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Simple, impressive recipes for winter gatherings PAGE 42

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Inside

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ON THE COVER: Onion Tartes Tatin: Young Kwak Photo; Inset: Don Hamilton Photo

Etc.

Health

PG. 8

STARTING STRONG • SUPPORTING SCRAPS PUTTING YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD

Home

PG. 26

HOMEWARD BOUND • MIND OVER MATTER COLLAGEN CONNECTION • WINTER KNIGHTS

Food

PG. 42

INSIDE JOBS • MULTIFACETED ARTIST SPREADING THE PLANT LOVE

MADE TO SHARE • HONEY FOR YOUR HONEY RECIPES: MEATBALLS AND ONION TARTES TATIN

Family

People

PG. 46

BEYOND BASKETBALL LET IT SNOW!

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PG. 54

KEY CHANGE: CAMI BRADLEY

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Thank You!

Thank you to our amazing partners, volunteers and guests who made the 38th annual Epicurean Delight possible!

2019 Culinary and Libation Award Winners Outstanding Hors d’oeuvre Rüt Bar & Kitchen Watermelon Poké

Outstanding Entree Spencer’s for Steaks and Chops Charred AKB Flank Steak Roulade

Outstanding First Course Thai Bamboo Golden Lobster and Pig in Thai Blanket

Outstanding Dessert Catered For You, Inc. White Chocolate Bomba People’s Choice Best Restaurant Spencer’s for Steaks and Chops Charred AKB Flank Steak Roulade

People’s Choice Best Libation – Winery Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 2016 Dionysus 2018 Connor Lee Chardonnay People’s Choice Best Libation – Brewery Trailbreaker Cider Dry & Crisp Hard Cider Blackberry Hard Cider

Grand Presenting Sponsor by Lindsey J Allen Photography

by Lindsey J Allen Photography

by Lindsey J Allen Photography

by Tiffany Hansen Photography

Alliant Employee Benefits Blood Center Foundation of the Inland Northwest Cancer Care Northwest CellNetix Pathology & Laboratories Charlie’s Produce Davenport Hotel Collection Eide Bailly, LLP Fresenius-Kabi HUB International NW

2019 Partners

Incyte Diagnostics ITRON Kalispel Tribe of Indians and Northern Quest Resort & Casino KELLYBRADY KHQ Local News Kootenai Health Mutual of Omaha Northwest Farm Credit Services Physicians Insurance, A Mutual Company

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FROM THE EDITOR SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO also at inlander.com/health&home

Stay Connected Email Health & Home Editor Anne McGregor at annem@inlander.com. The conversation continues on the Inlander Facebook page, and stay in touch with us at Inlander.com/Health&Home.

1227 W. Summit Parkway, Spokane, Wash. 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634

EDITOR Anne McGregor

annem@inlander.com

MANAGING EDITOR Jacob H. Fries ART DIRECTOR Ali Blackwood EVENTS EDITOR Chey Scott

Happy at Home BY ANNE McGREGOR

I

n this issue, we’re treated to a peek inside four local interior designer’s own homes (page 26), to see how they create the spaces they want to live in. Each space is beautiful and unique — and also subject to change. One common element among the designers was their lack of fear in revamping their spaces — moving furniture from room to room, regularly swapping out art and generally experimenting to keep things interesting or tweak the room’s function. With a new year upon us, that’s not a bad mindset — at home and elsewhere. In fact, research actually shows that “novelty” — including new experiences, new things to look at, listen to, smell or taste — actually makes us happier, sending a rush of dopamine through the brain. It also primes your mind for learning and improves motivation. Also in this issue, Jacob Jones explores some “novel” sports for kids (page 46), from yoga to roller derby, and finds there are many options, and good reasons, for kids to stay active. Finally we check in with local musician Cami Bradley (page 54), who’s still rooted in her hometown but exploring new musical forms.

CONTRIBUTORS Stacey Aggarwal, LeAnn Bjerken, Erick Doxey, Don Hamilton, Jonathan Hill, E.J. Iannelli, Jacob Jones, Josh Kelety, Young Kwak, Robert Maurer, Dan Nailen, Alex Sakariassen, Carrie Scozzaro, Carl Segerstrom, Nathan Weinbender, John R. White DESIGN & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wayne Hunt ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kristi Gotzian MARKETING DIRECTOR Kristina Smith ADVERTISING SALES Autumn Adrian, Mary Bookey, Jeanne Inman, Rich McMahon, Claire Price, Carolyn Padgham-Walker, Wanda Tashoff, Emily Walden SALES COORDINATION Camille Awbrey, Sydney Angove

Cheers!

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Derrick King, Tom Stover, Rachael Skipper

CONTRIBUTORS

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Frank DeCaro BUSINESS MANAGER Dee Ann Cook CREDIT MANAGER Kristin Wagner PUBLISHER Ted S. McGregor Jr. GENERAL MANAGER Jeremy McGregor

E.J. IANNELLI is a freelance writer, editor and translator based in Spokane. In this issue, he writes about mindfulness. “The mindfulness story was rewarding because, like many, I assumed that it was largely an ambiguous, informal pastime of the yoga and flower child set. It was enlightening to talk with national and local professionals who are able to speak to mindfulness as a recognized therapeutic practice with a growing body of compelling scientific research behind it.”

NATHAN WEINBENDER is the Inlander’s Music & Film editor, and has also been a film critic for Spokane Public Radio since 2011. He writes about Cami Bradley in this issue, someone he first interviewed in the summer of 2013 when he was a new reporter at the Spokesman-Review and she had just advanced to the finals of America’s Got Talent. “This new interview is the first time we’d talked in five years. I was impressed by how aware she is of her place within the music industry, and the changes she has made as an artist.”

Health & Home is published every other month and is available free at more than 500 locations across the Inland Northwest. One copy free per reader. Subscriptions are available at $2.50 per issue: call x213. Reaching Us: Editorial: x261; Circulation: x226; Advertising: x215. COPYRIGHT All contents copyrighted © Inland Publications, Inc. 2019. Health & Home is locally owned and has been published since 2004.

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Starting Strong BY CHEY SCOTT Spokane Health & Fitness Expo

Just in time for New Year’s resolutions to get fit — or shed some extra pounds acquired through holiday feasting — the Spokane Health & Fitness Expo is back. The weekend is filled with fitness class demos, competitions and spectator events like roller derby and jiu-jitsu. Attendees should dress in athleisure-wear to be ready to try something new during sessions introducing activities from kickboxing to rock climbing; aerial silks to pilates. Jan. 4 from 10 am-6 pm and Jan. 5 from 10 am-4 pm. $8 weekend admission; $5/ages 6-12. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanehealthfitexpo.com Homebuyer Education Seminar These frequently scheduled sessions at the library help future homebuyers explore the major aspects of the home-buying process in an unbiased format with SNAP Spokane instructors certified by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission. At the end of the seminar, attendees are issued a certification of completion which can be used to apply for down payment assistance. Offered Sat, Dec. 14 and Sat, Jan. 11 from 9 am-2 pm. Free; registration required. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd., Spokane Valley. snapwa.org Mount St. Helens: Critical Memory This new exhibit at the MAC commemorates the 40th anniversary of the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, which remains the most destructive volcanic event in U.S. history and one of the most universal memories for those living in the Pacific Northwest at the time. Experience personal accounts of the event and learn how Mount St. Helens has advanced understanding of volcanoes more than any other eruption in history. Exhibit on display Dec. 21 through July 2020; open Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10 admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) Noon Year’s Eve Family Celebration The Spokane Public Library is hosting this special celebration for families to ring in the New Year without the need to stay up late. Come to the library to enjoy crafts and a snack at this event for all ages, though young children should be accompanied by a caregiver. The program starts at 11 am, with a countdown starting at the minute leading up to noon. Tue, Dec. 31 from 11 am-noon. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. and Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes Rd. spokanelibrary.org

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DO YOUR PART

Supporting SCRAPS

T

he Spokane County Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) is on track to have cared for an estimated 10,000 animals by 2019’s end. While that’s an average annual number, says Executive Director Lindsey Soffes, it includes strays, runaways and other pets in need from all corners of Spokane County. To say SCRAPS’ headquarters in East Spokane goes through a lot of pet food and other supplies each day is an understatement. Local animal lovers who want to aid these thousands cared for each year while awaiting adoption can help in a number of ways, Soffes says. “We are so grateful for any donations, but one thing we tell the public is that all veterinary care is funded by the SCRAPS HOPE FOUNDATION, a separate nonprofit, and we encourage them to contribute directly to the care of the animals most in need by making

monetary donations,” she says. SCRAPS frequently shares social media updates on injured or sick animals supported by the foundation, allowing donors to see their dollars in action and to inspire others to give. Additionally, donations of dog food, cat food (wet and dry), cat litter and bedding or blankets for the animals are also always welcome, Soffes says. Those with some extra time can consider volunteering, such as for SCRAPS’ unique “Dog Meets World” program. “People can come and take a shelter dog out for a couple hours, to go get coffee or go for a walk, and it makes a huge difference for the animals who get to be out,” she says. Foster homes for special cases, including kittens, puppies and senior pets who’ve had long stays at the shelter, are also another constant need. — CHEY SCOTT To donate or find out more, visit spokanecounty.org/scraps.

