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AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2019

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a touch of

COLOR How to use vibrant hues in your home decor 22

ALSO INSIDE FAMILY Testing Boundaries 48 HEALTH Research Rising 10 FOOD Backwoods Feast 42 SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


Morihiko Nakahara, Conductor Hugh Panaro, Vocals Morgan James, Vocals

Morgan James, Vocals Hugh Panaro, Vocals

Broadway stars Hugh Panaro and Morgan James perform blockbuster hits from Goldfinger, Live and Let Die, Diamonds are Forever, Skyfall, and more.

James Lowe, Conductor Robert Belinic, Guitar

Works by a pair of iconic mid-twentieth century American masters.

Dmitri Shostakovich — Jazz Suite No. 2, Waltz No. 2 Erik Satie — Gymnopédies No. 1 & 3 Joaquin Rodrigo — Concierto de Aranjuez Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart — Symphony No. 40

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Adams — Short Ride in a Fast Machine Gershwin — Rhapsody in Blue Gershwin — I Got Rhythm Copland — Symphony No. 3

M A R T I N W O L D S O N T H E A T E R A T T H E F O X | Tickets: 509 624 1200 or SpokaneSymphony.org Health& Home


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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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FROM THE EDITOR SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO also at inlander.com/health&home

Stay Connected Email Health & Home Editor Anne McGregor at annem@inlander.com. The conversation continues on the Inlander Facebook page, and stay in touch with us at Inlander.com/Health&Home.

1227 W. Summit Parkway, Spokane, Wash. 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634

EDITOR Anne McGregor

annem@inlander.com

MANAGING EDITOR Jacob H. Fries ART DIRECTOR Ali Blackwood

A Brighter World

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onsider the following: Humans can perceive more than seven million different hues; Research shows colors actually make us happy — think bouquets and balloons; And our homes are supposed to be places to nurture our bodies and souls. So what’s with all the gray and white that people are decorating their homes with these days? In fact, writes designer Ingrid Fetell Lee, author of Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness, “When I studied color and its effect on joy, I wondered: Why is there such a gap between the colors that enliven us and the colors that surround us?” In this issue, local designers discuss how to confidently, and dare we say, boldly, add some joyful color to your surroundings (page 22). It’s easier than you might think and worth the effort. In our Health section, we explore the burst of activity in brain research in the Inland Northwest (page 10). People with neurological disorders like Parkinson’s and ALS have the opportunity to stay in the region while still participating in large clinical trials, and the new Gleason Institute promises to bring local patients access to cutting-edge treatment and assistive technologies. Finally we take a look at the Flying Irish Running Club (page 54), a Spokane institution that’s inspired thousands to get those daily steps, while enjoying camaraderie and fresh air. Sounds like a recipe for good health. Cheers!

EVENTS EDITOR Chey Scott CONTRIBUTORS Stacey Aggarwal, Wilson Criscione, Jonathan Hill, Jacob Jones, Josh Kelety, Young Kwak, Robert Maurer, Carson McGregor, Dan Nailen, Carrie Scozzaro, Morgan Scheerer, Matt Thompson, Nathan Weinbender, John R. White DESIGN & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wayne Hunt ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kristi Gotzian MARKETING DIRECTOR Kristina Smith ADVERTISING SALES Autumn Adrian, Mary Bookey, Jeanne Inman, Rich McMahon, Claire Price, Carolyn Padgham-Walker, Wanda Tashoff, Emily Walden SALES COORDINATION Camille Awbrey, Sydney Angove DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Derrick King, Tom Stover, Rachael Skipper

CONTRIBUTORS

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Justin Hynes BUSINESS MANAGER Dee Ann Cook CREDIT MANAGER Kristin Wagner PUBLISHER Ted S. McGregor Jr. GENERAL MANAGER Jeremy McGregor

JACOB JONES runs Whitman County Watch, a local news website for the Palouse, and previously worked as a staff writer for the Inlander. As the father of two adventurous toddlers, he spends a lot of time wishing they would make better decisions. His story in this issue explores how parents can guide children toward taking healthier risks and avoiding safety hazards.

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CARRIE SCOZZARO is regular contributor to Health & Home, writing about food and interior design, and a regular contributor to the Inlander. In this issue, she enjoyed learning how to use a Dutch oven from North Idaho College’s Jacob Rothrock, whose job teaching outdoor living, including fly-fishing and outdoor cooking, she says, “is a dream job many would envy.”

Health & Home is published every other month and is available free at more than 500 locations across the Inland Northwest. One copy free per reader. Subscriptions are available at $2.50 per issue: call x213. Reaching Us: Editorial: x261; Circulation: x226; Advertising: x215. COPYRIGHT All contents copyrighted © Inland Publications, Inc. 2019. Health & Home is locally owned and has been published since 2004.

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Celebrate Your City BY CHEY SCOTT Unity in the Community

Head to Riverfront Park for the region’s largest annual multicultural family event, which offers free school supplies and bike helmets to kids in kindergarten through 8th grade (children must be present; available while supplies last). Other events include the Cultural Village, live performances and entertainment, a career and education fair, youth fun zone, health fair, senior resources and general vendors. Sat, Aug. 17 from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. nwunity.org Whiskers & Wine (and Suds!) This annual event celebrates and supports Partners for Pets, a nonprofit dedicated to saving the lives of homeless animals in Spokane County. On the evening’s schedule is a dinner buffet with wine and beer, a silent auction and more. Funds raised help offset the cost of veterinary fees and maintaining the rescue’s cat adoption center in Spokane Valley. Sat, Aug. 24 at 5:30 pm. $25$30. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. partnersforpets. org/whiskers

Evening en Blanc Wear all white if you go to this outdoor fete, with food, wine and champagne at a pop-up dining event in Kendall Yards. The annual fundraiser benefits Project Beauty Share, a local nonprofit that collects and redistributes personal hygiene, cosmetics and beauty products to local organizations helping women and their families overcoming abuse, homelessness, addiction or poverty. Sun, Aug. 25 from 4-7 pm. $100/person. Kendall Yards Business District, 1335 W. Summit Pkwy. projectbeautyshare.org/evening-en-blanc 12th Annual Runway Renegades Fashion Show Local fashion designers, models and artists come together for this annual charity event, a runway show that raises money to bring creative projects to underserved or at-risk youth in the region. Event proceeds allow the nonprofit Runway Renegades to provide grants to area artists, who then volunteer their time and talents with local kids. The fashion show also includes a special popup boutique hosted by Goodwill Industries of the Inland Northwest. Sat, Sept. 14 from 5-11 pm. $30-$60. Riverside Place, 1110 W. Riverside. facebook.com/ RR.spokane (216-4300)

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SWEET HOMES

Ideas Behind Every Door

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ouses of all styles, sizes and shapes will be available to tour during the FALL FESTIVAL OF HOMES taking place across Spokane County starting Sept. 27. “Whether you’re looking to buy a home, just check out a new area or looking for design ideas, this is great,” says Kathy Gustafson, marketing and communications director for the Spokane Home Builders Association, organizer of the annual event. The majority of the 28 homes included in the festival are for sale, with many professionally staged. There are six hosted sites, where guests are encouraged to start their tours. Each host neighborhood has at least two homes for sale within it. “Our goal is to promote new home construction,” Gustafson says, “and to give people the opportunity to see what they want. It’s a one-stop shop if you’re looking at construction.” Homes of all styles, from traditional craftsmen to contemporary, will be shown, along with many homes that feature “green” building techniques

for energy efficiency. SHBA is also bringing in industry professionals from all over the state and North Idaho to judge the houses in different categories, such as Best Kitchen. Guests can also vote in the SHBA Fall Festival of Homes app, which can be downloaded for free and features turn-by-turn directions to some of the subdivisions that may not be on standard maps yet. You can also take virtual tours of the homes via the app. “We’re just giving the community the opportunity to see homes in all price ranges,” Gustafson says. “We have something for everyone.” — MORGAN SCHEERER Host sites include Eagle Ridge (South), Deer Park Meadows (North), River District Liberty Lake (Liberty Lake), ElkRidge Heights (South Valley) and Morningside Heights (Central Valley). The Spokane Home Builders Association Fall Festival of Homes runs Sept. 27-29, and Oct. 4-6, from 10am-5pm and is free. Check out spokanefestivalofhomes.com for details.

