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Time is running out on the region’s last drive-in By Mike Bookey | Page 20

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inside JULY 4- 10, 2013 | Vol. 20, No. 38

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comment | sequester

Earth to Boise

The sequester is further starving early education Idaho By Mary Lou Reed

O

n March 1, 2013, just like a blanket of wet snow, the federal sequester was allowed to quietly descend upon our land by an ego-centered, wildly partisan Congress. The sequester did not come completely unannounced, and the Republican Congressmen who let it happen did so with clear knowledge of the consequences. So in 2013 the state of Idaho is losing $3.7 million dollars for primary and secondary education and jobs for 50 teacher aides. Meals on Wheels for seniors is losing $202,000. Environmental funding for the state is taking a $1.2 million hit. The general public is not yet feeling the pinch, but like water torture, the sequester is leaving its mark, one drop at a time. One of the reasons the sequester is below our radar is that a large portion of the cuts hurt programs that help the poor. To be poor is to be virtually invisible. Of particular pain to me, North Idaho Head Start will lose slots for 17 children. Statewide, the loss will be 200 children; nationwide, 70,000 children will lose access to Head Start. Head Start provides preschool education for eligible 3-to-5-year-olds, along with health and food advice and counseling to their parents. Only children in families whose income is at or below the federal poverty level are eligible to enroll. Early Head Start offers services to pregnant women, infants and toddlers.

shaped at a very early age. Children enrolled in preschool at ages 3 and 4 will acquire cognitive, social and behavioral skills that will serve them well throughout their school years and into the world of jobs and responsibilities.

A

dedicated firstgrade teacher recently told me of her worries for the future of Idaho children who enter first grade from homes where their early learning has been sadly neglected. Public kindergartens are in place in Idaho, but attendance is not mandatory. So it’s possible for a child to enter first grade without the benefit of

Like water torture, the sequester is leaving its mark, one drop at a time.

W

hat you and I don’t often ask ourselves: Just what is it like to try to live on $11,490 a year, less than $1,000 a month, or to raise a child alone on $15,310 a year, or for you and your spouse to raise two children on $23,550? Most of the parents of Head Start students have jobs, but their jobs don’t pay enough to lift them above the poverty line. Unlike many states, Idaho puts no matching state funds into the Head Start program. That reality comes as no surprise, since Idaho is now dead last among states in the number of dollars it invests in its public schools per student. So there has never been enough money here in the Head Start program, or in other parts of the state, to include all the 3- and 4-year-olds who are eligible to enroll in the preschool classes. Perhaps 20 percent of the eligible children and their families are actually participating in the program. Isn’t it crazy for the sequester to take money from a very positive program that has been running on a shoestring all along? Who are these little kids in the North Idaho program? Twenty percent have disabilities and 15 percent are homeless or in foster homes. But each has the potential to succeed. Research and records have proven that children’s abilities are

either kindergarten or preschool. Idaho is one of 10 states that do not provide public preschools for their very youngest citizens, other than federally funded Head Start and Early Head Start. And Idaho has a higher percentage of children in its population than any other state, except Utah and Texas. We can hope Idaho will eventually join the rest of the country in recognizing that early childhood years, from birth to 4, are vitally important years for expanding a child’s mind and abilities. And early childhood education is relatively inexpensive to fund. If dollars for pre-kindergarten are too much to hope for, full-day kindergarten for all should be a goal for all Idaho school districts. According to economist Mike Ferguson of the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy, Idaho will have around $162 million more to spend in the coming year than in the current budget. But like the sequester, that surplus is at the mercy of politicians, who may not hold the future of education or the plight of the poor as their highest priorities. If education is the ladder out of poverty, the sequester is taking us full speed in the wrong direction. Austerity economics do not make sense in Greece, Spain or anywhere else. To quote economist Robert Reich: “Earth to Washington. Repeal the Sequester.” I would add “Earth to Boise. Ask first: How are the children?” n

comment | publisher’s note

Zombie Nation by ted s. mcGregor jr.

I

remember in 7th grade they showed us a map of Spokane, with a red zone emanating from Fairchild Air Force Base. If, our teacher told us, Russia drops an atom bomb on Fairchild, this would be the blast zone. It wasn’t hard to find my house, just on the edge of the red zone. Scary. My mom remembers how they drilled for an attack in the 1950s by hiding under their desks. A generation before that, my grandfather Archie served in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Like most of his generation, he never talked about it, but his fear of war would have been very real. There have been social fears forever — from the time of the saber-tooth tiger to the black plague to today. It’s how we cope that changes. It’s telling that one of Hollywood’s great eras was during World War II. It was a distinctly escapist cinema — 1942 brought America Holiday Inn, while Meet Me in St. Louis was a big hit in 1944. Maybe a 90-minute reminder of all that is good about humanity was a healthy way to face a world that was falling apart. Movies helped Americans recharge for the war effort. Today, if pop culture is any indication, we have a strange relationship with our fears. If it’s not based on a comic book, it seems every story has to be set in a post-apocalyptic near-future, with zombies as the villains of choice. We apparently enjoy watching the world be destroyed while safely shoveling popcorn into our mouths. If art reflects who we are, what do the children killing children of The Hunger Games say about us? Or the swarming zombies of World War Z? As David Denby puts it in his New Yorker review of World War Z, “Why do we long for what terrifies us, doctor?” It’s Psychology 101 to say that we’re sublimating our actual fears with such fantasies. The real fears are on the news every night — superstorms, super tornadoes, super heatwaves — but rather than depict those cataclysms, we obsess about a zombie apocalypse. We’re neither grappling with our reality nor taking a break from it. We’ve created a more complete detachment. What’s the impact of having zombie apocalypse on the brain? According to a new survey in Time magazine’s “Pursuit of Happiness” cover story, the percentage of Americans who describe themselves as optimists has dropped to 50 percent; in 2004, that figure was 79 percent. And it’s not surprising that the so-called “survivalist” movement is flourishing, with TV shows devoted to Doomsday Preppers and emergency food kits available at Costco. Instead of being victimized and turned feeble by some imagined dark future, we’re stronger as a society when we feel empowered to take on our challenges — like defeating fascism, ending the threat of nuclear annihilation or grappling with global warming. n

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most recent is for 2010. This report states that the The balance between security and individual liberty percentage of deaths from non-predator causes is has been defined: It is called the Bill of Rights. If this 94.5 percent, and the percentage of deaths caused by balance needs to be altered, only the people have the predators is 5.5. The percentage of all cattle and calf right to alter it. Edward Snowden knows this. deaths caused by wolves is 0.2 percent. Snowden also knows that the trampling of our Another part of the article where a little more Fourth Amendment rights by the government is info would have been helpful is that Mr. Rockholm is unconstitutional and illegitimate. It is illegitimate beparanoid. I went to a public meeting held by the IDFG cause the people have not sanctioned the surrender in Coeur d’Alene once that Mr. Rockholm attended, of their rights. It is up to the people, not the regime, and he was wearing a side-arm. The only thing I could to alter the balance between security and individual figure is that he was actually afraid the pro-wolfers liberty. might attack him during the meeting. The ubiquitous Ministry of Propaganda, known as the U.S. media, would have you believe that a BILL HOWELL benevolent government is storing our personal Spokane, Wash. papers for our own good; that Americans are not the “target” of searches; and that because we are not the “target,” unconstitutional searches are acceptable. Does anyone actually believe this? Thank you for having the grace to beat Edward Snowden did the only thing a me to the punch about where most of the moral, courageous American could do: He parking meter money is going (“Time’s Up,” exposed government criminality. It is now Send comments to 5/2/13), since I was going to suggest that up to us to force the regime to respect our editor@inlander.com. may be the biggest gripe most parkers have Bill of Rights. against the more rapacious new meters. Indeed, I suspect most complainers figure that ROGER WHITTEN setup was preordained by the decision the city council Deer Park, Wash. arrived at in 1997 in a closed-door session to fund the River Park Square parking garage. I consider the meter issue to be a red herring as regards convenient downtown parking. Downtown I enjoyed the article “The Wolf Killers” (6/20/13) but could prosper more if the city leased or bought downwish you had included a few more facts. You mention town’s pay parking lots and offered free parking. that advocates emphasize that wolves account for While I’m glad that some of the meter money only a miniscule number of livestock deaths, and then goes to public works, and that some of downtown gave some numbers from official reports for the entire prospers, I think the neighboring park remains the Northern Rocky Mountain region. The numbers cited biggest draw. are indeed miniscule, but a few additional facts would I’m too old to argue about what is best for help people unfamiliar with the data understand this downtown anymore, but I haven’t lost my preference better. for truth in advertising. Another indicator is cattle and calf deaths. The USDA prepares a report once every five years PHILIP J. MULLIGAN documenting the causes of cattle and calf deaths Spokane, Wash. due to predator and non-predator causes, and the

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CYNTHIA M BROWNFIELD: The way things evolve in this world it will be pretty much a normal way of life. Remember years ago when it was taboo to date/ marry someone of a different race and today no one really cares one way or the other. Maybe in 50 years or so they will be fighting for interspecies right to marry. Just saying! BARRY MORRIS: Hopefully much more favorably than [the previous day’s] torching of the Voting Rights Act. BOB GREEN: With a yawn... LORI WILSON: I’m hoping they’ll look upon it as something we teach our future grandchildren about in history books as they did the Equal Rights movement for our current generation. It’s something I hope most will see by then as something to be celebrated and proud of. STEVE SCOTT: In 50 years from now people will be fighting for the rights to marry dogs and sheep etc... THOR ERIK KING: I think American citizens will have a vast range of different viewpoints in future just as they do now. I’d certainly hope they don’t all look at history with the exact same opinion or we’ll somehow have managed to excise freedom of thought from our citizenry. ANNA BRUSSEL: I’m just glad I will be dead by then. This isn’t even a country it’s a darn circus! JESSICA RISING: It will be seen as an historic step for human rights, I believe. 

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 9

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comment | satire

Supreme Relief B by andy borowitz

y a five-to-four vote, the Supreme Court last week acted, in the words of Justice Antonin Scalia, “to relieve millions of Americans from the onerous burden of having to vote.” Writing for the majority, Justice Scalia stated, “Since 1965, citizens across the nation have lived under the tyranny of being forced to elect people to represent them. This is an important step to free them from that unfair and heinous obligation.” Justice Scalia added that the Voting Rights Act had “thrust upon the shoulders of millions of Americans the terrible and unwanted burden of exercising their rights in a democracy. “Many of them have been forced to drive to polling places, wait in line, and then cast their vote because of the oppressive requirements of this Act,” he wrote. “It is our honor and duty to free them from those hardships.” In conclusion, Justice Scalia wrote, “Our message to the Ameri-

can people is simple: we are voting so you won’t have to.” Elsewhere, in the latest publicity coup for the Afghan insurgent group, the Taliban this week finished first in a newly released survey of the “Best Places to Work 2013.” For the Taliban, who had just opened their office in Doha, Qatar, last month, the honor was “totally unexpected and incredibly humbling,” a spokesman for the group said. “This is the first office we’ve ever opened, so naturally we wanted it to be nice and all,” he said. “But to be named a better place to work than Apple and Google and the other amazing places on this list — whoa.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

comment | energy

Worldwide Fracking B by jim hightower

ig Oil’s frackers are wrapping their shameless profiteering in our flag. In shale fields across the country, you’ll see fracking rigs festooned with Old Glory, and they even paint some of their rigs red, white and blue. This patriotic pose is part and parcel of the industry’s cynical PR campaign to convince you and me that its assault on our health, water, air and economic future should be mindlessly saluted, rather than questioned. ENERGY INDEPENDENCE! is their deafening cry — this shale gas boom, they exclaim, will free America from dependence on foreign producers. “O say can you see [through the frackers’ big lie?]” One who has peeked behind their star-spangled curtain is investigative digger Joel Dyer, editor of Boulder Weekly in Colorado. What he uncovered is “one of the biggest scams ever perpetrated on America.” Far from independence, we’re going to get the pollution and other problems, but foreigners will get the energy, for the gas extracted from our fractured land is destined

for the export market. How do we know that? First, because the industry and its government enablers admit it in their internal communications. But secondly, guess who’s paying for the fracking of America? Dyer cites reports by Bloomberg News that China has pumped half a trillion dollars into the U.S. drilling “boom” — not only so it can export the energy back to its people, but especially so the Chinese can “redeploy the best U.S. practices and technologies” back to China. Other foreign owners fracking us are Japan ($5 billion invested so far), India ($3.5 billion), France ($4.5 billion) as well as multibillions more from South Korea, England and even Norway. Norway? Really? Come on, America — don’t let the profiteers wrap you up in our own flag. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

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YOU ARE STILL GOD’S PRECIOUS LITTLE GIRL. IF YOU ARE SUFFERING AFTER AN ABORTION, PLEASE CALL. YOU’RE NOT ALONE.

Marshall Chesrown, at the groundbreaking at Kendall Yards.

development

Gambling Losses How three local developers bet big and went bust By Daniel Walters

I

n February of 2006, The Inlander published a 3,300word story titled “The Man from Black Rock.” It starred Marshall Chesrown, the man we predicted could push Spokane past the tipping point to finally become a thriving city. Chesrown started out as a car salesman, but transformed himself into a millionaire developer. He turned 650 acres of Coeur d’Alene real estate into Black Rock, a luxury development and golf course aimed at the ultrawealthy. He purchased a 78-acre strip of railyard land near downtown Spokane and named it Kendall Yards, planning to turn it into a densely packed community of commercial and residential development.

Back then, The Inlander described Chesrown as charismatic, energetic, enthusiastic and mysterious. He was “ready to write the next chapter in his charmed life,” the profile read, and was “armed with what appear[ed] to be a golden touch.” It was appropriate that he wielded a literal golden shovel to break ground on Kendall Yards. The Inlander had one thing right: 2006 was a tipping point. It was the year when the housing market began to teeter. By 2008, the country had collapsed into the deepest recession in nearly 80 years. Chesrown’s Black Rock properties sank into foreclosure and lawsuits, and he lost them to the bank. The Kendall Yards project stalled for years. In 2009, with the

chris Bovey photo

soil still bare, Chesrown sold the property to Greenstone Homes. Last month Chesrown filed for personal bankruptcy, owing nearly $72 million. He has no income. His list of creditors runs 85 pages. On top of that, he lost $30,000 gambling in Las Vegas. Real estate development also is a gamble. Hit the jackpot, like Chesrown did, and become a multimillionaire. But when the luck turns as Chesrown’s did, entire empires collapse.

Brewster’s Millions

Rob Brewster can relate. As downtown Spokane began its renaissance in the late ’90s, 28-year-old Brewster began buying historic properties, like the Holley Mason and Hutton buildings, and renovated them. “I did it because I thought it was fun and good for the community,” Brewster says. He developed the boutique Montvale Hotel and neighboring restaurants. At one time, he dreamed of creating a 32-story tower in Spokane. But the recession hit, layoffs drove office vacancies, and banks stopped lending. “We weren’t able to refinance,” he says. Brewster entered the Spokane real estate market at about the ...continued on next page

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 13

news | development “gambling losses,” continued...

of high school, built up a national construction group and aimed to top $500 million in revenue by 2005. same time as Chesrown. Their assets hadn’t In fact, Jeffreys and Chesrown had attended had enough time to mature in order to weather University High School together. Chesrown economic catastrophe, Brewster says. found Jeffreys in Colorado in 1994 and hired To that, add plain old bad luck. “In 2010, him to help build an automotive dealership. It American Express mistakenly thought I was was a springboard for Jeffreys’ national success. deceased, and all of my The two became friends credit scores went to zero,” and owned adjacent propBrewster says. erties. Today, according to Venture after venture bankruptcy documents, went bankrupt. He lost the Chesrown still owes JefHolley Mason and Hutton freys money. buildings. Taxes hadn’t But if the allegations been paid on the other against Jeffreys are true, businesses in the Montvale he’s much different than Hotel’s building, and the Chesrown. Brewster Washington state Attorney and Chesrown, howGeneral’s office, suspicious ever imprudently, pursued of Brewster’s management dreams. Jeffreys sold decisions and financial illusions. transactions, convinced a He purportedly tried judge to hand the buildto pass off a photo of his ing over to a bankruptcy split-level Spokane condo trustee. Catacombs and as a nonexistent condo Scout, the restaurants in in San Francisco. The the Montvale’s building, case against him claims have been closed. (See he promised profits to page 31 for more.) investors in a warehouse Today, Brewster says in Denver, an apartment he’s a lot more cautious complex in Coeur d’Alene, about places like Spokane. an office building in San “Spokane is very Francisco, apartments in risky. It has all of the Seattle, condominiums in downside when the naRob Brewster (top). Plus, the Ridpath Hotel, which Mullan, Idaho — projects tional market goes crazy,” has been thrust into Greg Jeffreys’ legal issues. that never actually existed. Brewster says. “But it has Jeffreys’ case is ongosuch little upside.” ing. His attorney Mark Vovos says they have a defense. But even if he’s found innocent, Jeffreys will have to contend with scores of headlines and Greg Jeffreys, by contrast, was a developer who accusations when searching for future business took different sort of risks. Legal risks. partners. “I don’t gamble a lot,” Jeffreys said. He said Brewster and Chesrown may find it easier. this in his sprawling underground split-level Part of the bankruptcy system’s appeal is that it apartment, accessed from a downtown Spokane allows business owners to emerge from the ashes alleyway, while sitting beside stacks of poker and rebuild. “I’m a hell of a lot better developer chips. now than I was five years ago, ironically,” BrewIt was January 2012. Jeffreys and associate ster says. Brian Main had received much of the blame for Jack Pring, the Spokane Valley businessman the tangled mess the Ridpath Hotel had become. who sold Chesrown the property that became A civil lawsuit claimed Jeffreys had helped to split Black Rock, says he still completely trusts and up and sell off the Ridpath piece by piece, using believes in Chesrown. “The guy has had a little wildly inflated prices based on false pretenses. Jefbit of tough luck, but that doesn’t mean he can’t freys called the charges against him “horseshit.” come back and get ’er done,” Pring says. But he maintained he had a plan for the RidBut even if they never develop another acre, path, promising much would unfold in the public Brewster or Chesrown have forever changed eye by the summer. the region. The Holley Mason was slated to be That summer, much did. FBI agents raided torn down, and Brewster helped save it. The Jeffreys’ bank accounts, his house and his apartMontvale building had sat vacant for 25 years, ment. Casino tracking records revealed that only Brewster says, but today it’s open and operating. a few weeks after he told The Inlander he didn’t do “Whether or not I own it, in the end, is basimuch gambling, he went to a Las Vegas casino cally irrelevant,” Brewster says. and shelled out $100,000 in cash for “buy-ins” Though Chesrown’s name has been purged over the span of a month. from the history page of the Black Rock website, The indictment hit Jeffreys with 73 counts, the gorgeous, expensive buildings his group built accusing him of theft, conspiracy, Ponzi schemes, still exist. Homes, apartments and commercial money laundering and fraud. He was repeatedly buildings, though less dense and luxurious than denied bail. Chesrown planned, are springing up in Kendall At one time, Jeffreys seemed like he could Yards. Chesrown didn’t build those buildings, have had the impact of Chesrown or Brewster. but he paved the way — starting with that golden A 1999 Spokane Journal of Business profile depicted shovel. n Jeffreys as a self-effacing, self-made entrepreneur danielw@inlander.com who started a subcontracting company right out