POSITIVE REP

Putting Your Best Foot Forward, In Life and Online

T

hose of us of a certain age remember those famous Canon camera commercials featuring tennis star Andre Agassi telling us “image is everything.” Those ads came out nearly 30 years ago, and the cheeky ad makers playing up the athlete’s “rebel” image probably had no idea just how true that sentiment would become. Two Spokane-based women have co-authored a new book, REPUTATION BY DESIGN, that explores just how important image and reputation have become both professionally and personally in the internet age. The book is based on a course designed and taught at Gonzaga’s School of Business by one of its authors, KHQ news anchor Stephanie Vigil. That course, Image and Reputation, and Vigil’s interactions with students inspired her to team with Colleen McMahon, a Gonzaga professor specializing in public speaking, communications and public relations, to create a short book to help people outside the classroom. Reputation By Design is a breezy read that thankfully avoids the pitfalls of most dry academic writing while still rooting its chapters in hard research. The statistics the authors use to illustrate, for example, that most permanent impressions you make on someone are formed in the first seven seconds, are supported with anecdotes from students, local businesspeople, athletes like Ryan Leaf and the authors’ own experiences. That approach, as well as a colorful array of illustrations, photos and lists, helps the book’s messages get through to a more casual reader. At times, Reputation By Design reads like a self-help book, and one might think the authors’ ideas for managing one’s image on social media are either unrealistic or maybe just too time-consuming. But overall, it’s hard to argue with the case Reputation By Design makes for living your best life, one in service to a greater good than just oneself. Whether you’re reading it with your business in mind, or your personal life, you’ll likely find some useful tips here for always putting your best foot forward. — DAN NAILEN

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Homeward Bound Health care professionals are bringing clinic-style care right into patients’ homes STORY BY JOSH KELETY n PHOTOS BY YOUNG KWAK

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I

t’s a surprisingly icy and snowy morning in Spokane Valley — especially when considering that it’s early October. And Christina Duncan, a nurse practitioner for DispatchHealth, an on-demand mobile medical service that makes house calls, bringing urgent care services right into people’s homes, is preparing to start the workday. She and an EMT are loading up a small, brightly marked car with medical supplies and equipment, such as a portable $10,000 machine that can do instant on-site

blood tests. Their job? Respond to requests for service for issues ranging from the common cold to fractures and respiratory issues. Patients can request a visit through a phone app, the company’s website, or with a phone call. It’s like Uber, but for in-home urgent care. “We call them ‘rovers,’” Duncan says of the cars. “We come pretty prepared. We go into the patient’s home and treat them.”

Mike Conrad, medical technician with DispatchHealth, and Christina Duncan, nurse practitioner, head in to a Spokane residence to see a patient. (top) Conrad tests 4 year old Hadlee Pechia’s oxygen level with a pulse oximeter. (bottom) Duncan uses a swab to test for strep throat.

...continued on next page DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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A “jump kit” contains supplies needed to evaluate and treat patients.

“HOMEWARD BOUND,” CONTINUED... “There’s more stuff in here than there is an ambulance,” EMT Aaron Guehrn adds in reference to the ‘rovers.’ The company, DispatchHealth, which started five years ago and has now expanded to 16 markets, is reflective of the current trend in the medical industry toward remote health care that utilizes modern technology to deliver services with precision and efficiency. The general goal? Reduce patient travel time, expenses and possible exposures related to crowded waiting rooms with other sick people. But at its core, the home service is a stab at improving the quality of patient care. “We’re kind of bringing back the old-fashioned doctor call,” Duncan says. “I mean why not? Amazon delivers stuff. You

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Health& Home

[can] get your prescriptions mailed to your house. I think it’s kind of the way of the future.”

Mobile Medical Units

Clinics on wheels, or mobile medical units, have existed for quite some time — particularly for services targeted at serving patients who live in remote communities, says Jim Zimmerman, vice dean of administration, accreditation and finance at the Washington State University Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. “Mobile health units have been around for a long time because they have a really important place in serving rural and underserved communities,” he says. “In my experience anyway, it’s almost been 15

years that we’ve been aware of that kind of service.” Philanthropy and grant funding, in particular, have always had a soft spot for remote medical units, Zimmerman adds. DispatchHealth isn’t the only game in town. WSU announced its own mobile health care unit as part of a nonprofit academic health network intended to bring care — including screening for diabetes, cholesterol, pregnancy, STDs and asthma — to Washington’s rural areas beginning in January 2020. “There is a mega trend, if you will, in the industry, to deliver all different kinds of health care to where people actually are,” Zimmerman says. “There is a transition in the industry, away from in-hospital care —


Online Obstacles

Mobile medical units have the potential to augment tele-health services, creating a bridge between patients and remote specialists. “Remote monitoring instruments are becoming very portable and linkable through technologies like Bluetooth and broadband,” says Jim Zimmerman, vice dean of administration, accreditation and finance at WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. “Mobile units can get out into more remote and underserved communities and use advances in technology and telemedicine to link patients in their home with certain kinds of instruments in the urban centers where specialists might be.” While tele-health services, independently or when combined with mobile medical units, have opened up new ways to treat patients situated far from medical centers, internet connectivity poses some limitations. The Federal Communications Commission estimates that 53 percent of rural Americans (or 22 million people) lack access to basic broadband services, while internet infrastructure on American Indian reservations is severely lacking, according to a 2016 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “Gaps in access to affordable broadband may constrain deployment of telehealth,” the report reads. “Some areas still lack access to… speeds that may be required for advanced tele-health applications.” — JOSH KELETY

in fact, away from bricks and mortar facility care — and moving toward in-community or in-home care.” The advantages to mobile health care are numerous, proponents argue: Mobile units are highly configurable, and can pack a lot of different equipment, technology, and services into a single unit. They can get to patients in rural areas or reach elderly individuals who have trouble getting to a brick-and-mortar medical facility. The mobile services also may reduce costs when compared to operating and maintaining a bustling physical facility. “Rather than forgoing care due to distance or a lack of transportation, time being taken away from work — those issues are mitigated if the care can be brought to ...continued on next page

Together, We’re Transforming Health Care Thanks to the generous support of our donors, Providence Health Care Foundation is funding technology, programs and research that saves lives and enriches our community. For more than 130 years, our region has relied on Providence not only for world-class medical care, but to answer the call for help from our less fortunate neighbors.

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“HOMEWARD BOUND,” CONTINUED...

After a negative test for strep throat, Hadlee Pechia waves goodbye to Duncan and Conrad.

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the individual in their home,” Zimmerman says. In addition, “The aging of our population is providing a demand for these types of services in-home because those folks tend to be more infirm, less mobile.” Some patient groups find travel to a clinic setting especially difficult. Guehrn notes that for some patients with dementia, leaving the familiar environment of their homes to go to a hospital can be highly aggravating. Home visits are actually superior to a clinic visit in these cases, he says, “because their care providers can stay next to them and… keep them in a calm state of mind as opposed to eventually getting agitated — sometimes they can get violent, sometimes they can get withdrawn.” Then there is the risk of being exposed to other sick patients at a clinic, particularly for elderly patients or young infants. “Sitting around in the ER with people — some of them are having chest pain that’s not contagious — but you may have people in there with the flu or bacterial pneumonia,” Guehrn says. “It can be a killer for somebody who is 80 if they catch that.” “Why expose people to a meeting room


2.375” wide by 5” high

full of other sick people?” Duncan adds. “[The mobile medical unit] is for the busy mom who has got like four kids and is like ‘I don’t want to go sit in the urgent care with all four of my kids and get everyone else sick.’”

Wide Range of Care

So what kind of care does the mobile unit offer? A surprisingly wide variety. In addition to running basic blood tests, “We can actually prescribe medication, we can actually treat things, just like as if you were to go to a stand-alone urgent care center,” Duncan says. The team can also request mobile X-ray and ultrasound services so that patients don’t have to leave home for those tests. During one house call, Duncan and Guehrn visited an 82-year-old man who had been having respiratory issues. A previous visit by a DispatchHealth team had determined he didn’t have pneumonia, but a dispatcher recommended a follow-up visit. In his home, Duncan and Guehrn check in with him, take his vitals, and set-up a makeshift doctor’s office complete

with a mobile printer for paperwork. “It reminds me of 1964,” the patient says. “It reminds me of house calls.” “Not having to go out and be in an ER around people with colds and everything else is very good,” Guehrn adds. DispatchHealth takes both Medicare and Medicaid, and the company’s promotional materials indicate that visits cost between $5 and $50 after insurance. Otherwise, it’s a flat $275 fee per visit for those without any kind of coverage. In contrast, emergency room visits can cost thousands of dollars. “In-hospital or in-ER type care is certainly the highest cost per episode,” Zimmerman says. “To the extent that services can be provided in lower cost environments, that’s certainly for the better.” The company also holds a policy that each unit sees no more than seven patients per day, allowing roughly 45 minutes per person. When call requests start mounting up, the company sends out more cars to meet demand. “We can actually spend 45 minutes with a patient which is unheard of,” Duncan says.

