieties that you didn’t start out with. While easy to start from seed, local nurseries also offer many varieties. Strawflower These beautifully colored, papery, parchment-y flowers are almost unreal. Enjoy in the summer, or hang blooms upside down to dry for use throughout the winter.

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Calendula Available in many varieties ranging in color from the orangest orange to almost white, calendula is quick to flower, edible and even has some medicinal qualities. Trailing Nasturtium A delicious edible flower related to watercress, with the same delicate spiciness. Trailing varieties, available in many colors, are good for pots and have a great vase life when cut. Snapdragons Amazing varieties of these tough little guys are available for direct seeding: plant a row of these or scatter seed wherever you like. Once established, snapdragons kind of take care of themselves; they’re a good reseeder without being invasive and can naturalize in your garden. — Beth Mort, Snapdragon Flower Farm

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Home& Garden Northwest Seed & Pet’s scarlet macaw JACKSON ELLIOT PHOTO

NATURAL ATTRACTION

A 75-Year Spokane Tradition

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hat is Northwest Seed & Pet? It’s Karen Marcus helping customers as a scarlet macaw sits on her right shoulder like a rainbow. It’s the smell of earthy fertilizer and baby chicks and rosemary in the rain. “It’s very Spokane,” customer Steve Eggers says. This year, Northwest Seed & Pet celebrates its 75th anniversary in a community where many of its customers are second- or third-generation. As a child, Steve’s mom Kellie Eggers brought him to the store twice a week at a minimum. His favorite memory is the store’s alligator. “We would sit here for hours trying to get him to move,” he says. Today Steve and his mom are visiting the store with his niece. She happily watches the puppies and chicks, walking around in her bright pink boots. Ducks, lizards, mice, parakeets and chickens cuddle, sun themselves and squawk around her. For a young child, it’s a scene to appreciate. Before owning Northwest Seed & Pet, Bob Mauk worked as a clerk in the plant nursery. Over the years, he’s seen many changes, especially in the pet business.“For a long time, birds were very big and that’s waned. Fish and chickens are big now. I’ve heard it’s a better diet,” he says jokingly. “The highlight of my job is the good feeling when you help somebody out and they’re appreciative of it,” Mauk adds. — JACKSON ELLIOTT Northwest Seed & Pet has two locations: 2422 E. Sprague Ave. and 7302 N. Division St.

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Fresh is Best!

Tips for a successful raised bed vegetable garden at home “Do you find yourself envious of your neighbor’s vegetable garden? Are you tired of having to go to the store every time you need fresh herbs for a recipe? Good news! It’s not too late to put raised beds to work in your yard! The first step is planning and designing your raised beds. Do they need to be off the ground to protect the plants from animals? Where in your yard has the best sun? How big does your raised bed need to be? All of this will depend on your own needs, but there are some helpful guidelines when it comes to design.

You’ll want to place your raised bed where it can get a lot of direct sunlight. If you are planning on growing large plants like tomatoes your raised beds will need to be at least 18 inches deep. Draw out the dimensions, this will help when choosing materials and soil. When selecting wood it may be tempting to use inexpensive options like scraps or wood that’s already

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been treated. We recommend using cedar planks. Cedar is naturally resistant to pests and rot, and can last up to 20 years in a raised bed. For soil, there are many raised bed mixes on the market that a wide range of vegetables will thrive in. Before purchasing soil, you’ll need to calculate how many cubic feet of soil the bed will need, keep in mind the soil level in the bed will lower the first few times you water your plants so it won’t hurt to have a little extra on hand. Water your vegetables after transplanting, and once a day through the growing season. When temps start to cool down in September you can start to plant cold weather crops like lettuce and kale! By making your raised beds this summer you can provide your kitchen with fresh veggies and herbs, and you’ll be all set up for next year!”