Dreams and Illusions

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news | budget

Falling Down Why the city isn’t demolishing dangerous, abandoned buildings BY HEIDI GROOVER

W

hen Barbara Plewowners or responsible banks man looks up, she have hearings to challenge sees two matches demolition decisions, and waiting to be struck. when a building is ordered deAcross the street and up a molished, they have the first hill from her beige ranch-style chance to do the teardown. house in Spokane’s North But if they take no action, the Indian Trail neighborhood are work falls to the city. two dead trees, their brownThe city recoups its and-orange tops hovering over expenses by putting a lien on a house that once was. Now the property, meaning if the charred from a fire last fall, demolition costs aren’t repaid, the house’s insides are strewn the property goes to a county across the driveway, its roof auction and profits from the crushed under a snapped-off sale repay the city. Trautman pine tree. says that process typically Standing in slippers in her takes about three years, so the driveway, with gray hair and department still needs upfront wire-rim glasses, Plewman cash to pay for the demolicalls it a “tinder box.” tions. “What’s it going to take? Three of the properties A little lightning?” she says. on the list were ordered to “This is a good neighborbe demolished last year, but hood. Why should we put up were put off because the with something so trashy?” department couldn’t afford The house, abandoned the work. The other three by its owner, is have come in the one of six properfirst half of this year, ties on the city’s nearly reaching the to-demolish list, but Send comments to department’s foureditor@inlander.com. per-year average. the department in charge of tearing This stopgap the buildings down measure would pay doesn’t have the money to do for the backlog of demoliits work, says Heather Trauttions, but with negotiations man, director of the Office of over next year’s budget not Neighborhood Services and yet underway, it’s unclear Code Enforcement. if the city will find a more “The city has been requirpermanent solution. Meaning departments to cut back while, two more properties on their expenditures,” Trautare in waiting as the owner man says. “Many areas of my has 30 days to tear down the budget I’ve had to reduce … buildings before the city takes so I don’t have money to do over, and the department has very much.” identified another seven that So for the first time since could see demolition orders “well before 2006,” Trautman this year. says, her department is asking Trautman is hopeful her the council to spend $150,000 department will find ways to from the city’s reserves to pay fund its work, even in lean for the demolitions through times, but Stuckart sees the an emergency budget ordishortfall as a rallying point nance. Council President Ben against budget cuts. Stuckart says the measure will “When you cut too far, likely pass a full council vote you have to dip into reserves on Monday. to get work done to run the Damaged or dilapidated city,” he says. “This is just buildings end up on the city’s another example of why these demolition list after a process extreme cuts in budgets aren’t of complaints, notifications necessarily the best long-term and hearings. Property strategy.” n

letters

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 15

news | digest

need to know

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE MAC IS BACK

1.

Just missing a government shutdown, the Washington State Legislature reached a $33.6 billion two-year operating budget, including 16 tax breaks worth about $13 million.

2.

Pastor, real estate agent and headline-making conservative Mark Hamilton is not qualified to run for Spokane City Council because he has not lived in the district he wants to represent for long enough, a Spokane County Superior Court judge ruled.

3.

The South Hill’s long-awaited and controversial Target store will open next summer at the Regal-Palouse Highway site, developer Dave Black announced. Construction is expected to begin this October.

4.

MIKE McCALL PHOTO

Fleetwood Mac sold 325,000 tickets before they even added the last dozen stops on their 2013 tour, so it’s no surprise the band rocked for a packed Spokane Arena Saturday. This spring, the British-American rock band celebrated the 35th anniversary of its wildly successful album Rumours and released a four-song EP of its first new material in more than a decade.

digits

240

$

Average expected cost of a health insurance policy sold under Idaho’s insurance exchange, which will begin Jan. 1.

25

The U.S. Supreme Court uplifted the marriage equality movement in two rulings last week. The court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, which prohibited same-sex couples from receiving federal benefits, and declined to rule on California’s Proposition 8, deferring to a lower court decision that the ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional.

5.

Winds and dry grasses continue to fuel the 8,400-acre wildfire that killed 19 Arizona firefighters Sunday.

On inlander.com Estimated loss of Washington’s Bing cherry crop due to recent rains in central Washington.

percent

What’s Creating Buzz

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news | briefs

Lawfully New laws to take effect in Washington; plus, student loan interest rates double BILLS, BILLS, BILLS

Although Washington state lawmakers labored for months on an operating budget agreement, the Legislature passed more than 300 NEW LAWS this year, many of which take effect at the end of this month. Here are a few examples of recently enacted and soonto-be enforced legislation: uPeople who have been wrongly convicted in the state of Washington can receive compensation — at least $50,000 — for each year they spent in prison. uNosy bosses are barred from asking for their employees’ social media passwords at the workplace and during job interviews. uSeafood processors are required to label all fresh, frozen or processed fish and shellfish by their common names, so consumers can make more informed purchases. uSex education must now include information on sex crimes in Washington and their legal consequences. — DEANNA PAN

Air Base Dispute

U.S. Air Force officials say a lease payment dispute with the Kyrgyzstan government may force the closure of the Manas Transit Center where local Fairchild air refueling crews now operate in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Air Force Times reports the Kyrgyzstan parliament has voted to end its lease next summer, potentially angling for higher payments. The U.S. reportedly pays $60 million a year to lease the center, but officials now say a more expensive lease may not be feasible. Scott King, a spokesman for Fairchild Air Force Base, says local KC-135 planes and crews operate out of Manas year-round. He could not provide specific numbers due to security protocols. Three Fairchild airmen based at the Manas Transit Center died May 3 in a plane crash that remains under investigation. King says local officials planned to monitor the ongoing lease dispute, but they did not have any comment on how a closure might affect Fairchild. — JACOB JONES

INCREASED INTEREST

Neither Republicans nor Democrats thought the interest rates on student loans should double. But they have anyway. On Monday, INTEREST RATES on subsidized Stafford loans jumped from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. Jim White, dean of Student Financial Services at Gonzaga University, says the increased interest rates means students with the maximum amount of subsidized Stafford loans would pay nearly $4,600 extra over the life of their loan. In May, the House Republicans had passed a bill similar to Barack Obama’s proposal to permanently tie the growth of student loan interest rates to Treasury rates. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Spokane, sent out a press release blaming Democrats for not accepting the proposal in the Senate. The Senate, however, did try to act. On June 6, Senate Democrats tried to pass a bill that would have frozen student loan interest rates at 3.4 percent for the next two years. But the measure, which would have stripped away several tax loopholes, got only with 51 votes, not enough to avoid the threat of a filibuster. That gave Sen. Patty Murray, D-Washington, a chance to point fingers of her own. That doesn’t mean the battle’s over yet. On June 27, Democrats introduced another bill that would retroactively freeze rates at 3.4 percent for a year. Whether it can pass remains to be seen. — DANIEL WALTERS

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NEWS | OLYMPIA

Winners and Losers Inside Washington state’s new budget agreement BY DEANNA PAN

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fter 153 days of partisan gridlock, Gov. Jay Inslee signed a new two-year budget on Sunday afternoon, averting a government shutdown on July 1 that would have shuttered dozens of state agencies and cost tens of thousands of public workers their jobs. Not since 1991 have budget negotiators reached an agreement so close to their midnight deadline. Inslee and party leaders lauded the $33.6 billion budget compromise for making big investments on public schools and higher education. But others, including analysts from the Washington State Budget and Policy Center, have criticized the spending plan as a “BandAid” solution to the state’s financial obligations and for making cuts to a variety of public programs. Here’s a look at how Washington’s stakeholders fared after the final round of budget negotiations.

WINNERS

PUBLIC EDUCATION: The new budget makes a $1 billion down payment on K-through-12 schools in an effort to fulfill last year’s state Supreme Court mandate to amply fund basic education by 2018. More than a third of that money will go toward school supplies and operating costs. The rest will be used, among other things, to increase teaching hours, reduce early elementary class sizes, fund more guidance counselors and expand bilingual instruction for kids struggling with English. COLLEGE KIDS: Washington’s undergraduates will enjoy frozen tuition rates for at least one year in addition to $119 million in funding for the state’s public colleges. The new budget also invests $36 million in College Bound Scholarships for lowincome middle school students and $18 million to expand computer science and engineering programs at the University of Washington and Washington State and Western Washington universities. MEDICAID RECIPIENTS: Despite hand-wringing from a few state Republicans, the new budget expands Medicaid under President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, which lawmakers estimate will save the state $318 million and provide more than 250,000 low-income people with health coverage.

MEDICAID RECIPIENTS’ TEETH: Funding for dental services for Medicaid-eligible adults is restored to the tune of $23 million. BEEKEEPERS, DANCE HALLS AND CLAY TARGET SHOOTERS: Republicans and Democrats approved 16 tax breaks worth $13 million as part of the broader budget agreement, benefiting an array of different industries and businesses: Temporary tax exemptions were extended for apiarists due to concerns over colony collapse disorder. Nonprofit gun clubs will get a sales tax exemption for buying clay targets. Dance venues will no longer be subject to retail sales tax on cover charges. SPOKANE PUBLIC RADIO: The new $3.6 billion capital budget allocates $1 million to help the National Public Radio affiliate move out of its cramped Monroe Street location and into a turnof-the-century, 9,000-square-foot brick building on Pacific Avenue downtown. GIANT SALTWATER MOLLUSKS: For $265,000, the state will create the Geoduck Harvest Safety Committee to help establish a safety program for divers scavenging Washington’s inland waterways for geoducks, the world’s largest burrowing clams, which the Department of Fish and Wildlife has dubbed the “most impressive” in the Pacific Northwest. SEX-TRADE VICTIMS: The Department of Commerce was given $72,000 to coordinate a statewide committee and create a plan for the Legislature and governor to end sex trafficking.

LOSERS

TEACHERS’ SALARIES: For the third year in a row, lawmakers suspended annual cost-of-living raises for school employees, a measure voters approved 13 years ago by ballot initiative. The savings are worth $320 million. INFRASTRUCTURE: About $277 million was transferred out of the state’s Public Works Assistance Account, meaning there will be fewer funds available to support sewer, water and other development projects. POOR, UNEMPLOYED PARENTS: The budget cuts $156 million total from WorkFirst and Working Connections Child Care — welfare reform programs that help low-income adults find and keep jobs in addition to paying for child care — by assuming caseloads will be smaller. HOMELESS PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES: The Housing and Essential Needs program, which helps disabled people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness cover their rent, utilities and personal care, will lose $20 million in funding. INVASIVE SPECIES: A one-time $500,000 award was given to the Department of Natural Resources to eradicate “noxious weeds,” non-native grasses, flowering plants, shrubs and trees wantonly growing in Washington. SMOKERS: Public employees on state health insurance plans will be charged an additional $25 per month for smoking. n

NEWS | POLICE

Police Chief Frank Straub says the substation will increase police visibility. JACOB JONES PHOTO

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A

new Spokane Police substation, opened in downtown last week amid fanfare and balloons, likely will serve as an important test facility for potentially moving the department toward a precinct-based patrol system. Primarily an information desk for now, the new substation may lead to additional police offices throughout the city. A precinct model would eventually involve multiple stations with specific officers assigned to each patrol area. Mayor David Condon acknowledged the experimental role of the substation during the ribbon-cutting ceremony last Thursday, calling it part of a “continuing effort” to move police officers closer to the citizens they serve. “This is, in essence, a prototype,” he says. Police Chief Frank Straub says downtown is the first neighborhood to have specific patrol officers assigned to it full-time. The new substation, located in the Peyton Building along Riverside Avenue, has one sergeant and seven officers working out of it. Additional officers, bike patrols and volunteers will also use the office. “The idea is to put the police right in the heart of the community,” Straub says. SPD spokeswoman Monique Cotton says preliminary discussions have identified three potential zones for future precincts. Two precincts would cover areas north of the Spokane River. A third would encompass the downtown and South Hill areas. “That’s definitely been discussed,” she says. “[But] we’re in the very preliminary stages.” Since taking over the department last fall, Straub has worked to emphasize individual accountability through a data-based “CompStat” policing model that tracks and holds supervisors responsible for incidents in their patrol areas. A precinct system would take that concept a step further. In theory, Cotton says, having police officers posted to localized precinct stations could help drive increased leadership and accountability as officers interact more closely with their assigned neighborhoods. “It’s taking the data of CompStat and putting it into a real-life model,” she says. While property crime rates remain high throughout much of the city, police officials have reported dramatic improvements in the downtown area following new targeted patrols and closer monitoring of crime hot spots. They hope the substation will reinforce that progress. Straub also hopes the new substation will improve community engagement by making officers more visible and approachable. “There is more work to be done,” he says. “This new downtown facility will help us continue to drive down crime.” Condon says the department has seriously considered adopting a precinct system, noting Straub has experience overseeing departments with precinct stations. The mayor called the opening of the substation an innovative new step against stubborn crime issues. “We’ve been doing things the same way for a long time,” Condon says, “and we may need to switch that up.” 

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T h e

T

I n la n d

he line has snaked its way onto Highway 395, slowing down what thin stream of Sunday evening traffic is coming in and out of Colville. Soon, cars begin queueing up on the shoulder, waiting to turn onto a narrow country road. But rather than join the increasingly daunting line, two sedans, one after the other, charge off the side of the highway, through some waist-high weeds and into a gravel lot between the

20 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

FA D E TO

No r t h w e s t

highway and the country road. Five teens hop out of the sedans. One of the guys has a couple pillows under his arm. A young girl has a blanket in one hand; the other waves to a white Chevy Suburban about a hundred yards down the way. All five jog to the SUV and proceed to bend the laws of physics, allowing all of them into the already crowded vehicle. After more than a half hour of stopping and going,

s a y s

g oodb y e

and stopping and getting out to run up to other teens piled into other massive vehicles, the improbably packed Suburban arrives at a building that looks exactly as old as it is. Here, a woman asks them for $14, because it’s a Sunday and that’s all it costs for a carload, no matter how many contorted extremities constitute that “carload.” A hand reaches out from a passenger window with exact change. Finally, the SUV rumbles into the Auto Vue

B L AC K

to

it s

la s t

d r i v e - i n

m o v ie B y

t h eate r

Mike

B ooke y

A Saturday night at the Auto Vue Drive In in Colville earlier this month. young kwak photo

Drive In, the last operational drive-in movie theater in Eastern Washington. The gas-guzzler and its brave pilot find a vacant spot on the gopher-hole-pocked field, and just like other SUVs, trucks, station wagons and cars of all imaginable makes and models have been doing for 60 years, parks to watch — or with the intention to “watch” — two movies under a summer sky. But by this time next year, the rows of cars

spilling forth with children and popcorn and lawn chairs and all the other Americana that comes along with that will be gone. This is the last season for the Auto Vue. Technological advances in the theater industry have hammered the final nail into the coffin of a drive-in movie business that was first hampered by the advent of television, then home video rentals, then increasing property values, and all the while had to convince people that

watching a movie through your windshield was a good idea. Now, film distributors don’t want to ship prints of films, opting rather to send them digitally. This means theater owners like Steve Wisner, who was already running the Auto Vue on a razor-thin margin, would have to invest as much as $100,000 to convert to digital. ...continued on next page

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 21

COVER STORY

DRIVE-INS “fade to black,” continued... As the sky begins to slowly darken, despite it being past 9 pm, the assembled teenagers engage in the age-old game of Who Can Play Their Crappy Music The Loudest while younger kids sit impatiently in lawn chairs leaned up against bumpers of mini-vans, waiting for Fast & Furious 6 to appear on the weathered square of wood that serves as the Auto Vue’s screen. Two of those impatient (although perfectly well-behaved) kids are the nephews of Tammy Finley. She’s been coming to the Auto Vue for most of her life and brought the two boys — hard at work on a massive bucket of popcorn — over from nearby Inchelium on the Colville Indian Reservation to see a drive-in movie while they still could. “There are a lot of people who are disappointed that it’s going away. When we were their age,” says Finley, pointing to the boys, “we’d run amok. The drive-in was just something you did growing up around here.” Another guy says he had driven from northern Saskatchewan to visit family an hour or so across the border from Colville, and came down just to see an actual drive-in. Others memorialize the Auto Vue as though it’s an old friend who’s still on life support but is already being discussed in the past tense. They remember sneaking in and not getting caught. Or getting caught and having to face the music, which usually just meant paying for a ticket. No one seems to remember a particular film they saw here, but rather the fun — and often stupid —

22 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

things they did at the Auto Vue. To many, it was an experience that went far beyond the screen.