COMING OF AGE

Robot Relations

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imeon Mills pulls off a difficult trick with his debut novel. In THE OBSOLETES, the Spokane author (and husband of author Sharma Shields) manages to deliver a story that could be marketed to different genre audiences with equal effectiveness. Given that his two primary characters are both robots, you can probably guess that “sci-fi” is one of those genres. More interesting, though, is how The Obsoletes can just as easily be read as a YA coming-of-age tale. It holds all the tortured anguish and emotional highs and lows one would expect, even if its teenage protagonists weren’t constructed in a factory. Darryl and Kanga are the two main characters, robot “brothers” essentially raising themselves in small-town Michigan in the early ’90s after their robot parents were recalled for being, you guessed it, obsolete. Robots are not exactly beloved in Mills’ book; indeed, if Darryl and Kanga’s true identities are sussed out, they just might find themselves physically torn apart by frightened human townspeople — something they saw happen to a classmate during their “childhood.” The problem, though, is that as the two brothers move through high school, their efforts to appear human start to crumble. Kanga’s basketball prowess makes him an ever-more-popular man on campus, while Darryl’s unrequited crush — and his crush’s eyes for Kanga — make him jealous enough to start acting in dangerously human, vindictive ways. Ultimately in The Obsoletes, the brothers find out just how important family is, human or not, and help a town full of fearful humans learn a bit about accepting outsiders. Mills’ writing is breezy and fun, always engaging even for we readers who are neither young adults nor into sci-fi. — DAN NAILEN

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BRAIN

STUDIES Spokane is fast becoming a hub for research and treatment of neurological disorders BY STACEY AGGARWAL

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t’s no secret that Spokane has been experiencing a boom in health care, with two medical schools and numerous labs doing a wide variety of research. What may be surprising is that the region is developing into a hub for research in neuroscience, the study of disorders affecting the brain. “There are few things as interesting and complicated as the human brain,” says Marcos Frank, Ph.D., WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine Biomedical Sciences department professor and chair. “There’s really a tremendous amount of work there for scientists to understand just the basic underpinnings of how we think, feel and perceive — and how these can go wrong in with disease.” The incidence of neurodegenerative disease

— including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis (MS) — is expected to rise dramatically as the population ages. These diseases wreak havoc on the brain and can affect motor control, memory and learning. Unfortunately, they often get progressively worse, have few effective treatments and no cures. Frank believes that Spokane offers a unique opportunity for a foundation of neurological research. “In terms of demographics, Eastern Washington is a lot older than other parts of the country,” he points out. “It also has a heavy concentration of veterans. For reasons we don’t yet understand, veterans have a higher incidence of these neurodegenerative diseases. So, as a population, we here in Eastern Washington may ...continued on next page


“BRAIN STUDIES,” CONTINUED... encounter more people with these diseases than other parts of the state or other parts of the country.” Frank was recently named the interim director overseeing a massive new project — the launch of the Steve Gleason Institute for Neurosciences, in Spokane’s University District. Gleason, a Spokane native and well-known WSU and NFL football star who was diagnosed with ALS in 2011, has raised awareness of the disease, in part through his nonprofit, the Team Gleason Foundation, which is dedicated to assisting those coping with the disease with technology and equipment, as well as research into better treatments and ultimately, a cure. The neurological research at the Gleason Institute will focus on ALS and other “sister” neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, MS, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s. It will include a clinical research and care unit, with emphasis on offering therapies, as well as clinical trials of new treatments; an “Assistive Technology and Smart Home Center” incorporating use of augmented and virtual reality and prosthetic devices, and a “Discovery Research” unit, offering facilities that promote interdisciplinary work among researchers in various fields. The institute is a partnership with Team Gleason, and is supported by community partners, including Avista, Health Sciences & Services Authority of Spokane County (HSSA), Providence Health Care, St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute, MultiCare, the city of Spokane and the University District. Jason Aldred, MD, and Steven Pugh, MD, both of Inland Northwest Research, are also working hard to put Spokane on the neurological research map, coordinating not only treatment and care for patients with neurological disorders, but also enrolling patients in large, nationwide clinical treatment trials. The trials underway include research into symptom control, passive vaccines and targeted precision medicine trials that involve the genetics of Parkinson’s. Inland Northwest Research is actually the top recruiter in the world for several of these trials.

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he needs continue to grow. “Despite the great neurologists in the community, there’s still a shortage,” Aldred says. “The Baby Boomers of this area are relatively healthy and living longer, but developing these neurological disorders.” That means there’s a tremendous amount of opportunity in the region for neurological research. But, he says, “The biggest thing that has made us successful, really, is our patients.” Many of the people participating in clinical trials do so not just to benefit themselves but to provide more options for others with these diseases in

In response to a 2015 challenge from Steve Gleason, Microsoft developed software allowing paralyzed people to use eye movements to interact with technology.

the future. Actively helping others with the same diseases can be incredibly empowering, he notes. But participation in a clinical trial also provides a different experience for patients, Pugh says. As volunteers, “They get to see their doctor more in a different light. These visits are usually longer and more in depth. They get the opportunity to get involved with something more than just routine medical care.”

RSDAYURSDAY AY Y Y THUR Y TH ERY THURSRDY THURSDTA EVERE RSDAYHURSE V E EV REE EVE E RY HEU R E F E R Y F A VERY ET F E EVE D Y E S Y A E R R A D E F U D S R H S Y R F T THU ERY THUR THURSDA HURSDAY RSDAY FRE AY D EVERY EV E EVERY VERY T RSRY THU THURS E E RY THU EE EVE EVERY DAY FRRSDAY FREE EE EVE FREE A DAY FR E R S Y E F THURS R A R U D Y F U H S H T Y T SD UR SDA RSDAY EVERFYREE EVERY EVERY THV Y THUVRERY THURY RS E ERR EE R THEU E RY THU F EE Y E EVE DAY FRRSDAY FREE E Y R A EE VE F D R S F THURS R A U D Y FREE Y U H S A H T Y R D T A S Y U D Y R R H S R EVE FREE EVE RY T VERY THU ERY THUR THURSDA HUR E Y EE EVE V ERY T FREE E E EVER DAY FRRSDAY FREE REE EV EE THURS RSDAYURSDAY FRE U U H H T T SDAYHFURSDAY FR R U H EVERFYREE EVERY EVERY THV T RSDAYHUR T Y E ERR EE RY THEU EVERY VERY ET DAY FRRSDAY FREE EE EVE Y F EE E R A E F D R S Y E F THURS R A U TH THU URSD THURSDAYHURSDAY FR DAY U EVERFYREE EVERY EVERY THV ERY E EVERY T ERY THURS E E E R E F E R V E E Y TH E AY SDAY FR DAY FR V E D E E S E R R E F U R Y EE TH Y THUR Y THURS SDAY F SDAY FR URSDA Y EVERFREE EVER EVERY THV RSDAT Y THUVRERY THURY U R H E T E E E R E RY HU DAY FRRSDAY FREE EE EVE Y FREE E EVE R A E F D E R S Y E F THURS R A R U D Y F U TH TH URS THURSDA HURSDAY SDAY EVERFYREE EVERY EVERY THV ERY ERY T VERY THUR E TH AY FRSEDAY FREE DEAY FREE EV E E FREE EVERY D S R U TH Y THUR Y THURS AY FRE D S Y R DAY U Y A D EVERFREE EVER EVERY THVERY THURSRY THURSDTA S R HU E EE E EVE EE EVERY E EVERY TH DAY FRRSDAY FREE R AY FRE E F D R S Y F THURS R A U D Y U H T TH URS THURSDA HURSDAY SDAY EVERFYREE EVERY EVERY THV RY Y T ERY THUR HU DAY SDAY FREEAY FREE E YEFREE EVER T E EV VERYA R A D U D S H S R T R AY FRDEAY FREE EU U D U H S H T R T RSD Y Y U Y EVER EVER EVERY THERY THURS EVERY TH EV

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How do I volunteer for a clinical trial?

A clinical trial is a scientific investigation of an experimental new treatment. Patients can take part in these trials by referral from their doctors. However, physicians have a lot to worry about in their day-today work and may not be aware of all the clinical trials going on in our area. If you are struggling with a disorder and may be interested in furthering medical research on it, ask your doctor specifically to look up all the clinical trials in the area and see if there is one that might be a good fit for you. You can also do your own research at clinicaltrials.gov. It’s important to know that clinical trials are often “placebo-controlled,” meaning some volunteers will receive treatment, while others will receive a placebo. Whenever possible, most trials are also “double-blinded,” meaning that both you and your doctor won’t know what treatment you are receiving until the trial is over. Understanding study design is important as a volunteer, because although you’re receiving the same personal attention and care, there is no guarantee that the treatment you are receiving is not the placebo. Moreover, even if you are assigned to receive the experimental treatment, there is no guarantee that it will have any effect on the progression of your disease. But don’t be discouraged. Volunteers in these trials have the unique opportunity to make an impact on the future of their disease. “Even with ‘negative’ studies,” when the experimental treatment doesn’t help the disease, “if they’re well done, we can learn a whole lot,” Aldred says Dr. Jason Aldred. — STACEY AGGARWAL

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Logan Elementary principal Brent Perdue and teacher Roni Gross grapple with how to handle combative students. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Classroom Aggression Even as they face pressure not to isolate or restrain students, local teachers encounter violent behaviors BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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s someone who teaches the youngest children in Spokane Public Schools, Roni Gross has become used to violence. “I’ve been hit and kicked and punched and broken and hurt,” says Gross, a Logan Elementary K-3 special education teacher. In the 2017-18 school year, there were 85 staff injuries while administering isolation or restraint of students in Spokane Public Schools. That number, however, is likely far lower than the actual number of injuries to staff, as many injuries go unreported. Gross, for instance, very rarely reports any injuries to the office — not even when a student punched her in the face and broke her glasses. Brent Perdue, principal at Logan Elementary, has been an administrator in four different schools. But in recent years, he says he’s noticed a difference in the kinds of behaviors he’s seen from students.