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Chef Steven Swanson enjoys combining Northwest flavors with unexpected spices. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Spectacular Salmon Meet the modest chef behind Nectar Catering and Events BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

f you’ve attended a wedding, large party or corporate function in the Spokane regional area over the last three years, you’ve likely tried chef Steven Swanson’s cooking but don’t know it. That’s because Swanson is a very low-key guy who has nonetheless earned his chops at some big name places, including Everett Golf and Country Club in Seattle and locally at Twigs Bistro and Martini Bar and the

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Coeur d’Alene Resort before joining Spokane’s Nectar Catering and Events. Swanson has been with Nectar since 2016 and is integral to Nectar’s continued expansion, including Wine Wednesdays — a thematic lunch buffet and wine flight at Nectar’s historic 1889 Stevens Street location. “I’m excited to see chef Steven get the credit he deserves because he’s such a

humble man,” says owner Josh Wade, who started Nectar Tasting Room in 2011 and has since rebranded to Nectar Catering and Events, with locations in downtown Spokane and Kendall Yards. A new spot in Spokane’s Perry District will be opening later this year. All together, Wade says Nectar caters about 700 events a year, including 250 on-site at their Spokane locations. ...continued on page 44


SPRINKLE IT!

Spice Up the Grill

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ho better than a barbecue competitor to develop a really rockin’ spice blend? Before he created River Rock Spice Company, Steven Everett spent six years in professional barbecue competitions as part of the Rub ‘Em Raw BBQ team. “As competitors we like to make sure our spices go together,” says Everett. Named for regional waterways, Everett’s Chewelah Creek Chipotle has a slightly smoky flavor, while the Hamma Hamma Habanero has more heat. But not too much — during taste trials, Everett says he gave away 150 samples and only had two people say it was too hot. Everett, an Army veteran, worked with Tri-State Market Supply to develop his signature blends, which are MSG-free. Although Everett still enjoys barbecuing — he has five smokers at home — he’s focused on growing the business slowly, in addition to working his regular job in information technology. For his smoked brisket, Everett uses a combination of the two spice blends — adjusting the amount of Hamma Hamma Habanero to the desired heat level. He cooks the meat in a smoker until it’s done. What follows is the necessary, and hardest, part: Allowing the meat to rest — in a warming drawer if possible — for a full hour before eating. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Find River Rock Spice Blends at Super 1 stores in Washington, and at Rosauers in Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Oregon.

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Born in Arizona and raised in Newport, Washington, chef Swanson originally wanted to go into engineering. His grandmother was a chef, he says, and his father was a pretty good cook, so when Swanson got tired of working in a lumber mill and at other odd jobs, culinary school is what appealed to him. “It teaches you the basics, and you get out of it what you put into it,” says Swanson, who attended Spokane Community College, moved to Arizona and then ended up on Washington’s west side, where he specialized in menu development, before returning home to Newport where he now lives. Swanson says he’s partial to barbecue and fried chicken, but also into experimenting with Spanish and Moroccan food. He chose to share a recipe that highlights local salmon and berries, with the unexpected addition of exotic flavor from harissa, a Tunisian spice blend that Swanson makes himself. The biggest difficulty with fish for home cooks is overcooking, says Swanson. To get it right, he uses a thermometer when cooking fish for events. However, he notes that Nectar doesn’t serve fish for off-site events, because even spending time in a warming oven can overcook the fish. So if you’re preparing the recipe, plan to serve the salmon as soon as it is cooked. As for the salmon skin, Swanson is partial to leaving it on. “I think people are afraid of the skin. When it’s seared properly, it’s good.” And while the beurre blanc sauce is an indulgence, “it sounds a lot more intimidating than it is.” The acid in the wine helps cut the richness of the butter, while the harissa adds just the right little kick.

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TRY IT YOURSELF

Seared Salmon with Harissa Beurre Blanc

T

his complex-sounding and impressive-looking entree is surprisingly easy to prepare and perfect for a special dinner for two. Do-ahead tip: prep the berries and hash first, then start on the sauce, with a separate pan for the fish. Be ready to serve the meal when the fish is finished.

SEARED SALMON •• 2 5-oz. portions salmon •• Salt, pepper to taste •• 2 tablespoons olive oil

MACERATED BERRIES •• 6-8 blackberries (or 1/4 cup blueberries) •• 1/2 a vanilla bean •• 1 tablespoon sugar

1. Season salmon with salt and pepper. 2. Heat medium sauté pan to medium high. 3. Add oil, followed by salmon with skin side up. 4. Sear for two minutes, flip and cook one minute longer. 5. Remove from heat and set aside.