D

rive-in movies have been around in the U.S. since 1933, when the first theater opened in Camden, N.J. They were in the Inland Northwest by the late 1940s. Thanks in part to a car-obsessed culture after World War II, drive-in movies boomed to the point that there were almost 4,000 outdoor theaters operating nationwide, with seven in the greater Spokane area by the early 1970s. In Spokane, drive-ins could be impressive in scope. While Colville’s theater can hold around 200 cars, in the heyday of Spokane’s drive-in mania, several theaters could accommodate upwards of 700 vehicles. A drive-in enthusiast could make his way through Spokane and not see strip malls or open fields or a piece of freeway, but rather the graveyards of long-forgotten, long-paved-over outdoor movie theaters. They’d look for a sign of the East Sprague Drive-In which remained open until 1993, but see only an I-90 interchange. They’d head up Division Street and look for the Autovue Drive-In but find only the remnants of a Lowe’s hardware store, which has since been relocated. Continuing north, they would remember the Y Drive-In, famous for its risqué selection of films, and realize that it was replaced by a car dealership some 30 years ago. Not far from there, near Whitworth University, was for many years after its demise a sign touting the North Cedar DriveIn. It’s just a stretch of housing now. Even farther north, you’ll see what’s essentially a casket buried atop another casket. The Starlight Drive-In was leveled in favor of an

At one point, there were seven different drive-in theaters in the Spokane area, some of them capable of accomodating more than 700 vehicles. indoor theater, the Newport Cinemas, but that, too, eventually became antiquated and has been serving as a canvas for graffiti artists since 2004. It was open for only 12 years — 1972 to 1984 — and had a reputation for showing horror flicks and other B-movies. “Some of the movies we show are terrible, but our audience knows that and appreciates that,” said owner Walt Hefner in a 1981 Spokesman-Review article that already spoke of drive-ins as a gem of a bygone era. Just west of Spokane, some might remember the West End Drive-In. When it opened in July of 1952, newspaper ads touted it as “The most modern new drive-in theater — many new features add to your pleasure and convenience.” It also closed in the early 1980s, leaving behind a concession stand to be beat up by vandals until recent years, when all traces were removed. On the far other end of town, the East Trent Drive-In is now nothing more than mixed industrial land. Self-described “urban spelunker” Mike Corrigan, a former Inlander staff writer, remembers driving his parents’ Torino to Spokane’s drive-ins and watching as they fell by the wayside, one by one. The city grew, swallowing up the sort of open land required to run a drive-in theater. Part of the appeal of the drive-ins in Spokane was the fact that

they were — and still are, if you can find them — cheap entertainment. “It always appealed to young people and families with kids. It also appealed to people on dates who were there to make out,” says Corrigan, who tells a story about getting caught sneaking into the East Sprague Drive-In after hiding out in the trunk and having to borrow money from a young couple to keep from getting in too much trouble. “It was a festive party atmosphere, for sure,” he says. “Half the fun was the people-watching.”

T

here’s a love for this place, but as the owner, Wisner can’t justify keeping it open. It’s a business before it’s a piece of nostalgia. To keep it open and operational, Wisner says it would require $175,000 for a new digital projector and a new screen. The current one was damaged in a 2007 windstorm and has been in danger of falling down ever since. “It’s definitely the end of an era,” says Wisner, standing in the lobby of the Alpine Theater, the indoor theater he and his family also own. A line has formed at the box office in the minutes before Man of Steel is set to roll, and he’s handed off ticketselling duties to his sister, Teri, so he can talk, albeit with plenty of sighs, about the drive-in. Wisner came to Colville and began working in

museum of Arts & Culture photos

the theater business in 1974 when his father purchased the theaters. He’s seen the Auto Vue endure some ups and downs over those years. When video rental stores came about, the drive-in took a big hit. By the late ’80s his family was making more from a video store they owned than from the drive-in. While drive-ins around the country died off in droves during that time, the Auto Vue survived by switching to first-run movies and opening only on weekends, but there were other problems to deal with in recent years — vandalism, the aforementioned windstorm and a lawsuit with an insurance company over repairs to the screen. But they’ve come to the end of the line, says Wisner. “While we had the equipment out there, we were doing OK, but what we have out there is getting to the point that it’s falling apart,” says Wisner, adding that it wouldn’t make sense to replace their current 35mm projectors, given that film distribution companies won’t be sending out actual film reels of new films beginning next year. When Wisner announced late last year that the drive-in would be closing, there was a surprising response from the community. Some said they should make it a historical landmark. Others said they should raise money to convert to digital. ...continued on next page

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 23

COVER STORY

DRIVE-INS

Josh Cournyer, right, checks in on his sons, Zadin and Tyler, and daughter Cassidy before Fast & Furious 6 screens at the Auto Vue. young kwak photos

“fade to black,” continued... “They want to do a fundraiser, but no one is going to give me $175,000, ever,” says Wisner. On the other side of the state, though, there is a community that has managed to save its drive-in. When the Skyline DriveIn Theater in Shelton, a town northwest of Olympia on the westernmost finger of Puget Sound, was faced with either finding the funds to update its projector or close before this season, it turned to its supporters. “There are so few drive-ins left that there are implications for this community beyond what’s merely financial,” says Christopher Mayes, whose mother Dorothea has been running the theater since 2005. Christopher jumped in to help the business this winter after leaving a job in health care, putting together a Kickstarter

campaign — an online entrepreneurial organization company — to fund, or at least partially fund, a new projector for the drive-in. They were only halfway to their goal of $40,000, with just a day left before — due to Kickstarter rules — they’d be out of time. But with just 18 hours remaining on the clock, they reached their goal, thanks in part to 512 donations ranging from $5 to several thousand dollars. Mayes says they’ve raised the other half of the estimated $40,000 needed for a digital projector through other means and plan to go digital by the middle of this month, ensuring that in Shelton, at least, the drive-in will survive.

“T

hey’re going to plant flowers here or something, I think,” says a high-school-age guy to his baseball-capped friend as they wait in line

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24 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

for refreshments in the waning moments before showtime. “Maybe they could have people pay to come shoot gophers. There’s enough rednecks around here who would do that,” his friend says. Their food order comes up, and the two wander through the maze of vehicles as previews begin to roll. People retreat to their driver’s seats or lawn chair or couch placed atop a pickup truck as Fast & Furious 6 fills up the warped screen in front of them. Gradually, the car stereos all tune into the close-range FM station that long ago replaced those clunky metal speakers, and it’s time to watch a movie. But it’s hard not to realize in the movie’s first few minutes that this is far from ideal, when big surround sound and stadium seating is the norm in indoor theaters these days. The shape of the screen, or the dust in

the air, or maybe somebody’s headlights at one point makes it tough to distinguish which one of these guys is The Rock and which is Vin Diesel — not that it would necessarily matter to the plot of this meatheaded flick. Soon, a pair of kids run past the rows of alternating hoods and rear bumpers, and it would be tough not to be distracted. Headlights flash on and off. Drivers move closer for a better view, kicking up some dust and muffling the sound of the movie. These sorts of things don’t happen at your local megaplex. There, you walk in, sit down and stare straight ahead for a couple hours. On this Sunday night at the Auto Vue, though, it feels like an event, not a movie. It’s something — at least until after Labor Day, when the last double feature hits the screen — to see, not just to watch. n

Bradd Skubinna with items from the homes of fellow local artists.

visual art

young kwak photo

Bits and Baubles The Saranac Gallery shows off the things that inspire its own artists By Leah Sottile

I

t’s 10 o’clock in the morning on a Tuesday, and Bradd Skubinna and Larry Ellingson are standing in the bathroom. It’s hardly your average john: there are no tubes of toothpastes or bars of soap in sight. The walls of Ellingson’s bathroom are covered in Peruvian retablos, demonic masks, and just off the corner of the tub, a fullsized terra-cotta warrior from China. Skubinna, a fellow member of the Saranac Art Projects, a local nonprofit artist cooperative, has stopped

by to paw through Ellingson’s house. He walks in and out of the bedrooms, meanders through his living room. It’s something Ellingson has agreed to for the purposes of one of two art exhibits happening this month at the Saranac — a show called ARTifacts. The idea behind the show is to offer a glimpse into the minds of the artists of the Saranac, but this time not through the work they do. Skubinna, as juror, walks through the homes and studios of each of the co-op’s

21 artists, picking interesting objects that they surround themselves with. “Doing another show of our work seemed kind of boring,” Skubinna says. “It would be more interesting to choose things people have around them.” In some cases, the objects are “creative touchstones”: things that inspire each artist. In others, it might be an object they look past every day that simply jumps out at ...continued on next page Skubinna.

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 25

culture | visual art

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PRESENTED BY SPOKANE ROCKET VELO Bradd Skubinna found this photograph at Kurt Madison’s house. young kwak photo

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“bits and baubles,” continued...

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26 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

Skubinna, who also teaches art at Spokane dental articulator — a macabre-looking device. Falls Community College and Whitworth Uni“When I was growing up, they would take versity, seems to know that it’s an odd idea for castings of teeth and they’d match the gums that an art exhibition. And he admits it’s not as easy way,” Ellingson says. “My Ferrari and my cabin as he thought to pick out objects from each artist. at the lake are pretty much in my mouth because “I thought it would be I’ve had terrible teeth all really simple,” he says. my life.” He chuckles. “I’ve felt more inva“So this speaks to you,” sive … here’s this guy Skubinna says. walking around their But not all objects houses.” showcased in ARTifacts are During the month of July, a second show But Ellingson is necessarily sentimental. will also be on display at the Saranac enthusiastic about From surrealist artist Ryan Gallery. Unlike most shows there, this Skubinna’s arrival. His Babcock, Skubinna selected exhibition is a juried show of mostly nonSouth Hill home is a a set of three photographs member artists, all of which were given gallery in itself: works that he found in his house. the prompt of “prime.” Prime numbers. of Northwest artists like The photographs — a The act of something for use. Something Mel McCuddin, Robert portrait of John F. Kenthat’s high quality. Or maybe an era of Grimes and Andrew nedy, a snapshot of a boy time that was essential. The show will feaBohl cover the walls named Jack and a photo of ture work from locals like Tom Quinn, Traof his living room. His mobsters holding machine vis Masingale and Susan Fairfax, as well as bathroom is a shrine guns — belonged to Babartists from as far away as New York and to masks. His studio cock’s grandparents. “But Vermont. is filled with artifacts they didn’t know who Jack — LEAH SOTTILE of every kind: yellow was,” Skubinna says. road stripes, a G.I. Joe, Porcelain Madonnas bowling trophies, old and folk art paintings, trumpets. amateur paintings done His bedroom is covered with ceramic tiles by family members, photos of famous artists — from around the world. There’s a brightly colthey’ll all sit side-by-side in this show. ored Friedensreich Hundertwasser composition And now, a set of someone’s teeth. n made from old faxes. A mannequin wearing a dress made of sticky notes and to-do reminders. ARTifacts • On display Fri, July 5 through Sat, A Ganesh statue. July 27; open Thu from noon-5 pm, Fri and Ellingson leads him to something else, Sat from noon-8 pm • Opening reception: Fri, though: on the table in his bedroom sits a realJuly 5, from 5-8 pm • Saranac Art Projects • 25 istic set of human teeth with bright pink gums W. Main Ave. • saranacartprojects.wordpress. attached to a rotary handle of sorts. It’s an old com

Also at Saranac

CULTUrE | DIGEST

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Thursday, July 18th | 8pm

For Your Consideration

Friday, July 26 8pm | $17-$37

By Alissia Blackwood Mead

BOOK | Imagine you’re living in an underground silo after a nuclear apocalypse. You can see the wasteland outside, but you can never go there. You and your ancestors before you have been underground for generations so long that nobody really knows what happened to put you there. In Hugh Howey’s immersive WOOL, you feel as if you are right there with the residents of the silo. I couldn’t put it down. I dreamed about it. When I was finished, I immediately sought out more silo stories. Luckily, there are several.

WEBSITE | Sometimes, you fall so in love with a pair of shoes that you wish they made them in every color. The people behind CHROMATIC GALLERIE obviously understand this, because you can get their classic round-toed pump in a whopping 45 colors. On top of that, you have your choice of three heel heights, three width choices, and high quality materials like patent, leather and suede. Zooey Deschanel loves them, and you should too.

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JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 27

FIND ART and more this Friday, Venues open 5 - 8 pm

PARTICIPATING VENUES ADAMS STREET AREA BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Presenting Coeur d’Alene photographer, Allen Worst, “The Best of Worst Images” featuring modern/contemporary landscape, underwater and abstract photography mounted under acrylic glass. Spokane photographer, Patrick Lipsker, will also be exhibiting “Peculiar Perspectives” a collection of his recent works. Artists’ reception, Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet from 6-8pm. Music by “Lonesome” Lyle Morse 6:30-10pm.

HOTEL RUBY & SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W. 1ST AVE. Come in and join us at the Sapphire Lounge. Get an artistic, handcrafted cocktail, freshsqueezed juices & delicious flatbreads. Relax & be surrounded by stained-glass art, amazing chandeliers, great music & warm, romantic vibes!

DAVENPORT HOTEL AND STEAM PLANT AREA * BABY BAR

827 W. 1ST AVE. (directly behind Neato Burrito) Please join us at the Baby Bar for First Friday. We are featuring artist Benjamin Jennings.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

906 W. 2ND AVE. (across from the Steam Plant) Featuring artist Patti Simpson Ward: “Celebrating Spokane – Past and Present,” from the Crescent holiday windows to Manito Park.

Nectar Tasting Room is celebrating First Friday Independence Day style with fireworks on Red White & Rose wines! Join us for live music and new art on display. Wear Red White & Blue & your wine tasting is FREE. Music till 9:30, open until 10pm. 5 wineries, 50 wines, 1 beautiful space. Reservations 509.869.1572

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM

808 W. MAIN AVE. (River Park Square, Third Level) Featuring artist Kim Long’s “Inspired Illustrations,” drawings perceptively rendered in ink, colored pencil, and charcoal. These works best described as intricate, imaginative and detailed.

SPOKANE TRIBE HISTORICAL EXHIBIT & INFORMATION CENTER

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. Mark and Chris are making room for new work. Check out the great deals on handmade pottery, tables full of treasures that need good homes.

unless otherwise noted.

Steve Merryman Steam Plant

STEAM PLANT

159 S. LINCOLN ST. Please join us for FURRST FRIDAY: A twist on the traditional First Friday. This special event will support the area’s animal shelters from 4-8pm. SCRAPS, SpokAnimal & Spokane Humane Society will bring adoptable animals for you to meet & pet, along with artists whose work captures the art of animals: Steve Merryman, Marilyn Meyers, Kit & Pete Jacoda, PJ McConnel & more. Featuring a silent action of art the animals have created featuring: “Pawcasso”, “Meownet”, and “Jackson Pawlock” & crafts for children & adults. PLUS! Live music by Chuck Burbank and samples of Steam Plant’s handcrafted brews.

707 W. MAIN AVE. (Crescent Court Skywalk Level) We are featuring a family of five, Alice and Chuck Harmon and their three daughters; Pam, Jan and Diann. They all work in different colors and styles. Reception and refreshments 5-8:30pm. Music by Hohner.

211 N WALL ST. (skywalk level across from Bozzi Collection Gallery) Please join us this First Friday at our extensive Historical Exhibit and Information Center. Learn more about the Spokane Tribe’s privately funded STEP development that will provide 5,000 local jobs. Entertainment and refreshments.

BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

108 N. POST ST. Acoustics by Tommy. Happy Hour 4-6pm, Half price Eats menu 5-8pm and as always the best cocktails in Spokane!

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

211 N. WALL ST. Bozzi Collection will be featuring new works from abstract painter Melinda Melvin. Music by Jonathan Nicholson.

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA HERBAL EXXENCE CAFÉ

KRESS GALLERY/RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W. MAIN AVE. “Through the Eye of the Lense” – Honoring our Veterans Inland Northwest Honor Flight photographers will be presenting a pictorial journey in honor of our great American WWII heroes.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N. STEVENS ST. (Main & Stevens)

218 N. HOWARD ST. Please join us for July’s First Friday & view the wide range of photos by Jenny Lange, from beautiful serene close-ups of local, wild flowers to colorful graffiti from Spain.

115 N. WASHINGTON ST. We are featuring the modern, bright & brilliant oil on canvas paintings by artist Lynn Hanley.

LABORATORY

301 W. MAIN AVE. NEW VENUE: Please join us for the interactive exhibit “002” by Robert Hodgin and Alan Chatham. This interactive digital series uses a combination of aesthetics and technology to explore how our actions shape the perceptions of others. Works will be showing from sunset to dawn all month.

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July 5th! LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. WASHINGTON ST., SUITE 105 We will be celebrating First Friday in style pouring wines from La Picolla out of Woodinville off our new wine tap system. Charles Tappa will entertain & delight with jazz classics from 7:30 to 10:30 & Devon Plopper will be presenting her artwork which will be on display throughout the month of July. This is truly the trifecta, wine, art & music, so come join us for what is guaranteed to be a memorable night!

POTTERY PLACE PLUS GALLERY

203 N. WASHINGTON ST. (main floor of Auntie’s) “NATURE INSPIRES” – Lynn Marvin (Larilyn Gourd Art) & Daris Judd (paintings mixed with wax and found objects). Lynn is a lifelong artist with her most recent work being painted gourds. Daris’ eclectic mix of paint, wax & found objects is inspired this summer by flowers & sailing. Her goal is to interpret all with a big splash of whimsy & heart.

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

NORTH BANK AREA.

