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OCTOBER 3-9, 2013 | FREE

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It Takes a Village AS OFFICIALS TAKE ON “STREET KIDS” IN DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, WHAT MORE COULD WE BE DOING? OUR KIDS

THE FACE OF DOWNTOWN SPOKANE’S BOGEYMAN 22

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HOW OTHER NEWS OUTLETS ARE COVERING THE ISSUE 29

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SIZING UP FRANK STRAUB’S FIRST YEAR AS POLICE CHIEF 32


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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

DO YOU FEEL SAFE IN DOWNTOWN SPOKANE?

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SEAN DAY I feel plenty safe in downtown Spokane because there are a lot of people around and I’m not really here too often. … I just come here to hang out with friends or go get some food or go to the mall.

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Yeah I do feel safe when I’m around Main Street, but when you go to Riverfront Park, it gets a little dangerous. We have a lot of kids — we don’t know where they’re from — and you don’t know what they’re up to. So I don’t think we have enough police out here to take care of that issue.

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HEIDI HANES I used to live here in Spokane and I now live in the Tri-Cities, and I think I’ve never felt unsafe walking around downtown Spokane, but I’m usually here with friends or just here to shop or get coffee. I’ve never had any scary moments or anything.

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CAITLIN PRANTLE I feel safe here. I don’t hear anything in the news like there’s anything really bad going on, but… Why do you feel safe? When I’m with a group of friends, I feel really safe because we’re all just connected and stuff. I never hear of any burglaries or killings or anything, so I guess I feel OK.

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Yes, I feel safe in downtown Spokane. I come downtown a lot and even though there’s a lot of homeless people down here, I don’t feel like they’re going to hurt me. They just need help, and sometimes, a little bit of cash to help them out in the end.

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INTERVIEWS BY EMERA L. RILEY 9/29/2013, STARBUCKS, DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

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he Cathy McMorris Rodgers 2014 reelection campaign is underway — more than a year before the election. Most recently, she held a fundraiser where, if you paid enough, you could actually shake hands with House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. While on “recess,” she did manage to wedge in a quickie town meeting — providing all of 48 hours notice to the public. But why does our congresswoman even think she needs all this campaign loot? It’s worth mentioning that a sizeable amount of it comes from the much more affluent west side of the state — places like Mercer Island and Sammamish. Through four reelection campaigns, she has never seriously been challenged. The 2000 redistricting helped her out in the Fifth District, and her party has further benefited from the growing suburbs in the Spokane Valley. But still, does it follow that Democrats can’t even confront Rodgers on her record? After all, she serves in the leadership of the consensus worst Congress in American history, now staring at an 87 percent disapproval rating. You would think that this news alone would provoke a good debate. Consider: Two years ago her House, for purely ideological reasons, refused to pay the country’s debts, which resulted in a downgrade of credit and a loss of confidence worldwide. Now they threaten to repeat this stunt, just after they force a partial government shutdown by holding up the necessary continuing resolution (which they need because they have failed to pass the necessary appropriation bills).

E

stimates are that the Rodgers’ congressional antics in 2011 cost the taxpayers an estimated $1.3 billion, made all the worse by the sequester. Shouldn’t she be asked to confront her own record and her role in producing it? And then there are the issues that directly affect Spokane and the Fifth District: She and her party voted to gut the Community Development Block Grant program. Spokane has 10 CDBG neighborhoods. (You have to be very poor to qualify.) In addition to funding home rehabilitations, this program has played an important role in the renaissance we see in Browne’s Addition and Lower Perry. She apparently takes the position that such projects constitute wasteful spending. And let’s not forget food stamps, also on the block for deep cuts. Never mind that her constituents are among the most needy in the state: It’s as if she confuses her Fifth District constituents with her affluent west side supporters. On Mercer Island and up in Sammamish, most have never even seen a food stamp. Oh yes, while voting to cut food stamps, Rodgers continues to support farm price supports. Of course she does. As a member of the leadership team, she

6 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

organized votes to “defund” Obamacare more than 40 times — which, in addition to being a waste of time, detracts from the serious business of governing, e.g. passing appropriation bills. When asked to explain her obsession, she answered, “Because it won’t work.” This would be news to every European country — Germany has had national health insurance for more than a century. Then there’s Canada, New Zealand, Japan. And don’t forget Massachusetts and Hawaii. And on and on. Let’s acknowledge that much work remains to be done on the health care front. Peter Orszag, former director of both the Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office, writing for Foreign Affairs, views the Obama initiative, while a good start, to be loaded with both risks and rewards. Cost containment, quality control, access, efficiencies — all will need more serious and bipartisan attention. Instead, all Rodgers’ House does is bay at the moon. What’s worse, because of their so-called “Hastert Rule” they won’t even risk members moving towards the middle. The Hastert Rule holds that unless her House GOP caucus supports a measure, she and the leadership won’t even bring a bill to the floor for a vote. As a result, they destroy the very basis of our political process. Madison sought deliberation and compromise. Rodgers’ party wants neither.

Y

et with all this going on, not one Democratic challenger has ever asked her to defend her record, nor the record of the Congress she now helps to lead. Democratic candidates have come off as more interested in winning the biannual Miss Congeniality Award than in forcing a serious debate. Perhaps they could try channeling their inner Harry Truman. I refer to Harry’s “Give ’em Hell” speech — the rousing 1948 campaign address delivered at Kiel Auditorium in St. Louis, during his final campaign stop before returning home to Kansas City to await election results. After denouncing all the personal attacks of the “saboteurs and character assassins” and the “do-nothing,” Republican-led 80th Congress, Harry hit them with his punch line: “Any farmer who votes against his own interests, that is, votes the Republican ticket, ought to have his head examined.” (Harry never was much for Miss Congeniality awards.) Democrats might substitute “Fifth District residents” and see how that works. 


comment | publisher’s note

A Little Bird Said… by ted s. mcGregor jr.

B

irds are amazing. When you look at them, you can’t figure out how they fly. The Wright brothers learned that their bones are light, their feathers perfectly arranged, but the physics of it all escapes me. Last Friday, one literally fell out of the sky in front of me. Thinking it was probably just hurt, I picked the little guy up. You don’t get a lot of chances to look at a bird up close — seams of scarlet along his wings, a long, sharp beak, penetrating eyes. He was a beautiful little reminder of the wonder of creation, but all the life had gone out of him. I carried him across the street to Riverfront Park, laid him down by a tree and covered him with some leaves. “Sorry, little buddy.” That moment stuck with me all day. Birds are supposed to fly, not fall out of the sky at your feet — not exactly a great omen to kick off your day. Like the stoner dude in that classic “Double-Rainbow” YouTube clip, I wondered: “What does this mean?” All over, weird stuff like that is happening — good and bad. Russia is helping us control chemical weapons, and Iran called the White House, you know, just to chat. Did not see either of those things coming. Ted Cruz reads Green Eggs and Ham aloud to America as a bedtime story before shutting down the government and unplugging the Panda Cam at the National Zoo. Are the inmates finally in charge of the asylum? The rest of my Friday was quite pleasant. I watched as the ribbon was cut on a new stretch of the Centennial Trail, big smiles all around. Locally, at least, we can still accomplish great things. Later, we had an open house, and I reconnected with old friends and made some new ones. We are social creatures and should figure out how to be happy together. Cleaning up after the party, we found a couple of kegs from River City and Orlison left over. The beer guys were down at the Craft Brew Festival at Riverfront Park and couldn’t pick them up. Knowing the cardinal party rule of “Waste No Beer,” I loaded them into my Subaru and drove down there. Rain was falling, and the crowd had dispersed; the brewers were huddled under a couple of tents, sharing their concoctions and some laughs. Social creatures, those brewers, and happy. I delivered the kegs, along with some leftover pita bread and tapenade, and walked back to my car through the misty drizzle. I stopped, realizing that same tree was just behind me. I went to look — maybe to complete the circle of my day. The bird was still there, under the leaves. I paused for a moment; mortality always clarifies your thinking. Strange world, great day, I thought. Thanks for the reminder, little bird, to just keep flying. n

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REVERSE MORTGAGE

COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

ASK ABOUT NEW CHANGES!

Would you be more likely to use public transit if Spokane had a train or streetcar system?

Larry Waters 208-762-6887 NMLS ID 400451

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RICHARD GUINN: Absolutely! I already use the buses.

JACK OHMAN CARTOON

LETTERS

MORE GUNS IN SCHOOLS?