1. Rinse blackberries with cold water and drain. 2. Slice vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape seeds into bowl. 3. Add berries and sugar lightly mash with the back of a fork to soften berries and release their juice. Set aside for plating. SWEET POTATO AND FENNEL HASH •• 6-8 ounces sweet potatoes, diced small •• 1 small fennel bulb, diced small •• 1 yellow onion, diced small •• 1/2 ounce basil, sliced thin (chiffonade) •• 2 tablespoons olive oil

HARISSA BEURRE BLANC •• 1 tablespoon diced shallots •• 6 oz. dry white wine •• 1 tablespoon harissa (Tunisian spice available at Yoke’s or online) •• 1 lemon, zested •• 4 oz. butter, diced and kept cold 1. Add white wine, shallots, harissa and lemon zest to small pot set at medium heat. Reduce sauce by half. 2. Turn heat down and whisk in butter one cube at a time until each cube is dissolved. Do not let the sauce get too hot or it will separate or “break.” 3. Add a splash of cream to help keep sauce from separating or if you need to keep it warm for any period of time.

1. To large sauté pan, add olive oil and heat to medium high. 2. When pan is hot (but not smoking) add fennel, cubed sweet potatoes and diced onion. Cook for four minutes stirring once or twice. 3. Remove from heat, season with salt and pepper to taste and toss in basil.

TO SERVE: Scoop the hash onto a plate and place salmon skin side down on top. Top with beurre blanc followed by the macerated berries. Serves two.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

— SHARED BY CHEF STEVEN SWANSON OF NECTAR CATERING AND EVENTS JUNE - JULY 2019

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Gluten-free options from Wiley’s Downtown Bistro. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Gluten-Free and Easy Finding tasty and safe local options for gluten-free food BY MANDY BRAVIROFF

B

eing diagnosed with celiac disease in 2009 after struggling through some serious health issues was a tough hit. While it saved me from a future filled with the pain and agony I’d already been through, it inadvertently destroyed most of my personal life. Meals with friends and family were previously quite common, but my diagnosis brought that to an immediate halt. With the added fear of getting sick — and after actually getting sick a few times — I began avoiding eating at their homes, including on holidays. I felt lost, with no guidance for how to be “gluten-free.” Today, celiac disease, a genetically inherited condition, affects about 1 percent of Americans, or 3 million people. It’s estimated that up to 80 percent of people who

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have celiac disease, which can present itself through a wide range of symptoms or none at all, are undiagnosed. In 2017, I launched the Spokane Gluten Free Eats food blog after noticing a frequent question on social media: How can one eat gluten-free in Spokane? The Spokane-Coeur d’Alene area now has some of the best restaurants whose owners and staff truly understand the needs of people living with celiac disease, including the crucially important need to avoid cross-contamination on cooking surfaces and utensils. Their continued support has helped make it possible for those of us with the disease or gluten intolerance to enjoy eating out again. Here’s a sampling of what’s available, so get out there and eat, explore and enjoy!

SPOKANE

Cochinito Taqueria Cochinito offers handmade corn tortillas, savory twists on traditional recipes and vibrant fresca margaritas, making it a solid choice for gluten-free diners. For dedicated GF fried tortilla chips, call the kitchen ahead of your visit to order as they take longer to fry up. Favorite: 20-hour carne asada taco, $4.50 each Twigs Bistro Twigs has one of the largest gluten-free menus in Spokane. From delicious flatbreads to colorful salads and even a gourmet crab mac ’n’ cheese, you’re sure to be satisfied with all that Twigs offers gluten-free folks. Favorite: Moroccan beef appetizer, $16 Veraci Pizza Veraci has perfected its gluten-free take on traditional, handmade Italian pizza crust. The crispy crunch of the wood-fired crust nestled below a wide variety of savory, salty and sweet topping combos makes Veraci a favorite amongst local gluten-free diners. Favorite: Prosciutto arugula pizza, $21 Wiley’s Downtown Bistro Wiley’s popped up in Spokane’s food scene in 2017. With an intimate environment supporting local artists and a menu that is mostly gluten-free, choices are easy here. Favorite: Duck confit, $26


Boots Bakery Favorite: Pumpkin waffle with spiced chai butter and organic maple syrup, $7.95 The Shop Favorite: Rotating flavors of gluten-free cakes, $5/slice Wild Sage Favorite: Honey-dijon chicken, $29 Cole’s Bakery & Cafe (dedicated GF facility) Favorite: Lemon ricotta pancakes with lemon syrup, $13 The Wandering Table Favorite: Crispy Washington steelhead, $18 Kobe Hibachi Sushi & Bar Favorite: GF steak and shrimp hibachi (prepared on separate grill), $21.75 High Tide Lobster Bar Favorite: GF lobster roll, $17