Enjoy a glass of the newly released 2010 Claret while enticing & stimulating your senses while viewing the beautiful works of Priscilla Barnett. Priscilla is an abstract artist from Barbados whose media is acrylic, oil & mixed media.

CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Chocolate Apothecary will be featuring new works by Haley Waddington. Music by Eric Neuhausser.

SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET

HO HO TERIYAKI CHICKEN

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Featuring the beautiful watercolor paintings of owner Ho Lan. Don’t forget to try our fabulous menu! 4-7pm.

Allen Worst

RED LION HOTEL AT THE PARK PARK PLACE LOUNGE

303 W. NORTH RIVER DR. Chris Rieser & Jay Rawley will be performing acoustic patio music for all ages, young & old! 5:30-8pm. Happy Hour food & beverage specials!

painting and painted utility pieces. Her work brings nature indoors.

INTERPLAYERS THEATRE

174 S. HOWARD ST. Please join us for July’s First Friday. We are featuring the wonderful whimsical acrylics, watercolors, and ink drawings by artist Edie Dunlap in the Gellhorn Gallery, 5-7:30pm.

RIVERFRONT PARK

The IMAX Theatre, Spokane Falls SkyRide, Carrousel, Pavilion Attractions & Tour Train are open daily. “All Ages” Day Pass now on sale.

MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 WEST 2ND AVE. Featuring EMVY and BridgePress Cellars/ 2012 Award Winning Wines. Due to popular demand Debbie McCulley will be showing her bright life affirming art and jewelry again in July!

2ND SPACE ART

FIRST AVENUE AREA - WEST END* SPOKANE LAW ENFORCEMENT MUSEUM 1201 W. 1ST AVE. We are opening our doors for First Friday to appreciation to those in law enforcement who keep our communities safe. Come and see an amazing collection of artifacts and memorabilia. Refreshments. Donations.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

Barrister Winery

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA

404 W. MAIN AVE. Featuring large acrylics and abstract watercolors by Megan Broughton for July. Live music by John Zientek.

24 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us for First Friday for art, entertainment and our NEW Micro Brew Bar! We are featuring artist Kari Cooper.

610 W. 2ND AVE. Featuring the exotic creative paintings in acrylic by artist Jesse Slobodow. Fantasy, intimacy & wildlife themes. Next door to Barili Cellars... taste some wine & come enjoy the art!

RED DRAGON DOWNTOWN

608 W. 2ND AVE. Join Barili Cellars on First Friday from 4-9pm and enjoy current wine releases and fun art. We are featuring the many art mediums of Ona Jacobson. Ona’s exhibit is titled “A Study of Flowers and Nature” and features acrylic on canvas, watercolor, glass

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT MAIN MARKET CO-OP

44 W. MAIN AVE. Please join us for the June First Friday. We are featuring various Artists from the TriCounty Art Association.

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. MAIN AVE. Showing two exhibits for the July First Friday; PRIME and ARTifacts. Works by various artists. Opening reception.

WEST DOWNTOWN AREA

1406 W. 3RD AVE. Museum quality, historical life-sized portraits of my family cira 1920 China (Few photographs of this time period still exist today). Belly dancing in the Red Lantern Lounge starting at 5pm.

BARILI CELLARS

319 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us for an enjoyable evening of art and wine! Featuring John Dunning’s wine barrel furniture, wall decor, candle holders, and lighting fi xtures. Our newly released “MPV” will be in the tasting flight.

THE MAC – NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE

115 W. PACIFIC AVE., Historic Warehouse District (aka SODO)

2316 W. 1ST AVE. 5 galleries full of exhibits on Plateau Tribal Cultures, extreme NW explorer – David Douglas, Spokane modern architecture and art from the MAC collections. Free admission.

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org

Agave Nectar Ale Grilled Chicken Salad 6 oz. Blue Moon Agave Nector Ale 1/4 cup of honey 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard 1/4 cup diced red onion 2 tbsp olive oil 1/4 cup lemon juice

OPEN ENROLLMENT POTTERY CLASSES All Skill Levels & Ages Morning/Evening Classes Fun & Friendly Atmosphere Learn at Your Own Pace Supplies Included

4 skinless bonelss chicken breasts 1/2 red bell pepper (diced) 1 avocado (diced) 1 head of romaine lettuce Orange slices as garnish

Find the whole recipe at www.bluemoonbrewingcompany.com

clayconnection.net

714 E. Sprague Spokane | 509-747-6171 downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

CULTURE | CIRCUS

Out From Under the Big Top

You’ll find that perfect gift at the Museum Store.

Portland’s Wanderlust Circus proves the spirit of this age-old show is alive and thriving By Chey Scott

MAKE it thE MAC Wed - Sun 10am to 5pm 2316 W First Avenue, Spokane

(509) 456-3931

www.northwestmuseum.org An Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution

First Friday 5PM TO 8PM AT INTERPLAYERS

LIVE MUSIC & ARTWORK BY EDIE DUNLAP

STOP BY AND GET A DISCOUNT VOUCHER FOR ONE OF OUR SPECIAL SUMMER SHOWS.

455-7529 | www.InterplayersTheatre.org | 174 S. Howard St., Spokane

30 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

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oah Mickens believes he was born for a show features the troupe as exaggerated versions life in the circus. of themselves in a world where they’re eternally As a teenager, he was homeless doomed to living as traveling circus performers. and living with his mother and brother on the Each member of the troupe joined the circus durpiers and streets of Venice Beach, Calif., where ing different historical eras, represented through Mickens used his natural contortionist abilities the costuming and style of their performance, to create a street-show act. From that first taste of explains Mickens. performance, one thing led to another, and about “The story is just a fairytale magnification of two decades later in 2006, Mickens co-founded our actual lives and who we are,” he says. “To say the Portland-based Wanderlust Circus with cowe’re an immortal family of circus performers producer and -performer Nick “The Creature” from all eras of time, I think it hits close to home. Harbar. It feels real and true and yet works as a magical An eclectic mix of 1920s and ’30s vaudeville, backstory for the show.” gypsy-influenced allure and vintage cabaret, the On stage as William Batty, Mickens paints underground Rose City-based troupe of full-time his face white with garishly colored, sometimes stage performers epitomizes the definition of the glittery eye shadow extending up to his brows, nouveau cirque, or new circus, renaissance. These his lips thickly lined in black. His ringmaster alternative circuses have popped up in major citwardrobe ranges from a coat with tails to an ies around the country, keeping alive oversized ’40s-era zoot suit. Characterisan art form that seems as if it would tic of his role as a kooky and flamboyant have faded into oblivion by now. ringmaster, Mickens’ exaggerated facial Send comments to Picture a combination of Cirque expressions are at times clownish, in part editor@inlander.com. du Soleil acrobatics, Jazz Age cabaret, thanks to the face paint, and at others a Bohemian/Romani gypsy travelsinister. ing circus and Marx Brothers-style comedy. In To an unfamiliar audience, the outward contrast to a traditional traveling circus — think impression of Wanderlust may seem avant-garde Ringling Bros. — that includes tents, sideshows and artistically edgy, but Mickens believe its apand live animals, the new circus movement compeal spans all ages, backgrounds and interests. bines acrobatic circus skills with stage theatrics to “People always ask, ‘Is it family friendly? convey a story through its performers. Something my kids can enjoy? Something I can Mickens, naturally, takes on the role of take my grandma to?’ ” he says. Wanderlust’s ringmaster, teasing and exciting “I really do feel circus performance is the audience to the edge of their seats during the universally entertaining. It’s witnessing amazing entire spectacle. His effervescent stage persona is feats of skill that in the moment are so impactful, William Batty, a character inspired by the realsurprising and joyous that they work for anyone, life leader of a Victorian London-era circus act independently of the context in which one might called Batty’s Hippodrome. While his character place themselves.” is based on a historical figure, Mickens as Batty No matter where they may be, when William is also simply an exaggeration of his own self, Batty takes the stage with his wandering, familial he explains from backstage at the Marjorie Luke troupe, Mickens hopes that every audience memTheatre in Santa Barbara, Calif., the first stop of ber is inspired, either momentarily or so much so Wanderlust’s three week-long tour. that they decide to pursue their dormant creative For its current touring production, Wanpotential — maybe even by joining the circus. n derlust’s menagerie of traveling performers (it doesn’t enlist live animals) — comprised of aerialWanderlust Circus: “The Endless Road” • ists, acrobatic stunt teams, jugglers, belly dancers, Thu, July 4, at 7 pm • $13-$18 • All-ages • musicians, and of course a ringmaster — present Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • a show within a show, “The Endless Road.” The ticketswest.com • 325-7328

letters

Then They Went Kaput The tangled story of how a hotel bankruptcy darkened downtown dining

T last.

By Jo Miller he Sunday morning rush had died down, so the managers locked the doors and employees began to clean up. But this wasn’t just another end to a shift at Scout Tavern. It was the

An emotional atmosphere hung over the employees. “It was awful. Everybody looked miserable. Everybody was drunk. Because, whatever, right?” says Ben Cochran, Scout’s kitchen manager. The next day, June 3, the locks were changed, leaving Scout’s 14 employees jobless and the restaurant — once popular for slam poetry, trivia and its eclectic ambiance — gutted and dark. Catacombs Pub, Spokane’s Old World pizza restaurant, had came to the same fate about a month earlier. Catacombs and Scout, both situated in the bottom of the Montvale Hotel building on West First Avenue, are both owned by the hotel’s owner, Rob Brewster. The two restaurant closures resulted from Brewster filing for bankruptcy protection under Chapter 11 reorganization for the Montvale in February. But the explanation for Catacombs and Scout closing is not necessarily that simple. ...continued on next page

When the Montvale’s owner filed for bankruptcy, two restaurants in the building soon closed. young kwak photo

FOOD | CLOSINGS

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Catacombs pub closed this spring, along with the neighboring Scout.

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“then they went kaput,” continued...

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midst the Montvale bankruptcy, Chapter 11 trustee David Gardner took over ownership of the hotel located at the corner of First Avenue and Monroe Street in downtown Spokane. Gardner, an attorney with Spokane law firm Winston & Cashatt, then became the owner of Catacombs and the landlord of Scout. The decision to close Catacombs was Gardner’s. “Catacombs was running into a number of problems,” he says. “The most concerning for me as trustee was whether or not Catacombs was operating with appropriate licensure.” Bankruptcy filings indicated Catacombs was simply a tenant of the Montvale Hotel building, but Gardner was told that at some point Brewster changed position, indicating that Catacombs was actually owned and operated by the hotel. Immediately upon learning of the change, Gardner took it upon himself to close the restaurant, he says. “I’m not going to be responsible for the operation of a restaurant not operating under accordance of law,” Gardner says. As for Scout, Brewster chose to close its

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doors. When he opened Scout at the end of 2011, his vision was to make the Montvale a destination hotel, like the Portland-based McMenamins chain. Opening Scout in the hotel’s building would aid that vision and provide a distinctive atmosphere where guests could eat and drink. But Scout had money stolen over the course of the last few months, Brewster says, and that he says led to his decision to shut it down. Employees were stealing cash, he claims, and it caused him to lose interest in fighting for the restaurant. “It became apparent that there was no reason whatsoever to keep fooling with the project,” Brewster says, adding that there were “a lot of shenanigans with the employees.” Cochran, the kitchen manager, recounts one night at Catacombs when employees were pocketing money. “That night, not one cash transaction was done at Catacombs, and it was busy,” he says. When customers paid with cash, an employee would clear the order and keep the cash. Cochran says it was because late payroll checks had always been an issue, and that for some employees, the pocketed money was the

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only money they had. Brewster says there were issues in the past, but everyone got paid and what the employees were stealing was more than they were owed. Scout manager Lauren Sharkey says the paychecks of four employees bounced during the last two pay periods, and her last check came up short of what she was owed. Additional problems occurred leading up to the closing of the two restaurants. Melissa Busch, manager at Catacombs and Scout, says both places were often out of what they needed — whether it was food, PBR or cash to pay vendors. Part of that problem was that funds between the two restaurants and the hotel were often shared, she says. “They were paying for stuff in the hotel that should have stayed in the restaurant,” Busch says. Gardner says that Brewster would take money from one of the three businesses and give it to whichever needed money. “I don’t think they did a good job of respecting each businesses’ boundaries,” Gardner says. At the beginning of May, Scout took its final turn for the worse when KREM 2 News aired an interview with Brewster talking about his “financial fall.” Sharkey says that although Brewster didn’t indicate Scout would be closing, people assumed they were done for. “That really stuck us in the coffin,” she says.

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efore Scout closed, a glimmer of hope presented itself when Dan Stadtmueller — bookkeeper for the Montvale, Scout and Catacombs — along with Janice Back, the former general manager of all three businesses, put in an offer on Scout’s lease to keep it open themselves. The offer was rejected. Stadtmueller says he doesn’t know why the offer was turned down. “It was extremely generous,” he says. About a week before Scout closed, Gardner came forward with changes to the lease offer. Stadtmueller says he and Back accepted the changes, but the lease ultimately wasn’t given to them. “The battle cry at the beginning was to not let the place go dark and then [the trustee and creditors] stood by and let it go dark,” Stadtmueller says. Gardner says he rejected the lease offer mainly because Stadtmueller and Back wanted to lease the space on behalf of Scout but didn’t have the authority to do so. What happens next with the spaces left behind by Catacombs and Scout is all under Gardner’s control. It is yet to be determined if Brewster, who currently lives in Seattle, will regain control of the building in the future. A new tenant for the former Catacombs space is in the process of being approved and Gardner says the new tenant plans to open a restaurant within the next few months. The former Scout space is still in the process of being listed for rent. Other Montvale building tenants, such as Scratch Restaurant & Rain Lounge, are humming along and keeping the block lit, Gardner says. As for the Montvale, Gardner says it’s operating well and staying full and alive in the midst of the bankruptcy. “We’re putting heads in beds, as they say,” he says. n

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Hacienda Las Flores

food | opening

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Next Level

The Q sports bar at Northern Quest morphs into EPIC By Jo Miller

AMERICAN DELI AND GIFTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD. $6 FOOD SPECIALS. KILLER REUBEN! IF YOU DON’T LIKE IT I’LL BUY IT. WE ARE FEATURING 15 LOCAL ARTISANS IN OUR DELI. THANK YOU.

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lake Crossley estimates that he has said the word “epic” an average of 200 times per day since Northern Quest Resort & Casino remodeled The Q and changed the name to EPIC. Crossley, venue manager of EPIC, might be joking about that estimation, yet he can’t help but describe all the changes that have swept through The Q as “epic.” “Everything, we’re just taking it to the epic level,” he says. Renovation began on The Q three months ago and the former “ultimate sports bar” was gutted, refilled, rebooted and injected with a big dose of — you guessed it — epicness. EPIC debuted June 21 as a new “sports restaurant.” “We’ll never get away from sports,” Crossley says. “We have a 30-foot screen.” Indeed, the 10-by-30-foot TV stretching over the top of the bar stills plays football, basketball and anything else you can think of. But everything else is new — from the bar back to cushy chairs to a couple of 12-person booths, as well as more TVs and a dark, woody color scheme. The menu got a major renovation too. More than half is new. They wanted to move away from deep-frying the majority of items they

served, Crossley says. They got rid of things like the 22-inch hot dog and deep-fried pretzels and moved to what head chef Mike Thornton calls “not-your-typical-sports-bar fare.” Now you’ll find items like Cougar Gold mac and cheese ($12.95) with applewood-smoked bacon and Tillamook white cheddar mixed in, or the Surf and Turf burger ($15.95) stacked with Wagyu beef, provolone and white truffle garlic aioli between toasted ciabatta, and skewered with a stack of seared prawns. A weekend nightclub — dubbed Studio E — was added in the restaurant, complete with a dance floor and laser fog machine. While DJ Mayhem and Hype spin the beats, the live feed from the dance floor gets projected onto the big screen in the restaurant. The club even has its own signature drink: the Studio E cucumber shot, with Pinnacle cucumber watermelon vodka served chilled in a hollowed-out cucumber shot glass. It’s a shot glass you can eat. n EPIC at Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Road, Airway Heights • SunThu, 11 am-10 pm; Fri-Sat, 11 am-2am • 4812122 • northernquest.com

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food | opening

Office Taste

at Two Rivers Casino • Resort

Eat Good lives up to its name in an unsuspecting spot By Annemarie C. Frohnhoefer

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id your mind of the notion that healthy, sustainable eateries are expensive, pretentious establishments located in the more eccentric parts of town. The office parks and subdivisions ringing Liberty Lake are about as corporate and mainstream as one can get, yet this is where you will find the area’s newest restaurant offering a menu loaded with local, good-foryou ingredients. Breakfast starts at 7 am, when the cafeteriastyle restaurant opens. Patrons walk down the line, choosing from items like fruit and maple oatmeal ($3), fruit bowls with whipped yogurt ($3.50) and made-to-order breakfast items like ham, egg or bacon breakfast sandwiches ($3). Lunch starts at 10:30 and has the same setup: ready-to-pick-up slices of pizza ($2.50), nonfried chicken fingers — that really taste like fried chicken ($3) — and wraps and sandwiches ($6). Continue down the line to request made-to-order burgers and grilled chicken sandwiches ($3.50$4). There’s also a salad bar with homemade croutons and local greens. The hand-tossed pizza’s thick and chewy crust has a fluted edge. The grilled chicken

sandwich is more about flavor, less about cramming your mouth full of unnaturally super-sized chicken. As for the beef — if this is what a simple, honest burger tastes like, there needs to be greater amounts of edible truth in this world. The onions are sliced super-thin with an emphasis on flavor. The lettuce is fresh, as are the tomatoes. The mustard and ketchup don’t have that out-of-thebottle vinegary bite. The thin patty is evenly grilled and topped with a melted slice of Oregon cheddar. The verdict? This is one tasty burger. Eat Good’s atmosphere is utilitarian. The hours are a bit odd. But the food is good. Molly Patrick opened Eat Good last month with the goal of creating simple, honest food, and she plans on making the current location the anchor of a growing business, one that will extend into Spokane and beyond, providing office workers and retail employees options beyond food courts and the restaurants on Third Avenue. n