Spokane Public Schools, in its lack of wisdom, has decided to arm employees in our schools beginning in January. It will be one of only two districts in the state to take this drastic measure to “combat” potential violence. These will not be police officers contracted with the District, but 13 “peace officers” who will be packing the guns. They will be trading their diplomacy for tools of destruction. I am concerned about the increase in militarization of our society and the message this sends to our children: “Resolve conflicts with guns.” For all citizens who are concerned, please join the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane and other concerned citizens in protest of this madness. We will be voicing our concerns at the school board meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at 7 pm. LOUISE CHADEZ Spokane, Wash.

REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK.

REFRESHING READ

I greatly enjoyed the article “Who Is Afraid of the GMO?” (9/26/13). I feel it is informative and evenhanded, with very helpful links. Refreshing to read good journalism and depressing to realize how public discourse on this and other issues is so impoverished. JIM MCFERSON Wenatchee, Wash.

WE’RE ALREADY EATING THEM

rivercityred. blogspot.com

8 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

Regarding “Who Is Afraid of the GMO?”: Almost everything we eat, with the exception of some fish and most shellfish, has been genetically engineered. Look at what corn used to be before it was genetically engineered — about the size of one’s little finger. Ever hear of a Jonagold apple? How about a pluot, or a nectarine? Same goes for broccoli, cauliflower and a host of other foods. Additional labeling won’t change most people’s buying habits. A large percentage of people don’t read labels anyway. I do read labels and look for certain ingredients now, like whole grains, amount of fat,

etc. Additional labeling will be just another reason to increase prices. HERB POSTLEWAIT Spokane, Wash.

GIVE SCIENCE MORE TIME

It’s all about controlling the food industry. If we look into the Monsanto crystal ball of the future, we see them holding contracts on almost every major farmer in the world. What would food cost us if that was to happen? On March 14, 1996, Dr. Marion Nestle, a toxicologist who worked in one of the government’s regulatory agencies for 13 years, wrote an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine. She Send comments to sums it up this way: We don’t editor@inlander.com. have an understanding of the full range of hazards from genetically modified organisms. “This technology is being promoted, in the face of concerns by respectable scientists and in the face of data to the contrary, by agencies which are supposed to be protecting human health and the environment.” My take on any new technology is that, no matter how exciting they may be (i.e. cellphones), they must be looked at with the utmost caution. Time must be allowed for scientists and unbiased agencies to have a clear understanding of all potential side effects before they are introduced to the public and our environment. There are more than 1,600 different species of microorganisms in a teaspoon of soil, and scientists should know that they cannot predict the effect of a new organism on the ecology and environment. Meanwhile, lobbyists try to rewrite world safety standards in favor of biotechnology. I am hoping that the voters in Washington state vote for Initiative 522 and see it as another scam by Monsanto and their group of associates for profits.

LETTERS

JOHN FITZGERALD St. Maries, Idaho

JEANNIE KIVETT MORS: No, just another amount of $$$ wasted. We are just fine with what we have. In fact, don’t they just keep cutting back bus service? JOSH MECKEL: Spokane downtown needs a fast efficient parkand-ride system that runs most of the day, so you can skip the parking issues downtown. LORELEI BARRETT: Yes, but none of us would be alive still by the time they would get it up and running. Still waiting on the North/South freeway. JANE TANFEI: I use STA regularly. A light rail using current railway tracks across the county and connecting to the STA bus (trolley) stops would be preferable. Not holding my breath. DON SPARKY BARBIERI: A fixed route (overhead electric trolley system as discussed) will fuel growth in the walkable blocks adjacent to the route. This has been proven in many cities in the U.S. and Europe. Great idea and affordable… Get it done. JAY COUSINS: A rubber tire trolley that loops the campus, downtown, Monroe Street to Garland and Browne’s Addition would likely have the ridership needed to be successful. Design-wise, it should have the feel of an historic trolley or streetcar. If it pencils out, switch it to electric later. … It needs to be accepted by the potential riders, it doesn’t need to be some one-of-a-kind dream system. It just needs to work. SHARON PEGAU: Would love to see light rail between CDA and the airport w/ stops in Post Falls, Liberty Lake, the Valley and downtown. HALEY CHICOINE: When in Portland I use their light rail. It’s simple and relatively quick. Always avoided the buses when possible. I vote light rail! 


OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 9


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COMMENT | SATIRE

It’s Inescapable M BY ANDY BOROWITZ

illions of Tea Party loyalists fled the United States in the early morning hours Tuesday, seeking what one of them called “the American dream of liberty from health care.” Harland Dorrinson, 47, a tire salesman from Lexington, Ky., packed up his family and whatever belongings he could fit into his Chevy Suburban just hours before the health-insurance exchanges opened, joining the Tea Party’s Freedom Caravan with one goal in mind: escape from Obamacare. “My father didn’t have health care and neither did my father’s father before him,” he said. “I’ll be damned if I’m going to let my children have it.” But after driving more than 10 hours to the Canadian border, Dorrinson was dismayed to learn that America’s neighbor had been in the iron grip of health care for decades. Turning away from Canada, Dorrinson joined a procession of

Tea Party cars heading south to Mexico. But halfway to the southern border, he heard through the Tea Party grapevine that Mexico, too, has public health care, as do Great Britain, Japan, Turkey, Spain, Belgium, New Zealand, Slovenia and dozens of other countries to which he had considered fleeing. Undaunted, Dorrinson said he had begun looking into additional countries, like Chad and North Korea, but he expressed astonishment at a world seemingly overrun by health care. “It turns out that the United States is one of the last countries on earth to get it,” he said. “It makes me proud to be an American.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | POLITICS

The Cult of Money I BY JIM HIGHTOWER

n case you’re wondering just how far Republican lawmakers have wandered into the wacky weeds of far-right ideology, check out the babblings of Rep. Paul Ryan. Chairman of the House Budget Committee, he has pushed feverishly for gutting America’s highly successful food stamp program. Why? Because, he rants, it’s a government giveaway that turns our safety net into “a hammock that lulls able-bodied people to lives of dependency and complacency.” A hammock? A person’s food stamp allotment averages under $4.50 a day. As for “able-bodied people,” does he not know that two-thirds of the program’s benefits go to children, the elderly and disabled people? In a society of gross and growing economic disparity, with mass unemployment and underemployment, food stamps are a minimal measure of our humanity and social morality. Forget the Paul Ryans — here’s the guy we should be listening to: “Excuse me if I use strong words,” he recently began, “but where there is no work, there is no dignity… We don’t want this global-

ized economic system which does us so much harm.” Pointing directly at the wealthiest elites who push relentlessly to shred government safety nets, he declared: “[Widening disparity] is the consequence of an economic system that brings about this tragedy, an economic system that has at its center an idol which is called money.” Such idolatry, he added, creates an economic culture that throws away the well-being of the many to enhance the fortunes of the few. “We have to say no to this throwaway culture. We want a just system that helps everyone,” he concluded. That’s the powerful moral voice of Francis, the Catholic Church’s new Pope, who ended his comments with a fiery prayer, calling on people to rise up against the “cult of money” and asking God to “teach us to fight for work.” Amen. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 11


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9/27/13 3:21 PM


Writing the Next Age Twenty years ago, Spokane’s Cyan released one of the most successful computer games ever. Then the story changed By Daniel Walters

I

n 1993, the same year that launched the bloody, demon-blasting computer game Doom, a tiny developer called Cyan from a mid-sized city called Spokane released a computer game called Myst. For nearly a decade, it held the title of best-selling computer game of all time. It did so without machine guns or combo-punches. It started quiet. Under a cloud of stars, a glowing book beckoned from blackness while the wind whistled. Open the book, place your hand on the picture on the first page, and get sucked into a multiverse of weird worlds, with fog-drenched forest boardwalks and red-stained torture rooms, a music-powered spaceship and a sound-nav-

igated subway car, obscure puzzles and hidden passages all rendered in gorgeous 3-D. In a double-wide mobile home on a hill in Chattaroy, Wash., three brothers created worlds. Rand Miller was the lead programmer. Robyn Miller designed the art. Even their kid brother Ryan, a senior in high school, chipped in, writing reams of backstory that became tomes in Myst’s in-game library. In the Myst mythology, creative types with the right grasp of language, with the gift for an eloquent phrase, can summon entire “Ages” — beautiful, strange and dark worlds — into reach. Not a bad analogy for the Miller brothers.

But they wrote a catch into the backstory. If the authors aren’t careful, the ages become unstable, the ground quakes, and the whole world collapses into nothingness. In a way, that’s what almost happened to Cyan.