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Mind over Matters Harnessing thoughts to manage cravings, insomnia and emotions BY E.J. IANNELLI

H

umans are emotional creatures. When a driver cuts us off on the highway, we get upset. When we’ve got to perform to meet expectations, we get anxious. When someone insults us, our feelings get hurt. And while raw emotion can often get the better of us, we’re not always the masters of our wandering minds, either. Ubiquitous screens, the relentless back-and-forth of digital communication and the constant buzz of electronic notifications only add to the number of potential distractions. One increasingly popular way to restore a sense of tranquility to our daily lives is through a behavior known as mindfulness. Although that might conjure images of Buddhist monks and New Age healing crystals, mindfulness is actually an established therapeutic practice with a growing body of scientific evidence to support its benefits.

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“Mindfulness is actually quite simple,” says Lindsay Anne Daehlin, a clinical social worker and co-owner of Wellness Therapies in Spokane. “It’s a practice of being present to whatever’s happening in the moment with acceptance and self-compassion.” Those last two aspects are “critical,” she adds, because they prevent us from getting caught up in judgement — even (or especially) when that judgement is directed at ourselves. Judgement usually brings emotions like shame and anger in tow. Those are powerful forces that can yank us out of the moment. Instead, the goal is more like a detached awareness of our immediate experience and all its complexity. Daehlin breaks mindfulness into two general categories. First, there’s formal mindfulness, which means engaging in activities that ask us to focus on the here and now, such as meditation, yoga and tai chi.

The second type is informal mindfulness. “That’s where you bring a mindful awareness to whatever you’re doing. So if I’m washing the dishes, I’m noticing warm water on my hands, the sounds in my house. I’m noticing my breathing. I’m just in the experience, but I’m doing something else.” Informal mindfulness is more spontaneous and ongoing. As a result, less research has been conducted on its effects than those of formal mindfulness. “We know though functional MRIs and different brain scans that the structure of the brain gets altered with practicing mindfulness. Even if you practice 20 minutes a day for eight weeks, they’ve noticed structural changes,” says Daehlin. To illustrate, she describes Dr. Dan Siegel’s “hand” model of the brain. This model uses our fingers to represent the prefrontal cortex, which controls higher-lev-


el thinking, and our thumb to represent the primitive “fight or flight” part of the brain. Make a fist with your thumb inside, and you’ve got a rough idea of how the brain looks and operates. “Mindfulness trains the brain to have that moment of pause before the emotional reaction or response. It creates actual neuro pathways between the prefrontal cortex and the limbic system, or the emotional brain. So we can see what’s actually happening when people report that they’re more able to stop and take a breath when they get escalated or flooded with emotion.”

O

ne of the country’s foremost researchers in this regard is Dr. Judson “Jud” Brewer, director of research and innovation at Brown University’s Mindfulness Center. Brewer is a psychiatrist who’s used functional magnetic

the point where they become habitual.” As part of his work with his company MindSciences, Brewer has developed software apps that employ mindfulness techniques to counter everything from overeating and compulsive behavior in relationships to internet porn addictions. In one study on the efficacy of these app-based platforms, Brewer and his team found a 40 percent reduction in craving-related eating. Another study saw a 57 percent reduction in clinically validated anxiety scores. And in a more recent study that involved smokers who were looking to quit, they were able to predict clinical outcomes based on the levels of brain activity as a result of mindfulness training. He does warn, however, that not all mindfulness apps are created equal. Mindfulness newbies will want to find software with a bit more legitimacy than just a men-

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Practice Apps Headspace “Themed sessions” on many topics as well as “SOS exercises in case of sudden meltdowns.” Free trial, then $13/month (pictured here). Calm Focus on mental fitness, relaxation and sleep. Free 30-day trial, then $60 annually. Stop, Breathe and Think Offers “5 Minutes to Peace” for the “under 25 generation.” Free trial, then $10/month ($11/month/premium). resonance imaging, or fMRI, to study the neural mechanisms of mindfulness with a particular focus on treating addiction and breaking bad habits. “Our brains are set up to always be looking for rewards. They’re always comparing different behaviors,” he says. “Let’s say I eat some broccoli and then chocolate. My brain’s going to compare those two experiences and say, ‘I’ll have the chocolate, please.’ That’s a metaphor for how we perform almost all of our behaviors and how we make decisions in life, consciously or unconsciously. And if there’s a behavior that’s rewarding, our brains tend to just lay those down in memory to

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tion of “science” in its description. That’s where a professional guide with experience in this field can be helpful, says Daehlin. A therapist or support group can also encourage us to stick with mindfulness training when we feel like emotion, habit and distraction will always dominate. “A lot of people will try to practice mindfulness and say, ‘I’m bad at it.’ But you can’t be bad at mindfulness. You can have a very busy mind. You can have discomfort and restlessness. It’s when we can notice and accept that restlessness, that’s what really frees us from being stuck in that emotion or frustration. And that,” she says, “is the power of mindfulness.”

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Bone broth is a delicious way to add collagen to your diet. SUPERFOOD

Collagen Connection C

ollagen — the most abundant protein in the body — is the glue that holds us together. This versatile protein supports your skin, coats your joints and gives strength to connective tissue. However, as we age, we begin to break down more collagen than our bodies can produce, leading to wrinkled skin and painful joints. Can consuming more collagen in our diets help to reverse this breakdown?

Attributes

Supplementation with collagen may be able to offset some of our bodies’ natural breakdown processes. Either through manufacturing or digestion, collagen is broken down into peptides — small strings of amino acids that once made up the full-sized collagen protein. These small peptides can be absorbed and used by the body. Collagen peptides are hypothesized not only to accumulate at collagen-concentrated areas like joints and skin, but also stimulate our cells to produce more of their own collagen. Studies suggest that collagen supplementation can alleviate symptoms of joint pain, arthritis and improve skin hydration.

Super Powers

Perhaps the first site of action for ingested collagen is in the intestine. Collagen peptides interact with a region of the intestine known as Peyer’s Patches, an area with a high amount of immune

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cells related to anti-inflammation. Through this mechanism, collagen has been associated with relieving inflammatory symptoms of autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. In a study done in healthy patients with no history of arthritis, daily supplementation with undenatured collagen modestly improved knee range of motion. This study also found that the maximum beneficial effects were achieved and persisted after three months. Another study found that osteoarthritis symptoms were also relieved in a similar time frame.

Weaknesses

Since many studies on the beneficial effects of collagen supplementation were done in combination with other compounds (such as chondroitin or other vitamins and minerals), it’s difficult to pinpoint the exact role of collagen in many study results. Additionally, collagen is an animal protein and is not a vegan-friendly supplement. Supplemental collagen type II (also called CII collagen) is often sourced from chicken sternum, shark or pig.

How to Use It

There are a few ways to add collagen to your diet. Consuming bone broths or organ meats is a whole-food way to add collagen to your daily routine. Alternatively, collagen supplements are

widely available online and at health food stores. There are many different types of collagen, however, most supplements contain only collagen type II (also known as CII). Due to this, most studies have focused solely on CII, rather than other collagen types. When deciding on a collagen supplement, it’s important to understand the difference between hydrolyzed and undenatured collagen. Hydrolyzed collagen is broken down during manufacturing to contain smaller peptides but is often taken at a high dosage, between 8-12 grams. However, when taking collagen to benefit arthritic conditions, it may be beneficial to take the undenatured form. Undenatured collagen is the full-length collagen protein as it exists in nature. The suggested dose of undenatured collagen in studies is much lower, at just 40 milligrams. Very few toxic effects have been associated with high doses of collagen, but controlled longterm toxicity studies in humans have yet to be performed. — STACEY AGGARWAL Stacey Aggarwal received a PhD in Pharmacology from the University of Washington, where she studied mitochondrial function in breast cancer. Now she writes about biology, health, and nutrition while running a lavender farm in North Idaho.


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Members of the Spokane Winter Knights Snowmobile Club. SPOKANE WINTER KNIGHTS PHOTO

Winter Knights Snowmobilers at the ready for winter weather rescues BY CARL SEGERSTROM

D

uring the snowy December of 1967, a pregnant woman was trapped in her home in the foothills between Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake. Not having the means themselves, but familiar with some local sled heads who were up to the task, the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office called on the nascent Spokane Snowmobile Club to help rescue the snowbound woman.