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JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 35

Going Nowhere

it was that turned John into John Locke-reading straightarrow who avoids guns, not the tragedy that drives Tonto. It’s just stuff that’s filling time — and that’s one thing this contraption clearly does not need. And then there’s Depp, whose portrayal of Tonto would be an insult to cinema no matter what you think about a white guy playing a Comanche. It’s a part that consists of nothing but smart-ass remarks about his new partner and bug-eyed reaction takes, and Verbinski resists exactly zero opportunities to cut away to those reaction the result will turn John and Tonto into uncomfortable takes just to make sure we understand the zaniness of partners, and find John wearing a black mask, and riding everything we’re seeing. Positing Tonto as an addled, a white horse. dead-bird-feeding post-traumatic stress case feels like The Lone Ranger marks the latest collaboration benothing but an excuse to let Depp do any ridiculous thing tween Depp and director Gore Verbinski — who oversaw he wants with the character, and as a result he’s nothing the first three Pirates films as well as the funky animated but a collection of anachronistic punch lines and twitchy Western Rango — and it’s hard not to mannerisms. feel a certain desperation as they try to So why is The Lone Ranger such THE LONE RANGER re-capture comic-adventure lightning in a a catastrophe, when at least some of Rated PG-13 bottle. For several precious minutes near Directed by Gore Verbinski the Pirates films made a nearly identithe conclusion, they even succeed, as the Starring Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer, Tom cal formula work? Because in those finale finds two trains weaving back and films, Jack Sparrow was reacting to Wilkinson forth in proximity for a rousing bunch of ghost ships and sea monsters; the meticulously-choreographed shoot-’emfaint hand-waving here to the idea up that will be coming soon to a Disney theme park near that The Lone Ranger actually has some sort of mystical you. abilities doesn’t fill the same need for an out-of-this-world Unfortunately, that climactic set-piece comes at the counterpoint. Tonto isn’t a delivery system for broad conclusion of 149 minutes of complete nonsense. Verbinmugging and wisecracks because it makes sense, but ski and his team of screenwriters clearly set out to take because that’s all Johnny Depp seems capable of investing absolutely nothing seriously, presuming (perhaps approin a character any more. priately) that a straightforward heroic take on the iconic The Lone Ranger may be loud, chaotic and fundamencharacter would be too square for 2013 audiences. The tally inconsequential, but that’s true of plenty of sumscript keeps making gestures at caring about charactermer movies. This one, like Depp’s performance, seems building, but none of it is really worth caring about — not convinced that it’s actually delightfully insouciant, rather the relationship between John and Dan, not whatever it than something that’s smirking for two and a half hours was that once separated John and Rebecca, not whatever at its own jokes. n

The Lone Ranger, like its star, spends two and a half hours smirking at its own jokes By Scott Renshaw

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h, Johnny Depp: He had us in the palm of his hand. We hard-core movie buffs loved what he represented. Here was a too-pretty-to-betrue movie star who, instead of gravitating towards safe choices, built an entire career out of hiding his face behind funky make-up and facial hair. Even once he became the centerpiece of a blockbuster franchise, with Pirates of the Caribbean, it was in a role that it’s hard to imagine any other star would touch, let alone play the way he played it. But of late — from Alice in Wonderland to The Rum Diary — he’s grown too locked into his own love affair with eccentricity. And while there are plenty of other things wrong with The Lone Ranger, his performance here may be the most consistently grating thing in it, and the key to why it’s such a miserable experience. He’s even part of the misguided framing structure set in 1933 San Francisco, in which a wizened old Tonto (Depp) tells a young boy the story of how he came to know John Reid (Armie Hammer) in 1869 Texas. A dandyish district attorney, Reid has come to the small railroad town where his brother Dan (James Badge Dale) is a Texas Ranger, now married to John’s childhood sweetheart, Rebecca (Ruth Wilson). But when a cruel killer named Butch Cavendish (William Fichtner) escapes from custody, Dan and John join a posse in pursuit — and

36 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

Johnny Depp in his least PC role since Hunter S. Thompson.

film | shorts

opening films HANNAH ARENDT 

This film tells the true story of Hannah Arendt, a Jewish philosopher and escapee of Nazi Germany. The biopic relives Hannah’s report of exNazi Adolf Eichmann’s 1961 trial and its ensuing avalanche of controversy. Did she defend Eichmann, or merely the uncomfortable truth? Barbara Sukowa depicts the journalistic drama and political repercussions as she discovers “the banality of evil.” At Magic Lantern (BN) Not Rated

STORIES WE TELL

In genre-defying documentary style, Sarah Polley digs into the layers of her family’s memories to find, of course, the truth. But each version of the past and confessions of her mother’s affair combine into a playful, colorful tale that’ll hit you in the feels. Supported by an unusual but genuine cast who mainly play themselves, Polley learns how memories of the past can reverberate into the present. (BN) PG-13

THE LONE RANGER

Johnny Depp dons another wig as Tonto, the Native American sidekick to the not-so-lonesome Lone Ranger, John Reid (Armie Hammer). Tonto lays down the wisdom in fluent broken English to transform a man of law into a masked hero. Loaded with Pirates of the Caribbean special effects and quippy humor, Depp and Hammer gallop horseback through the dust in an adventure against the Western bad guys. (BN) PG-13

Despicable Me 2

Gru is back with his minions and adopted daughters in the animated sequel, picking up as the Anti-Villain League cracks down on high-tech super-criminals. The agency calls on (or rather, kidnaps) Gru for his ex-villain expertise, but will he be able to juggle the mission on top of his paternal duties? Get ready to giggle for returning voice actors Steve Carell, Kristin Wigg, Miranda Cosgrove and the adorably clumsy minions. (PG)

now playing BEFORE MIDNIGHT

In 1995, Before Sunrise introduced us to the pair as dreamy twenty-somethings whose chance meeting on a train led to a single wildly romantic night in Vienna; in 2004, Before Sunset found them reuniting in Paris as slightly more hardened adults, in a way that completely reframed the events that occurred nine years earlier. Now, the third installment in Richard Linklater’s story features our couple (Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy) now very much together raising twin daughters as they vacation in Greece. (SR) Rated R

FRANCES HA

Frances  is a young New Yorker, hoping to apprentice at a dance company and follow her lifelong dreams. The problem? She’s not a dancer, and she doesn’t live in New York. She has a best friend, but doesn’t really talk to her anymore. As her dreams and ideal life dwindle into dust, the world tells  Frances  she must face the cold hard truth of reality. Her next problem? She’s happy, and there’s nothing that’s going to stop that, even an impossible journey to obtain so much more life than she already has. (SM) Rated R

THE HEAT

Ready for another buddy cop film? Well, this time around we’ve got a bit of a twist as a tightly wound FBI agent played by Sandra Bullock goes on the hunt for a badass drug dealer. But the catch is that she has to team up with goofball Boston police officer, played with, we’ll assume, ample fart jokes by Melissa McCarthy in order to catch this evil doer. Hijinks ensue as this unlikely pair hits the mean streets. (MB) Rated R

THE INTERNSHIP

Two obsolete oldies find themselves without jobs, falling straight into an internship at Google with a shot at employment — that is if they prove themselves to be the best of the best amongst a mob of interns straight of out college. Now, they must compete against tech-savvy, bright young people or face the rough waters of unemployment. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson star in a battle between old and young that will surely end in a comedic fiasco, hopefully proving that the aging generation hasn’t lost their pizzazz. (SM) Rated PG-13

IRON MAN 3

So, there’s this pretty obscure movie that a lot of you haven’t heard about. It’s called Iron Man and it really never got popular. They made a sequel, which didn’t do well in box offices either and definitely didn’t amass a huge fan base or anything. A third one is coming out this week. So, I guess, if you feel like it, go and see a movie that didn’t get big and support some struggling actors like Robert Downey Jr., Guy Pierce and Gwyneth Paltrow. The movie is about a man who makes a metal robot suit. There’s an evil villain. The guy has to save the world most of the time and stuff. We’re kidding, this thing is outrageous and, of course, very popular. (SM) PG-13

KEVIN HART: LET ME EXPLAIN

Comic Kevin Hart has been burning up audiences at comedy clubs around the country for years now, but it seems he’s really hit his stride in the last few years. Filmed at a sold-out Madison Square Garden last year, this film features Hart’s wacky and energetic comedic style so you can better un-

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 37

film | shorts

THE MAGIC LANTERN

now playing

JULY 5TH - JULY 11TH STORIES WE TELL (108 MIN - PG-13) Fri/Sat: 4:15, Sun: 3:30, Tues-Thur: 5:30 HANNAH ARENDT (113 MIN - PG-13) Fri/Sat: 2:00, 6:30, Sun: 1:15, Tues-Thur: 7:30

derstand why he’s one of the hottest stand-up comics in the business. (MB) Rated R

BEFORE MIDNIGHT (109 MIN - R) Fri/Sat: 2:45, 7:00, Sun: 1:45, 6:00, Tues-Thur: 7:00

MAN OF STEEL

MUD (130 - PG-13) Fri/Sat: 8:30, Sun: 5:30, Tues-Thur: 3:00

The reboot of the reboot of the Superman story is brimming with both fight and flight scenes, lots of self-doubt, a bit of humor, the problems of actually being a stranger in a strange land, and a moving, heartfelt look at father-son relationships. Henry Cavill is slightly earnest in the lead, Amy Adams gives Lois Lane the right amount of feisty toughness, Russell Crowe shows the stoic side of Jor-El, Kevin Costner is a wise and kindly Jonathan Kent, and Michael Shannon manages to mix malevolence with pride as General Zod. Visual effects are excessive, but writer David S. Goyer and director Zack Snyder make everything balance out just right. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE SAPPHIRES (96 MIN - PG=13) Fri/Sat: 5:00, Sun: 4:00, Tues-Thur: 5:00 FRANCES HA (84 MIN - R) Fri/Sat: 9:00, Sun: 12:00 pm, Tues-Thur: 3:15 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

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MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

It seems that Joss Whedon (the man behind Avengers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and generally known as the king of all nerds everywhere) can do whatever the hell he wants after raking in so much superhero cash last summer. Take on Shakespeare? Why not? He wrote and directed this modern telling of the classic tale, most of which he filmed at his own house — because he can do things like that. (MB) Rated PG-13.

MUD

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1-800-720-6008

The gang from Monsters Inc. is back, and this time they’re back in school. We see Mike trying to get back into the Monsters University scaring department — after failing out — by winning a university-wide “Scare Games.” Here Monsters University takes advantage of a familiar college-movie trope: an outcasts vs. elites competition straight out of Revenge of the Nerds. (SR) Rated PG

AT THE BING

901 W. SPRAGUE AVE, SPOKANE | 509.227.7638

Two teenagers stumble across a ruggedly handsome fugitive (Matthew McConaughey)  hiding in the  Deep South  from bounty hunters and the law. The boys decide to take matters into their own hands, making a pact to keep the dashing criminal hidden from hungry killers and help reunite him with his long lost love. It’s nice to see McConaughey continue his habit of appearing in movies that aren’t, by and large, romantic comedies. Let’s hope he keeps it up. (SM) Rated PG-13

NOW YOU SEE ME

It was only a matter of time before magicians figured out that illusions could be applied practically in the form of bank robbery. But Interpol and the FBI aren’t impressed with these magic tricks. Now, a battle royale breaks out between the cops and the magicians who steal for spectacle and sport. Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman gear up in this movie as magic trick debunker and bank’s financial backer. Jessie Eisenburg, Dave Franco, Isla Fisher and Mark Ruffalo sprinkle their act-

Man of Steel ing talent throughout the movie as illusionists and the cops out to get them. (SM) PG-13

THE SAPPHIRES

A musical comedy-drama, The Sapphires follows four women as they are discovered by a talent scout (played by the hilarious Chris O’Dowd from The IT Crowd) and travel to Vietnam in 1968 to sing for the troops. The soul group battles racism and cat fights, leading to tension in the group and numerous hardships that threatens their success. (KS) Rated PG-31

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

Director J.J. Abrams has done what every Star Trek fan has been hoping for. He’s upped the ante on everything in the sequel to his 2009 reboot of the franchise. And he’s done so with an eye cocked in the direction of diehard fans, to whom he sends little shout-outs of old Trek references. He also spins a whopping good, action- and effectsfilled tale of intrigue and attitudes (and relationships and photon torpedoes and even a cameo by a Tribble). (ES) Rated PG-13

THIS IS THE END

Who would’ve thought that a party at James Franco’s house could lead to catastrophe? Playing themselves, the allstar cast includes Seth Rogen, Danny

McBride and Jonah Hill, among others, all of whom are trapped in Franco’s house as the Apocalypse unfolds. As supplies dwindle, they must take on the outside world, dodging sinkholes and blue lights that snatch people away. (AC) Rated R

WHITE HOUSE DOWN

Didn’t we just see this movie, like when it was called Olympus Has Fallen? Yes, but this time it’s angry (or maybe frustrated) Americans instead of North Koreans who launch an assault on 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Jamie Foxx is the president; Channing Tatum is the square-jawed Everyman who steps up to protect him; James Woods, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and lots of other strong actors struggle with a cliché-ridden script as various good and bad guys. One good thing: We learn that the presidential limo is called Ground Force One. (ES) Rated PG-13

WORLD WAR Z

Former UN worker Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) and his family are stuck in an apocalyptic traffic jam as Philadelphia falls to fast-moving, rabid zombies. Then, Gerry is tasked by the government to travel around the world looking for the source of this global pandemic, all the while trying to get back to his family. (MJ) Rated PG-13 n

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

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METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Before midnight

96

Star Trek

73

This is the End

68

monsters University

64

man of Steel

60

World War Z

56

White House Down

52

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film | review

Animation Redux

Back for more.

Despicable Me 2 keeps the goofiness of the original alive By Ed Symkus

O

nly one question ever comes into play like style under orders of Silas. But it should be when Hollywood brings up the idea of no surprise that he takes the gig, nor should it a sequel: How much money did the first catch anyone off-guard that he and Lucy end up film make? Answer: Despicable Me, the 2010 anias partners, attempting to track down traces of mated comedy, took in more than half a billion PX-41 at a nearby mall. Things, of course, do not dollars. Sequel, anyone? go smoothly, partly because of mall restaurateur Former villain Gru (Steve Carell) has settled Eduardo (Benjamin Bratt), who looks suspiciousdown to being a loving dad for ly like former villain El Macho, and DESPICABLE ME 2 his three adopted daughters, partly because Gru’s babbling little Rated PG and he’s become a respectable yellow helpers known as Minions are businessman, watching over the Directed by Pierre Coffin and fond of causing chaos. jam and jelly business that’s run Chris Renaud The youngest of viewers will love Starring the voices of Steve Carell, the slapstick shenanigans and the by his former henchman Dr. Kristen Wiig, Benjamin Bratt Nefario (Russell Brand). Alas, bright color palette, and some adults the jams and jellies are awful, will giggle at obscure references only and Dr. Nefario misses being evil, so he takes they will get, such as when the Mungo Jerry song another job. “In the Summertime” pops up on the soundtrack, But bigger problems loom. Like that secret and suddenly one of Minions is sporting a wooly lab in the Arctic that has mysteriously vanished. wig that makes him look just like the band’s lead You know, the lab that was manufacturing PXsinger Ray Dorset. The sight gags are every41, the “transmutation serum” that can turn where. The only way to catch most of them is cute bunnies into “indestructible mindless killing to look around and stop paying attention to the machines.” story. So, does Gru go the safe route of routine, or But how could anyone do that when it’s does he, after being kidnapped and brought to hinted that Lucy might have a thing for Gru, and Silas Ramsbottom (Steve Coogan), the director vice versa? Or when the Minions are subjected of the Anti-Villain League, agree to search for the to the serum and become “indestructible mindserum and help save the world? less killing machines”? Or when, during the end He doesn’t know what to make of Lucy credits, the film’s 3D gets so pumped up that Wilde (Kristen Wiig), the excitable agent who, the Minions manage to fill the theater with the armed with her lipstick taser, nabs him in Bondbubbles they’re blowing? n

◄ Indicates no show time for Thursday, July 4th.

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 DESPICABLE ME 2

PG Daily (10:00) (4:30) 6:45◄ 9:00◄ In 2D Daily (10:20) (12:00) (12:30) (2:15) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10◄ 9:25◄

THE LONE RANGER

PG-13 Daily (12:20) (3:20) (4:00) 6:20◄ 7:00◄ 9:20◄ 9:50◄

THE HEAT

R Daily (11:45) (2:20) (4:45) 7:15◄ 9:45◄

WHITE HOUSE DOWN

PG-13 Daily (10:10) (12:50) (3:45) 6:45◄ 9:35◄

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY

G Daily (2:00) 6:50◄ In 2D Daily (11:15) (4:20) 9:25◄

WORLD WAR Z

PG-13 Daily (11:30) (4:20) 9:15◄ In 2D Daily (1:50) 7:00◄

MAN OF STEEL

PG-13 Daily (12:00) (3:00) 6:15◄ 9:15◄

THIS IS THE END

R Daily (2:25) (5:00) 7:10◄ 9:40◄ Fri-Sun (12:15)

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS PG-13 Fri-Sun (10:20) (1:00)

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

DESPICABLE ME 2

PG Daily (10:00) (4:30) 6:45◄ 9:00◄ In 2D Daily (10:20) (12:00) (12:30) (2:15) (2:45) (5:00) 7:15◄ 9:30◄

THE LONE RANGER

PG-13 Daily (10:00) (12:20) (1:00) (3:20) (4:00) 6:20◄ 7:00◄ 9:20◄ 9:50◄

REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK.