Surreal Adventure

Rand Miller calls from New Mexico — appropriately, he celebrated Myst’s 20th anniversary at Carlsbad Caverns. The Millers knew they had put together a decent game. But they didn’t expect it to sell more than 10 million copies, to drive the adoption of the CD-ROM, or to land in the Museum of Modern Art’s collection of ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 13


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Tony Fryman, president of Cyan, says he’s excited about the company’s soon-to-be-disclosed Kickstarter project.

Sarah wurtz photo

“writing the next age,” continued... significant videogames. They didn’t expect it to be a game that would, two decades later, inspire a lengthy retrospective over its legacy like last week’s Grantland piece. “It was our little surreal adventure,” Rand says, echoing the game’s tagline. With profits soaring, they constructed headquarters that looked like something out of Myst. A jagged brick edifice that appeared torn out of the building’s face arched over the entrance, while waterfalls poured down rocks out back. Inside, artists worked beside a small library, under the stars of an artificial planetarium. Cyan had enough money for a nearly a limitless canvas for the sequel, Riven. “A painting is finished if you run out of money and run out of time,” Rand says. “[But] Riven, in a lot of ways, had kind of this unlimited budget. It was being funded by Myst.” The freedom was exhilarating; the pressure, exhausting. Riven was released four years later to critical praise. It was hyped in an epic-length Wired story, marveling over how a success like Myst could come from a isolated place like Spokane. Riven was longer. It was a lot harder. And it was the company’s last clear success. As Robyn, the artist, left the company to create more linear stories, Rand’s ambitions turned to “building something that would never end.” He was intrigued by massive multiplayer games like EverQuest, where thousands of players could play simultaneously. But instead of EverQuest’s addictive grind of killing monsters to get bigger weapons to kill bigger monsters, he wanted a different draw.

“What we were looking to do is to play on a different emotion: The human desire to explore. The reason you went to Carlsbad Caverns was to explore, to see what’s in the next cavern,” Rand says. “What I was looking for was drama and storytelling, like Lost instead of Family Feud.” While another studio created direct Myst sequels, it spent the next six years designing a multiplayer Riven follow-up, Uru. It set up an assembly-line workflow to constantly churn out new content. It constructed a sprawling complex across the parking lot from its headquarters to house a sizeable staff. They mapped out elaborate stories, created characters, planned ingame events. “The world would just get bigger and bigger, and you could explore with other people,” Rand says. It was a huge risk. A few massive multiplayer games have been towering successes; others have bankrupted entire studios. But Cyan never got the chance. In 2004, just as the game was about to be released, Uru’s publisher Ubisoft shuttered its entire online division. It was a huge blow to nearly six years of development. Most of Uru’s content trickled out in the form of single-player games and expansion packs, but Uru was never truly released in its intended form. “I think that you have to look at things that fall apart as things you can learn from,” Rand says. “You have to make sure that failures are just stumbles, and not complete collapses.” For a time, Cyan teetered on that edge. A year later, the company released one last game, Myst: End of Ages, then prepared to stop all active software development. “I remember


going into the conference room and saying that’s the end,” Rand says. “We don’t have anything in the pipeline. We’ll have to let everybody go.”

A New Age

Stars still shine down from the planetarium at Cyan, but on an empty hardwood floor. The artist hubs and the library are gone. Yet Cyan has survived. Soon after Rand announced mass layoffs, a Myst fan working for Turner Broadcasting System began putting together a deal to temporarily resurrect Uru online as part of its GameTap subscription service. It allowed Cyan to reverse its layoffs just as the first iPhone was released.

“We had people walking around like zombies. There was a whole air of ‘Anything we do for a while is going to be surviving.’” “I think the mobile platform came at just the right time,” Rand says. The company released a few original casual mobile games and the Myst games for mobile devices. In Cyan’s headquarters on a Thursday afternoon, the halls are mostly quiet. A few of Cyan’s remaining employees work on updating the Myst for modern PCs. To keep Cyan alive, the company ran a separate game-testing division, performed third-party work and rented out office space to separate companies. Some, like Ryan, felt their passion had been extinguished when Uru’s online component was canceled. “Morale plummeted. We had people walking around like zombies,” he says. “There was a whole air of ‘Anything we do for a while is going to be surviving.’ We were the patient with the IV drip, and there were times you said, ‘You know what, you need to pull the plug.’ This is not the life you want to live.” Ryan left Cyan and became a pastor. On Sundays, he preaches in the building once intended for Uru’s development, now converted into a church. But for the first time in years, he says he sees a pulse at Cyan, as the company prepares to launch an ambitious project through Kickstarter. The world of gaming sits in a strange position. Publishers outlay multimillion-dollar budgets hoping to get billion-dollar returns. It took Myst more than three years to sell 3.5 million copies. The most recent Tomb Raider reboot sold that amount in just one month — and its publisher considered it a disappointment. But at the same time, thanks to digital distribution methods, publishers are less relevant than ever. “From a business perspective, not having a publisher is pretty sweet,” Cyan’s president Tony Fryman says. In a way, the fans have become the publisher. Tim Schafer, who designed humorous adventure games during the Myst era, asked fans for $400,000 through Kickstarter last February to make another vintage pointand-click adventure. They gave him $3.3 million. And few fans are as passionate as Myst die-hards. They continue to fly into Spokane from around the globe for semiannual “Mysterium” conventions. They obsess over the series’ fictional language, one couple inscribing a “D’ni” phrase on their wedding rings. Last year, an Australian fan spent $10,000 creating a real-life replica of the Myst Book that allowed the entire game to be played in the book’s small window. Rand says Cyan plans to launch its own Kickstarter project, a sci-fi successor to Myst, as soon as next month. At this point Rand won’t reveal the title, but he offers this image as a teaser: A white picket fence and an old farmhouse on a strange and alien world, without explanation for how they arrived. “In this particular game that we’ve designed, you end up being placed on another world that” — Rand laughs cryptically — “that’s very intriguing.” n danielw@inlander.com

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 15


news | digest

PHOTO EYE Cutting a NEW PATH

need to know

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

Amid gridlock over the Affordable Care Act, which took effect this week, lawmakers refused to pass a new budget or extend the current one, shutting down the federal government for the first time in more than 17 years.

2.

A new indictment against jailed developer Greg Jeffreys claims he and his wife used an inflated appraisal to get a bank loan to purchase parts of the Ridpath Hotel.

3.

After two hours of testimony and debate over family values and human anatomy, the Spokane City Council voted against an ordinance that would have required employees, like those at lingerie coffee stands, to cover up.

4.

In the home of a Spokane man accused of stalking his neighbor, federal agents discovered a stockpile of weapons and writings in which the man called himself “God’s wrath” and referenced a “kill room” like that in Dexter, a TV series with a serial killer as its hero.

TREVOR PATRICK PHOTO

Friends of the Centennial Trail Director Loreen McFaul, Parks Director Leroy Eadie, Park Board President Randy Cameron and Greenstone CEO Jim Frank and COO Jason Wheaton celebrate the grand opening of a newly completed stretch of the Centennial Trail on Friday. The new section winds through Kendall Yards and under the Monroe Street Bridge to connect with West Bridge Avenue. The project was paid for by both Greenstone and state grant funds.

digits

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%

The unemployment rate in Spokane County, the lowest in nearly five years, according to new state data.

400

5.

The Spokane City Council approved a reorganization of the city’s Parks Department, creating eight new exempt positions, for which employees will be appointed instead of hired through the civil service process.

On inlander.com What’s Creating Buzz People who attended last week’s hearing on a proposed coal terminal in western Washington, which would require transporting coal through Spokane.

DRONES: New reports show the FBI used a Predator drone in Eastern Washington to collect aerial photos of the home of Kevin Harpham, the man who attempted to bomb Spokane’s MLK Day parade in 2011. Details on the blog.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

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Fairchild deals with the federal shutdown; plus, the roll-out of Obamacare Fallout

Nearly 550 civilian and non-active duty military employees at Fairchild Air Force Base faced immediate furloughs Tuesday as the base halted all non-essential services in response to the government shutdown. Military officials report about 300 civilian Department of Defense employees and 248 inactive Air National Guard members had received furlough notices by Tuesday afternoon. All active-duty personnel and “excepted” civilian employees will continue to report for work. Base officials emphasize emergency, security and mission-essential operations will not be interrupted. However, the base commissary, library, teen center and other services expected to close until further notice. “The government shutdown is extremely disruptive to the Air Force and Fairchild operations,” a news release states, “but our 24/7 mission will continue unabated.” Non-excepted DOD employees placed on “emergency, no-notice, no-pay” furloughs will not receive retroactive back pay for missed days without later approval from Congress. Fairchild Air Force Base serves as the largest employer in Spokane County. Greater Spokane Incorporated President Rich Hadley says civilian employees make up about 20 percent of the Fairchild workforce. He says any local economic impact will likely depend on how long the shutdown lasts.