COEUR D’ALENE

Le Peep Nestled next to the Spokane River, Le Peep

gives its diners a marvelous view as well as an expansive gluten-free menu, whether it’s breakfast or lunch you seek. Favorite: Turkey apple Brie melt, $12 Beverly’s With captivating panoramic lake views and exceptional service, Beverly’s at the Coeur d’Alene Resort can prepare most of its menu offerings gluten-free, including warm rolls before dinner by request. Favorite: 6-ounce certified Angus beef filet mignon, $39

SANDPOINT

Second Avenue Pizza At Second Avenue Pizza, the owner and employees understand celiac disease and are incredibly supportive to the local GF crowd. The crust is made locally and is remarkably fluffy, which isn’t common with gluten-free dough. Grab a gluten-free beer on tap. Favorite: The Carolyn Special, $16.95$23.95 Find more resources from Spokane Gluten-free Eats at spokanegfeats.weebly. com and on Instagram @spokaneglutenfreeeats.

ESCAPE

Whiskey, Neat

Aside from wine and cider, are there many gluten-free options for those who want a stiffer drink? Liquors like whiskey are made from grains such as wheat, rye, barley or corn, and all of those except corn contain gluten. Sometimes these spirits are made from triticale, a seemingly double-trouble hybrid of rye and wheat. Here’s the great news: “It is a misconception that distilled spirits contain gluten,” explains Don Poffenroth, co-owner of Spokane’s Dry Fly Distilling, Washington’s first small-batch distillery and a popular source of whiskeys made from triticale and other local grains. “The key is distillation.” To relieve any concerns about its own products, Dry Fly reached out to celiac groups across the country after opening in 2007 and, after sharing their process, received certifications that their alcohols are gluten-free. – SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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Saving the Bugs What your family can do to help out our struggling six-legged friends BY JACOB JONES 48

Health& Home


Coming up in the

JUNE 14-20, 2018 | KEEPIN’

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SUMMEER GUID SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

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JONATHAN HILL ILLUSTRATION

F

ine, green blades, mowed straight and even. No weeds, bare patches or scattered leaves — just lush grass from sidewalk to stoop, picket fence to picket fence. Long established as a middle-class aspiration, the perfect lawn is also hostile territory. To a bee or butterfly, a flawless yard offers no food to eat. It provides no shelter for nesting or avoiding predators. Pesticides may linger. A perfect lawn serves as a des-

ert, fragmenting natural habitat. Spokane resident John Baumann, who serves as vice president of the Washington Butterfly Association, says he spent his youth chasing myriad butterflies through suburban backyards. But they have become much harder to find. “That kind of experience is barely possible anymore,” he says. “They will not find as many butterflies and they will not find the diversity.” ...continued on next page

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cropland that provide little sanctuary. A private yard with native or insect-friendly plants serves as an oasis. Put a lot of them together and your can create new pathways for bugs to rebound. “Planting a few native plants really helps,” Erhardt says. “It does not matter how small your piece of land is.”

S

A monarch butterfly enjoys some milkweed.

a nice lawn, experts recommend cultivating native plants, reducing and targeting An April study published in Biological the use of pesticides and providing some Conservation estimated 40 percent of insect nesting cover. species face an imminent risk of extincBrenda Erhardt, a resource conservation, citing widespread tilling of habitat tion planner with the Latah Soil and Water into farmland, increased pesticide usage, Conservation District, works primarily on invasive species and climate change. Other restoring prairie and wetland habitat in recent studies have estimated a 90 percent North Idaho. She champions the reintrodecline in monarch duction of native plant butterflies and an species to help rebuild 87 percent drop in nesting and pollinaGET INVOLVED bumblebee population networks. For anyone looking to take their interest tions. “We have lost in insects beyond the backyard, several Researchers a lot of our habitat regional organizations offer classes or field have warned of an connections,” she says. trips. The Xerces Society connects volunaccelerating “insect “Anything we can do teers with several citizen science efforts apocalypse” that to bridge those gaps is to measure and map insect populations. threatens crop polreally, really importConservation groups and nurseries host linators and global ant.” workshops on native plants. food chains. Losing Erhardt explains The Washington Butterfly Association bugs dominoes regional insects have will also hold its annual butterfly conferthrough ecosystems evolved alongside ence June 28-30 in Colville. to starve off birds, native plants, adapting fish and reptiles. Into them as sources sects also process waste for decomposition. of food and shelter. Monarch caterpillars, “We tend to think insects are of no conwhich turn into the widely recognized brilsequence,” Baumann says, “but ecosystem liant orange butterflies, eat only milkweed services are a big deal. … There are a lot of and have seen their numbers decimated by misconceptions.” increased use of weed killers. Local experts say homeowners can take As housing developments and farms several steps to make yards friendlier to push into new areas, insects increasingly beneficial insects and help rebuild a patchbecome isolated or have to cross large work of natural habitat. With or without swathes of pavement, lawn or nonnative