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“I don’t know that the behaviors are worse, but they present like they’re worse because I do believe the volume is greater,” he says. “I think there are more kids with those levels of needs.” Perdue doesn’t want to come off like he’s blaming kids. There are a variety of factors contributing to why a student may have behavioral issues at a young age, like family poverty, a lack of mental health care and childhood trauma. At Logan Elementary, 90 percent of students are considered low-income, according to state data. As Gross puts it, students in her behavioral intervention class are “tiny people with big things happening in their lives and ... there are things they don’t have control over.” Spokane Public Schools has emphasized “restorative practices” to change a student’s behavior in the last several years. “Exclusionary” discipline such as isolation, suspension and expulsion are expected

to be used only as a last resort. Though secondary grade levels have seen decreases in exclusionary discipline since 2014-2015, elementary suspensions or expulsions are about even overall when comparing 201819, according to Spokane Public Schools data. The state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction contends Spokane Public Schools is “overusing” isolation, which involves locking students in what is often a padded room. State officials say that isolation and restraint should never be used as a punishment. But at Holmes Elementary, students were put into isolation more than 500 times in the 2017-18 school year, among the highest of any school in Spokane, according to state data. “The district is not saying exclusionary measures can never be used,” Stephanie Lundberg, principal at Holmes Elementary, says. “They’re saying there’s not a lot of


research to support that suspending a child is going to change behavior.” She says the school has seen “a fair amount of success” in exclusionary discipline. “It’s always about safety,” she says. “We don’t want staff getting hurt and we don’t want kids getting hurt.” Though Lundberg says it’s “absolutely” a goal for Holmes to reduce that number, “This year alone I had two separate teachers punched in the face,” she says. “It wasn’t unintentional … this was a targeted punch to the face. That was a new thing we haven’t seen.”

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his past school year, Holmes tried a pilot program to support students in behavioral intervention. The goal, Lundberg says, was to “try something different” with students. It was one of two elementary schools in Spokane to jump on the pilot. “We wanted to create an environment for our kids that would be more therapeutic in nature,” Lundberg says. Some students had heart rate monitors to track when they’re becoming upset. The class also varied instructional strategies, with some students taking online courses through Spokane Virtual Learning. A specialist was on site to support kids when they needed it. Lundberg calls it a “step in the right direction.” Students could also use more mental health support in school, Perdue says. Logan, for instance, has one mental health counselor. But he argues that’s not enough. “The challenge there is we have over 400 kids who attend the school,” he says. “And there are way more than 24 kids who could benefit from that.” Gross, the teacher at Logan, emphasizes early intervention as a way to change student behaviors and ultimately keep themselves — and teachers — safe. She says she sees more success with students she’s able to work with at a younger age. “A big part of my job is to help them see that school can be fun and safe and silly,” Gross says. For Gross, safety is her No. 1 concern when a student becomes violent. If she does decide the isolation room would be useful, she monitors to make sure the kid is OK. And minutes later, things are usually different. Sometimes, children don’t remember what happened. “Often,” she says, “they don’t even remember that they hurt you.”

Together, We’re Transforming Health Care Thanks to the generous support of our donors, Providence Health Care Foundation is funding technology, programs and research that saves lives and enriches our community. For more than 130 years, our region has relied on Providence not only for world-class medical care, but to answer the call for help from our less fortunate neighbors.

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Doctor E Data Electronic health records are here to stay. Are they helping? BY JOSH KELETY

lectronic health records were supposed to change the world, for patients and their caregivers, providing real-time, portable access to one’s entire health record, all in one place, with a few keystrokes. The vast majority of hospitals are now using some form of electronic health records, but have the systems, implemented at substantial costs, lived up to the hype? “EHRs have been a mixed blessing for many of us,” says Darryl Potyk, an internal medicine specialist at Providence Health Services, which uses Epic, a popular EHR system. “It’s a tool and I’m really quite hopeful that some of the workflow issues can get streamlined.” For patients, however, a visit to the doctor may sometimes seem more like a data entry session, with the physician

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typing away and only occasionally making eye contact. “One of my colleagues says, ‘We’re not doctors anymore, we’re clickoligists,’” Potyk says. Brian Seppi, another internal medicine specialist at Providence in Spokane, says he had to work at improving patient interaction while typing on his computer. “It’s a learned behavior to be able to do that,” he says. “If it’s something that requires a lot of attention, I’ll push away from the computer.” Still, for Potyk, there is some truth to the notion that visits to the doctor have fundamentally changed with the introduction of EHRs. “The templates often don’t fully capture the thinking that the physicians are doing,” he says. “Now it’s a series of check boxes that you click.”

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And for all the hype, EHRs aren’t even helping doctors save time. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. “It’s not at all uncommon to have physicians doing their work late into the night,” Potyk says. “There’s many, many cases that we all know about where people are working throughout the day, getting the basics done, but then finishing their notes late into the evening after dinner, after they’ve put their kids to bed.” In fact, a Medscape project surveying 15,000 physicians in 29 specialties on their “well being,” revealed considerable discontent. Forty-eight percent of women and 38 percent of men said they were “burned out.” Among those with self-described “burnout,” 56 percent attributed those feelings to too many “bureaucratic” tasks and 24 percent specifically to frustration with electronic health records, which have been found to take up as much as half of a physician’s workday. Potyk says that some of the complaints about EHRs are due to older physicians not adapting well to a digital interface. “We have a lot of physicians who aren’t tech savvy and would choose not to use EHR.” As chief of medical education for UW Medicine’s Gonzaga partnership, Potyk works with med students and thinks the up-and-coming generation of physicians are probably better equipped to efficiently use EHR systems, as well as adjust to the frequent tweaks EHR manufacturers are making to their products. “I don’t see EHRs as being the burnout boogeyman,” he says. “They’re getting better, the interfaces are getting better, we’re seeing a lot of evolution.” But he still acknowledges the impacts of the current issues with EHRs: “We’re all, as a result of some of the inefficiencies, feeling like that hamster on the wheel,” Potyk says.

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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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Taking Stock of Prescriptions My mom is 76 years old and is currently taking 12 different medications. Is that too many for one person to be taking?

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he answer to your question depends on your mom and what she is taking. That being said, the correct answer is very likely “yes.� Clearly, as a society we are overmedicated. Seventy percent of adults in the United States over the past year have taken or currently takes a prescription medication. One out of 10 adults takes five or more prescriptions. Our medical care system is very adept at adding medications but rarely de-prescribes them. The more medications that anyone takes, the greater the likelihood of adverse effects and the greater the likelihood of drug interactions. My suggestion is that you talk to your

pharmacist and/or your prescriber about this. Ask them to go through each medication and make sure that each is still needed, that there is not redundancy in the medication regimen, that there are no potentially significant drug interactions, and that the benefits of each medication clearly outweigh the risks. In most cases when this type of analysis is done, medications are removed from the regimen. Additionally, as we age many chronic conditions can be treated a bit less aggressively, sometimes reducing the need for medication. De-prescribing medications will result in fewer medications which will lower cost and

spokanecenter.com 18

Health& Home


reduce the risk of drug misadventures — all of which may improve our quality of life. — JOHN R. WHITE John R. White is chair of the Department of Pharmacotherapy at WSU-Spokane and an expert on diabetes. He served as editor and author of the newly released edition of Medications for the Treatment of Diabetes for health care professionals. The American Diabetes Association has called the book, “the most authoritative guide to diabetes therapeutics available.”

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SUPERFOOD

Striking Oil MCT oils stirred up interest as key components of “bulletproof coffee” — a blend of coffee, butter and MCT oil that’s touted for its ability to increase energy levels, improve focus, decrease appetite and promote weight loss. But what are MCT oils, and is there any science behind including them in your diet?

ATTRIBUTES

MCT oil is a supplement made up of medium-length fatty acids known as triglycerides. These fatty acids are strings of multiple carbon molecules that can vary in length. In MCT oil, this carbon “chain” has between six and 12 carbons, thus earning its name “medium chain triglycerides (MCT).” For reference, short-chain fatty acids have less than six carbons, while long-chain fatty acids have 13-21 carbon atoms.

SUPER POWERS

The buzz around MCT oils is largely due to the popularity of the ketogenic diet. This diet focuses on manipulating your food intake so that your body uses primarily ketones from fats for energy, rather than glucose. Supporters of MCT oil argue that fats of medium-length oils aren’t often consumed in the standard Western diet. These oils are digested differently than longer-chain oils. They go directly from the digestive system to the liver, bypassing the step where they may be stored as fat in the body. Therefore, MCTs can

be directly consumed by your body as a source of energy. Although there have been studies done on MCT oil as a supplement, the academic discussion of MCT oils is often directly related to the ketogenic diet. So far, these studies have suggested that

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Health& Home


JOIN THE FIGHT FOR ALZHEIMER’S FIRST SURVIVOR

taking MCT oil can help improve memory (particularly in Alzheimer’s), weight management, energy and drive healthier levels of cholesterol and glucose in some people.