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According to club lore, the woman referred to her rescuers — founding club members Darrel Triber, Larry Crouse, Jerry Lutz and Jack Riggins — as her “winter knights in shining armor.” And when you get called something as righteous as that, the name tends to stick. Now, more than 50 years later, the Spokane Winter Knights Snowmobile Club is continuing to assist the Spokane County

Sheriff’s Office in its search-and-rescue efforts. And while no one heads into the backcountry with the idea of needing to be saved, you can take some level of comfort in knowing that the Winter Knights are on speed dial in case of an emergency. Over the years, the Winter Knights have grown from a handful of motorcycle buddies looking for something to do during the winter to an incorporated nonprofit that boasts more than 300 members, hosts annual fundraisers, keeps firewood stocked at the warming hut on Mount Spokane and has 16 county-trained search-and-rescue volunteers. They’ve invested their time and club money into becoming an integral part of the local search-and-rescue community. “Most people don’t realize how lucky they are that there’s people like them, who come out here at night to train and learn,” says Thad Schultz, at one of the club’s monthly search-and-rescue meetings at the Greater Spokane Emergency Management offices. Schultz, the coordinator for the Sheriff’s Office’s rescue program, says the club often plays an integral role in rescuing people who are lost or injured in the backcountry. “They specialize in transporting, running trails and getting people out,” he says. And when it comes to finding people in the snow, the group is responsible for a high rate of recovery compared to “ground pounders” who search for missing people on foot.

O

ne reason that the club is such an asset compared to their bipedal counterparts is that one of the most fraught times in any rescue is getting people to safety before they get hypothermic. And snowmobiles can get people to warmth and shelter a lot quicker than snowshoers. Schultz says he’s glad to have the Winter Knights lending their time and expertise in search-and-rescue missions, but the reality, in the age of cell phones and GPS, is that calls aren’t as frequent as they used to be. Which is fine with Schultz, because as he says, “If I never go out on another search that’s fine, because someone is having the worst day of their life that day.” Reduced call numbers notwithstanding, the Winter Knights figure out ways to be helpful in emergency situations. In 2009, one of the snowiest winters in Spokane history, one of the elder statesmen of the club, Bob Walker, answered a call from Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich asking for help rescuing people stranded near the


Hutterian Brethren’s commune on the West Plains. In groups of three, riders rode out to help people stuck between massive snow drifts. “It was the craziest thing I’d ever seen,” says Frank Young, a club member and search-and-rescue volunteer. “You’d be riding along and there would be an 8-foot wall of snow that would drop off right to pavement — that’s just how the wind had blown it off.” As the snowmobilers bounced between windblown berms of snow, locating stranded motorists, they’d call over to one of the Hutterites who was operating a tractor with a front-end loader and would collect rescuees in its metal bucket. Over the course of the night, the snowmobilers, in conjunction with the Hutterites, rescued nearly two dozen stranded motorists.

W

hile the club is on call for missions both winter and summer — many club members are also ATV riders — they’ve also found that their training comes in handy even when they’re not on a call. Recognizing the dangers of the backcountry, and prepared with knowledge from their rescue training, the group doesn’t head out on the trail without the equipment to help each other or anyone else who might need it. “The training and stuff that we get benefits not just our searches, but when we’re out in the winter riding anyway,” says Greg Figg, the president of the club. Recently, on a ride near Trestle Creek, north of Lake Pend Oreille, Figg and another Winter Knight rider came across a kid with a broken femur on a backcountry trail. While the kid’s group had tried to patch together his leg with a makeshift splint that included a snow shovel, Figg was carrying first-aid equipment and was able to make a proper splint. In part because Figg was able to lend a helping hand on the trail, the youth was able to be safely transported to a waiting ambulance. Over the years, the Winter Knights have come a long way from a small group of friends out riding around in the snow, to a major community asset in the backcountry and anywhere else they’re needed. And that’s the plan, says Figg. “It’s part of our charter as a club to provide these services.” With their training, equipment and ready-when-called-upon attitude, he says the Winter Knights “fill an important need that the county wouldn’t have otherwise.”

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individuals with cystic fibrosis carry this mutation and could potentially be treated with this new medication if they meet the age criteria. Clinical trials of this medication demonstrated that its use is associated with a significant improvement in breathing tests. The medication also caused improvements in sweat chloride (a test used in cystic fibrosis), fewer cases of worsening breathing symptoms and lung function, and an improvement in body mass index. This medication, like all medications, has some adverse effects but generally the therapy was well tolerated. It would be well worth talking about this new medication with your health care provider. They can do the genetic test to determine if your child has the appropriate type of cystic fibrosis (if they have not already done this) and can walk you through the pros and cons of this new therapy versus the one that they are currently on. — JOHN R. WHITE John R. White is the chair of the Department RY E EVE of Pharmacotherapy at WSU-Spokane. Y FRSEDAY FREE URSDA -

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CHANGE UP

Embracing Kindness

“B

e the change you want to see in the world.” These powerful words by Gandhi are so clearly wise, and so very hard to achieve. We live in divisive times, seeing very different solutions to local and national issues and often — very often — feeling intolerant of others’ points of view. Maybe the world could be a just a little better if we all practiced what John Wooden, the Robert Maurer extraordinary UCLA basketball coach discovered: “You cannot live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you.” So start small. Welcome a driver who is trying to get into your lane, thank a clerk, smile at a stranger, thank a friend who has been supportive, listen respectfully to another’s point of view. Those things take only a few seconds and they cost nothing. But they do come with benefits for others, and for you. With our

modern brain scans, we have discovered there are two pleasure centers in the brain. One, we have known about, the nucleus accumbens, lights up with physical pleasures, such as a good meal or a hug. But the scans have revealed a second pleasure center, the superior temporal sulcus. It is activated by any moment of service, large or small. Another body of research has demonstrated that being kind to others helps provide an immunity to stress, strengthening the immune system. Acts of kindness sound simple but in the business of the day and the difficult people we sometimes encounter, compassion is easily forgotten. Mother Teresa had her struggles with service like the rest of us when she said, “God never gives you anything you cannot handle. I wish God didn’t trust me so much.” But in all the hustle and bustle, what more important task do we have each day than to make this world a little brighter? — ROBERT MAURER Robert Maurer is a Spokane psychologist, founder of the Science of Excellence consulting firm, and the author of several books including One Small Step Can Change Your Life and Mastering Fear.

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Spokane designer Tammie Ladd was drawn to the wide expanse of floor to ceiling windows in her home, which she says was designed by “one of Spokane’s greats in the mid-century era,” architect John McGough. DON HAMILTON PHOTO

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S

ome people take their work home, which for interior designers often means a living space that doubles as a testing ground for professional ideas as well as an expression of their unique styles and design priorities. Take a tour of spaces that four local designers call their personal favorites.

T

INSIDE JOBS Taking a peek at local designers’ favorite spaces in their own homes BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

AMMIE LADD had an unusual reaction to the home she now shares with husband Justin, who does the accounting for her nearly 20-year old TAMMIE LADD DESIGN firm. The couple was considering building a house to replace their single level rancher when they saw a “for sale” sign in the neighborhood, but there was no visible house. Intrigued, Tammie climbed a mysterious set of curving stone steps from the road and located the home, low-slung and unobtrusively tucked into a rise above a South Hill street. Tammie knocked on the door and found herself speaking to the original owner of the 1962 midcentury modern home. “My eyes watered,” says Tammie. “I can’t even explain it.” The house was designed by “John McGough of Walker McGough Architects, which has become Integrus,” Tammie says, “He was one of Spokane’s ‘greats’ in the midcentury era.” In 2005, the Ladds moved in and have held off on any remodeling, preserving the authentic interior. Tucked on a hillside, emerging from the rocky terrain, the home’s unassuming metal and wood exterior gives way to a dramatic interior, featuring floor-to-ceiling windows spanning the entire back of the house and flooding Tammie’s favorite room — the living room — with natural light. Local art adorns the walls. Tammie’s favorite piece is by Patrick Siler, a WSU professor emeritus, offering both a reminder of her own time at the university, as well as the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture event where she got it. “It’s not too serious,” she says, noting it goes with anything they put near it. The color palette in the living room is, like the rest of the house, neutral, tending towards grays that go well with the variety of wood tones throughout. Like many designers, Tammie moves things around frequently, especially in the living room. A high back settee first found a home in the living room, but has now migrated to the kitchen eating area, function...continued on next page DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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“INSIDE JOBS,” CONTINUED...

Among Tammie Ladd’s favorite elements in her living room are a Patrick Siler painting (below) and one of her designer secrets — a hammered metal side table from Target. (inset, right) DON HAMILTON PHOTOS

ing as a cozy banquette. In the living room, Tammie always likes to have ample groupings of seating and within-reach surfaces on which to rest a dish or plate, so there are now two sofas, in gray microfiber to withstand kids and pets, as well as several smaller chairs and portable tables. A current favorite table is her hammered metal drum table from Target — a piece she says she’s recommended to clients.