“SAVING THE BUGS,” CONTINUED...

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everal regional nurseries now specialize in providing native plants and seeds. Erhardt recommends Clearwater Seed in Spokane and Thorn Creek Native Seed Farm in Genesee, Idaho. The Xerces Society offers many resources on protecting backyard pollinators as well as regional guides to native plant species. A combination of native plants that bloom at overlapping intervals throughout the year helps to provide consistent food. Experts also suggested letting some fallen leaves remain as ground cover for bugs like moths, beetles and spiders over the winter. Crafty tutorials can also be found online for constructing pollinator houses or “bee hotels” that create decorative nesting spaces for native insects. Associate professor Gary Chang, an entomologist at Gonzaga University, notes that while honeybees and monarch butterflies get most of the attention, a wide variety of insects now faces environmental threats. “There are a lot of big picture reasons for why people should care,” he says. “Insects are a good indicator of environmental health. It can be a sign of other issues that are going on.” Many insects suffer from overly aggressive use of pesticides. Chang explains some people may mix up helpful and harmful insects such as bees versus yellowjackets. Proper identification allows homeowners to decide whether a more targeted trap or pesticide would work better. “You can decide if you need to control them or not,” he says. “There are some options that are more specific.” While he still encounters a lot of pushback, Baumann says people increasingly understand that modern conservation means more than saving the whales. Insects also face urgent risks. The effort to carve out space for their recovery can start at home by recognizing their needs. So don’t mind the weeds, he says. Embrace wildflowers and the leftover leaves. Who needs a perfect lawn when they could be out chasing butterflies? “Our area does have a lot to offer,” he says. “It’s great how people’s eyes light up.”


THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

Thoughts Count

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here are two paths to experiencing happiness and both paths are valuable. The easier of the two is the “outer path.” We can seek happiness by walking through the park on a beautiful spring day or looking into the eyes of a loved one or working in our garden. These are worthy pursuits that lift our spirits and remind us of the beauty in the world. The second path is more challenging and that is to look within. It is a challenge when life is difficult to remember that we have the potential to change our emotional responses through the conversations we have with ourselves. Many of us are very self-critical and judge ourselves for our mistakes and our perceived flaws. It is wise to be aware of those aspects that need correcting, but the harshness is not required and it can be painful, preventing rather than inspiring efforts to improve. How do you know if you are being too hard on

yourself? The test is simple. As you listen to your inner conversations, ask yourself, “Would I talk to someone I loved this way?” If the answer is no, it is time to reprogram that inner voice. There are two simple ways to do this. One is, two or three times a day, ask yourself silently or out loud, “What am I grateful for?” Just asking the question primes the brain to seek answers. And two, rehearse out loud, two or three times a day, what you would say to someone you love if they were facing your challenges. So, while enjoying the beauty of the outdoors during this wonderful time of year, don’t forget that there is an opportunity to create the same beauty within. — ROBERT MAURER Robert Maurer is a Spokane psychologist, consultant and author of several books, including One Small Step Can Change Your Life.