THE HEAT

R Daily (11:45) (2:20) (4:45) 7:15◄ 9:40◄

WHITE HOUSE DOWN

PG-13 Daily (10:10) (12:50) (3:45) 6:45◄ 9:30◄

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY

G Daily (10:45) (3:40) 6:15◄ In 2D Daily (11:15) (1:15) (1:45) (4:15) 6:45◄ 9:15◄

WORLD WAR Z

PG-13 Daily (1:15) (3:30) 7:00◄ 9:00◄ In 2D Daily (11:20) (2:00) (4:30) 7:20◄ 9:50◄

MAN OF STEEL

PG-13 Daily (10:15) (3:50) 9:25◄ In 2D Daily (3:20) 6:30◄ 9:40◄ Fri-Sun (12:15)

THIS IS THE END

R Daily (2:30) (5:00) 7:20◄ 9:40◄ Fri-Sun (12:10)

rivercityred. blogspot.com

NOW YOU SEE ME

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:50) (4:20) 6:50◄ 9:25◄

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

PG-13 Daily 6:30◄ 9:20◄ Fri-Sun (10:00) (12:50) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 7/3/13-7/11/13

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 39

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ALL AGES | 6:30PM DOORS

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C

Boy Wonder

Justin Bieber became a star because of YouTube. That’s Carson Lueders’ plan, too By Leah Sottile

chad ramsey photo

arson Lueders has just finished the sixth grade, and life is pretty cool. The skinny 11-year-old has a motocross bike his parents let him race on weekends. He’s got one basketball hoop in his driveway and one in the living room, where his mom lets him practice his dunks all day. There’s an electronic drum kit that he can pound on anytime. He’s got a couple of guitars, three dogs and a Razor scooter. But then, that’s stuff lots of kids have. Where Carson Lueders’ life differs from the typical kid is in the hundreds of envelopes and trinkets from fans around the world that sit in gigantic piles throughout the Lueders house. There are carefully sketched pencil portraits of his face from Korea, envelopes full of money from Wales, stuffed animals from Australia and more marriage proposals than the typical 11-year-old can even comprehend. His life differs in the freshly opened boxes of neon wristbands with his name in bubbly white letters, and the T-shirts with his face plastered across the chest, in the millions of YouTube views, the monthly trips to Los Angeles to meet with agents and producers. In the past year, the kid with the white-blonde hair has stopped attending a regular school and started being homeschooled. His talent for singing YouTube covers of Justin Bieber and Keith Urban and Cody Simpson songs has gone from a hobby to a full-blown career, one that takes him from his Newman Lake, Wash., home to recording studios in L.A. and stages in San Diego too often for him to be a regular middle schooler. After three years of posting videos on YouTube, early last year Carson got a shout-out on Twitter from Australian pop star Simpson. Then in March, country superstar Keith Urban sang his praises for a cover of his song “For You” that Carson and older brother Jackson had posted. “WOW!!!!!!!!!! Just saw this video on @YouTube...totally got to me!!!! Awesome job guys!!!! -KU” Urban wrote on his Twitter page. The Lueders family woke up the next morning to thousands of new fans praising Carson for his songs online. “That was a pivotal point because Carson, for three years, was just posting videos on YouTube. When Keith tweeted ...continued on next page

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 41

MUSIC | pop

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“boy wonder,” continued...

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the video that day, that was when he went over the one million YouTube [views] mark,” says Carson’s mom Diane Lueders. “It took him three years to get one million YouTube views. It took him three months to get the second million YouTube views. Now he’s at almost eight million or something like that?” Carson walks back into the living room where his mom and his basketball hoop sit — a spacious great room with a panoramic view of Newman Lake’s glassy water, just a baseball’s throw away — and points at her. “Eight and a half,” he corrects, plopping down in a chair with an orange and a giant bag of kettle corn. “Eight and a half million YouTube views!” she exclaims. A year ago, none of the Lueders family could have dreamt it.

D

iane Lueders calls her son’s musical talent a “gift from the Lord,” something she and her husband and their other two children noticed about the youngest Lueders early on. They dressed him up as Elvis one year — Diane bejeweled her eldest son’s karate outfit and bought a black foam pompadour from Walmart — for a school talent show. With a barrel-sized guitar around his shoulders and foam hair bigger than his own head, Carson took the stage and sung a verse of The King’s “Hound Dog” to a clapping crowd. Another time he froze in front of a talent show crowd. His father Jon stood beside him and sang most of the words to “Amazing Grace” while Carson stood silent. “Now he’s auditioning in front of top producers, managers, that kind of thing,” Diane says. “You go from ‘I can’t do the school talent show’ to trying out for a big TV show. That’s where you say ‘Carson, you have come a long way.’ ” A year ago, the family decided to fully pursue his career so that Carson — who looks unflinchingly into the camera as he sings and easily performs dance sequences like he grew up on Michael Jackson and Justin Timberlake videos — could figure out if it was what he truly wanted. “I wasn’t even sure that I wanted to pursue music,” Carson says, “I think this year I’m more committed. I like it, I like doing it. There’s a lot of hard work. There’s times I’m in the studio until 2 o’clock in the morning right now.”

Lake Roosevelt...

Diane stops him. “We were visiting until 2, but you were not recording until 2.” “I was recording ‘til like 1:30,” he says. Diane smiles. “When was that?” “Never mind.” He picks up the kettle korn and shoves a handful in his mouth. In the past year, the Lueders family has seen their youngest son change from an elementary school kid in a sparkling karate uniform to a tiny businessman who mentions contracts, publishing percentages, product endorsements and sponsorships in conversations before his mom does. His parents, backed by millions of supporters from 110 countries (they’ve counted), see an immense talent in Carson. He could be the next Simpson. Maybe the next Bieber. “With all your kids, if you see a talent in sports or whatever, you provide opportunities,” Diane says. “This seems extreme, what we’re doing, but it’s really no different than what parents do for kids in sports.” Carson looks down at the tape recorder sitting next to him. “We’ve been talking for 58 minutes,” he says. He gets up from his chair and starts shooting at the indoor hoop, practicing his three-point shot. With any positive attention online comes a fair share of negative — and Carson is no exception. “‘Quit trying to be the next Justin Bieber,’” Diane says they say. “But then his defenders and fanbase say, ‘He’s not the next Justin Bieber. He’s the first Carson.’ ” And right now, being the first Carson is not a shabby thing. “Carson is averaging 15,000 views a day,” Diane says. “So that means every five seconds someone is clicking on one of Carson’s music videos.” “Someone just clicked on my music video,” Carson says from his imaginary free-throw line. “Isn’t that interesting?” Diane says. “Someone just clicked on my music video,” Carson says again. “I’m not saying they probably watch all of it... ” Diane continues. “Someone just clicked on my video.” And Carson bounces the ball off the backboard, catches it mid-air and slam-dunks it through the hoop. n leahs@inlander.com Carson Lueders’ videos can be viewed at youtube.com/user/jdlueders.

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www.VisitLincolnCountyWashington.com 42 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

MUSIC | rock

Hot Rock

Say cheese, guys.

We Can Help!

There are some areas in which Jaill misses the mark — but the music’s not one of them

“W

Deissner Law Office 509.462.0827 www.deissnerlaw.com 1707 W. Broadway Spokane, WA 99201

By Jordan Satterfield e’re kind of a classically moronic band,” says Vincent Kircher, frontman for Milwaukee garage-pop project Jaill. “We always seem to tour the Northeast in the winter and the Southwest in the summer.” But what the currently overheated Jaill lacks in tour planning skills, it more than makes up for in creativity and vigor. As Kircher’s long-running recording moniker, Jaill has seen numerous members come and go in more than a decade of existence, in one form or another. Yet each new record seems to propel the group forward into becoming a sturdier, more intentional, more mature unit. There’s an intriguing dichotomy behind Jaill’s nature. First and foremost a garage-rock band, the grit and fuzz that typically coats such sounds is replaced by tight, clean, jangling pop. The attitude is there for sure, but so is the sincerity — two things you don’t see packaged together very often. In the past year alone, the Sub Pop-signed act has put out the excellent LP Traps, played more than 100 shows, and lost two longtime members. Now backed by three new members, Kircher’s already working on another, even more involved album. “In terms of touring, we didn’t really think we were making the next step,” says Kircher of the band’s previous incarnation. “I feel

SOCIAL SECURITY OR SSI?

like maybe the morale was down a bit, and now the band has filled out with three amazing guys who were all singers in bands back in Milwaukee.” Kircher says the new lineup’s experience with recording is steering the band toward a more diverse, “weirder” record, probably by the end of this year. But right now, touring is the first priority. “With Traps, we took months and months to record it and weren’t playing any shows,” Kircher recalls. “You could really feel the drop-off of people just forgetting about you.” This is the third time that Kircher and company have jangled their way through Spokane, and their third time at Mootsy’s. “The first time we played there, it was pretty dead,” he remembers, “but our second show there was good, so I’m hoping that this next time we come through, people remember us and head out for it.” There’s no doubt that the fanbase Jaill has established in its two stops at the old yellow door will come around to see them again. The one thing we can’t promise is a break from the heat — July 8 looks like it’s going to be a hot one. n Jaill with Normal Babies and Cosmonauts • Mon, July 8, at 10 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • $7 • 21+ • 838-1570

Licensed in Washington & Idaho

Beer Cocktails Music Food 120 E. Sprague Ave.

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 43

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

HIP-HOP DEAD PREZ

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Wednesday, 7/3

S

ince Legendary politi-rappers Dead Prez took up the mic in the mid-1990s, they have taken a lyrical stand against everything that drives mainstream hip-hop: the control of corporations, the glitz, the glamour. They rap about politics and social justice — at times to such extremes that they’ve incited riots. And, here’s a random thing: They’ve been also known to preach to their audience about being healthy, tossing apples into the crowd. So yeah, this is a rap show like none other. — LEAH SOTTILE Dead Prez with Q Dot, Real Life Rockaz, Jaeda and DJ Parafyn • Thurs, July 11, at 7 pm • Red Room Lounge • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • $20 • 21+ • 838-7613

HIP-HOP OMEGA JACKSON

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn CHECKERBOARD, Deepest Ocean THE COUNTRY CLUB (676-2582), Last Chance Band EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FEDORA PUB, Kosh FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho J THE HOP!, Bermuda, Beyond the Shore, Barrier, Verbera, Lay The Tarp IRON HORSE BAR (926-8411), Raggs and Bush Doktor REPUBLIC BREWING (775-2700), Chuck Mead & the Grassy Knoll Boys THE ROADHOUSE, Luke Jaxon ZOLA, Island Soul

Thursday, 7/4

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Twisted Biscuit BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Phoenix CDA CASINO, Strictly Business J COEUR D’ALENE PARK (SPOKANE), Daniel Mark Faller THE COUNTRY CLUB (676-2582), Last Chance Band GATEWAY MARINA (208-689-3902), The Jam Band J THE HOP!, Loss Monstarz, Whurlwind Entertainment LEFTBANK (315-8623), Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind MOON TIME, Flying Mammals PAVILLION PARK, 6 Foot Swing THE ROCK BAR (443-3796), Armed and Dangerous SPLASH (208-765-4000), YESTERDAYSCAKE, Steve Denny TEMPLIN’S (208-773-1611), Sammy Eubanks UGLY BETTIE’S, New Era, Kung Foo

44 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

Grip, Mark Shurtz

Friday, 7/5

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, Bill Bozly BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Cliff Park BLUE SPARK, DJ Mark Thomas BOLO’S (891-8995), Slow Burn CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Phoenix J CARR’S CORNER, Omega Jackson, All Urban Outfield, Hooves, Fat Arm, Encino Band, Guttah Face (see story above) J CLOVER (487-2937), Paul Grove CLUB RIO (208-437-4814), Sammy Eubanks CDA CASINO, Strictly Business, Mike Morris COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208-

263-6971), Slag Dog THE COUNTRY CLUB (676-2582), Torino Drive CURLEY’S (208-773-5816), Shiner FEDORA PUB, Truck Mills GATEWAY MARINA (208-689-3902), The Jam Band J THE HOP!, Navigator, Amontillados Cask, Outlier, Haunter, Shadow of Heaven JONES RADIATOR, Dead Serious Lovers LEFTBANK (315-8623), Charles Tappa J MAIN MARKET (458-2667), Dario Re MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), Martini Brothers J PARK BENCH CAFÉ (456-4349), Union Street PEND D’OREILLE WINERY (208-2658545), Bridges Home PICNIC PINES (299-3223), Bobby Bremer Band

RED LION AT THE PARK (326-8000), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser and the Nerve THE ROCK BAR (443-3796), Triple Shot SPLASH (208-765-4000), YESTERDAYSCAKE, Steve Denny UGLY BETTIE’S, TC Tye Trio WHITESTONE TASTING ROOM (8382427), Ken Davis & Tui

Saturday, 7/6

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, Kosh ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Stage to Stage feat. Pamela Benton, Monarch Mountain Band, Rachel Bade-McMurphy Quartet, Brett Duchenne, NativeSun J BABY BAR, Monuments Reunion Show with Drag Like Pull

F

orget any ideas you have that hip-hop is all about gold chains and big fancy cars. New York artist Omega Jackson is a rapper — in that he rhymes. But that’s where the similarities end. Wayward thoughts and observations seem like they just fall out of Jackson’s mouth, and most times they’re layered with the strangest of sounds. With Jackson on the mic, this is an artsy kind of hip-hop that feels like there’s someone out there thinking about adding something brand new to the rap conversation, not just repeating what other people have done before him. — LEAH SOTTILE Omega Jackson with All Urban Outfield, Hooves, Fat Arm, Sales Wagon, Guttahface and DJ Ionic26 • Fri, July 5, at 9 pm • Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington St. • $5 • 21+ • 474-1731 BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Cliff Park BOLO’S (891-8995), Slow Burn J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Soul Brunch with DJ Darkside Som BROADWAY BAR (326-5000), Dudley Do-Wrong CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Phoenix J CHAPS (624-4182), Just Plain Darin J CLOVER (487-2937), Dan Mills CLUB RIO (208-437-4814), Sammy Eubanks COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Mike Morris COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Devon Wade THE COUNTRY CLUB (676-2582), Torino Drive CURLEY’S (208-773-5816), Shiner

Fedora Pub, Truck Mills Gateway Marina (208-689-3902), The Jam Band J The Hop!, Odyssey, Honey Badger, Misplaces the Past, Almost Home, Visionary, Lies Like Saints, Saxeus Indaba (443-3566), Azure Rising La Rosa Club (208-255-2100), Mike and Shanna Thompson The Lariat (466-9918), Texas Twister LeftBank (315-8623), Carey Brazil Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Martini Brothers Picnic Pines (299-3223), Bobby Bremer Band Red Lion River Inn (328-9526), Chris Rieser and the Nerve Red Room Lounge, D-Why, ETRyan, Sam Lachow, Raz Simone Splash (208-765-4000), YESTERDAYSCAKE, Steve Denny

Sunday, 7/7

Arbor Crest Winery (927-9463), Soul Proprietor Blue Spark, HipGrass CDA Casino, Echo Elysium J CdA City Park (208-667-3162), Barry Aiken and North Point

get listed!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. Curley’s (208-773-5816), Whack A Mole Daley’s, Jam Night with VooDoo Church Eichardt’s, Truck Mills J The Hop!, Apparitions, Mouth of the Serpent, Murken Kepriulous Knitting Factory, John Hiatt & The Combo, Holly Williams Northern Quest, Bad Company with Paul Rodgers Saddle Inn (624-1228), The Two Dudes

music | venues

Bistro on Spruce (208-664-1774), Truck Mills The District Bar, Dan Conrad Eichardt’s, Charley Packard Fedora Pub, Kosh Fizzie Mulligans, Kicho J The Hop!, Daniel Stickney & Friends JJ’s Grill (467-7267), Chris Rieser and the Nerve Knitting Factory, Josh Abbott Band, Will Green J Luxe Coffeehouse, Dario Re J Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Maxie Ray Mills Mootsy’s, Muscle and Marrow, Drag Like Pull, BIAS J Prince of Peace Church (4650779), The Big Bucks Band The Roadhouse, Last Chance Band

Coming Up…

J Red Room Lounge, Dead Prez on July 11 (see story on facing page) Saranac Public House (4739455), Rumble on the Rooftop feat. Casey Rogers, The Longnecks, Nic Garofolo on July 11 J Boots Bakery & Lounge, Old Bear Mountain on July 12 J Glover Field, KYRS Music Fest feat. Menomena, Finn Riggins, Cathedral Pearls and others on July 13 Knitting Factory, The Postal Service on July 15 J Gorge Amphitheater (7856262), John Mayer, Phillip Phillips on July 20

wine cellars presents

Monday, 7/8

Calypsos Coffee (208-665-0591), Open mic Knitting Factory, Candlebox J Mootsy’s, Jaill, Normal Babies, Cosmonauts (see story on page 43) Rico’s (332-6566), Open mic ugly Bettie’s, Open mic

Tuesday, 7/9

The 1st Annual

arbor crest music fest

Saturday, July 6

Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn J Downtown CdA (208-6673162), Floating Crowbar J The Hop!, Elektro Grave Kelly’s Irish Pub (208-667-1717), Powell Brothers Knitting Factory, Kottonmouth Kings, X Clan, Imperial Soundclash, Wildcard J Moscow Food Co-op (208-8828537), Tea & Eye J The Shop, Millham Guitar Studio Viking Bar, AG/CP

Non-Stop Music • Noon – 8 pm • FREE admission!