“We have a lot of federal employees in this region,” Hadley says, adding, “We already have sequestration. … It’s really unfortunate.” — JACOB JONES

Technical Difficulties

Washington’s online marketplace where consumers can compare and shop for health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act went live on Tuesday, but not without a few hiccups. Users reported problems loading the exchange website wahealthplanfinder.org and completing their applications, forcing officials to take down the site shortly after it debuted at 7:30 am. By 2:30 Tuesday afternoon, the site was back online, but loading very slowly. Deanna Davis, the executive director of Better Health Together, a nonprofit organization leading Eastern and North Central Washington’s network of in-person support services, says technical glitches on the first day of open enrollment should have been expected. “Just be patient,” she says, “and call us.” If you’re having difficulties using the Healthplanfinder website, you can call Better Health Together at 1-800-819-2993 to set up an appointment with a trained “in-person assister” who can help you weigh your options and sign up for insurance through the exchange. Open enrollment ends in March 2014 and plans

Dozens of parents camped overnight outside Prairie View Elementary Monday night, hoping to snag a kindergarten spot for their sons and daughters. This isn’t the first time spots have been in such high demand. “This has been going on for at least three years,” says Jared Hoadley, executive director of student services for the Mead School District. About 30 parents lined up outside the school at 4:30 pm Monday, according to KREM, ready to wait until 8 am the next morning for 2014’s kindergarten registration at the school. Hoadley says Spokane County projections originally indicated the elementary would be about half full when it opened in 2007. Instead, it was completely full. In the last decade, the Five Mile area has boomed, as developments have popped up in the once rural community. “There were more students than anybody anticipated,” Hoadley says. “We run over 600 students.” There are 80 slots for kindergarten students, but because children with siblings already attending Prairie View get priority, around 40 slots have already been taken. Kindergartners in the Prairie View boundaries who don’t get a spot will be bused to other elementary schools in the district. They’ll get a chance next year to apply for first grade at Prairie View, but even that won’t be guaranteed. Hoadley says the Prairie View principal arrived early in the morning to deliver donuts and coffee to the campers. The district knows it has to do something about the growth in the Prairie View area. “We probably will have to run a bond to build another facility,” Hoadley says. “There’s a current facilities review committee looking at that very issue.” — DANIEL WALTERS

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 17


NEWS | SOCIAL SERVICES

Marty and Julie McKinney are holding an open house at their shelter on Saturday. samuel Sargeant photo

Keeping the Faith Truth Ministries homeless shelter will stay open for now, but its future remains uncertain By Deanna Pan

M

arty McKinney is a rock of a man. At 45, he’s gruff and heady, wearing a black “Git-R-Done” ball cap over his bare head and a Duck Dynasty T-shirt. He could be a Robertson brother, but with a shorter beard. McKinney scans the room. There are 22 familiar faces at Truth Ministries homeless shelter tonight. Only one guy is new. McKinney doesn’t forget that 20 years ago, he could have been one of them. “Got any good news today?” he asks. A young man with a long goatee and a few missing teeth breathlessly describes a job lead, doing construction work for guy he knows. (“He’s talking big,” he says. “Time will tell.”) Another young man says he’s starting school at Spokane Falls Community College in two weeks. His plan is to study computer engineering, and his dream is transfer to a big-name school. (“Stanford or MIT,” he says.) McKinney asks who wants to lead this evening’s prayer. A recent transplant from Los Angeles volunteers. Head bowed, hands together, his voice is rich and clear as water. “Heavenly father, thank you for Marty and his wife, Julie, and Truth Ministries for helping us out,” the man says. “Without them, I don’t know where we’d be.” Nearly two dozen men shout, “Amen!” One by one, the men file into the dining area, sign their names on a clipboard and donate a dollar if they have it. Dinner tonight is hot dogs, potato salad and a bag of Doritos. Dessert is chocolate cake. Blue, a pointy-eared blue heeler, lolls on the floor near the cafeteria tables, her dark eyes fixated on the men’s paper plates. Three weeks ago, Truth Ministries was on

18 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

the brink of closing. The shelter sleeps 50 men per night — and even more as the nights get colder — on a $60,000 annual budget. It’s one of three men’s shelters in the city. Scraping together enough money to operate Truth Ministries has always been a challenge for owners McKinney and his wife since they opened the shelter 10 years ago, but it’s gotten harder to elicit donations after the economy collapsed five years ago. Last month, the McKinneys needed $2,800 to cover utilities and repairs, but their accounts were empty. They didn’t know where or who to go to for extra funds. At the time, McKinney said it’d take a miracle to keep them from closing their doors for good. “I’d come to a place where my faith was in question, my belief in what we were doing,” he says. “When you’re not supported for what you do, it makes it pretty tough to keep doing what you’re doing.” At a bucket drive two Saturdays ago, their miracle happened. McKinney, wife Julie and a slew of volunteers raised $3,000 in cash and spare change from drivers at Browne Street and Spokane Falls Boulevard. But even though their bills are paid through October, the shelter’s future is far from secure. In November, Julie McKinney says, “it starts all over.” “This is our life,” she says. “I don’t think we’re asking for too much. We’re just asking to get by.”

I

n his much younger days, McKinney roamed the Northwest with his rock-and-roll band. They looked like the guys from Poison — long-haired and spandex-clad — and thrashed like AC/DC. He was drinkin’ and druggin’, headed


toward divorce and desperately unhappy. One night 20 years ago, his sat in his room, alone save for a bottle of sleeping pills, a half rack of beer and a dusty, paperback Bible. “Something changes,” he thought. “Or I’m bailing.” He read the New Testament and he prayed — consistently and ritualistically for months. Reading the Bible, he says, saved life and his marriage. A decade ago, McKinney quit his job in construction to dedicate his life to ministry. He, his wife, their son and some friends used to walk downtown from 7 pm until 2 am, delivering homemade sandwiches to the homeless and talking about God. They’d start at Division and Sprague and head west before looping around Crosswalk, an emergency shelter for teenagers, at Howard and Second. One sack of burgers turned into more than 200 sandwiches — PB&J, tuna fish, bologna, all kinds. It wasn’t long before their ministry had a brick-and-mortar home. “God gave us that fire,” Julie says. “And we couldn’t stop.” They moved their shelter to its East Sprague location in 2005 after losing a lease on their downtown building. A local businessman gave them the keys and a generous mortgage. The space used to be an antique emporium, and it still looks like one. Lattice garden panels skirt the walls near bunk beds with mismatched blankets and pillows. Thrifted couches and used office furniture surround blackbox TVs. Retro glass figurines and potted plants line the shelves. A fissure in the ceiling crackles and leaks. Their neighbors down the street are mostly abandoned, boarded-up storefronts. Occasionally prostitutes dawdle nearby with their pimps. Last week, on the night of a fundraiser at Carr’s Corner, someone chucked a trash-bin lid into their window. But for the McKinneys, this place feels like home; these men are their family. They spend holidays and birthdays here. When someone moves out, breaks an addiction, gets a place of his own, a job and a family, their pride is palpable. When someone dies, their pain is real.