Designer Fave

Wherever you’re sitting, you have to be able to set down your whatever! “A measure of success of a good living room is wherever you’re sitting, you have to be able to set down your whatever!” says Tammie, who worked for ALSC Architects, then migrated to Portland, before returning to Spokane and starting her own business in 2000. The living room also features a large, dark rock fireplace that Tammie acknowledges can complicate modern function. “When this house was designed, it was not designed for a TV,” says Tammie, who currently has the curved big-screen elegantly situated on a black sideboard with mother-of-pearl drawer fronts. ...continued on next page

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“INSIDE JOBS,” CONTINUED...

I

NHABIT design studio founder DEBBIE BRAVO’s view from her office is stunning: the Spokane River against a forested slope. And since she works from her Post Falls home, her commute can’t be beat, either. “It’s important to have that visual connection to the outdoors,” says Bravo, who designed the house with her husband and the help of architect, paying attention to every little detail. Numerous large, fixed sash windows are offset by smaller, screened ones to allow for both air circulation and a view, for example. “Interior design is much more than making it look pretty,” says Bravo, who recently started INHABIT after working with ALSC Architects in Spokane for close to 22 years.

Functional and beautiful, Bravo’s house is a reflection of her playful and resourceful side. It features lots of warm wood and pops of color like the orange sofa and purposely mismatched carpet tiles she assembled underneath the dining room table. She splurged on the sparkly kitchen island counter, which glimmers under cylindrical pendant light fixtures nearby. Bravo is keen on unique lighting in her house. Clear elements — crystal, Plexiglas, glass — sometimes unexpectedly combine with more industrial materials, like the crystal and black metal luminaire in the master bathroom. With its views of the river, the master bathroom is one of Bravo’s favorite places in the two-story home. “The tub is placed centrally in the room such that you can see the tops of the trees and the sky while soaking in the tub,” Bravo says. “It’s lovely, whether enjoying it during a snowy winter evening or a warm summer night.”

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Designer Fave

A combination of patterned light- and medium-gray tiles more commonly found in commercial design form the walk-in shower area, which has half-walls of tinted glass for privacy. Recessed lighting illuminates two mirrors over two deep sinks set into a long counter above a walnut vanity.

A soaking tub with views of the treetops lends a “zen” quality, to Debbie Bravo’s favorite room in her home, the master bath, while the crystal light fixture adds an unexpected sparkle. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

Interior design is much more than making it look pretty. There are potted plants, plush towels and that incredible tub for unwinding after a long day. “My house,” Bravo says, “is very zen.”

...continued on next page


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Understanding the historical basis for split-level design helped Sarah McGovern guide the remodel of her own split-level home. The wood fireplace offers ambiance, while new windows improve energy efficiency. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

“INSIDE JOBS,” CONTINUED...

W

hen MILIEU founder and lead designer SARAH McGOVERN returned to Spokane from Mississippi, she really wanted a Craftsman home like one she’d previously rented near Manito Park. Instead, she got a late-’70s rancher she describes as not “architecturally significant.”

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Curious about where the design arose, the Washington State University graduate with a master of arts in interior design and undergraduate studies in both fine art and art conservation, probed the history of raised split-level ranchers like hers. She learned the genetic roots were actually in famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s


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Sarah McGovern enjoys mixing styles and often changes accessories in rooms. Right now, University of Idaho professor Byron Clercx’s art hangs over the fireplace, a “knock-off” George Nelson bench offers a perfect spot for a pot of succulents, and a 1930s mahogany dry bar anchors the kitchen island. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

“INSIDE JOBS,” CONTINUED...

Designer Fave

When they remodeled in 2008, they replaced inefficient windows, as well as adding more panes in the living room and front entry. They kept the fireplace, which McGovern says is less about efficiency and more about creating ambience. Her décor is a mix of styles, she says, with elements ranging from a knockoff Herman Miller midcentury modern George Nelson bench to her favorite item: a 1930s

My house is sort of a laboratory. mahogany dry bar that she got at a yard sale. She’s also partial to original art, like former University of Idaho professor Byron Clercx’s piece currently hanging over the fireplace. She often changes artwork and furnishings around as she explores new design ideas, McGovern says. “My house is sort of a laboratory.” ...continued on next page

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Designer Fave

“INSIDE JOBS,” CONTINUED...

H

EATHER HANLEY, of TIN ROOF FURNITURE, is so excited to move into her new home — a midcentury modern showpiece — she almost doesn’t miss the place she recently moved out of, except for maybe the pantry and the kitchen. “I’m sad to leave that,” says Hanley, who was drawn to the rock fireplace and vaulted ceilings in the body of the 1970s style home she and her husband purchased around three and a half years ago. Renovations were the first order of business. First, they opened up the kitchen to flow seamlessly into the adjacent living room and dining area. Then they added a nearly 15-foot long marble island, along with an elegant granite and walnut

Brass accents on the kitchen island and a handpainted tile backsplash are two of Heather Hanley’s favorite elements in the kitchen, which was opened to the main room during the remodel. COLBY RASMUSSEN PHOTOS

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Multifaceted Artist Terry Lee’s Hayden-area studio reveals a local sculptor, painter and mentor STORY AND PHOTOS BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

ERRY LEE might be to Coeur d’Alene what inventive artists like the late Harold Balazs was to Spokane — shaping the community through public sculpture, yet just as skilled in other mediums, particularly painting. Like Balazs, Lee understands that while financial success reflects a keen business sense, personal success can be measured in relation to community. Sculptor, painter, businessman, mentor — it all comes together in Lee’s Hayden-area studio. Situated near Coeur d’Alene Airport/Pappy Boyington Field, Lee’s studio is, like the man himself, multifaceted. Part of it is in the house, part

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is in the shop and much of it is in continual flux. Inside his modest home, half his living room is given over to painting, where he works surrounded by books and brushes at an easel capable of holding canvasses several feet wide. Around him are both paintings and sculptures from his 26 years making art in North Idaho. “Art was not an interest; it was a passion,” says Lee, who was born and raised in Coeur d’Alene, left for seven years and returned in 1994 with a plan to make a living from art. His painting studio reflects a dynamic business. Some artworks are being readied for

shipping out, while others will linger on walls, counters and tables a while longer. Maybe they’ll appear in one of Lee’s numerous gallery representations in Montana, Wyoming, New Mexico or Utah, or be sent to one of a handful of shows in which he regularly participates. Outside his home is a gargantuan, asphalt-paved driveway that accommodates numerous vehicles, from the oversized pickup truck Lee uses to haul heavy bronze sculptures, to visitors’ cars parked there during Lee’s participation in the annual Coeur d’Alene Arts & Culture Alliance Artist Studio Tour.


Your Home, Your Happiness I’M WITH YOU, START TO FINISH expect excellence in service and detail Lee also gets visitors pursuing their personal artistic journeys. Some arrive to take a class with Lee or they might be teaching-artists to whom he lends space. He also opens his studio to skill-seekers during weekly open studio sessions. For a nominal donation to cover the cost of the model, people can practice figure drawing one week and facial portraiture another. Lee began the open sessions in 1994, before moving to Hayden, when he had a studio on family land near Interstate 90. He’d set it up shortly after returning from San Diego where he made his first forays into painting. Being there spurred his interest, says Lee. “I was exposed to really good galleries and the [San Diego] Museum,” he says. Lee started painting what he saw — Del Mar racetrack horses, the California coast — and taught himself what he could. He developed an eye for color, gravitating towards artists like John Asaro, Dan McCaw and Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, all of whom have a characteristically loose style, akin to impressionism. He sold some work, gained experience and decided art was his thing. “I call it the ‘step in front of the train’ approach,” he says. At age 71, Lee has more than found his stride. In 2018 he was named Safari Club International artist of the year for his massive and magnificent paintings of wildlife. Lee has traveled to Africa twice and is in the midst of planning a third trip. Visitors to his studio can see works in progress, which for a large-scale bronze usually involves making a small, clay maquette. Then he scales up the figure, adding and refining details. The finished piece is hauled to a foundry, where it will be cut apart, cast in bronze, put back together and readied for installation. Lately he’s been busy with yet another figure for Coeur d’Alene’s McEuen Park: a large, life-sized female suffragist to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the constitutional amendment securing women the right to vote. When she is installed, the statue will stand alongside other pieces he created in a similar vein: The Working Man (2014), Idaho Farmer (2017) and The Idaho Lumberjack (2019). “Coeur d’Alene had four active mills here when I was growing up,” says Lee, who says he can’t think of a better place than Coeur d’Alene’s lakeside park to commemorate local history.