Wednesday, 7/10

509.927.9463 • arborcrest.com

Noon–1:30 1:30–3:00 3:00–4:30 4:30–6:00 6:00–7:30

Pamela Benton Electric Violin and Guitar Monarch Mountain Bluegrass Band Rachel Bade-McMurphy Quartet Jazz Brett Dechenne Bluesy-style Funk Native Sun Classic Rock

sponsored by

Ages 21+ • Arbor Crest Cliff House Estate & Tasting Room • 4705 N Fruithill Rd

315 restaurant • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 AVENUE PIZZARIA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 baby bar • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 the beLLtower • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 binG Crosby theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 biGFoot Pub • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 bLue sPark • 15 S. Howard St. • 838-5787 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 the CeLLar • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 the Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 the CheCkerboard bar • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 Coeur d’aLene Casino • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 daLey’s CheaP shots • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 the distriCt bar • 916 W. First Ave. • 244-3279 eiChardt’s • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 Fedora Pub • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 Fizzie MuLLiGan’s • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 Fox theater • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GibLiano brothers • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 the hoP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 iron horse • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 John’s aLLey • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 Jones radiator • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 knittinG FaCtory • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LaGuna CaFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 Mezzo Pazzo wine bar • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 Moon tiMe • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 northern Quest Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 nyne • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 o’shay’s • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W, Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 roadhouse Country roCk bar • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 the roCk bar & GriLL • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 443-3796 the shoP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 souLFuL souPs & sPirits • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 the swaMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 zoLa • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 45

MIKE MCCALL PHOTO

THEATER SUPERCALIFRAGILISTIC

For almost 50 years now, audiences have been charmed by Disney’s classic film adaptation of P.L. Travers’ book series Mary Poppins, starring the unforgettable Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke. If anything, the film made all of us wish that Mary Poppins, with her magical umbrella and her silly songs, could be our own nanny/babysitter. Let the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre — one of only a few professional theaters in the country granted rights this year to produce the musical — take you back to that nostalgic, dreamy place where toys put themselves away at the snap of a finger, and sidewalk chalk art serves as a secret portal to a fantastical, imaginary world. — CHEY SCOTT Mary Poppins • July 5-14, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $28-$42 • Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre • 880 W. Garden Ave. • cdasummertheatre.com • 208-769-7780

46 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

FESTIVAL YE GRANDE OL’ TIME

SPORTS PEDAL PARTY

Northwest Renaissance Festival • Opening weekend July 6-7, Fri and Sat from 11 am to 7 pm • $6-$10 • 6493 Hwy. 291, Nine Mile Falls, Wash. • 276-7728 • nwrf.net

Lilac City Twilight Criterium • Sat, July 6 from 5-9 pm • Free for spectators, $30 for first race, $20 each additional race • Downtown Spokane • spokanesports.org • 270-8347

The last time we trekked out to the wilderness of the Nine Mile Falls area, we found ourselves scared to death at Creepy Hallow, the annual Halloween fest. This time of the year, the same impressive acting crew brings us the Northwest Renaissance Festival. For four weekends in July, curious visitors can venture to the grounds to experience knightly games, battle chess and jousting, performances can be seen on the eight stages throughout the festival grounds, with vendors offering the grandest of old-fashioned treats. — KARA STERMER

Cycling enthusiast or not, the second annual Lilac City Twilight Criterium cycling races this weekend should be full of excitement for racers and spectators alike. After the first such event was a hit last summer, this evening of bike races is back with an even greater need for speed. Spectators are invited to stand along downtown Spokane’s streets to watch elite cyclists fly by at speeds reaching 40 mph. If you want to be a part of the action, pedal along in the free Citizens’ Ragtag Rally starting at 7:40 pm. — JEFF RUTHERFORD

THURSDAY • JULY 4TH, 2013

get listed!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

FESTIVAL GARDEN PARTY

You don’t need an invitation to Buckingham Palace to have a garden party experience when the Pend Oreille Valley Lavender Festival is just 40 miles north of Spokane, in the quaint town of Newport. This festival, now in its 10th year, includes wine tasting, educational workshops, food, live music, artisan vendors and even face painting for the kids. And, you don’t need the Queen’s invitation, just $6. — ANNA CLAUSEN Pend Oreille Valley Lavender Festival • July 6-7, Sat from 9 am-5 pm, Sun from 10 am-4 pm • $6-$25 • Newport City Park, South Calispel Ave. • povlavenderfestival.com • 671-0295

HEADLINE ENTERTAINMENT

SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA The Numerica Credit Union

CHILDREN’S MEADOW FIRST FRIDAY POST-FIREWORKS STYLE

With the Fourth of July on a Thursday, plenty of folks are figuring out how to slide right into the weekend without worrying about that whole Friday thing. But it’s not just any Friday, it’s First Friday, and you that means you can walk off some of that patriotic potato salad by touring some of the new art on display at local galleries and businesses. Be sure to stop by the Steam Plant for this month’s special “Furrst” Friday, a benefit for the area’s shelters that features animal-themed art and adoptable pets. — LISA WAANANEN First Friday • Fri, July 5 from 5-8 pm • Locations throughout downtown • inlander.com/FirstFriday

events | calendar

Comedy

Stand-Up Comedy Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D's Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (4837300) Music in Your FaceImprov comedy show based on a Medieval Minstrel Show. July 5-27, Fridays at 8 pm. $7$9. All-ages. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) Short Stacks Improv comedy night featuring new ideas and skits the BDT players are working on. July 5 at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) Live Comedy Live stand-up comedy shows every Sunday at 9 pm. Free. Goodtymes Bar and Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070)

Community Entertainment in the Park Summer entertainment series featuring live music and performances. Thursdays through July 11 at 7 pm. Free. East City Park, Moscow. (208-8837036) Find Waldo "Where's Waldo" kids' scavenger hunt at participating local businesses, prize drawing for eligible participants. July 1-31. Free. Pick up and turn in passport at Auntie's, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) Pennant Run Second annual event benefiting the Wounded Warrior Project; distances include a 1K, 5K and dash for kids. July 4 at 10 am. $15-$30, kids under three free. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. (535-2922)

All Day Activities, Entertainment & Discounts Riverfront Park Rides & Attractions, International Food Booths, Exhibitors, Arts & Craft Booths, and Roving Performers.

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JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 47

relationships

Advice Goddess Not A Mourning Person

My girlfriend died in a car accident four months ago, and I fear I’m not grieving the way I should. I was really broken up at first, crying hysterically, and I miss her terribly. I often think of things I wish I could tell her or we could do together, but I’m comforted by remembering all the positive things about us and her, and I’m grateful for the time we did have. Friends are worried, saying that I need to experience grief fully and work through all the stages amy alkon in order to recover; otherwise, the grief could come back to bite me. I worry that I am suppressing stuff, but I have no idea what. Despite what’s happened, I still like my life and my job. I even find —Living myself laughing at stupid stuff. Am I just in major denial? Those who care about you are worried that you aren’t wallowing in pain and despair, and they’re maybe even a little suspicious: “Come on, man, who’s keeping you company if not Misery?” Supposedly, if you really loved somebody, you’ll grieve big, long, and showy: retire from personal hygiene, refuse to leave your bed for six months, and only stop sobbing into your pillow to ask somebody to plant weeping willows so even the vegetation will be crying in solidarity. But bereavement researcher Dr. George A. Bonanno points out in his terrific book, “The Other Side of Sadness,” that there’s no evidence for this belief or a number of widely held beliefs about grieving, like the notion that there are “stages of grief” — five of them — that every bereaved person must go through before they can go on: “Whoops, you flunked anger. Better go back and punch four walls and get in two bar fights!” The “stages of grief” were based on psychiatrist Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross’ observations of people who were themselves dying, not those who’d lost someone they loved. “Grieving over the death of a loved one is not the same as facing your own death,” Bonanno points out. He adds that Freud’s notion that the bereaved must do “grief work” to heal — slog through every one of their memories and hopes about their lost loved one (as if sorting a mountain of wet clothes at an industrial laundry) — is unsupported by research, and there’s even evidence that this re-chewing of memories strengthens their connection to the deceased, preventing healing. Yet another myth is that your failure to go into Scarlett O’Hara-style hysterics in the coffee room every day means you’re postponing your grieving (perhaps until beach volleyball season ends?). In fact, the idea of “delayed grief” — grief as a darkly mischievous force determined to eventually pop up and bite you — is another unsubstantiated idea from one of Freud’s psychoanalytic minions. Studies find delayed grief extremely rare — almost to the point of nonexistence. What your behavior seems to reflect is resilience — healthy coping through putting your girlfriend’s life and death in perspective in ways that help you go on with your life. In other words, if you have a problem, it’s that your friends think you have a problem. The next time they suggest you’re grieving incorrectly, you might reassure them. Tell them you’re in the “bargaining” stage and that you’d feel much better if only they’d stock your fridge with beer and steak, and on their way out, would they mind detailing your car?

When Bald Things Happen To Good People

I’m a decent-looking guy with unfortunate hair. It’s thinning rapidly and receding to the back of my skull, and topical treatments barely made a difference. I’m now thinking of shaving my whole head, but I’m wondering what women think. —Follicular Rebellion Considering my circumstances, what’s my best option? Going bald isn’t all bad. If you’re like a lot of men, every time you lose a hair off your head, you’re a hair closer to growing a ponytail out your nose. Although women generally prefer men with hair on their head, there’s a line that gets crossed, and that’s when there’s a desperate little patch on top (a la Prince William) that calls to mind a pointless attempt to grow a vegetable garden in arid countryside. Doing that doesn’t make you look like you have hair; it makes you look like you have hair issues. Shaving your head, on the other hand, projects confidence, suggesting that you’re comfortable enough with your face and yourself to put them out there unadorned. If you go the head-shaving route, consider adding facial hair to make it look like there’s still a little lawn on the property, balancing out the clearing on top. You could try a few styles, take pix, and poll the ladies. Who knows? It might be just the way to meet a woman who longs to run her fingers through your back hair. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER JULY 4, 2013

events | calendar Wanderlust Circus Acrobats, stunts and more. July 4 from 4-7 pm. All-ages. The Bing, 901 W. Sprague Ave. ticketswest.com Bad Science Friday"Homeopathic remedies"-themed activities on the science behind home remedies. July 5 from 10 am-6 pm. $7-$10. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (443-5669) Palouse Ice Cream SocialCommunity dessert social. July 7 from noon-5 pm. Palouse City Park, Palouse, Wash. visitpalouse.com (878-1253) Mother-Daughter PJ PartyHosted by the Spokane Parks Dept. for moms, grandmas, daughters, etc., featuring activities and carousel rides. July 9 from 8-9:30 pm. $20. Looff Carrousel at Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneparks.org Glenrose Summer MarketFarmers market, live music, vendors and more. July 9 from 3-7 pm. (Also schedule for Aug. 13 and Sept. 10). Little Yellow Schoolhouse, corner of 37th and Fancher. (944-1085) Ride of SilenceThe organization’s founder stops in Spokane on a trip crossing the U.S. in recognition of cyclists who have been killed in bike/ vehicle collisions. July 10 at 5 pm. Old Spaghetti Factory, 152 S. Monroe (4447109) Rumble on the RooftopFundraiser event benefiting the Campus Kitchens Project at Gonzaga, featuring live music, raffle prizes, food and drink, and more. July 11 at 5 pm. $12-$15. Saranac rooftop, 21 W. Main Ave. campuskitchens.org/rumble2013 (313-6939)

Etc.

Archaeologist for a DayParticipants learn about history through archaeology. July 3 at 2 pm and 3:30 pm, South Hill branch; July 5 at 3 pm, Downtown branch; July 11 at 10 am, West Central Comm. Center, and at 3 pm at Hillyard branch. (444-5307) Bonner County Garden TourTour six private gardens. July 7 from 10 am-4 pm. $10. Locations vary. bcgardeners.com (208-265-2070) Spokane Moves to Amend the Constitution The local activist group meets on the second Tuesdays of each month. Next meeting is July 9 at 6:30 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Ft. George Wright Dr. (844-1776) Beginning Sewing ClassLearn to make a simple pair of shorts in a hands-on class. July 10 from 4-8 pm. $25. Sew EZ Too, 603 W. Garland Ave. (325-6644)

Festival

Statehood Day ParadeCommunity parade and celebration. July 3. Downtown Wallace, Idaho. wallaceidahochamber.com (208-290-7183) Bead StampedeVendors, displays and more. July 5 from noon-5 pm, July 6 from 10 am-5 pm, July 7 from 10 am-4 pm. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, CdA. zizbead.com (208-765-4969) Northwest Renaissance Festival Reenactments, vendors, performances and more. July 6-7 from 11 am-7 pm. $6-$35. 6493 Hwy. 291, Nine Mile Falls. nwrf.net (278-7728)

Lavender FestivalArtisans, vendors, live music, food, family activites and more. July 6 from 9 am-5 pm, and July 7 from 10 am-4 pm. $5-$10. City Park, Newport. povlavenderfestival. com (671-0295) Strawberry CelebrationStrawberry picking, arts and crafts, vendors and more. July 6-7. Green Bluff Growers, Mead. greenbluffgrowers.com All-American Fun FairOld-fashioned fair and yard sale featuring fair games, food, beverages and more, all benefiting the Bonner County Food Band. July 6 at 10 am. Bonner County Food Bank, 1707 Culver Dr. (208-2633663)

Film

Up Screening of the animated film as part of the summer outdoor movies series. July 3 at dusk. Free. All-ages. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (755-6726) Harry Potter and the Order of the PhoenixScreening of the film as part of the summer outdoor movies series. July 5 at dusk. Free. All-ages. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (755-6726) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Screning as part of the Mobius Summer Film Series at The Bing. July 6 at 11 am and 2 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) Hotel TransylvaniaScreening as part of the South Perry Summer Theater series. July 6 at dusk. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (534-1647) Coeur d'Alene Library Summer Movies Children's movies (rated G or PG) shown on Mondays at 1 pm through July 29. Free. CdA Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315)

Food

Basic Knife SkillsLearn basic knife skills, including caring for and selecting knives for different uses. July 7 at 2 pm. $59. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. (328-3335) Summer BBQ CookingLearn to cook several barbecue favorites with Chef Bob Black. July 9 from 5:30-8 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950) Spotlight on VegetablesChef Adam Hegsted teaches a class on cooking with vegetables from local farmers markets. July 9 from 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Norwest Culinary Academy, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) Dairy-Free DessertsLearn to make desserts minus dairy to cut calories, fat or for allergies. July 9 at 5:30 pm. $45. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. (328-3335) Puff PastriesLearn to make puffs for breakfast pastries and appetizers. July 10 from 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Norwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St., Bldg. 1 (533-8141)

Music

Fourth of July ConcertAnnual Fourth of July concert featuring carillonneur Wesley Arai. July 4 at 9 pm. Free. St. John's Cathedral, 127 W. 12th Ave. (838-4277) The Music of World War IIPerformance featuring Heidi Kuban and Diane Copeland. July 5-6. Circle Moon

Theatre, Hwy. 211 off of Hwy. 2, Newport, Wash. (208-448-1294) Bad Company with Paul Rodgers Rock concert. July 7 at 6 pm. $59$109. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. (481-6700) A Prairie Home CompanionLive performance featuring music, improv, poetry and more. July 8 at 7:30 pm. $27.50-$30.50. All-ages. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) Concert in the ParkMusic by the Community Band of the Palouse, picnics welcome and food available to purchase. July 10 from 6-8 pm. Free. Reaney Park, Pullman, Wash. pullmanparksandrec.com (338-3227)

Sports

Jedermann Gran FondoSecond annual 112-, 66- or 30-mile cycling race through the farming communities of Eastern Wash. July 20 at 7 am. $25$80. Cheney, Wash. emdesports.com (953-9924) Spokane IndiansSpokane Indians vs. Eugene Emeralds. July 4-8, ThuSat and Mon at 6:30 pm, Sun at 3:30 pm. $5-$11. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. (325-7328) Amazing RaceScavenger hunt race through the Albeni Falls Dam campground. July 5-6 at 7 pm. Albeni Falls Dam Visitor Center, 2376 E. Hwy. 2, Oldtown, Idaho. (208-437-3133) Drag RacesOval track race. July 6 at 7 pm. $5-$12. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights, Wash. (244-3333) Negative Split Half Marathon and 5KHalf marathon and 5K race benefiting the Boys and Girls Club of Spokane County. July 6. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (208-806-1311) Lilac City Twilight Criterium Cycling races through the streets of downtown Spokane, including noncompetitive kids' and all-ages races. July 6 from 5-9 pm. $30; free to watch. Downtown Spokane. (270-8347) Pend d'Oreille Bay Trail HikeExplore the new waterfront trail around Sandpoint's waterfront. July 6 from 9 am-11 pm. Free. Sandpoint. (gdelgadillo@idahoconservation.org) Firecracker Mile SwimOne-mile open water swim benefiting local swim teams. July 7 at 10 am. $15. Ages 13+. Garfield Bay, Sandpoint. firecrackermile.com Barrel RacingHorse racing. July 9 from 6:30-9 pm. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho. (208-263-8414) Stand-Up Paddleboard Basics Learn about the sport and the equipment needed to start. July 11 from 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900)

theater

Jack and the BeanstalkMusical. July 3 and 12 at 6:30 pm. $5-$10. Performances held outdoors. Idaho Reperatory Theatre, University of Idaho, Moscow. (208-885-6465) Lookout, MullanOriginal play by Pat Grounds. July 3-28, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. All-ages. Sixth Street Melodrama, 212 Sixth St., Wallace, Idaho. (208-752-8871)