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or the men who stay here, Truth Ministries is a temporary respite, a step in the right direction. Police and hospitals will call in the middle of the night and send the McKinneys men who Union Gospel Mission down the street won’t take, or when House of Charity on Pacific Avenue is too full. Guys come in drunk and high, without an ID. But McKinney’s an adherent to the school of tough love. He doesn’t expect them to go cold turkey, but he demands that they work toward it. “We’re not gonna pull any punches or powder anybody’s tushes. We’re not here to change diapers,” Marty says. “We’re here to say we want to be there for you, but you have to do the work.” That’s exactly what the McKinneys are doing. They’d like $5,000 a month to cover the expenses of running the shelter and their own income.They don’t need much. McKinney does odd construction jobs on the side for money. Julie McKinney worked as a caretaker for an elderly woman for 10 years and at a Fred Meyer deli for about a month this summer. They’ve never made a real salary from the shelter before, but they’d like to, so they can run it full-time. Eventually, they plan on opening low-income housing for their boys if they can raise the funds to do it. “To just give up and walk away and let everything we’ve done for the last 10 years go… ” McKinneys says, his voice trailing off. “We’re not giving up without a fight.” Fifty men will be back on the streets if the shelter is shuttered. Truth Ministries doesn’t have the budget Union Gospel Mission has for advertising and marketing, or the institutional support and government grants that keep House of Charity afloat. This weekend, the McKinneys are holding an open house at the shelter to convince the public that the work they do for the homeless is worth the community’s support. “If [anyone is] interested in seeing what we do, we open every night at 8 pm. We’re here at 7 pm,” McKinneys says. “Don’t tell us you’re coming. Just walk in the door and watch. You’re gonna see the real thing.” n You can help Marty and Julie keep their homeless shelter running by sending a check to P.O. Box 901, Mead, WA 99021 or donating online at gofundme.com/4a1q50. Truth Ministries is holding an open house this Saturday, Oct. 5, from 2-4 pm at 1910 E. Sprague Ave. (Come through the back door.) Call 509-4562576 for more information.

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 19


City of Spokane

news | rural life

TRANSPORTATION PLAN UPDATE

Share your vision for the City’s Transportation System Tuesday October 8, 2013 6:00-8:00 PM Student Union Building 17, Room 107 Spokane Falls Community College W. 3410 Ft. George Wright Drive Park in Lot P9 or take STA Route 20 or 33 For More Information: www.spokaneplanning.org/chap4.html Contact: Kathleen Weinand at (509) 625-6146 or kweinand@spokanecity.org

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20 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

Haunting a Ghost Town Unofficial mayor John Elwood is one of the last residents of Elberton, Wash. BY MATT BENOIT

J

ohn Elwood lives in a town that no longer exists. Where churches, hotels and homes once lined the streets, now remain the few forlorn fragments of an Eastern Washington ghost town: an old cemetery; a boarded-up brick church; an unused railroad trestle straddling the banks of the Palouse River. Elberton, Wash., is a place where the pavement ends and the past begins. “Rather few people really get the opportunity to live in a rural setting in the Palouse country,” says Elwood, 62, who lives in a century-old home with his wife, a cat named Tom Kitten, and two dogs, Barkis and Pip. Elberton, 60 miles south of Spokane, is one of only two Washington towns in the past 50 years to disincorporate, or give up its official status as a town. Two others, Gold Bar and Mesa, have recently mulled disincorporation due to budget issues. Although Elberton is now a quiet residential community of less than 15 people, it was once, as Elwood puts it, an “up-and-comer.” The town got its start in the 1870s, and succeeding decades brought rail service and growth. With a population of 500 at the turn of the 20th century, Elberton enjoyed an economic boom spurred by a sawmill, a flour mill, acres of prune orchards and a four-furnace fruit dryer said to be — at one time — the largest in the world. The town also hosted the famed Elberton Picnic — a three-day, fair-like event so big that former presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan once attended to give a speech. After a while, though, hard times befell Elberton.  

Decline and demise

The demise began when the local sawmill moved to Idaho after exhausting local timber resources. A fire in 1908 and flood in 1910 destroyed por-

tions of the town. Eventually, Elberton’s flour mill closed, and prompted by improving transportation to larger towns, so did the rest of its once-thriving business district.  Largely residential in the following decades, Elberton’s population shrank to less than 70 by 1966. That year, after a series of bridge repairs exceeded the town’s operating budget, the town disincorporated. When a town disincorporates, the majority of its assets and powers are transferred to either the county or state. In Elberton’s case, a 1969 grant allowed Whitman County’s parks and recreation department to take ownership of most of the former town’s land. The county envisioned turning the site into a county park that doubled as a living history museum, but a lack of finances sidelined those plans. Today, a few residents and a ropes course, operated and maintained annually by the Palouse River Counseling Center, are the only active portions of Elberton. “It’s just sad that the little town had to die,” says Bill Stern, 66, who grew up on his father’s farm just outside Elberton’s city limits. Stern recalls a childhood spent playing games in front of an old general store that’s now a bare foundation with a derelict basketball hoop. Children would swim in the Palouse River during the summer and ice skate on it during the winter.   Charlotte Mundell, 71, was raised in Elberton and remembers Sunday school classes at the stillstanding United Brethren Church, built in 1913. The classes were held in the basement, which filled with mud after a 1996 flood.  

Little House on the Palouse

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John Elwood’s Elberton home was once the town’s polling place. by D.A. Davidson, Elberton’s last official mayor who ran Elberton’s final business — a general store — until the mid-1970s.   Stepping into Elwood’s home is like stepping back in time. There are no computers or televisions. In the kitchen sits a cast-iron stove. On a nearby wall hangs a gray rotary phone. Hanging near the front door, on an enclosed porch, is a framed 1944 voting poster. Elwood found it in an old shed on his property. The house, he says, once was Elberton’s polling place. Elwood’s doorbell, repaired using a bell from a tricycle, is indicative of the remodeled and somewhat cannibalized nature of his home: various parts and pieces — including a brown-andgray, paint-cracked backyard door taken from a painter’s former residence — were removed from other unoccupied area homes. In the backyard — not far from where Elberton’s picnic grounds once featured a dance pavilion, grandstand and horse-racing track — are several sheds, wooden swings, two gardens and a chicken pen.

matt benoit photo

During the summer, Elwood and his wife sleep outside in a wooden pavilion situated near a sheepherders’ wagon that’s now a sauna. Although the Elwoods originally paid rent to the county to live in their home, the rest of Elberton’s rental homes were eventually abandoned or burned as training exercises for local firefighters. Today, the couple is only responsible for the house’s upkeep. “It’s only here because we saved it,” says Elwood with a laugh. “And when we’re done with it, my guess is that [the county] will be, too.” Until that time, however, Elwood likely will be content as Elberton’s “mayor,” keeping tabs on the old church, admiring the land’s natural beauty, and telling anyone who’ll listen about this nearly forgotten part of the Palouse. n This article was provided by Murrow News Service, which is produced by journalism students at the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 21


Harleigh Coulter, outside Macy’s in downtown Spokane, says she’s pregnant but would rather sleep on the streets than go home to her family. In the foreground, her friend Dillon Green.


OUR KIDS, >>OUR PROBLEM WHO ARE SPOKANE’S “STREET KIDS” AND WHAT DO THEY NEED? STORY BY HEIDI GROOVER | PHOTOS BY YOUNG KWAK

C

ool fall air swirls around Harleigh Coulter as she sits among nearly everything she has. Someone hands her a half-gallon of Tropicana and a can of pizza-flavored Pringles; someone else lights her Camel cigarette and says, “I’ll be right back, sister.” At 22, with crooked teeth and icy blue eyes, Coulter doesn’t have much. But she does have hope in the extra heartbeat tucked under her three layers of long sleeves. She’s six weeks pregnant, and other than the morning sickness, she’s giddy. Ask her where she’ll be this time next year and she’ll paint a picture of a house with enough room for her and the baby, her “baby daddy” and her street brother, Dillon, plus a fenced yard for Dillon’s Husky mix. But for now, Coulter’s sleeping on the street, in a park or down by the river. She’s not without parents. In fact, she still sees them both. But they’re going through their own hard times, she says, and she doesn’t want to burden them. Anyway, her stepdad is unpredictable. She describes yelling and mental abuse, the kind that doesn’t leave bruises, but gets under her skin and makes her heart race. The kind, she fears, that could cause her to miscarry from stress. “My friends know that when I’m stressed — they know how to calm me down. They know how to take care of me when I need it,” Coulter says, sitting on the cold sidewalk beside the Macy’s building downtown. “Sleeping on the streets, depending on where I’m sleeping, there’s the sound of the river, if we’re down by the river. That actually calms me down a lot. Sometimes even cars going down the street help me sleep.” She and her friends see themselves as a family. They look out for each other, and they say they’re angry when they hear about violence from other young people that’s giving

them, and downtown, a bad reputation. They panhandle and ask for leftovers, and admit they smoke pot, but say they’re not looking for trouble. Some struggle with anger or mental health issues as serious as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. For some, living on the street is their best option. For others, it feels like their only one. Dillon Green, 20, carries a bulky backpack with clothes and a blanket hanging from the side as he pushes his dirty-blond hair straight back out of his eyes. Four years ago, he was put into foster care because of his parents’ meth use. Soon, he dropped out of school. Some nights, he couch-surfs; on others, he sleeps somewhere downtown. This morning, he woke up in Riverfront Park. He’s too old for Crosswalk, the youth shelter, and he doesn’t get along with older homeless men in other shelters who, he says, can be violent. Green says he’s been confronted by cops while hanging out with friends in Riverfront Park and told they couldn’t be there in such a large group. On a recent fall day, as downtown employees scatter for lunch, Green and his small “family” move from the planter near the Olive Garden on Spokane Falls Boulevard to outside Macy’s and back to the park. “Sometimes we ask for leftovers because we’re hungry,” Green says, acknowledging complaints from business owners about “street kids” downtown. “They can get over it.”