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Home Growing Indoor herb gardening not only livens up winter windows but also offers fresh flavors for food BY LEANN BJERKEN

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hort days and long cold nights leave many of us looking for ways to keep our indoor spaces just a little brighter. One great way to do that is by creating an indoor garden for common kitchen herbs like basil, parsley, thyme and mint. Ideas abound for creating clever planters — from suspended glass jars or tin cans, to wooden trays, painted terra cotta pots, PVC pipes, plastic bottles, milk cartons, tea cups and more. For the less crafty, there are also mini greenhouse kits complete with seeds and built-in lights. After you figure out the vessel, it’s time to get started with the plants. While your choice of containers is nearly endless, when it comes to growing, “Less is more in terms of gardening,” says Justin Bickston, owner of 509 Grow, an indoor gardening and hydroponics shop on North Division in Spokane, noting that the best thing for beginners is to keep it simple. “Plants are pretty self-sufficient, so indoor growers mostly just have to keep in mind three factors: light, water and air. The more light you have, the more vigorous your growth. A bit of fresh air exchange and a good regimen of watering and you’re set.” Bickston says starter seed trays or kits are good to start with, because they usu-

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ally have basic plant varieties. “Herbs are easy to grow as long as you don’t overwater or overfertilize, and stay patient.” Jeff Johnson, manager and co-owner of Spokane Organic and Hydroponic Supply, on East Sprague, says herb gardeners can begin with the standard herb varieties, but he says shoots of salad vegetables like arugula, spinach, kale, chard, beetroot and mung bean sprouts also are popular. “Microgreens like those are popular because you’re able to pick them just after their first leaves have developed,” he says. Johnson advises beginners start with a tray filled with either soil or rockwool (a planting medium made from spinning molten basalt rock into fine fibers), a fluorescent light and seeds. “The T5 fluorescent light is excellent for growing herbs, sprouts and leafy greens,” he says. Johnson says once plants have started growing, gardeners can continue to harvest until they start to flower. “They don’t taste as good after flowering,” he says. “You may also want to restart once your tray or soil starts to get too worn down.” Alan Creach, is a co-owner of Creach Greenhouse and the Plant Farm, two gardening businesses in Spokane Valley. While his businesses sell a wide variety of

herbs, Creach says the most popular are rosemary and lavender, followed closely by basil and mint. “Mint varieties are picking up in popularity, because people like to add them to tea and other drinks,” he says. “During the holiday season it’s popular for people to buy assortments of seasonings like basil, parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme for using in holiday dinners.” The herbs are not only tasty, but can also be attractive decorative elements. “I encourage people who’re interested to carefully consider different varieties, as each one has different colored leaves and textures,” Creach says. Those elements are easier to appreciate if you buy plants rather than growing from seeds. “You can start from seed or a kit, but if you want a better quality plant you should go with a local grower, whose plants are usually created from cuttings and sold in containers of three to five plants,” he says. Creach suggests starting plants in a shallow dish or bowl, where water and air can move more easily through the soil. “In winter especially you want soil that’s coarse with good drainage, and a good light source because herbs thrive best in light,” he says. “Another good idea is regular fertilization with a fertilizer that’s water soluble.”


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Annecia Paulson “The owner carried so many unique plants I had never seen before,” Paulson writes in an email. “Large terrariums that were like little worlds, and the whole store was simply magical. I immediately began soaking up all the info from the owner and did research on every plant. I wanted to make sure each customer knew how special their plant was and how they needed to care for it.” She strives to recreate that magic at her booth, where the handmade hangers are now some of the most popular items she sells. Paulson will be at Brrrzaar on Saturday, Dec. 14, at River Park Square from 10 am to 9 pm, with hangers in new colors as well as new larger terrariums. Her items are also featured at From Here, the year-round shop filled with the work of local artisans inside River Park Square. No matter the vessel, Paulson notes, at the heart of it all is a passion for plants. “I love educating customers on their new addition and giving them confidence that they can succeed.” — ANNE McGREGOR

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Made to Share Chef Josh Pebbles brings a world of experience to Coeur d’Alene’s Vine & Olive STORY BY CARRIE SCOZZARO n PHOTOS BY YOUNG KWAK

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hef Josh Pebbles’ story is a familiar one: He started as a dishwasher at age 14, working for “20 bucks a night and a hamburger,” he says, nonetheless realizing he’d found where he belonged. By 18 he was at Café Borrone, a venerable Italian café near Stanford University, where he cemented a fascination for Italian cuisine that has carried him from California to Italy to Coeur d’Alene, where he now serves as executive chef at Vine & Olive. Why Italian cuisine? “It was the whole mentality of using only the best ingredients,” says Pebbles, who traveled to Italy in 2013 and wound up spending two years there. “And they take such precision and care in absolutely everything they do.” Why Italy? Pebbles had been reading the book Heat, by the New Yorker’s Bill Buford, who left his writing job to live in Tuscany and work in Mario Batali’s kitchen. In that spirit, Pebbles departed for Modena, Italy,

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Chef Josh Pebbles to pursue authentic experiences. While wandering around Florence’s Piazza della Signoria, Pebbles stumbled upon what is now one of his favorite dishes: Meatballs. “It was so simple but everything was just perfect,” says Pebbles, who remembers heading straight to the butcher to get pork so he could try replicating the dish.

Another serendipitous encounter resulted in an apprenticeship of sorts that redefined his approach to pasta and charcuterie. He’d gone to one of his favorite places to eat and asked where he might learn to make pasta. The answer was Osteria Francescana or Hosteria Giusti, both Michelin-starred restaurants. After two years at Hosteria Giusti, a restaurant and salumeria — which translates to maker of cured meats — dating back several hundred years, Pebbles returned to California, where he opened the shortlived, dinner-only Borrone Market Bar. Divorce sent him south to Los Angeles where he, like Restaurant: Impossible’s Robert Irvine, stepped in to revive a restaurant, the Tart, part of Farmer’s Daughter Hotel. Then, Pebbles took a year-and-a-half break. He migrated to AR Cucina in Culver City, California, to become chef de cuisine for owner Akasha Richmond, formerly megastar Michael Jackson’s private chef. Still, he was restless and casting about for a new challenge.


TRY IT YOURSELF

Pearl Onion Tartes Tatin This elegant, yet simple, savory French dish is a variation on the classic tart in which the ingredients — in this case onions — are caramelized along the bottom of the dish while the pastry is baked on top. Pearl onions are small, white and typically sweeter than their larger cousins, and can be found in the specialty produce aisle. Chef Josh uses several 4-inch tart pans but you can substitute ramekins or muffin pans.

Josh Pebbles shares recipes for Pork Meatballs with Nonna’s Sauce and Pearl Onion Tartes Tatin, items he says he’d are perfect for a winter gathering of friends. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

Pebbles’ transition to North Idaho almost didn’t happen. Remarried and approaching his early 40s, he was contemplating working in Costa Rica when his wife, Shanéa, saw Vine & Olive owner Naomi Boutz’ job posting on Craigslist Portland. It seemed like a great fit. As he did with other restaurants, Pebbles spent time working among the staff and slowly integrating specials into the menu. He’s particularly excited about one complex menu item: diver scallops with celeriac puree, Sicilian eggplant caponata, crisp kale with grappa-infused grapes, Aleppo peppers and preserved lemon puree ($26). Pebbles has also been working on a new lunch menu and the wine dinners for which Vine & Olive is known.

•• 1-1/2 pounds pearl onions, cut root side off at base of roots •• 12 ounces puff pastry, cut 1 inch larger than pan size, then freeze until use •• 2/3 cup powdered sugar •• 3 tablespoons butter, unsalted, room temperature •• Balsamic vinegar (aged eight years or more) 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 2. Prepare a bowl with ice water. 3. After you’ve cut the root side off of the base of each onion, bring a pot of water to a simmer and add pearl onions (skin on) for 90 seconds. 4. Place onions in ice bath to cool, then squeeze onions between thumb and forefinger to release outer skin. 5. Lightly spray tart pans with pan coating. 6. Sift sugar over base of pans until bottom is not visible. 7. Place approximately one tablespoon of butter on bottom of each pan and spread to edges with fingers. (Use less butter if pans are smaller, more if larger.) 8. Place onions in pans. 9. Place cut puff pastry sheet over onions and gently tuck edges around inside of pan around onions (use butter knife to aid tucking). Keep puff pastry you’re not using in freezer until you need it. 10. Flatten dough down so you can see the imprint of onions on dough. 11. Bake until golden brown, about 12-15 minutes. 12. Let cool slightly (3-4 minutes) then flip pans upside down to release onion tartlets. 13. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar just before serving. …continues on next page DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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JOY TO THE WORLD

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM

TRY IT YOURSELF

Pork Meatballs with Nonna’s Sauce 35 W. Main, Spokane • Mon-Sat 10-5:30 (509) 464-7677 • kizurispokane.com

Pebbles says this time-tested recipe is typical of what he’d serve at a party or bring to a potluck. Make any or all of the dish up to several days ahead to minimize time spent in the kitchen on the day-of. The recipe makes 2-3 dozen meatballs, depending on how large they’re formed.