WEAKNESSES

Studies have also shown that when MCT oil is consumed at high levels or as an exclusive source of fat, it winds up being stored in your body the same way other fats do. Just like any other fat, eating excessive amounts of MCT oil can still lead to weight gain and fat storage, digestive issues, and metabolic changes.

HOW TO USE IT

MCT oil most commonly comes as a tastefree liquid that can be added to beverages, smoothies, salad dressings or sauces, but can also be taken in the form of predosed capsules or a powder. Or add these medium-length oils to your diet from food sources such as coconut oil, palm kernel oil, and dairy products. — STACEY AGGARWAL

COEUR D’ALENE

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Clear Your Cloudy Vision LASER-ASSISTED CATARACT SURGERY Empire Eye’s Surgery Center is the only practice offering advanced Laser-assisted Cataract Surgery in the Spokane and Coeur d’Alene area. The board certified surgeons and specialty trained physicians at Empire Eye Physicians offer treatments with life-changing results. BOARD CERTIFIED SURGEONS AND SPECIALTY TRAINED PHYSICIANS Mark Kontos, M.D. Sean Hendricks, M.D. Ali Heaton, O.D.

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21


make it

POP

Adding color to your home can be fun and stress-free with these interior design experts’ tips and tricks | BY CHEY SCOTT

F

or those not professionally trained in the art of interior design or color theory, picking something as seemingly simple as a paint color for a single room can feel like home improvement roulette. Warm or cool? What are undertones, anyway? What if this paint color clashes with the wood floors or finishes? What if I change my mind about this green wall paint in two months?

While some renovation projects really are better left to the experts — like the three Spokane-based interior designers featured here — there’s also no need to feel overwhelmed by the choice to bring more brightness and color into your home. From small accessory pieces like throw pillows, all the way to floor-to-ceiling wall paint, big and small color updates can totally transform and refresh a space. ...continued on page 24

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Health& Home


“This client was ready for some color and patterns in her life, and wasn’t afraid to go bold. The pops of color and clean modern accents make this a space to remember.” — Carter Crandall PHOTO COURTESY BLYTHE INTERIORS

AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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“If people are scared and say, ‘What goes with this and that?’ look at pictures of birds. It’s like God’s way of saying ‘these colors work together.’” — Carter Crandall PHOTOS COURTESY BLYTHE INTERIORS

“MAKE IT POP,” CONTINUED...

Natural Inspiration Not sure where to start when it comes to picking a color scheme for your

home? Look to nature, the world’s original “interior” designer. Designer Carter Crandall, who runs the new Spokane office of San Diego-based Blythe Interiors, loves to use colorful birds, butterflies and other natural elements for color inspiration. “I have a Pinterest board that I always end up sending people of bird color schemes,” Crandall says. “If people are scared and say, ‘What goes with this and that?’ look at pictures of birds. It’s like God’s way of saying ‘these colors work together.’” While the males of most bird species carry the most color — bright blues, reds, pinks, greens, yellows, oranges and more — she notes that many of these eye-catching hues are balanced out by some neutral feathers, too, like white, black, grey or beige. Brilliant tropical species can become inspiration for more vivid palettes, while a less flashy (but still beautiful) great blue heron with its blue head and tail feathers, gold beak, dusty grey-blue body and black legs could unite for a more muted space that still has pops of brightness. Photos or paintings of bird species whose foliage became the source of inspiration for a space’s palette can even be used as art to anchor the space, Crandall says. “Let’s stick that bird in there and — boom — we’ve made it work.” To balance a space’s colorful elements so it’s not too overpowering, Crandall also recommends elements like green houseplants and other natural materials, found in natural fibers or wood, to add texture and interest. “Greenery is color and plants are pops of color,” she says. “It’s the cheapest thing you can buy, and it brings life to the room and plants come in various shades.” ...continued on page 26

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Health& Home


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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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“MAKE IT POP,” CONTINUED...

Trend Carefully While plenty of trendy “colors of the year,”

like Pantone’s living coral, or the ubiquitous rose gold/millennial pink, can make big waves in both fashion and interior design, their brief time in the spotlight can also make a space feel dated if you go all in. “We’re careful using trendy colors,” notes HUE Color and Decor co-owner Jana Oliveri. “We might accent with trendy colors or put them where you could remove them later, so not necessarily a whole wall, but maybe a small space — we might do a half-bath.” Another option to incorporate currently popular tones is to pair them with classic hues that never go out of style. “Navy is a classic, we use a lot of that,” Oliveri notes. Neutrals can also help create that balance. “We love color, but we love a space with blended neutrals, and we do pops of color and you’re not going to walk in and it’s rainbow or Sesame Street,” she adds. Don’t be afraid to bring a trendy color of the year into your home, however, if it’s ...continued on page 30

“When clients give you the thumbs up to color, but still want the space to be calming, we put most of the focus on the floor.” — Carter Crandall PHOTO COURTESY BLYTHE INTERIORS

Meet the

COLOR EXPERTS

Blythe Interiors: Carter Crandall A recent transplant to the Inland Northwest, Carter Crandall oversees the new Spokane office of the San Diego-based design studio Blythe Interiors, which specializes in affordable residential projects at any stage, from a single room refresh to new construction. “If the client has a couple thousand dollars [budget], we’ll facilitate that and get as luxe as we can for that price point, and really honor what the client wants,” Crandall says. The designer, with 20 years of industry experience, is currently in the process of remodeling her family’s 1990s-era North Spokane home, and describes her personal style as transitional, incorporating modern

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Health& Home

with vintage pieces for a cohesive look. “That is a typical client as well, because as we get older, things get passed down to us, and we don’t want to let them go but want to make it work in a modern contemporary space,” she notes. Portfolio and contact: blytheinteriors.com


AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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digin

Catholic CharitIes Invites You to A fundraising event supporting food security in our community

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Carne Asada street tacos Chicken Satay w/peanut sauce Vegetable empanadas Bao Buns Poutine

$65 TICKET INCLUDES FOOD AND 2 DRINKS. MUST BE 21 and OVER TO ATTEND

Visit cceasternwa.org/events to purchase tickets.

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Health& Home


Caring for kids A fundraising event for Catholic Charities Eastern Washington and Morning Star Boys’ Ranch benefiting children in our commmunity.

Th u rs d ay , Oc t obe 5pm - 7p r 10 m Tickets $100 per person Or -new in 2019Special pricing for young adults (21 to 30) $60.00

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“MAKE IT POP,” CONTINUED... also a color you truly love. “Make it your space, not just because a color is on trend, but pick a color you love and be daring and make it your own,” adds HUE co-owner Cathy Peroff. This rationale is partly why Crandall often asks to see what’s hanging in a client’s closet when she’s touring their home, to test the waters for color aversion or embrace. “I say ‘Show me your shoes and the funnest piece you have in here.’ Even if it’s muted, like a pale purple… it gives me a place to start. They like blue and purple and are comfortable with the cooler tones.” If she finds lots of bright colors, or even pops, like a bright red handbag, Crandall can infer that a client might be willing to go a little bolder in their living spaces, too.

Start Small For clients who aren’t ready to dive deep

“Colorful design doesn’t mean you’re committed to something. With a neutral foundation, clients can easily update the color palette any time they want through the use of art and accessories.” — Carter Crandall

into the rainbow, designers suggest testing the waters with things that are inexpensive and easily changed, namely accessories. “The rule in decorating is always start

PHOTOS COURTESY BLYTHE INTERIORS

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Health& Home


with the most inexpensive pieces first, and work from the floor up,” Peroff explains. “Then you start to add things that are interchangeable.” She lists off examples of these items, like an accent chair, rugs, throw pillows, poofs, planters, house plants and photos or art on the walls. “Anything organic is one of our easiest ways to show bright color,” Peroff says. “If you’re really terrified, just go get a bouquet of flowers, put it in a room and see how it changes your space. You can bring in an amazing pop with just a floral arrangement.” “People are often afraid to use color, and I think a lot of that is commitment,” Oliveri adds. “The other fear is just in how to choose and how to start, and how to pick the colors and pair them together.” If you try these tips and aren’t sure it’s working, Crandall suggests taking a photo of the entire space. “We’re so emotionally attached to our spaces, when we take a picture we become an observer of the space, and see things we might not normally see,” she explains.

...continued on next page

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Warm Red

True Red

Cool Red

“The focal point is the hot pink settee, and we brought in navy blue, various greens and brass accents with the lamp and accessories to complement the hot pink.” — Jana Oliveri PHOTO COURTESY HUE

“MAKE IT POP,” CONTINUED...