MEDIA

The group returns to celebrate their cowardly act like they’ve just scored a touchdown.” HOW OTHER NEWS OUTLETS ARE COVERING THE ISSUE 29

POLICE

We are not going to arrest our way out of situations downtown.” SIZING UP FRANK STRAUB’S FIRST YEAR AS POLICE CHIEF 32

At times in recent weeks, it’s seemed a sleepy town has awoken to find itself a city with a gritty urban downtown under siege. TV reporters muse about the new boldness of a roving group of “street kids.” Business owners blame their closures on the same group. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 23


Cover Story | Downtown

Dillon Green skates behind his mixed breed dog, Katara, toward Riverfront Park: “Sometimes we ask for leftovers because we’re hungry.”

“OUR KIDS, OUR PROBLEM,” CONTINUED...

The mayor says he’s “angry” about violence in the city’s core. Indeed, few on the streets downtown are angels, “street kid” or otherwise. As midnight approaches on a crisp Thursday and Coulter’s group panhandles outside the darkened Ridpath Hotel, others down the street, mostly in their late 20s or 30s, explain their own home-

We’re not trying to move them on. We’re trying to move them into a life that’s better for themselves.” lessness and meth addictions. They look over their shoulders. One trades marijuana for a cigarette. Another wears a black necktie to indicate he’s got “a product to sell.” Bar patrons inch toward the far edge of the sidewalk as they pass the group. Just a block away and two weeks earlier, a KXLY cameraman caught video of a teenager punching a man, knocking him to the ground and running away with other teens, laughing the whole time. That night, the same group reportedly broke into and stole from Sport Town near Main and Stevens. Last

24 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

summer, a bouncer at the nearby Jimmy’z on Sprague said he was jumped by a group of 20 teenagers after getting off work, landing him in the hospital. And within the past year, the owners of both the 3-month-old cafe Beignets and downtown mainstay the Blue Spark blamed their closures on young loiterers. Up a few blocks, at the skate park under the freeway, even experienced young homeless people say the violence and drug use are too rough to risk. But the statistics alone warrant a closer look at downtown. There have been small increases in some types of violent crime: two commercial robberies to last year’s one; two more assaults than there had been by this time in 2012. But violent crime overall — including homicide, rape, robbery and assault — is down nearly 5 percent citywide and about 12 percent downtown. And while property crime is up across the city, it’s down downtown. On a weeknight in the downtown core, marked and unmarked officers patrol. During the day, bike cops and officers on foot are out too. “Overall, I believe our downtown is safe, but … I am not pleased with where we are at this point,” says Mayor David Condon. “We have a significant amount of work to do.” Bridget Cannon, programs director at the downtown youth shelter Crosswalk, says the problems of downtown aren’t new, though she blames media and social media for exaggerat-

ing them this year. She points out that Crosswalk keeps kids overnight, so those punching Satellite patrons aren’t also staying at her shelter. Late last month, she and the shelter’s kids gathered to talk about recent violence. The kids were worried they’d get lumped in with those making trouble, Cannon says, so they suggested signing pacts of nonviolence or doing a downtown cleanup. Cannon calls teenagers and young adults on the street “completely disconnected, meaning they’re not enrolled in school, they’re not employed, they’re doing absolutely nothing.” And changing that may be harder than it seems to most. Cannon points to a difficult job market and the problems people can face renting a house or apartment without a job. “I’m not making an excuse by any means [for those who are violent],” she says, “but if you want to know who they are, that’s part of the picture.”

The fear alone has been enough to spark a community discussion, with business owners, police and the City Council taking action on the threat — real or perceived — they believe the so-called “street kids” pose. First, businesses took matters into their own hands. Across the street from the Macy’s


where Coulter and Green sat, on the fourth floor of the Chase Bank building, the lighting is low and elegant in the entryway to Kiemle & Hagood, where a copy of the Wall Street Journal sits on the coffee table. The property management company oversees the Peyton Building on Post Street, where manager Alison Bantz has taken extra measures to respond to groups of people congregating on the sidewalks nearby. Adjusting her neat orange sweater, Bantz is careful with her words. “It’s not illegal to be homeless and I appreciate that. It’s not illegal to smoke and I understand that,” she says. “But I think the general business public wants to feel safe on the streets.” Bantz says large groups of smokers and loiterers began to congregate on the sidewalk outside the building, intimidating potential customers, when the nearby STA Plaza closed its smoking area last summer. (STA now says it plans to open a new one.) Despite state law outlawing smoking within 25 feet of a business entrance, lax enforcement has meant the law has had little impact. So the company spent $1,500 on a mosquito — a device that emits a high-pitched sound designed to be heard only by people younger than 30 after they stand near it for more than a few minutes — and about $15,000 since April on private security guards. Bantz says she didn’t renew the lease for the smoke shop that had occupied the building in another effort to curb the problem. With a vacancy in the building and at least one tenant, Career Path Services, accessed by people with disabilities, the measures were essential, she says. Bantz says she had trouble renting the vacant space, now home to the new bar the Volstead Act, because of the loitering. Among the building’s other tenants: Brews Bros Espresso, the police department’s new downtown precinct and a Cougar Crest Winery tasting room. “Nobody wants to sit inside tasting wine and — it was not an appealing sight looking out on that,” she says. The block is also the most direct path for people staying downtown to get to the area’s biggest retail center. “Our concept,” Bantz says, “is that as you come from those Davenport properties, [Post Street] should be the cleanest, nicest, most attractive entry to River Park Square.”

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Before a small crowd of reporters and city staff last week, City Council President Ben Stuckart touted a group of city efforts he deemed the “Downtown Livability Initiative,” which is made largely of projects already in progress. Among them: a set of ordinances the council passed Monday; a plan to hire 25 new police officers, which the mayor proposed in his 2014 budget; a Downtown Spokane Partnership-led PR campaign to discourage people from giving money to panhandlers; and STA’s plans to reopen the smoking area. The city, Stuckart announced, will also turn streetlights on earlier and urge the federal government to fund youth outreach programs. Early next year, the DSP plans to hire a consultant to assess services available in downtown, deciding what’s successful and what’s not. DSP President Mark Richard sets the stakes: 1,300 business and property owners, 26,000 jobs and 15 percent of Spokane’s taxable retail sales happen downtown. The ultimate goal is to discourage both panhandling and outreach programs DSP sees as offering “handouts” instead of connections to services. (Some local shelters are also pushing back against panhandling by temporarily barring people they catch “flying a sign.”) “We’re not trying to move them on. We’re trying to move them into a life that’s better for themselves,” Richard says. “To me, this is way more more humane than a nonprofit that wants to hand them a tarp under the bridge and say, ‘God bless you. I love you, man. Go back under the bridge.’” The ordinances passed this week span issues in the downtown core. Changes strengthened rules prohibiting skateboards on downtown sidewalks and “unruly” behavior at the STA Plaza, including any “conduct that is inconsistent with [its] intended use and purpose,” and will allow the city to cite property owners who don’t remove graffiti from their buildings within 10 days of being notified. The other laws created new misdemeanor offenses for inter...continued on next page

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Cover Story | Downtown “OUR KIDS, OUR PROBLEM,” CONTINUED... fering with health care facilities by blocking entrances or disturbing the peace within the facility, or knowingly calling 911 in a nonemergency situation. (Misdemeanor offenses mean an officer can make an arrest or write someone a criminal ticket for which the person must appear in court; failing to appear results in a warrant. Laws against trespassing and “transient shelters” can also result in misdemeanors for the homeless.) A provision outlawing possession of vehicle prowling tools like a slim jim or a shaved key was postponed this week, pending a final legal review. A controversial extension of the city’s sitlie ordinance also was on the docket until com-

“We need to get it right. ...