Nonna’s Tomato Sauce

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•• 48 ounces San Marzano whole peeled tomatoes •• 6 garlic cloves, chopped •• 1 yellow onion, fine dice •• 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar •• 1 cup red wine •• 1 tablespoons granulated sugar •• 2 teaspoons salt •• 2 teaspoons black pepper •• 3 tablespoons olive oil

1. In a food processor blend canned tomatoes for about 20 seconds. 2. In a large pot, add olive oil, onions and garlic. Sauté until soft. 3. Add tomatoes, red wine and balsamic vinegar and bring to a low simmer. 4. Add salt, pepper and sugar then over low heat cook for 30-40 minutes. 5. Sauce can be made five days ahead and refrigerated till needed.

Meatballs

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•• 3 pounds ground pork •• 4 eggs •• 3 cups breadcrumbs, Panko style •• 5 cups Parmigiano-Reggiano, finely grated (microplane works best) •• 12 garlic cloves, minced •• 4 yellow onions, fine dice •• 1 cup parsley, chopped

•• 3 tablespoons olive oil •• 2 teaspoons salt •• 1 teaspoon black pepper, ground 1. Sauté onions on medium heat in olive oil until soft, then add garlic. Remove from heat and let cool. 2. Combine the remaining ingredients with the cooled onion mixture in a large bowl. Using your hands, fold all together until completely incorporated. 3. Test it! Take a small piece of the mixture and sauté with a little oil, then taste for seasonings, adjusting as necessary. 4. Form the meatballs into small, bite-size pieces and place in refrigerator for at least one hour or overnight (wrap tightly in plastic if overnight). This helps firm them up. 5. In a large sauté pan, add oil to cover bottom of pan. Over medium high heat, sear the meatballs on all sides. Do this in batches as to not overcrowd the pan. Place seared meatballs in a separate baking dish. 6. Once all the meatballs are seared, drain off most of the fat from the pan and add the tomato sauce, stirring with a wooden spoon to deglaze the pan. 7. Bring tomato sauce to a simmer and then pour over meatballs. 8. In a preheated 350 degrees Fahrenheit oven, bake until cooked through, about 15 minutes depending on size. — SHARED BY VINE & OLIVE’S JOSH PEBBLES


5” wide by 7.625” high

BEE SWEET

Honey For Your Honey

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y now you’ve heard: Honey bees are in trouble! Extensive research is underway at Washington State University to unravel why bees are struggling worldwide and to help prop up existing bee populations. And while the scientific results aren’t all in, one immediate, and delicious, result is. That’s because the WSU entomology department’s research bee colonies were busy all summer doing what any other bees would do — making HONEY, about 4,000 pounds of it, says assistant research professor Brandon Hopkins. The honey crop is now for sale, just in time for gift giving, with proceeds helping to continue the honeybee research. “Sales help support technicians, fuel for the trucks to drive around and care for the bees. It supports all of the research we do,” Hopkins says. Interestingly, the Palouse, with all its wheat fields, is “not the greatest place for honey,” Hopkins says, but it is perfect for research because the research bees are more isolated from other bees. “If we were commercial beekeepers we would have long been out of business,” says Walter “Steve” Sheppard, entomology department chair. “We manage the bee hives for research and for honey bee breeding. [Honey] is almost a byproduct, although we are pretty excited when the season comes.” — ANNE McGREGOR Find WSU Entomology Department Honey at Ferdinand’s Ice Cream Shoppe on the WSU campus, or order online, $8.15 for a 1 pound jar, at the WSU Entomology store store.entomology.cahnrs.wsu.edu/honey

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Beyond Basketball 46

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ones dash to a nearby slide to slip down and start another climb. Gym owner Adam Healy says rock climbing — once a fringe sport of outcasts and explorers — has gone mainstream in recent years. Budding athletes have increasingly connected with the challenge of working their way to the top of difficult climbing routes. “You get that sense of achievement,” he says. “It definitely helps build self-confidence and a sense of adventure.” Climbing’s combination of creative problem solving and self-guided improvement can make it an appealing alternative to more structured, traditional sports like baseball or soccer. As access expands to such sports, parents may find new ways to get their kids moving. In a time of scheduled playdates, video games and social media, research shows most children get far less physical activity than recommended. The 2018 U.S. report card on children’s fitness found just 43 percent of 6-11 year olds got enough activity. Those rates dropped to 8 percent for 12-15 year olds and 5 percent for 16-18 year olds. Participation is down for team sports and PE classes.

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JONATHAN HILL ILLUSTRATION

Alternatives to traditional sports offer kids fitness and lifelong lessons BY JACOB JONES

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winging and scrambling, small climbers ascend the colorful plastic handholds of the youth area of Bloc Yard Bouldering Gym in North Spokane. Toddlers and teens test themselves against

gravity, their faces twisted into dogged grimaces. As they hoist themselves over the top of the wall, stern looks turn to wide smiles. Parents cheer from below. The younger

arah Ullrich-French, an associate professor at Washington State University studying sports and motivation, explains participating in school-based team sports can boost physical fitness and academic performance. But many kids benefit from a different approach. “We have these real traditional sports and a very small percentage of kids will thrive and be really good at those sports,” she says. “Parents should be offering opportunities for kids to try out a lot of different activities … so (kids) can identify which things they really click with.” Some kids might enjoy skateboarding. Others might enjoy martial arts or surfing or ice skating. The important part is getting them moving. Ullrich-French says many children decide at a young age whether they consider themselves to be athletes or active. During those early years, parents can work to make sports fun, inclusive and low pressure. Kids also want to feel like they fit in with a social or peer group. “When kids quit (sports), often times it was because they did not have fun,” she says. “When kids don’t have fun, don’t connect, don’t feel good about what they ...continued on next page DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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“ALTERNATIVE ATHLETICS,” CONTINUED...

Getting a workout at the Numerica Skate Ribbon. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

can do, then they stop.” Jessi Moon, founder of the Cherry Bomb Brawlers roller derby team, says their junior league really prioritizes having an accepting culture that values diversity and acceptance. Skaters earn team nicknames that celebrate their personality and build confidence. “There’s no judgment here,” she says. “You are who you are.” As roller skaters slam each other around the track, they also learn about what unique strengths they bring to the team and how to overcome adversity through cooperation, Moon says. They become stronger skaters, but also more self-assured and resourceful. “You have to learn how to handle conflict,” she says. “There’s a mental as well as a physical aspect.” While traditional sports offer structure and team-based motivation that some kids will respond well to, most will still age out of school sports at some point. Few will compete at the college level and many drop

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out before then. Alternative sports or activities often carry over into adulthood more easily or can be enjoyed together as a family. Ullrich-French says a key factor in whether children stick with a sport is whether they internalize that activity as part of their identity. Do they come to think of themselves as a climber, skater or active person? “Kids can really just do what they enjoy doing instead of what they have to do,” she says. “It becomes part of who they are.”

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kids a break from tests, peer pressure and social media. “They can get a sense of community and belonging,” she says. “They just really need an activity that’s non-judgmental.” Yoga, like rock climbing or roller derby, offers lessons that reach far beyond the gym or studio. They improve physical fitness, but also help kids learn about relationships and respon-

You have to learn how to handle conflict. There’s a mental as well as a physical aspect.

her Desautel, co-owner of YogaJoy North in Spokane, says getting started in yoga as a youth lays a foundation for a lifetime of potential practice and growth. Like many other activities, yoga offers self-led improvement, social connection, new skills and fun. “It’s very adaptable,” she says. “It’s self-pacing.” YogaJoy instructor Mary Fuhr, who often works with special needs children, says the practice encourages a non-competitive environment that gives

sibility. They build character and resiliency. They strengthen self-esteem and personal identity. “It’s absolutely everything,” Ullrich-French says. Parents should not force their children into sports, but there are more ways than ever to get kids active. Looks for what lights them up and helps them grow. “Just find anything they can connect with that involves movement,” she says. “Any movement is better than no movement.”

ESCAPE

Y O U R G E TAWAY, JUST 30 M I N U T E S AWAY. Spa Ssakwa’q’n at Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort Hotel helps you escape the ordinary, and embrace the extraordinary. Relax in our heated pools, saunas and tea lounge. Reinvigorate with massages, facials, manicures/pedicures and other body treatments. Enjoy products from elite brands such as Blue Beautifly, Naturopathica, Farm House Fresh and more. Call now to book your appointment, and escape to another world. Open 7 days a week 1 855 232-2772

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SCHWEITZER

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

Let It Snow! Whether for a weekend getaway or lessons to get the little ones started, here’s a preview of what Spokane’s five local resorts have in store for the 2019-20 season BY ALEX SAKARIASSEN

With a mountain range or lake dominating the horizon in nearly every direction, the view from Schweitzer Mountain is enough to lodge a rider’s heart in their throat. Throw in the resort’s 2,900 skiable acres and an average annual snowfall of 300 inches and nobody could be blamed for a little lightheadedness. Schweitzer has been beckoning the snowsports crowd to its slopes season after season since 1963, and today offers a host of options. Miles of Nordic skiing and snowshoe trails, three separate terrain parks and a village complete with artist studio, movie theater and morning yoga sessions make it easy to keep the entire family occupied from sunrise until well after sunset. WHAT’S NEW: Over the summer, crews removed the old Snow Ghost double chair in the Outback Bowl, replacing it with a high-speed quad and a triple. Visitors will also notice more protected outdoor seating at a couple base area restaurants, faster internet service and a newly paved road leading to the resort.