Understand Undertones Now that you know what colors you love, hate and want to use in your home, what else is there to consider? Color undertones are a big one, and a lesser-known aspect of interior design that can be frustrating if you get it wrong. Undertones can, for example, make a red (usually a warm color) look different based on things like lighting and other

colors around it. Warmer reds have more orange and yellow undertones, whereas a cool red is going to have some bluish or purple undertones. “So [a client] knows they want green, but do they want a soft green or do they want a yellow or blue undertone? We help with that aspect so it blends and gives that overall feel” they’re going for, Oliveri notes.

...continued on page 34

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We Care Every Day, In Every Way. Visiting Angels Can Help... Jana Oliveri

Cathy Peroff

Meet the

COLOR EXPERTS

HUE Color & Decor: Jana Oliveri and Cathy Peroff This newly founded Spokane design studio, owned by longtime friends and designers Jana Oliveri and Cathy Peroff, specializes in helping clients choose cohesive color palettes for their homes, no matter the project’s scale. “When you do remodels and projects, there is really no one we know of really [in the area] focused on color,” Oliveri says. “Paint is one of the first things people want to do to make a change because it’s the most inexpensive.” After spending years working at a local Sherwin-Williams paint store, Peroff became known by clients for her expertise in choosing, matching and combining colors to fit specific needs. “I just realized I had a knack for it — putting together color and helping people get

on historical registers and suggesting colors, and just really diving into all features of color and decorating,” Peroff says. One of HUE’s specialties is helping homeowners find era-appropriate paint colors for historic homes, which, if listed on a historic registry, fall under strict requirements when making any changes. The full-service design firm can also re-envision any space beyond paint colors to create a fully cohesive space, from finishes to furniture. “I’ve done an entire room off a pillow or a rug or a picture,” Oliveri notes. “You can create any paint color you want going off a piece of art or pillow. But often when you start with a paint color, you’re limited by aspects of that room.” Portfolio and contact: huecolordecor.com

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“Willing to be bold, and reflecting on the year of their home and their love of midcentury pieces, bright orange ceramic tile gave this space an instant wow factor.” — Jana Oliveri PHOTO COURTESY HUE

“MAKE IT POP,” CONTINUED...

(Above) “Using painted stripes in a bright blue on the walls of this child’s room added the backdrop for the space. We then added a bright orange desk (complementary color) and accented with grays and wood tones to ground the space.” — Jana Oliveri (Left) “At times, simply painting a wall in your hallway with a pop of color and pairing it with art can add just the right touch to an otherwise monochromatic space.” — Jana Oliveri PHOTOS COURTESY HUE

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A space’s size and other elements, like the tone of natural woodwork, the direction of the sunlight coming into the space and what kind of interior lighting is used, like LEDs or incandescent bulbs, can all change how a color looks because of undertones, she explains. If you’re picking a darker color, like navy, Peroff also cautions against picking a few shades lighter than you want simply because you’re worried it will appear too dark. “Don’t bump up three colors on the chart for a small space assuming it’ll look darker,” she says. “Pick the color you want to go with.” Undertones also can impact what colors complement each other, and how balanced a space with several different colors will feel. “If a room is overall warm, then we’ll balance with cool colors and tones,” Oliveri says. “If you go into a room with maple woodwork and it’s beige and it’s all warm tones — or the opposite, it’s a grey and white stark space, and there is no warmth — we bring in wood and plants and organic materials and warmer colors. A lot of time it’s just missing those organic natural elements, to bring it all together and balance it out; not always paint color.”


SEPT 27-29 & OCT 4-6

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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

35


Di n i n g e w with a Vi Inside or out, the views are as good as the new menu.

COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

Making the Most of your Summer Head to Coeur d’Alene to squeeze the most out of the season

S

ummer is short, but the memories live on. So make the most of the sunny days of August and even September with adventures in North Idaho.

River Grill Restaurant

Live Music Thursday at 6pm June 20th - Sept 26th

BREAKFAST: Mon-Sun 7am-11am LUNCH & DINNER: Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm

Fri & Sat 11am-10pm

HAPPY HOUR: Mon-Fri 4pm-6pm Sat & Sun 2pm-6pm

414 E 1st Ave | Post Falls, Id (208) 773-1611 36

Health& Home

GET ON THE WATER. What better way to experience the beauty of Lake Coeur d’Alene than on a cruise? Start Thursday mornings right with a Yoga & Mimosa cruise through Aug. 29 or rock out to Bands on Boats Aug. 2, 9, 16 and 30 or visit cdacruises.com for information about river, sunset, brunch cruises and more (cdacruises.com). Or for the ultimate view, book a scenic flight over the lake or surrounding areas with Brooks Seaplane — but do it quickly. Their popular and affordable Coeur d’Alene sunset flights sell out each summer. SEE SOME CLASSICS. Imagine yourself cruising in any of the 60 or so vintage wooden boats at the annual Antique and Classic Boat Show Aug. 23-25, located along the Coeur d’Alene Resort boardwalk. And if your idea of cruisers involves four wheels, mark your calendar for the Coaster Classic Car Show at Silverwood Theme Park, Aug. 31-Sept. 1. GET ACTIVE. Rent a standup paddleboard or kayak or try parasailing — go solo or tandem — for a priceless experience at Coeur d’Alene Parasail.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Cheer on the athletes — or join them! — during the Coeur d’Alene Triathlon Aug. 10, which is three events in one: full triathlon, half-distance event, and a duathlon. The annual Coeur d’Fondo bicycle race takes place Sept. 21, when riders will converge on downtown to join a celebration already in progress. Oktoberfest will be in its second day of showcasing German culture with food, beverages and lots of oom-pa-pa music. CATCH A CONCERT. Live After 5 continues on Wednesdays in McEuen Park through Sept. 4, when local favorites the Rub complete a strong summer lineup. Free Thursday concerts continue at Riverstone through Aug. 29 and the free City Park concerts take place every Sunday through Sept. 15. ENJOY THE TASTES OF SUMMER. Have some huckleberries! Try them in a “gooey” dessert at the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s Dockside Restaurant. Ask for a cocktail made with them and enjoy the view from Whispers Lounge. Or bring some berry good items home like jam or candies from Marketplace Gifts inside the Resort Plaza Shops. DRINK A COLD ONE. Help support the North Idaho Centennial Trail system and get your fill of the Kelly Hughes Band and local craft beer and cider at the annual Ales


for the Trails, Aug. 10 in McEuen Park. At Silver Mountain on Aug. 17, a ticket to Brewsfest includes a scenic gondola ride, commemorative mug and six tastings of regional craft beer. Mark the official end of summer at the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s annual Labour Day Luau, Sept. 1. The family-friendly event features a gourmet buffet including a whole smoked pig, hula lessons, fire eaters, DJ dance music and of course, a tropical cocktail bar.

C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

Smokey Joe’s Cafe AUGUST 8-25

Set in the idealized ’50s, Smokey Joe’s Cafe, presented by Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, is a compelling musical about love lost and won, brought to life with some of the greatest songs ever recorded. $49 adult, $42 senior, $27 child; Friday-

Saturday 7:30 pm; Sunday 2 pm; Salvation Army Kroc Center.

ArtWalk AUGUST 9

Explore beautiful downtown Coeur d’Alene when more than two dozen businesses and galleries open their doors and showcase celebrated local and regional artists. Free; 5-8 pm;

Stay & Play

ON LAKE COEUR D’ALENE

download a map at artsandculturecda. org/artwalk.

North Idaho State Fair AUGUST 21-25

The fair promises five days packed full of fun with carnival rides, rodeo action, live music and a smashing demo derby. 10 am-10 pm; Kootenai County Fairgrounds.

STICKS & STONES GOLF PACKAGE

Luxury accommodations, award-winning golf, and a rejuvenating spa experience.

B O O K T O DAY !