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Howdy! Helping kids develop confidence and compassion starts with a simple hello BY MATT THOMPSON

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lan go foill — Gaelic for “health till later.” As-salaam-alaykum — Arabic for “Peace be unto you.” Live long and prosper — a Vulcan salute. Many years of happy days befall my gracious sovereign — Shakespeare for “Good morning, Dad” (at least in our household). What is in a greeting? Quite a lot, I think. A salutation is an age-old tradition that conveys “Hello, I am here, I acknowledge your existence, I won’t hurt you if you don’t hurt me.” Or, “for you I have joy and respect and I am so glad to see you.” Or, “I trust you and am willing to be vulnerable before you, here is my hand to prove it.” Whether because of email, texting or dialling directly to one’s personal phone number, I fear the art of salutation has lost some ground in our modern times. “‘Sup.” “Hey.” “Huh?” “What?” These are some of the more typical greetings I observe in my practice these days. Lately I have been attempting to engage in a little role play with adolescents in my office. “OK, pretend you are going to pick up a friend at their house, and it is the first time you are meeting their dad. Here we go, you ring the bell… dingdong — OK, what do you say?” The young person usually stares back at me blankly and after a pause, grunts, “Huh?”

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“OK, pretend you are calling your friend Kyle’s house, they actually have a home phone. What do you say when someone answers?” Adolescent: “Hey — Kyle home?” In my experience, role playing with adolescents never really goes very well, except maybe at a drama camp. But I think it is important that we keep trying because the absence of these skills will likely be a barrier to success later in life, whether in getting a job, finding a life partner or getting out of a speeding ticket. I must concede, this isn’t an issue that we can entirely blame on our modern, digital lifestyles. Just this spring I was counseling some parents through their concern about their 9-year-old who they worry reads too much. They have to ask him not to read at the dinner table, in the car, during class and through the night. They worry reading may hinder his social development and lead to isolation. I would agree: Even something as nutritious as reading can at times get in the way of human connections, so we just have to remember to actively engage our kids in connection, with eye contact and all. I suggested they encourage daily “face time” where he puts down the book and just engages

in human-to-human interaction, whether with his parents, siblings or friends. Such “face time,” as opposed to screen or page time, is essential for learning how to interact with others, to interpret verbal and nonverbal cues, to learn to listen, to learn to communicate. And really, the most elemental “face time” is a salutation. Maybe I am old fashioned and too hung up on manners and comportment? In my opinion, in a world that seems more and more prone to brusque truncation in communication, a sincere greeting goes a long way. Whether simply making eye contact and uttering, “Hello, this is Renphrough Speedmoore. Is Kyle home?” Or, perhaps with an extended hand and a smile, stating, “Mrs. Neslax? Nice to meet you. I am Ranson Crites. I am here for your daughter.” These are social skills our world still desperately needs. It’s worth some work. At the very least, in an increasingly narcisisstic society, it may spread just a little bit of good will and a positive vibe — and maybe, if we’re lucky, even some empathy and humility. Matt Thompson is a pediatrician at the Kids Clinic in Spokane.


In the Air Seasonal Allergies and CBDs BY TUCK CLARRY

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or some, summery weather offers newfound love and hope after a dreary winter that loomed well into this calendar year. But for many, the bliss is marred by itchy eyes and sinus headaches. But get this: Naturally anti-inflammatory cannabinoids — THC and CBD — may offer help for those suffering with seasonal allergies. “Cannabis seems to inhibit the inflammatory pathway,” cannabis researcher and doctor Sue Sisley told Leafly. “And that certainly does relate to allergies, because if you can cut the inflammatory pathway, then it could certainly help the untreated allergies, all the classic symptoms: the itchy, runny nose, itchiness, hives and all those kinds of things.” Though the direct action of antihistamines commonly used for allergies will probably have a swifter, more noticeable effect on symptoms, cannabis’ anti-inflammatory action could also assist. And thanks to legalization, there are plenty of CBD and THC oral sprays that can help those dealing with pesky seasonal allergies.

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CEO Toni Lodge says the NATIVE project’s clinic and community center in Spokane is “the safety net of the safety net.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Healthy Outlook Three decades in, Toni Lodge continues building community for future generations through the NATIVE Project BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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ore than 30 years ago, it was becoming increasingly clear to Toni Lodge and other concerned parents, neighbors and friends that someone needed to step in to help change the story for Native American kids in Spokane. “We just were tired of people saying Native kids have the most suicide, most dropouts, most everything,” Lodge says. “We were like, ‘OK, well we’ll just figure out a way to be part of the solution.’”