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LOOKOUT PASS

There’s something strangely entertaining about riding a lift in Idaho, shredding fresh powder in Montana, then heading back across the border for a beer. Lookout Pass straddles 540 acres along the Montana-Idaho border just off Interstate 90, and the fact that the area can get as much as 400 inches per season goes a long way in explaining why skiers and snowboarders show up here in droves. A full complement of lessons, clubs and workshops ensure no family member will be left behind. And if a break from the slopes is in order, the Loft Pub is the perfect place to belly up for a brew, a burger and an update on the latest football scores. WHAT’S NEW: Crews at Lookout Pass spent the summer swapping the area’s frontside lift with a new quad, which marketing and sales manager Matt Sawyer says will nearly double Lookout’s uphill capacity. Plus, Sawyer adds, replacing the old triple with a quad “allows families to ride together.”

MT. SPOKANE

Last season brought a lot of hype to Mt. Spokane as the resort unveiled a new lift and seven new north-facing runs. The expansion upped the mountain’s skiable acreage to 1,704, ensuring skiers and snowboarders even more of a shot at the kind of thrilling terrain Mt. Spokane has become regionally renowned for. With the summit-situated Vista House, late-week night skiing and three terrain parks, there’s no shortage of options for riders at all skill levels. When those ski boots finally start feeling too tight, Mt. Spokane’s two base lodges boast ample space to kick back and reflect on the day’s gnarlier moments. WHAT’S NEW: The 2019-20 season marks the return of the resort’s Saturday shuttle service from Spokane. From Dec. 28 to March 7, riders can hop a 55-passenger bus from multiple in-town locations straight to the Mt. Spokane parking lot. “We’ve had lots of people ask about it, so we’re excited to offer that,” says Mt. Spokane’s Brenda McQuarrie. ...continued on next page

BOB LEGASA/MT. SPOKANE PHOTO

AT THE MAC The National Museum of American Illustration, Newport, RI and the American Illustrators Gallery, NYC.© 2019

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DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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SILVER MOUNTAIN

An easy drive along Interstate 90 and a scenic ride up a gondola are all it takes to start making turns at Silver Mountain. From there, the resort’s five lifts and 73 named runs send a clear message: take your pick. Average snowfall here is around 340 inches per season, an amount that tends to make the season pretty darned long. A tubing hill and top-notch terrain park lend any day at Silver a healthy helping of variety. The resort’s Silver Rapids Indoor Water Park, nestled at the base of the gondola, add a family friendly vibe to the experience. WHAT’S NEW: This season will feature a new ski shop at Silver Mountain’s base area, complete with equipment tuning, boot fitting and an expanded selection of ski accessories. “We’re expanding the beginning progression terrain park, too,” says GM Jeff Colburn. “That’s been pretty popular for us, so we’re expanding that, putting in some new features and some music.”

SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

“LET IT SNOW,” CONTINUED...

49 DEGREES NORTH

Situated on the southern portion of Washington’s Colville National Forest, just 10 miles east of Chewelah, 49 Degrees North has been catering to powder-hungry throngs of snowsports enthusiasts for nearly half a century. Six lifts scattered across 2,325 acres of skiable terrain make for a truly shreddable experience, and on-area amenities like the Boomtown Lounge and Cy’s Cafe offer all the hot chocolate, cinnamon rolls and craft beer that riders need to stay fueled. Add to all that, four Saturdays of night skiing per season and it’s easy to see why 49 Degrees North belongs on this season’s must-ski list. WHAT’S NEW: After 23 years as owner and operator of 49 Degrees North, John Eminger passed the torch in April 2019 to Silver Mountain owner CMR Lands, which also owns and operates Silver Mountain.

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Keep up with this ski season by picking up your copy of Snowlander, inserted free in the Inlander on December 19, January 9 and February 13.


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INLANDER RESTAURANT WEEK Feb 20th-29th

PICK IT UP FREE EVERY THURSDAY! DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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Cami Bradley says her new work under the name Carmen Jane is, “the first time I’ve felt fully me in music.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Key Change After a stint on America’s Got Talent, local singer-songwriter Cami Bradley looked to reinvent her sound — and herself BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

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f you saw Spokane musician Cami Bradley as a contestant on America’s Got Talent back in 2013, you saw a 25-yearold singer-songwriter known for plaintive arrangements of pop standards. If you followed her career beyond TV, you’re surely familiar with the Sweeplings, the folk-pop duo she founded with Alabama singer-songwriter Whitney Dean. And if you happen to see her performing Christmas classics, including selections from Glenn Miller’s Nutcracker Suite, with the Spokane Jazz Orchestra on Dec. 7, you’ll no doubt be blown away by her old-fashioned vocal prowess. But now that she’s 31, Bradley wants to be known for more than just her stint on the small screen. Under the new moniker of Carmen

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Jane — her given first and middle names — she’s producing music that’s more adventurous and experimental than anything she’s done before. Bradley describes the new sound as “dark pop,” and says that she was probably channeling the gothic electronics of Billie Eilish when she first went into the studio. But it’s still gestating. “I’m loving it, Bradley says. “It’s the first time I’ve felt fully me in music.” Bradley is still based in Spokane, but she’s regularly pinballing back and forth between here and Los Angeles, where she’s still feeling her way through the complicated machinations of the music industry. She’s also still making music with the Sweeplings, and they’ve reached a wide audience because their songs have appeared in commercials and on TV series like Pretty

Little Liars and The Vampire Diaries. But that’s just one of many musical irons that Bradley has in the fire. In a corner of Atticus on a busy Saturday afternoon, she has a brief respite before flying back to L.A.; this trip will be devoted to writing new material with her younger brother Ryan, who lives there and performs blues-rock under the stage name Dirt Miller. Bradley says she needs those professional partnerships to push her style in unexpected directions. Though she put out a few solo releases pre-Sweeplings, she says now that she was never fully satisfied with those songs once they were committed to tape: “Maybe I hadn’t lived enough life or felt enough things to be as deep as I wanted. The sound was never real enough to me. “You get into a groove — and it’s a good


one. But I wasn’t really expanding upon how I wrote or who I wrote with,” she continues. “The Sweeplings is one of the most amazing things, but it’s only one side of me as an artist. And there was another side that I also wanted to get out there.” Carmen Jane is different. It feels a bit more grown-up, more sure of itself, moodier and edgier than anything she’s done before. The acoustic hush of the Sweeplings has given way to slinky synthesizers and club-ready beats, and while Bradley’s powerful voice is still at the center, it’s almost unrecognizable from the more delicate intimacy of her previous solo work. As a project, Carmen Jane has been a collaboration with producer Nico Rebscher, who had an international hit co-writing Alice Merton’s jittery pop song “No Roots.” Bradley has traveled to his native Germany to write and record with him, and she says their connection was almost immediate. “I’ve always had in my head what I wanted it to be and could never get someone to understand,” Bradley says. “The first chords [Nico] played on the piano was, ‘Yes, that’s exactly what I’m talking about.’ And he’s really good at pushing me beyond my limits.” She doesn’t want to be defined by her time on America’s Got Talent, but she’s also aware to know that her career would look a lot different if she hadn’t been given that kind of national platform. Bradley was an unassuming audience favorite during the competition show’s eighth season, eventually taking sixth place amongst a pool of thousands of performers. She didn’t take on a recording contract immediately after her run on the show, which is usually de rigueur for newfound TV stars, and she has no regrets about it now. “There’s a subsidiary of the music industry that’s made for cover bands and reality stars,” Bradley says. “You can be successful in that for sure, but I’m coming back into the L.A. world fresh and with a new name, so people don’t tie me to that. I definitely don’t have regrets now that I’m dipping my toe back into it, and realizing that it was a smart decision.” Cami Bradley will perform with the Spokane Jazz Orchestra on Sat, Dec. 7, at the Bing Crosby Theater (901 W. Sprague) at 7:30 pm. Tickets start at $25 and are available at spokanejazz.org.

REASONS WHY Locally-owned businesses are good for our economy They create more local jobs They add character to our community They use fresh, quality ingredients Local tastes delicious

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Dry Fly, No-Li, Townshend and the Inlander are working together to spread the word that drinking local has a very positive and lasting effect on our community. DECEMBER 2019 - JANUARY 2020

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THE UNIVERSITY

FOR WASHINGTON

From educating medical students over the past four decades to working with the region’s entrepreneurs, the UW’s commitment to Eastern Washington runs deep. Together with partners like Gonzaga University, we’re serving local students, communities and the state we all call home.

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Profile for The Inlander

Health & Home 12/02/2019  

Health & Home 12/02/2019