EVENTS | FOURTH OF JULY THE WIZARD OF OZ Performed by Sandpoint OnStage. July 5-6, July 12-13 and July 19 at 8 pm. Panida Theater, 300 W. First, Sandpoint. Panida.org (208263-9191) MARY POPPINS Musical based on the P.L. Travers story and Walt Disney film. July 5-14, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm and Wed, July 10 at 7:30 pm. $28-$42. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com (208-769-7780) THE MYSTERY OF IRMA VEP Satire. July 5-6, 19 and 24 at 7:30 pm, July 7 at 2 pm. $10-$20. University of Idaho, Hartung Theater, Moscow. idahorep.org (208882-6465) LET'S MISBEHAVE Musical based on the music and lyrics of Cole Porter. July 1011, 13 and 27 at 7:30 pm and July 14 and 21 at 2 pm. $10-$20. University of Idaho, Hartung Theater, Moscow. idahorep.org (208-882-6465)

VISUAL ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY Galleries and participating businesses display new art exhibits with live music and refreshments offered at some locations. July 5 from 5-8 pm. Free. For a map and complete list of participating locations, visit Inlander. com/FirstFriday or see pages 28-29. CLOSE-IN: ALLIE KURTZ VOGT Painting exhibition as part of a summer series featuring regional artists. July 9-Aug. 15. Artist reception on Aug. 15 from 5-6 pm. Gallery hours Mon-Sat from 10 am-4 pm. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone St. gonzaga.edu/jundt (313-6611) CHASE GALLERY ALL MEDIA JURIED SHOW Biannual juried art show, featuring work by 28 local and regional artists. July 9-Sept. 27. Artist reception Aug. 2 from 5-8 pm. Gallery hours Mon 8 am-9 pm, Tues-Fri 8 am-5 pm. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org (321-9614)

WORDS

BROKEN MIC Spoken word open mic night. Wednesdays at 6 pm. All-ages. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) TERI BROWN Book reading and signing by the author of "Born of Illusion." July 6 at 2 pm. Free. Auntie's, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) BOOTSLAM Poetry slam night, open to all ages. July 7 at 7 pm. $5 suggested donation. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) SAM LIEN LE "The Spirit Stills the Storm" personal memoir reading. July 9 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie's, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) CRAIG JOHNSON Reading of "A Serpent's Tooth: A Walt Longmire Mystery" by the author of the Longmire series which inspired an A&E original drama. July 11 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie's, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) TEAM SPOKANE 2013 SHOWCASE FUNDRAISER Fundraiser event to send competitors to the National Poetry Slam in Boston in August. July 12 at 7 pm. Allages. Free with donations accepted and a portion of book sales during the event benefiting the team. Auntie's, 402 W. Main Ave. n

MORE EVENTS

Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

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COEUR D’ALENE

Coeur d’Alene does Fourth of July right with not just one, but two days of events. Festivities kick off with the annual Kids’ Parade on July 3, and this year’s theme is “Celebrating Ironman” (the triathlon, not the movie). Kiddos strut their stuff through downtown Coeur d’Alene on foot, bikes and floats donning costumes and with pets in tow. A second patriotic parade begins downtown July 4 at 11 am. The party continues with live music, food and games in the City Park all day long. Lounge on the city beach or take your boat out on the water to watch the fireworks display over the lake, ending the day with a bang. Kids’ Parade, July 3 at 10 am; Fourth of July Celebration, July 4 from 10 am-dusk • Coeur d’Alene City Park • 115 NW Blvd. • cdachamber.org • (208) 292-1635

PULLMAN

Nothing quite beats a community barbecue and fireworks display to raise patriotic spirits. At Pullman’s Sunnyside Park, all-American grub will be served starting at 5 pm in the park shelter. Live music starts at 5:30 pm featuring the Pullman Community Band, and folksinger Dan Maher, and The Fabulous Kingpins take the stage at 7 pm to rock your socks off with classic rock ’n’ roll hits. The city of Pullman promises this year’s fireworks will be substantially larger than last year. The bigger, better, booming fireworks take off at 10 pm. Pullman Transit is offering free rides to and from the park, so skip the hassle of parking and take the bus. July 4 at 5 pm • Sunnyside Park • Old Wawawai Rd., Pullman • pullmanchamber.com • 334-3565

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Strawberry Celebration July 6th & 7th

Bring the kids and pick until your hearts content!

SANDPOINT

To some, there’s arguably no better way to celebrate ’Merica than in small town ’Merica. The Sandpoint Lions Club hosts its annual Fourth of July party starting at 9 am in Sandpoint’s cozy downtown. After you’ve had your fill of patriotic floats, grab family and friends and head over to City Beach. Take a dip in Lake Pend Oreille or spend the day on the beach catching rays while listening to live music and joining in games. At the end of the day, snuggle into a blanket while lying back in a chair to watch the firework show beginning at dusk. July 4 from 9 am-dusk • Downtown Sandpoint • sandpointlions.org • (208) 263-4118

SPOKANE

or call 238-4754

The people at Riverfront Park must bleed red, white and blue because they make Fourth of July one of the biggest events of the year. Jampacked with festivities, the park offers a bouncy castle, live music, performers, food and beer gardens. Plus, all of the usual games and rides in the Pavilion amusement area are at a discounted price ($10). For the kids, performances by Magician Dick Frost and Spokane Area Square Dancers can be found in the Children’s Meadow, and the Spokane Jazz Orchestra will headline the day’s musical entertainment. Make sure to stake out a spot to watch the park’s always spectacular fireworks display at dusk. July 4 starting at 11 am • Riverfront Park • 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • spokaneriverfrontpark.com • 625-6601 — COMPILED BY MYCHAELA NICKOLOFF MORE FIREWORKS DISPLAYS Coeur d’Alene Casino, Worley Diamond Lake, Newport Harrison, Idaho Priest River, Idaho NE WA Fairgrounds, Colville

For more information go to

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Pavillion Park, Liberty Lake Silver Mountain Resort, Kellogg Silverwood Theme Park, Athol Sunnyside Park, Pullman

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Happy 237th Bir thday America!

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1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Jeers

Downtown GoodwillI was sitting on the bench, you smiled at me and looked back. I’ve never seen anything so beautiful in my life. I would love to take you on a date.

years now and I hope it never ends. I love you Whitney 7/10.

Love of My LifeI saw you 3 years ago and I have been seeing you in my dreams ever since. You are the love off my life and can’t stop thinking about you. I can’t take my eyes off of you. Now I see you every morning and I love the sunshine you bring to life every day. JCERB, will you marry me?

day, every day. You, speed up, straight at my car and turn into the spot. I threw my hands up out of fear then as you slow down stealing my spot I flip you off. (Sorry but you scared the living crap out of me coming head on at 20 miles an hour.) I drive up, dreading to find a spot, find one a bit down the way. I get out of my car and as I am walking into the store, on the phone, you decide to stand in the entrance and taunt me. Clearly I was on the phone and had to move, but you had to be a little baby and continue to provoke me. So jeers to you, ugly couple in Walmart, may you have a crappy day.

Applebees On Pines I saw you Wednesday, Jun 26th. You: Pretty with dark hair and told me I was really cute when you walked out. Headed out to parking lot, but you were already gone. Me: the person who you told was cute with shaved head and v-neck. Coffee or drinks sometime? Crossing Paths To the most beautiful red head, with eyes more magical than Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry. You have a personality that sticks out to the whole world. I hope to get the chance to hang with such an amazing person and her wonderful little black dog. I know we’ll cross paths again. Gas StationI saw you at the gas station across from SCC, Saturday, June 29th. You gave me A $1.00. Meet me at McDonald’s on Sprague Ave. 10:00 am for coffee?

Cheers

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707 W. Main St.Cheers to every one of you working at, going into, coming out of, or passing by, 707 W. Main St. during the noon to one o’clock Spokane Street Music Week rush. Your kindness, patience, good sports-man-ship, generosity, or simply, your basic tolerance was so greatly appreciated as I solicited your donations for 2nd Harvest Food Bank. The honor of being able to raise my voice to raise awareness for such a necessary cause is humbling. To those in a hurry who stopped, if only to listen, or in wonder of what was happening, thank you. To those who came out, invited, or curious, thank you. To those who silently reminded themselves of their own good fortune or health, and blessed each of us with simple acknowledgement, bless you. If you donated a dime or twenty bucks for “that one song”, know you made a great difference just by noticing we were there. Thank you and please always remember, every one on the street has a voice, not just we, who, once a year during our special week, are lifted by the gifts you offer. Every penny matters. Your kindness is most important. Blue Dress Busker 4 Years and StrongWe’ve had our ups, we had are downs. We’ve had mad days, sad days and glad days. But no matter what happens I will always say ‘I Love You’ at the end of everyday because Baby you take my breath away. Some love stories are good and some are great, but our love story has been going 4

Always On My MindIt’s what started it all and even after so long the hold is still there. Saw your picture this week for the first time in awhile and the song played in my head all day. Find myself comparing all others to you. I hate the way it ended, I was stupid and I’m sorry. Look forward to seeing you again over a cup of coffee on a cold summer day. My Wonderful Husband I just wanted to get a cheers out to my wonderful husband! You do so much for our little tripod family and I couldn’t appreciate you more! I applaud you, good sir. Keep on being a badass, Jesse! To The Caring Staffat Holy Family

To connect

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” Hospital. Their smiles and positive attitudes helped me through a difficult time during my shortterm stay. Not only was the food good and the care was excellent, any concern I had was dealt with quickly and efficiently. Good SamaritansCheers to the couple who found my purse that was lost at Costco and turned it into customer service. Thank you, thank you, thank you! You are my hero! You all made my stress-filled day bearable. I am so glad that there are still honorable, trustworthy people in our community. May you all be truly blessed. Responsible Dog OwnersCheers to responsible dog owners who are care about their pets and don’t just leave them in the backyard all the time once they’ve grown tired of them. Jeers to lazy, irresponsible owners who just ignore the dog and irritates the neighbors with its nonstop bark, bark, bark. Have you folks ever heard of muzzles? Chicken Wiggles! this 4th of July we celebrate our two year anniversary. I’ve been happier than I’ve ever been since you came into my life and this fall you and I will be welcoming a new person into our family. I couldn’t ask for a better man and future father to have in my life. I’m so proud of all of your recent accomplishments, together, we have a bright future, you, me, the pugs, and our little miss. I love you BeepBoop! Happy Anniversary! - SillyPants

Big Phatty Cheersto Jim of the Deaconess ER! My wife came in with a raging migraine and your awesome personality and humor was well received and a good dose of natural medicine. We have been there a few times and everyone was great but you sir have raised the bar. We thank you for your kindness and understanding and for you rushing things along. I hope you are well taken care of like you took care of my Queen. Sincerely Mr, Mrs & lil’ “Australia” My Wife!You are my wife until the end if time. You’ve made my life great and worth while. We have been together this long and I hope we keep staying that way. I couldn’t imagine life without you. You’re the first person I wanna see in the morning and the last person I wanna see at night. You have given me happiness and love and life. I never knew I could love someone so much. I didn’t know love could be this true. When I see you, I melt like butter and when you kiss me I get butterflies. It’s kinda weird knowing I could love somone as much as I love you! Happy Anniversary my wife! 7/10/10 ar wm forever Thank You So Much!I was parked on Monroe and I had to walk to City Hall. I forgot to put money in my meter, and I realized this when I was on the 4th floor of City Hall! I hurried back to my van and there was 30 minutes on the meter! Thank you so much, you saved me a good bit of money! Happy Birthday!to my beautiful wife. I love you more than the words can ever express. Thank you for all you are. I love you.

Jeers

Scammers To the man who scammed me outside of Atticus, congratulations on destroying my meager faith in humanity. I kindly loaned you $40 so you could buy gas for an emergency, return, and repay me (with a tip in your own words). I waited at Atticus for over an hour, but you never returned. Yes, undoubtedly, I was uncommonly naive, but you, sir, are nothing more than a common carptetbagger. I hope you run out of that gas and get into a tragic automobile accident. Moral Compass Jeers to the ignorant woman I met at the bus stop who treated me like I’m a thug deserving accusation and concern from people ‘cause I’m big and dress differently. As you defend people in front of you who are inconveniencing people by driving the wrong way in a parking lot and parking across 3 spots. Apparently your moral compass is based off appearances instead of actions, its a shame you can’t get a ticket for going down the wrong side of that road. The Badger STA Passengerswho won’t leave the windows closed. If it is hot outside and the driver has the air conditioning on for a change, please leave the windows alone. You don’t

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Rude CoupleTo the rude couple at the north side Walmart on June 24. It was my day off. After running around town I had finally made it to my final stop, Walmart. I was pulling into the parking lot and saw a spot, I turn so I can back in and park. After working 60kknd hours this week, I finally had a day off and was very excited to find a spot so close to the door since my feet hurt from standing at work, all

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Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

deserve to make the rest of us suffer because you supposedly feel car sick, or the bus “smells weird”, or you’re from Hillyard and you hate air conditioning for some reason. Sure, if you open a bunch of windows it feels nice sometimes when the bus is moving. But then it gets hotter inside the bus every time it slows down or stops and how does that help anybody? There are lots of things people can try first before sabotaging the bus’s climate control, such as taking off a layer or not sitting in the last row of seats right in front of the engine (the rest of us shouldn’t be punished because your butt got warm). But nobody ever does that stuff. Instead, they open every window they can get at and make it like a hot yoga class inside the bus. Next time, how about at least waiting a few minutes for your bodies to adjust instead of going straight for the windows? Especially if you’re only going for a short ride. You can tough it out and deal with whatever your issue is for ten or fifteen minutes.

Unsupervised ChildrenJeers to the college band at Art Fest for the incredibly disrespectful behavior during the Philip Boulding harp performance. This professional musician who makes his own harps and travels from the western side of the state with all his instruments and gear for his one hour of stage time must have posted a sign when he took the stage that read: “Any egocentric jackass that wants to come up here while I am playing please do so because I love distractions”. First it was the two drummers setting up gear because they probably were late to the park. Then one by one others would walk up to place some item by a music stand or to place the sheet music on a stand to make sure it fit on a stand. The worst part for him (which he confided to me after the performance) was the constant chatter and laughter from the band members hanging out in back of the stage. One of the ring leaders was a boy in a red jacket, but many were involved. It’s not required that you appreciate all genres of music, but you could at least act like a decent human while the preceding performer has the stage. If basic manners are included in the measure of musicians I would rate you as hacks. It’s not too late to improve. Why don’t you all hand write an apology letter to Mr. Boulding with a request that he return next year for a better reception? I hope my annual donations to the media dept. do not find a path to the music dept.

time. I am still timed on how long it takes to from the time you pull to the speaker box to the time you pull away from the window. As distorted as I sound to you over the speaker box, you are 10 times more distorted on top of all the noise going on inside. Please let the driver order. The further away from the speaker you are the harder it is to hear you. Remember that I am only one person taking your order, cashing out the order ahead of you and making and bagging your order. If you happen to be at an establishment that has a menu board before the order box, stop there and figure out what you want. Also use that time to make any phone calls that need to be made. Remember, I can hear your conversation about what and who you did last night. Please, just treat me with the common respect that you would want to be treated with if you were in my position.

Birthday Cake ThiefJeers to the thief who stole my birthday cake out of my car last night. I hope the one bite you took out of that double-decker cake was worth my window repair fees.

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Jeers To Me!For guilting the young man who played his heart out at hoopfest. My thought process was that the victory was shallow if won on a technicality. I was completely wrong and my action lacked class. I sincerely apologize to the blue team, and my sons team. I am very sorry.

Hands Free?To the drivers in this town who hold their cell phones while talking on speaker. It’s called the “Hands-free law” not the don’t hold a cell phone up to your ear law. There is no difference from holding a cell phone inches away from your face than it is to have it Rude Drive Thru Customers on your face. I won’t say you look First off, working at a fast food ridiculous, just trying to help you restaurant does not make me any out. Do the research and read the less of a human being than you. fine print. What does WA State You do not need to yell at me Smelly At The GymDuring workouts when I say that I can’t hear you. Try law enforcement say? That using at the gym I get pretty winded, and turning off your engine. If I make a your phones speaker function is the last thing I need is someone’s mistake on your order, there is no okay, but the phone needs to be perfume smell to choke on. For the reason to scream and yell at me, placed down and not held or you life of me I do not understand why just tell me that I made a mistake. If can get that $124 citation. Just they would be wearing perfume to I don’t answer your question about be happy you don’t live in King work out. It is very offensive, and I prices right away, just give me a County, they don’t allow activities hope they do read this and realize second. I do not have the entire such as wrangling children, putting that people don’t want to smell it at menu memorized. Just because on make-up and eating. the gym! Deodorant is fine. there is no one behind you in line is no reason to take your sweet RE: Donation “No”The “if everyone would eat right” comment may be insensitive to men who suffer from N A B Y R P prostate cancer and their family M A C B E T H O S E members, but I have often had L A D S W E A T E R the same thought when asked H S N A N S V E R E K L W A the same question at Safeway. E A U G N E The truth is: manufactured food I S I S K N A B is killing us all and driving our W E E B E W I T I N medical costs into the disappearing H E D G E P E U G E O T ozone. Bad eating habits and bad R E E S E S HIS WEEK’s S A T E T food may be causing and/or O D S ! P S R R A E E exacerbating cancer, heart disease, ANSW W Y A T T R T C diabetes, allergies, asthma, autism, U R G E S I M E O N fibromyalgia as well as causing D E S I R E D R A E N A an explosion (sorry) of intestinal M U M S R E N S I disorders. We don’t need corn W I L L E P M C R syrup and palm oil in everything. R A T T R I E O P L We don’t need meat and dairy W E T H E P E O O N products every day. Watch or read H I L L A X C O N O I N D Forks Over Knives. And pry the can R S E D N I T K E N of Coke out of your hand! T S A THE PEOPLE Rude PeopleTo people who talk during the student speeches at commencement exercises. Your lack of manners and common courtesy prevents those around you from hearing the speeches. Also, if an older person is looking for a seat, allow her to have the aisle seat. The rules prohibited saving seats.

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JULY 4, 2013 INLANDER 53

Rain or Shine Hoopfest goes on PHOTOS BY TREVOR PATRICK

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