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The group cobbled together $100, and someone donated a Ford Pinto to be auctioned off. With that little bit of seed money, the group incorporated and started an Indian Youth Leadership Program that would serve as the core mission of the NATIVE Project. From there, things escalated quickly, Lodge says. Kids participating in the program wanted their non-Native friends to join. Then it became clear some of the

youth needed mental health and substance abuse treatment. Then their families needed treatment, too. So the NATIVE Project started offering more and more of those services. Eventually they got a nudge from the federal office that guides care for members of Native American tribes. “Indian Health Service said, ‘You know, Spokane is the eighth-largest urban Indian city in the United States,’” Lodge says.


ECO FRIENDLY MATS FROM RECYCLED PLASTIC “Spokane County has people from over 300 tribes that live here because of the 1950s federal policy of relocation, where people came here and worked in the mines and for the railroad, for Kaiser.” With an ask from IHS, the NATIVE Project put in a bid to become the regional Indian Health Clinic, says Lodge, and they won.

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wenty years later, the NATIVE Project’s clinic and community center at 1803 W. Maxwell Ave. offers a thoughtful bundle of integrated services, including medical, dental, pharmacy, behavioral health, licensed substance abuse treatment and licensed mental health treatment. It’s available to people of all ethnicities and backgrounds, as well as financial status. “We started with $100 and last year our budget was $10 million. So we’re truly a community-based, community-grown organization,” Lodge says. “We are probably one of the most integrated behavioral health and medical clinics in the area doing this Medicaid transformation work. It’s very invigorating to be able to serve not only Native people but other people of color, Medicaid patients, and to serve people in West Central. We are the safety net of the safety net.” Lodge, an enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, originally grew up in North Dakota. It was there that she first started working as a journalist in the ‘70s, which is how she wound up covering the cases that led to landmark legislation that restored and protected Native American rights. “The Indian Child Welfare Act, the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, those were all passed in the ’70s,” Lodge says. “And I’m sitting there, just a little young reporter going, ‘Oh my God,’ and listening to the stories that were never told to us in the schools about all the children that were taken away from their parents.” On top of suffering through family separation, Native Americans weren’t federally allowed to practice their own religions until 1978, Lodge says, a shock in “a country supposedly founded on religious freedom.” “You’re sitting there as a young Native person and you realize, ‘Oh my God, we’re the occupied people!’” Lodge says. “I mean so much of this was never taught to us.” She says it was life-changing, seeing how effective activism could be at changing

the status quo at that time, and seeing how effective community could be. It inspired her to work in community advocacy. She moved to Spokane and, not long after, the NATIVE Project came to be. On top of being one of the founders, Lodge has served as CEO for the last 27 years. In May, Lodge was recognized for her contributions by being inducted into Spokane’s Citizen Hall of Fame. “There have been tens of thousands of people’s lives who have benefitted from her engagement in Spokane,” writes John McCarthy, a doctor with the NATIVE Project and leader at the University of Washington’s medical school in Spokane, in his letter nominating Lodge for the honor. “Not many people appreciate the profound impact this clinic has had for our Native American community and the leadership opportunities it has promoted within that community. The reality, however, is that for three generations of families, Toni and the clinic have been supporting a march towards healing of physical, cultural, emotional and spiritual distress.” One of the things Lodge says she is proudest of is that no matter who you are, there is someone who works at the NATIVE Project who looks like you. “[While hiring] we spend a lot of energy saying, ‘You’re going to see Marshallese people, African people, African American people, Hispanic people. We have several Spanish speakers. We have Vietnamese people, and this is our staff,’” Lodge says. “We look like the community that we serve, and that doesn’t always happen.”

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s at the beginning, the main objective is still to coach youth and get them on a path toward successful careers and healthy lives. Many who work at the clinic are former leadership program participants, Lodge says, and every bit of money made goes right back into youth programming, which is all done with the Native American concept of seven generations in mind. Under that thinking, decisions are made based on how they would impact grandchildren seven generations from now. “That’s what our logo stands for, too. The four feathers are the four directions and the seven rocks are the seven generations,” Lodge says. “We think with whatever we plan, ‘How is this going to affect the future? How is this going to support our kids in the future?’”

Tues - Sat 11am-6pm 2012 E Sprague Ave Spokane

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Profile for The Inlander

Inlander Health & Home 06/06/2019  

Inlander Health & Home 06/06/2019