COEUR D’ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

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SPONSORED BY THE COEUR D’ALENE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

AUGUST - APRIL SEPTEMBER - MAY 2019 2018

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“Keeping systems simple is one of the secrets to having kids maintain it,” says professional organizer Katie Regelin (lower right). NATALIE GIESA PHOTOS

Space for Success Organize your home to help kids succeed BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

t can seem that days go by more quickly towards the end of summer. Soon it will be time to switch gears and get ready for fall, including school, which for parents means packing away summer and making space for studying and all the stuff that goes with kids’ many and varied school-year activities. But where to start? The first step, says Katie Regelin, owner of Order Restored and a mother of three children, is to declutter. After developing systems that worked for her, she went on to create her company in 2017 to help others. Despite lingering summery weather, there’s no time like the present to start the process. “Now’s the time to take inventory of what you have and what you no longer need,” Regelin says. Her recommendation: start with clothing and school stuff. “Having efficient systems in place to handle both of these areas is key to maintaining an orderly home, and getting kids involved in the process is important for follow-through,” Regelin says. Set aside time with your child — ages 3 and up are perfectly capable — to review their clothing, deciding what no longer

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fits, isn’t needed, or has fallen out of favor, Regelin suggests. Items can be passed to younger siblings or donated. “Older kids may need a gentle reminder that if they want new school clothes they need to help clean out their closet,” she says. Decluttering includes going through last year’s backpack and school supplies sooner, rather than in September. “Get your school’s supply list early and watch for the sales,” Regelin says. “This is also the best time to stock up on crayons, glue sticks, and extra pencils that can be used year-round or as stocking stuffers.” Once you’ve cleaned out, it’s time to set up a system to help get and stay organized. “Keeping systems simple is one of the secrets to having kids maintain it,” Regelin says. So, recognizing kids may be more ambivalent about hanging clothes than you are, focus on other methods to corral clothing: dresser drawers, baskets or boxes that kids can help label. When clothes come out of the wash — Regelin does each child’s laundry separately to eliminate having to sort them again — kids can be responsible

for putting them away. A place for schoolwork is important, and doesn’t have to be a desk, Regelin says. “I find most young children do homework at the kitchen table, so a nearby drawer or Mason jar for pencils, or rolling cart tucked into a closet with homework supplies works just fine,” she says. Older kids might need several dedicated spots for schoolwork, depending on the project at hand. “Focusing on the results and outcomes of the student projects should determine if the students’ study environment needs to be modified,” says Regelin. Parents need to stay on top of the details, too, Regelin says, which can include snack lists, class schedules and IEPs. “A folder with each child’s name on it can help corral weekly homework assignments, school projects and sports schedules,” she says. Another suggestion: help everyone stay on track with routines, such as emptying backpacks of unnecessary papers in a recycling bin by the door as soon as kids’ come home from school. Remember to tidy up homework areas and prep backpacks the night before. “One last thought is to provide kids with incentives to do well in school,” says Regelin. “For example, my friend’s high school son knows “‘if you don’t get B’s, you don’t get the keys!’” That and lowered insurance rates for school-aged drivers can be a powerful motivator to get and stay organized, especially with good habits they — and parents — learn early on.


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DON HAMILTON PHOTO

Home Again Gina Freuen converted her studio into a live-work space STORY AND PHOTOS BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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any artists find themselves turning a portion of their homes into studios; Gina Freuen did the reverse. After her husband passed away unexpectedly in 2014, Freuen found herself contemplating her life’s trajectory. She decided to move out of her Little Spokane River area home — her son and his family live there now — and convert the adjacent building that formerly held her ceramic studio into her living quarters. “I have a different perspective from this side of the house,” Freuen says. Instead of seeing the massive garden where she spends much of her time in warmer months when not in the studio, she now sees the neighbor’s horses and a verdant swath of land alongside the gurgling river-fed creek.


Freuen renovated the 600-square-foot building, cutting back on studio space to create a kitchen and dining area, adding a second floor sleeping area, and plenty of places to showcase art throughout. Numerous built-in shelves hold her own ceramics, those of former students, and works from her travels, including a trip to Turkey, and from regional artists like Mardis Nenno and Chris Antemann. The walls are covered with works by such artists as Harold Balazs, Robert Grimes, Mel McCuddin and both Freuen’s sister Kay O’Rourke, and her mother, the late Dede McKay. A Gonzaga University instructor for 20 years and longtime artist, Freuen is entrenched in the regional arts community. Right now she works one-on-one with a few students from Mead School District’s Riverpoint Academy where daughter Regan Drew worked before the school’s closure. She is an exhibiting partner at Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery in Spokane, where she helps manage guest shows. Freuen also displays work inside her home studio, such as during the annual Little Spokane River Studio Tour in September, which she helped found in 2008. The 12-by-15 studio is light-flooded and well-organized, with a potter’s wheel, buckets of glaze, bags of clay and a long central table. “You don’t need fancy tools,” says Freuen, who does a combination of hand-building and wheel-throwing. “Sometimes pieces are only wheelthrown then altered through carving, stamping, kind of a repoussé approach,” Freuen says. “Sometimes they are slab-built. Whatever suits the form I am working on.” Freuen’s teapots might be the most recognizable of her ceramic work. “I feel like my work has gone way beyond teapots, but I enjoy making them as part of my regular studio regimen,” she says. “I like their whimsy and the problem solving decisions that go into making them.” Her studio, although small, has three doors. One leads to the house, the other to the covered slab of concrete where she has several kilns for firing work. The largest is fueled by wood, versus electricity or gas, and it is where she does “soda firing,” a multiday firing process that produces unusual and desirable glaze effects. The third door is a remnant from her former home, a heavy door with pencil marks where children’s and now grandchildren’s heights have been recorded, a reminder of the importance of family.

AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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Jacob Rothrock, who teaches outdoor living skills at North Idaho College, fires up the grill for a Dutch oven cooking tutorial in his back yard. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Beyond the Grill Expand your outdoor cooking repertoire by using a Dutch oven BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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t’s been said that food eaten out-ofdoors — al fresco if you are in Italy — just tastes better. But how about when it’s cooked outside too? Maybe that’s part of the appeal of camping: cooking on an open fire with the scent wafting into the night sky. Fine as that may be, there’s no need to be limited to charred meats cooked over open flames. The Dutch oven offers almost unlimited options for outdoor cooking, says Jacob Rothrock, head of North Idaho College’s Outdoor Pursuits program. “Anything you can cook in [the oven] you can cook over coals,” says Rothrock, who first learned to cook with Dutch ovens as a flyfishing guide in Colorado. Dutch ovens are versatile, deep-sided pots with a handle and lid, typically made of cast iron, although aluminum is also used, and most (excluding enameled cast

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iron) can be used indoors and out. They retain heat well and, with proper care, can last for decades. Using hot coals, versus grilling over a flame, Dutch ovens offer numerous outdoor cooking options, from baking, to simmering, to frying. Rothrock has plenty of outdoor experience — he was raised in North Carolina where his parents bought an old Girl Scout camp. Rothrock recalls taking up a flyfishing pole at age 3; he was catching fish by age 4. After graduating from North Carolina State’s outdoor management program, he helped guide multi-day flyfishing expeditions, which meant horse-packing everything in and out of camp, as well as cooking for guests. He found he enjoyed teaching more than guiding and relocated to North Idaho to take a job at North Idaho College in 2007. Part of his job requires teaching Outdoor Pursuits classes, including lake kayaking, flyfishing, bike maintenance and outdoor cooking. The outdoor cooking class covers backpacking, fire and food safety, basic kitchen prep techniques and cooking for dietary restrictions, as well as proper care

...continued on page 44

TOOLS OF THE TRADE To be successful with your Dutch oven, Jacob Rothrock recommends the following gear: •• Briquettes and lighter fluid. (Unlike grilling, lighter fluid chemicals don’t permeate the food and you want to make sure the coals get fully lit. A chimney to heat the coals, which are ready to cook on once they turn white, can be very handy, too.) •• Cutting board. •• Fire ring or a metal pizza pan to set hot Dutch oven on, minimizing impact to ground. (Fire and high heat can kill the organisms in the soil, so an elevated surface or firepan is ideal to hold both the coals and Dutch oven.) •• Leather gloves. •• Lid lifter or channel locks. •• Long metal tongs. •• Metal utensils. •• Sharp knife. •• Small metal shovel and fireproof way of disposing of ash or hauling it out. •• Water — just in case.


POP OF FUN

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ove popcorn, but dread the discomfort and embarrassment of having hulls stuck in your teeth? Worry no more. Check out the Japanese Heirloom “hulless” popcorn from STARVING FARMER POPCORN COMPANY in Quincy, Washington. Although this white popcorn isn’t new (it’s considered an heirloom variety) and it isn’t truly hulless (after all, the hull holds moisture in a kernel and allows it to pop in the first place), its old-time nutty flavor and super crunchy texture have won over many popcorn lovers. Starving Farmer Popcorn Company’s founder Greg Richardson got into growing popcorn after his potato crop failed. He had been experimenting with growing the Japanese hulless popcorn on the side and decided to see if he could sell it. It was an instant hit on Ebay, so he expanded to retail. Japanese hulless popcorn is now the flagship crop for Starving Farmer. “It isn’t genetically modified,” he says, “and it tastes how the original popcorn tasted years and years ago.” They also offer other varieties of popcorn with softer hulls, including a yellow hulless movie theater popcorn and a South American yellow heirloom mushroom-style popcorn. (Don’t worry, “mushroom” just refers to the shape of the popped kernel.) — CARSON McGREGOR Find Japanese Heirloom hulless popcorn in Spokane at Northwest Seed & Pet, 2422 E. Sprague or 7302 N. Division, at the Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. Fifth St., or at starvingfarmerpopcorn.net.