A lot of these young people are refugees in a way.” plaints arose over its constitutionality. The revisions would extend the hours that sitting and lying on downtown sidewalks is illegal from the current 7 am to 9 pm to between 6 am and 3 am, and would remove a clause in the current law requiring officers to warn people before arresting them for violating it. At an August public safety committee meeting introducing the ordinances to the council, police Sgt. Dan Waters described nighttime scenes where “normal people … can’t walk down the sidewalk. “If you want to go down there and feel safe,” he told the council, “you have to literally tip-toe around some sidewalks.” Some, including the ACLU of Washington, worry that expanding the sit-lie law would unfairly target homeless people and give police too much discretion in whom to arrest. DSP’s Richard and some councilmembers say they’d still like to see the changes. “We have to remember the primary purpose of a sidewalk is for walk and for movement,” Councilman Steve Salvatori said at

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Stuckart’s press conference. “We cannot watch our sidewalks be managed in a way that our businesses close down. That is simply not fair. … We will do something.” But as the weather cools down and the groups downtown dwindle — and with estimates that it costs as much $120 a day to house someone in a local jail, plus the cost of a public defender — some argue criminalizing disorder is a waste of money. Worse, they say, it’s unlikely to solve the root problems causing young people to act out in the first place.

For a few nights this summer, the gym in the basement of downtown’s Central United Methodist Church, with its high ceiling and linoleum floor, was buzzing with about 40 boisterous teenagers jumping on trampolines and doing gymnastics. Rough pasts, life on the street — none of it mattered for a moment. “[Living on the street] is an ecosystem where kids are just learning to survive,” says Loli Kalua. Recreation can provide a break from that. From this basement, Kalua runs Change for the Better, a new outreach program that offers help for homeless people in need of a GED, an ID or help finding housing or a job. The group mostly works with adults, but has hopes to extend its reach to young adults and teenagers. As fall weather settles in, it plans to start midnight basketball here on Fridays. Kalua, who often houses “couch-surfing” teenagers her own children befriend, says the basketball program will be a temporary offering for young people on the street. But in the long term, she — and the group sitting outside Macy’s — hopes Spokane will create a youth center that consistently offers sports, videogames and positive adult role models who can connect with at-risk young people. Downtown’s youth-focused nonprofits, Crosswalk and Cup of Cool Water, do important work connecting people with education and resources, she says, but she wants to see activities to keep them entertained. “They’re screaming for a purpose, for a place to belong, for a reason to be and do,” Kalua says. “You’ve got to get ’em where they are, and that’s in the dirt.” Kalua’s isn’t the only effort.

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A once healthy, then defunded, street outreach program led by Crosswalk will return with newly awarded grant money. In East Central, Spokane police officers coached about 40 at-risk kids in a basketball league this summer as part of an ongoing youth-focused initiative. Momentum is building behind a local community court, where offenders could do community service instead of serving hard time for “quality of life crimes,” like public urination and graffiti. (Similarly, Clark County has a homeless court, where homeless people can work off fines through community service.) Spokane County’s juvenile court already has a state-mandated diversion program in place, targeting teenagers about four weeks after they commit low-level offenses. “That’s on purpose. We want to see what’s happened [since],” says program manager Scott Ryman, who says most of the kids he sees in the program have experienced childhood stress and a lack of role models. They’re connected with classes and community service in an effort to break the cycle. While he won’t share his personal views about downtown, Ryman says he’d like to see more community mentoring programs. “We need to get it right. … A lot of these young people are refugees in a way,” he says, but it can’t fall on the criminal justice system alone. “There is no silver bullet.” With support from private grant funds, Spokane Public Schools is piloting a new program for middle school students where teams of school and social service employees meet with parents whose children have four unexcused absences in a month. The team works to find and solve whatever might be keeping the student from the classroom, things like a lack of transportation or after-school care. (Washington’s Becca Law, named for a 13-year-old runaway prostitute bludgeoned to death in Spokane in the ‘90s, mandates that schools report children who miss more than five days in a month to juvenile court. Programs like this attempt to intervene before that point to keep the child in school.) And there’s hope in new commercial development, including Walt Worthy’s massive Convention Center hotel and Ron Wells’ plans to transform the Ridpath into apartments. Wells, whose development company

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On a downtown emphasis patrol, Spokane police officers talk with “Ace,” right, and Annette Carter near the Olive Garden. has restored historic buildings across the city, says he believes more people living in the core will create a safer downtown with more eyes on the street. “We had the same problem with street people … in the west end of downtown, at First and Cedar,” Wells says of the 1990s. “[Today] it’s much better. It’s completely new days. It’s a great neighborhood now, and the rest of downtown will be a great neighborhood as well. I’m confident.”

Elsewhere, some have been even more ambitious.  The Australian state of Victoria encourages planners and developers to use “Crime Prevention Through

Environmental Design.” The theory aims to make shared spaces feel safer by encouraging enough foot traffic to provide “natural surveillance” or designing buildings that are active enough to discourage vandalism or violence. One example: designing shops on the ground floor of tall office buildings.  Consider also efforts in the United Kingdom, where in some towns, social workers are plotting kids like data on a chart. They’re plugging teenagers into a matrix, listing interactions with social services, school and police, and calculating their likelihood of getting in trouble. The worst 50 or so make the list of kids they’ll try to help. The program was a response to a national report in the ‘90s criticizing the nation for its response to youth crime.

The “top 50” young people in each neighborhood considered most likely to offend or reoffend become the focus of the program and are offered sports, classes and mentoring. In its first two years, arrests among those identified in the “top 50” fell by 65 percent, and even among those who did get arrested after entering the program, they were arrested fewer times and for less serious offenses, according to a government review of the project. “You’re always going to get businesses concerned about youth if you get an incident or two where something goes wrong,” says Irvin Waller, a University of Ottawa professor and head of an international nonprofit for victims of violent crimes. Waller has studied crime preven...continued on next page

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Cover Story | Downtown “OUR KIDS, OUR PROBLEM,” CONTINUED... tion programs across the globe, and his book Less there. Despite early controversy and pushback, Law, More Order takes aim at public safety systems evaluations of the program have found it actually he says are reactive to crime instead of proactive decreases alcohol use and saves taxpayers millions in preventing it. “Targeting services is absolutely a year in emergency response to chronic street alwhat is needed, but the way we’re organized at the coholics. moment is policing of problem places, so you’ve “The data are accumulating and can no longer got youth who are a problem in an area [and] you be ignored,” University of Washington research get the police to come in and do something about assistant professor Susan Collins told the Associit.” ated Press. “Chronic homeless people are human Instead, Waller says, a successful approach is a beings who are equally capable of making positive comprehensive one. choices if given a chance.” “Police operate in a silo and their main tools The city is also home to a diversion program are responding to 911 calls and making arrests, some say could be one answer to problems here and they’re not very good at other things,” he in the Inland Northwest. As part of a pilot project says. Schools and service agencies are there called Law Enforcement Assisted other silos. “Models that solve these FEEDBACK Diversion, or LEAD, cops can offer sorts of problems find ways of getting How would you fix people they’re ready to arrest for drugs these silos to work together around the downtown? or prostitution (who don’t have violent Send letters to particular problem.” priors) an alternative: a meeting with a Getting groups at the same meeting editor@inlander.com case manager who will assess their needs table is just the start. Waller advocates and try to get them into treatment or for local governments to establish an ofhousing, bypassing the criminal justice fice — “in City Hall, not in the police” — to identify system entirely. The program, currently operating problems and potential solutions. only on certain days in one neighborhood, was  Across the Cascades, Seattle is a champion born out of a shared frustration over how many in the “housing first” movement, fighting to get people were being jailed for drug offenses and homeless people places to live, believing that stahow little of an impact doing time seemed to have bility can help them overcome other struggles. on their habits. The well-known 1811 Eastlake building takes the “We are now 41 years into the War on Drugs, theory a step further, providing “wet housing,” and it is objectively a failure,” says program direcwhere 75 chronic alcoholics are not, as they are tor Kris Nyrop, rattling off oft-cited statistics about in most programs, required to be sober to live ...continued page 30