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“BEYOND THE GRILL,” CONTINUED... of equipment. “There are all these rules around cast iron that really don’t matter,” says Rothrock. It’s ok to use soap and to scrub cast iron, for example, providing you season it properly. Seasoning is a simple process recommended by cast iron manufacturers for creating a nonstick cooking surface, preventing rust and extending the life of the pan. To season, ensure the pan is thoroughly dry and coat the inside of the pan with a high-heat oil like olive oil, says Rothrock. Get it very hot again — either in the oven or over hot coals if you’re cooking outdoors — to create a protective coating or seasoning over the surface, then store the cooled pan with a paper towel inside to wick condensation. Rothrock recommends a good quality 12-inch pot with a lid that’s big enough to do double-duty as a skillet. Lids allow Dutch ovens to be stacked and, more importantly, provide a place for coals to be placed above food for faster, more even cooking. How many coals? It depends on several factors: the size of the pan, what you’re cooking, outdoor conditions. Rothrock recommends looking up a coal chart, which conveys coals needed to reach certain temperatures, paying attention as you cook to see what works best. “Experimentation is the theme,” says Rothrock, which is what he tells his students, too. “The overarching message for these students is ‘You can take care of yourself. You can [cook] cheaper and healthier because you know the ingredients.’”

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YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

TRY IT YOURSELF

Outdoor Feast Dutch Oven Cornbread Jacob Rothrock modified his mother’s go-to recipe, originally from Joy of Cooking, for this campfire cornbread. He uses a 12-inch Dutch oven with a lid; a smaller pot will yield thicker bread and will cook more slowly. •• 1 ¼ cups yellow or white stoneground cornmeal •• ¾ cups all-purpose flour •• 2 ½ teaspoons baking powder •• 2 Tablespoons sugar (use less if you prefer less sweetness) •• ¾ teaspoon salt •• 1 egg, beaten •• 2-3 Tablespoons butter, bacon drippings or vegetable oil (you can use less, but the bottom crust won’t be as crispy) •• 1 cup milk 1. Preheat Dutch oven and lid. 2. Mix dry ingredients and wet ingredients separately. 3. Combine the two in a few strokes, taking care not to overmix. 4. Melt butter in Dutch oven until it sizzles when touched with a forkful of batter. Pour batter into the heated Dutch oven, cover and put a layer of charcoal briquettes on top, making sure there are also 7-9 briquettes underneath. Rotate oven and lid 90 degrees every 5-10 minutes. (Tip: align oven handle and lid bale and use it to remind you how many times you’ve rotated oven.) Bake about 25 minutes, depending on the size of Dutch oven and other factors (ambient temperature, wind, etc.).

Dutch Oven Chili Rothrock uses elk meat and prefers his chili on the spicy side; adjust spice level to personal taste. In this recipe, which only involves simmering, you’ll only need coals underneath the Dutch oven, and none on the lid, just as though it were cooking on a stovetop. •• 1 Tablespoon olive oil •• 1 onion, chopped •• 2 stalks celery, chopped •• 4 large cloves garlic, minced •• 1 pound ground meat •• 5 Tablespoons chili powder (or to taste) •• 2 bay leaves •• ¼ teaspoon basil •• 28 ounce can crushed tomatoes •• 16 ounce can kidney beans, drained •• water to fill half of larger can •• salt and pepper to taste 1. Preheat Dutch oven. 2. Add oil, and then onions, celery, garlic and meat. Cook until meat is browned, then stir in remaining ingredients. 3. Cover and cook until thickened, about 2-3 hours. Serve with cornbread and optional garnishes, such as shredded cheese, diced green onion, cilantro and sour cream. — SHARED BY JASON ROTHROCK OF NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE

AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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When she was just four years old, Namaste Foods founder Daphne Taylor discovered her “entrepreneurial heart.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Thoughtful Foods A leader in gluten-free and allergen-free specialty products, Coeur d’Alene’s Namaste Foods grew from its founder’s desire to help others BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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aphne Taylor never set out to build a multimillion dollar national brand, yet her Coeur d’Alene-based Namaste Foods is just that. It grew out of her empathy with friends and family who were unable to enjoy various foods because of allergies, says Taylor, who started developing recipes that were gluten-free, as well as allergen- and GMO-free around 20 years ago. Now, Coeur d’Alene-based Namaste Foods has 50+ products, including cookie and cake mixes, pizza doughs, pastas, baking ingredients and more, available via online retailers like Amazon, grocery chains like Safeway and Costco, as well as on their own website. Their perfect flour blend and their waffle mix are the most popular items, says Taylor, who is partial to the spice cake mix, with cinnamon and cloves, for fall. “People turn it into carrot cake, gingerbread, all kinds of things,” she says. In the early days, she did everything by hand, says Taylor, who brought her products to local health food stores like

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Huckleberry’s Fresh Market, many of which were often just starting out, too. Her kids would get paid a penny a piece to put labels on. “It’s been a family business since day one,” says Taylor. She knew she was onto something when she got calls from people who had tried her products while in the Northwest and wanted more, but lived out-of state. Eventually she and her family had to decide where they wanted to go with the business. It was growing with little or no marketing, says Taylor, but they knew it would benefit from more effort. So, 19 years ago, she left her government job, waitressed at the old Beachhouse near Silver Beach and attended to such things as food distributors, UPC codes and business cards for her small business. “It kind of started growing in spite of ourselves,” says Taylor, who can trace her interest in business to an early age. She was 4 years old, Taylor recalls, and realized that certain rocks allowed her to write on the sidewalk. Not missing a beat, she sold them to the neighborhood kids for

a penny. “That’s when you know you have an entrepreneurial heart,” says Taylor, who has learned to trust her instincts with Namaste Foods. She was taking yoga at the time she was naming the company and heard the word namaste — a Sanskrit salutation translating to “I bow to you” — and knew, despite some pushback, that it was the right word for the company, she says. “We started this company to try to help people, and since day one that’s been our focus,” says Taylor, who organized a giveback program and is partial to groups that help women and kids. Namaste is also giving back to the small business community by doing contract manufacturing for others, including those who want an allergen-free environment. Right now they’re working with a Spokane-based company that makes a powdered lemonade and needs a co-packer. “Isn’t that something?” asks Taylor. “I love that.”


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Freedom to Fail Calculated risks help kids gain confidence and wisdom STORY BY JACOB JONES n ILLUSTRATION BY JONATHAN HILL

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udding bicyclists thread between orange cones and bump over obstacles at a recent community bike rodeo in an empty Pullman parking lot. Older riders bunny hop their bikes and pop wheelies as organizer Scott McBeath circles offering encouragement. “Nice!” he calls to a pint-sized pedaler steering through the course. McBeath leads a series of bike camps for Pullman Parks and Recreation each summer, teaching children as young as 3 how to bike safely. As his riders im-

prove, they advance to jumping off ramps, descending rocky trails and navigating city traffic. Biking can exemplify the childhood connection between risk and responsibility. How fast is too fast? Is this move too difficult? Will someone get hurt? Parents fret over toddlers scaling the monkey bars or teens out late at night. They hover, scold and babyproof. How do you let a child test boundaries without jeopardizing safety? Just like biking, it takes balance. Not all risks are bad, researchers say. Beneficial risks can help boost con-

fidence, build camaraderie and develop self-awareness. Confronting fear and failure instills resiliency. Somewhere between “free-ranging” and “helicoptering,” parents can guide kids toward taking smarter risks. “You’re teaching them how to ride,” McBeath says of biking. “You’re [also] teaching them how to be independent and make decisions for themselves.” Elizabeth Weybright, an assistant professor at Washington State University, studies adolescent development and risky behavior. She explains that as chil...continued on next page

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“FREEDOM TO FAIL,” CONTINUED... dren grow, they often seek out novel experiences that push limits or result in rewards. That can range from climbing trees and underage drinking to healthy challenges like public speaking and taking on difficult leadership roles. As their brains develop, she notes teens sometimes acquire physical skills and strengths before they mentally grasp the consequences of their decisions. “They don’t necessarily have those abilities to think through what might happen,” she says. “It’s like having a car with all gas and no brake.” Weybright says her research also indi-

offer a secure and honest perspective that encourages self-reflection. “There’s also a benefit in doing things that don’t go well,” she says. “They’re learning what it’s like to fail and how to deal with that and move on.” Many experts suggest time in the outdoors can provide healthy opportunities to discuss potential hazards and decision-making with children of all ages. Maya West, a teacher with the Urban Eden Farm School in Spokane, says their 3-6 year olds spend all of their time outside on the organic farm, exploring their own limits and interests. The kids can scramble over logs, gather

They’re learning what it’s like to fail and how to deal with that and move on. cates that boredom, risk-taking friends and poor supervision tend to increase dangerous behaviors such as substance abuse.

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xperts recommend talking with kids — at any age — about the objective hazards they encounter during risky activities. Go through potential outcomes and consequences with them. With grade-schoolers, that might be talking about the dangers of playing near the street. With teens, that might mean discussing the repercussions of drugs or unsafe sex. Weybright suggests asking older kids about whether their actions align with their personal values and keeping track of who they hang out with. She says parents can

around a fire ring, help harvest vegetables and splash in the nearby creek. West says staffers rarely forbid a child from trying something iffy, but they ask questions to help clarify the potential consequences. “We trust that children are capable of driving their own learning,” she says. “We’re always looking out for their safety, but we’re allowing them to take risks so they can learn.” West says she will introduce children to risky tasks, like using sharp scissors, by modeling it for them first and then setting strict rules for responsible behavior. “There are boundaries,” she says. “If they’re not using it safely, they don’t get to use it. Those tools do need to be…

respected and treated appropriately.” West and others argue that allowing children to take small risks helps them learn to trust their own judgment and develop their physical awareness. Offering the room to take risks can empower them to take ownership of their decisions and behaviors. Many children suffer serious injuries from car crashes, West notes, but the parent who prohibits skateboarding or hunting probably doesn’t think twice about driving them around in a car because they consider it a necessary risk. “Letting children take risks and make choices and make mistakes is just as important to their development and just as necessary as riding in a car,” she says. “Without that, they’re not going to develop into as strong and well-rounded and resilient of individuals.”

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uring a recent bike camp, McBeath escorted a dozen young riders through the streets of downtown Pullman. Before such an outing, he will run the group through traffic scenarios on a chalkboard and ask them about how to handle different hazards. “What will happen if you did this or did that?” he explains. “When we’re riding, we also do lots of stopping and talking about what’s going to happen.” McBeath says he tries to get them to anticipate risks so they can manage them. He’s trying to arm them with experience. And he’s having faith they will rise to the challenge. “Kids year after year come to me and say, ‘Thank you for teaching me freedom,’” he says. “I love seeing kids ride and seeing kids progress. They really mature and grow.”

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PROPER PRAISES

Good Work C

hildren love to learn — their minds seek stimulation, new information and skills. Yet, even in the best of schools with the most gifted of teachers, this love can be diminished by the pressure to perform and excel. Fortunately, an exciting body of research provides a simple strategy for protecting and enhancing the love of learning, even in the most competitive of school environments. The research has been conducted over a decade by psychologist Carol Dweck, Ph.D, at Stanford. She discovered that one type of praise encouraged a lifetime of learning no matter how difficult the challenge. Another type of praise, though equally well-meaning, created risks for the process of learning becoming more frustrating as a child moved through the school system and into adult-

hood. The type of praise she found essential was acknowledging a child’s efforts rather than the results. This gives the child the message that learning is a lifelong process and as school becomes more difficult, they will work harder and with enthusiasm. The child grows to believe that effort and perseverance are the tools of success. She called this a GROWTH MINDSET. The other type she called a fixed mindset. It includes praising a child for being brilliant, talented, smart or gifted. This inad-

vertently gives the message that learning should always be easy for them, given their abundant natural talents. The problem arises when setbacks or difficult tasks occur, which call that “innate” talent into question. As a result, the child may withdraw from the challenge or blame others for his or her perceived failings. Children raised with a growth mindset evolve into adults who take initiative, see difficult tasks through, are eager to learn and undaunted by setbacks, and open to and able to act positively on criticism. Sounds like a recipe for a successful life. — ROBERT MAURER Robert Maurer is a Spokane psychologist, consultant, teacher and author of several books, including One Small Step Can Change Your Life and Mastering Fear.

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Well Done! Prevent E. coli with simple strategies BY DR. MATT THOMPSON

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he bacteria most often responsible for the outbreaks of bloody diarrhea you learn about in the media is Escherichia coli O157:H7. This bacteria most often gets to humans from cows that can carry the bacteria without a problem because they lack a receptor in their guts that permits transmission of the bacterial toxin into the bloodstream. But humans have loads of these receptors in their guts, and other places as well, with a high proportion in their kidneys. So if we ingest these bacteria — even a tiny amount — the toxins they produce can cause us bloody diarrhea and in some cases, kidney failure. An exploration of the various acts of animal and vegetable husbandry that may transpire leading to E. coli contaminating

food is beyond the charter of this periodical. But assuredly, the poop gets to the food, making it essential to thoroughly wash fruit and vegetables, no matter how pristine their appearance may be. The matter of contaminated meat is quite a bit more interesting. About 10 percent of ruminant animals like cows are “super shedders” of E. coli O157:H7, accounting for about 90 percent of cases of diagnosed infections. Still, you may generally safely enjoy a nice tenderloin or T-bone rare and bloody in the middle, because if bacteria or toxins are contaminating the surface of the meat, a good searing of the outside of the steak is usually adequate to kill any unwanted guests. But grinding beef can deliver any

bacteria contaminating the outside of the meat to the inside of a burger, so it needs to be cooked throughout to kill throughout. If ever you are asked, “How would you like your burger?” the only safe answer is, “Done all the way, of course.” You may be puzzled about how that bacteria gets to the surface of the cut meat. It’s not always clear, but we can presume it might be during the butchering and handling process: if the gastrointestinal tract of the cow is disrupted or possibly if there is contaminated water that somehow comes into contact with the meat. In any case, there’s no denying that cow manure is the vector for all E. Coli O157-H7 infections, whether on animal, vegetable or in water. As consumers, we must be ever vigilant and resolute to rinse our produce well, wash our hands thoroughly before we eat, and cook ground beef throughout. But we shouldn’t demonize the cows — they are just doing their thing, chewing their cud, unaware of the danger that lurks within. I hope you will take heed of this cautionary tale about E. coli O157:H7. And who knows, the odyssey of salmonella and an assortment of other pathogens that

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cause food poisoning could be the subjects of their own epic tales that we may explore another time. But all flippancy aside, this is a serious issue. I have cared for numerous children with a kidney complication from E. coli called called Hemolytic Uremic

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Done all the way, of course. Syndrome. It’s the most common cause of acute kidney failure in infants and young children. So make sure you cook that ground meat through, and rinse that produce well with clean water. For now, bon appetit! Matt Thompson is a pediatrician at the Kids Clinic in Spokane.

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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019

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Run This Town Since 2006, the Flying Irish Running Club has promoted fitness and camaraderie BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

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ecoming a devoted runner can be an intimidating prospect, but Spokane running club the Flying Irish has done its best to make that barrier for entry a little easier. It has attracted thousands of participants at all kinds of skill levels, from beginners to intermediate runners to marathoners. People bring kids in strollers or run with their dogs. You can even walk if you so choose. Anyone is welcome, and that accessibility has inspired a particularly zealous band of devotees. One of them is Jim Palm, a restaurant designer who moved to Spokane from San Francisco around seven years ago. He says he stumbled upon the Flying

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Irish via an Inlander article and decided to give it a shot. “I went one night, and I’ve met some of the best friends I have in my life. It’s been one of the most amazing groups of people I’ve ever encountered,” Palm says. “It’s one of the reasons I’ve decided to stay in Spokane. I’m as big of a booster of Spokane as I am the Flying Irish.” The club was founded in 2006, when a group of friends bandied about the idea over beers at O’Doherty’s. It picked up steam from there, and the Flying Irish has gone on to host a couple hundred runners every week, and more than 11,000 individual runners in its 13 years. The average

run is typically 3 to 4 miles, and the group follows a certain number of designated routes. Everyone takes off around 6 pm, then circles back to their starting point for celebratory drinks and what they call a “shirting ceremony,” where participants qualify for commemorative T-shirts. It’s this mix of exercise and social gathering that has kept runners coming back to the Flying Irish. There are even some folks who have gone years without ever missing a run. “I was more of a casual runner, but the camaraderie of the Flying Irish certainly made running part a more regular part of my life,” Palm says.


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IN KENDALL YARDS 1184 W. Summit Parkway 509.473.9341 Donna Drake and Jim Palm joined the board of the Flying Irish Running Club after finding inspiration and friendship during the club’s Thursday runs, which depart from Chateau Rive in Spokane. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

Donna Drake had a similar experience. In 2014, she and a friend had decided they were going to push themselves to participate in a triathlon. “I had never really enjoyed running,” Drake says. “I probably couldn’t run three blocks.” They showed up for a Flying Irish run as part of their training and were immediately welcomed by the regulars. Drake continued attending and eventually joined other running clubs, and she has since participated in multiple triathlons and half marathons. A full marathon, she says, is on her bucket list. “It really changed how I feel about running,” Drake says. “I enjoy it in a social setting like that. It’s an awesome place to start… It did change my life. It made running a lot more fun.” Both Drake and Palm are now board members for the Flying Irish, where they help organize the runs and keep track of everyone who has joined the club. “It’s a networking thing,” Drake says. “I became more involved with the community of runners and triathlon athletes.”

“I felt like it was time for me to give back some of my time and energy to make the next generation of runners enjoy it as much as I did,” Palm says of becoming a board member. “I feel so strongly about this running club, and the health benefits — anything you can do to get somebody off the couch.” The official Flying Irish season kicks off the first Thursday in March, and runs through the annual Turkey Trot in November. Those weekly runs have become both a custom and a group hangout for its most ardent followers: Palm says he even knows people who have met their spouses and significant others through the club. “It really is pretty unique to see hundreds of people every Thursday night running through the streets of Spokane,” Palm says. “People mark their calendars around those dates.” The Flying Irish Running Club meets for its weekly runs on Thursdays at 6 pm at Chateau Rive in the Flour Mill. Details at flyingirish.org.

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