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ow to a story you’ll see only on KXLY 4 News,” says Nadine Woodward, stonefaced, to the camera. “It shows how dangerous the streets of downtown Spokane have become.” The station rolls its exclusive video of a “victim knocked unconscious when he was sucker-punched by a street kid” outside the Satellite Diner late one night in mid-September. Then comes a package from reporter Jeff Humphrey in which he speculates the suspect may have been panhandling and then recounts the scene. “While the victim lies there unconscious,” he says, “the group returns to celebrate their cowardly act like they’ve just scored a touchdown.” The station’s coverage is part of the spectrum of local media coverage bringing questions about downtown safety to the forefront of community and City Hall discussion, despite clear evidence that crime is down in the city’s core. A story on KXLY.com introducing the video includes, without any authoritative or even anecdotal source, the assertion that “street kids [are] getting bolder and more violent as their acts go unpunished” and that “victims don’t like reporting that they’ve been bested by a group of kids, some of them not even old enough to drive.” The scene in the video — pleasure being taken in brutality — could haunt any viewer, but the station has used the footage,

which Humphrey has since called “the beatdown,” in at least six other reports, including those about nonviolent issues like panhandling. Woodward called it part of a “teenage crime wave that seems to be spiraling out of control.” Humphrey has called young people downtown “ne’er-do-wells” and ended one story saying, “Street kids still run the night here in downtown Spokane.” KREM and KHQ also have covered the issue, though from a count of their online story and video archives, with less fervor than KXLY. The SpokesmanReview ran a package of stories late last month about downtown’s “sullied image,” but columnist Doug Clark took a more alarmist tone, calling downtown an “open toilet” before detailing an hour-long walkabout he took to assess the state of things. Among his observations: stains on sidewalks, noisy skateboarders and 30 young people who told him they’re homeless. At one point he quotes from a Jeff Humphrey story, calling the area outside the Olive Garden “ground zero for rude, obscenity-shouting young people who have made loitering their full-time jobs.” By the end, Clark seems stunned by what his town has become, ending his column this way: “Time to leave this place of sadness and go somewhere to mourn for my city.” (In what seemed like a direct response, fellow Spokesman columnist Shawn Vestal then wrote a column about how he “walked through

downtown Spokane — and lived to tell about it.”) Social media extends the shelf life of these stories and creates an ongoing discussion where facts can fight for airtime. Media outlets’ questions about whether viewers and readers feel safe in downtown have created long comment threads where people rail against Spokane and “street kids.” Some say they don’t go downtown; others say they’ll go only if they’re armed. Blame shifts to bad parenting or bad governance; someone suggests shipping the kids to boot camp. “I think the media’s trying to raise consciousness — I would hope that’s their motivation — for the challenges that confront us downtown,” says Police Chief Frank Straub. “So let’s take that as a positive. Sometimes in the process of raising consciousness, you are also fueling fear a little bit.” Bridget Cannon, youth program director at Crosswalk, says she doesn’t believe young loiterers are a new problem. “What’s different is the media coverage, and that’s tied into social media stuff,” she says. “Now you have video cameras on phones. Before you might have heard about an issue; now people pull out their phones and you have video. … When you have a video, that does create a whole different sort of perception.” — HEIDI GROOVER

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Cover Story | Downtown “OUR KIDS, OUR PROBLEM,” CONTINUED...

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Downtown Spokane’s problems, real or perceived, could be the first chance to test the local movement branding itself “Smart Justice.” A coalition of social, legal and health advocates, Smart Justice proponents push for alternatives to incarceration and crime prevention measures, and they support a program modeled on LEAD. After the council proposed its set of downtown ordinances, Smart Justice advocates crafted a letter to the police chief, mayor and city council asking them to take the winter to consider alternatives before creating laws that could land more people in jail. Local civil rights attorney and Smart Justice proponent Breean Beggs says innovative thinking

could help solve downtown’s problems, and larger crime issues, in the long run. The necessary shift, he says, is from thinking only about a crime to considering the offender. It’s about asking “What do they need to not re-offend?” instead of “What is the morally appropriate punishment for their particular crime?” Smart Justice isn’t advocating leniency for violent criminals, but for those whose offenses are more minor, the group believes there are cheaper, better solutions. “If there is actual violence, if they’re being threatening or there’s property damage, they should be arrested,” Beggs says, “but if people are just in the area and not actually causing trouble, even if they’re counterculture or don’t look productive, they shouldn’t go to jail. There are better interventions. “I’m hopeful the city has kind of a different attitude and will look at improving things for everyone, instead of just scouring a few blocks.” Back at the downtown planter, Dillon Green reflects on his teenage years, on running away briefly and then dropping out. He says he doesn’t know where he’d be if those years had gone differently. He’s smart. The other night, he says, he had a conversation with another homeless man about physics. He doubts he would have ever enjoyed high school, but maybe he would have gone to college. Then, he adds, “I’d be one of the yuppies yelling at the homeless kids.” n heidig@inlander.com

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Cover Story | Police

Correcting Course S

pokane Police Chief Frank Straub calls it a “re-engineering” process. Throughout the past 12 months under his leadership, the Spokane Police Department has seen shake-up after shake-up, reworking everything from command structures to patrol strategies to vehicle decals. From top to bottom, Straub has replaced his entire executive staff. Officers of all ranks have shifted to new assignments and gone through expanded training. The department has updated how it tracks and responds to crimes throughout the city. Heading into his second year, Straub expects to continue a restless pursuit of reform. “What the community is going to see,” he says, “is a constantly evolving police department, one that never sits still.” Walking into a barrage of expectations last fall, Straub has weathered his first year well. While many local critics consider the department’s recent reforms long overdue, most community advocates have praised Straub’s efforts to repair the bitter relationship between the city’s police force and its citizenry. Straub has pushed new community outreach programs. He has embraced interagency partnerships and new accountability standards. He has lobbied for additional staffing and equipment. All while so far avoiding much of the scandal and dysfunction that plagued other recent administrations. “I think he’s done a great job considering the challenges he got himself into,” says Rick Eichstaedt, director

YEAR ONE SEPT. 10, 2012: With support from Mayor David Condon, the Spokane City Council approves Frank Straub as director of law enforcement, a temporary position until he can be commissioned and sworn in as police chief.

Amid high expectations, Frank Straub makes big changes, hits several bumps and looks to work yet undone BY JACOB JONES

of the Center for Justice, one of the department’s strongest critics. But many other challenges remain. Ongoing negotiations with the Spokane Police Guild have complicated efforts to adopt additional reforms. Crime rates throughout Spokane continue to run well above those of similarly sized cities. High-profile murders and multiple officerinvolved shootings have captured headlines and shaken nerves. And despite the department’s recent efforts to target downtown crime, business closures and public fears persist over renewed reports of street disorder and youth violence. “We have a lot of work to do,” Straub says.

W

hen Straub first took over the Spokane department in 2012, nine out of every 100 city residents could expect to be victims of a property crime. As most major cities across the country enjoyed falling crime rates, Spokane saw its property crime rates rise 13 percent in the years since 2000. Department crime records show citywide property crimes continue at about 5.5 percent above last year, with those numbers varying widely throughout different parts of the city. Meanwhile, violent crimes, such as murder or robbery, have dropped by about 4.9 percent compared to 2012. “I’m frustrated by the property crime issue,” Straub acknowledges. “We’ve basically been able to get it to a level and hold it to that level, but we really need to get it down.” Straub attributes most of the city’s property crime, in-

cluding the notorious vehicle theft rates, to drug addiction. The city’s northeast region, encompassing areas north of the river and east of Division, has endured a 17 percent rise in property crime this year. In May, Straub himself became a victim when his bicycle was stolen from his garage on the relatively safe South Hill. The downtown business core has struggled with its own issues. Beignets restaurant and the Blue Spark bar both closed in the past year, blaming loiterers and “street kids” for driving off customers. The Blue Spark in particular accused the police of ignoring its concerns. Driven by anecdotal observations and persistent TV coverage, downtown visitors have voiced uneasiness regarding late-night assaults, aggressive panhandling and other disruptive behavior. Straub argues he has worked closely with local businesses and the Downtown Spokane Partnership to increase the police presence in the city’s core and address problems. He advocates a collaborative approach, with community service providers teaming with street officers to move beyond just arresting troublemakers. “We are not going to arrest our way out of situations downtown,” he says. “Draconian enforcement is not good for anybody.” Looking at the numbers, Straub argues the department has made significant headway downtown, helping drive down violent crime by 12 percent compared to last year. Property crime has also dropped 1.5 percent. The West Central and eastern South Hill neighborhoods also ...continued on page 34 have seen decreases.

COMPILED BY JACOB JONES OCT. 8: Condon swears in Straub as police chief.

32 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

OCT. 15: The City Council approves a $350,000 settlement with Det. Jeff Harvey, apologizing for his temporary termination over a confrontation with a Fish & Wildlife officer.

OCT. 23: Condon and the City Council approve extending the contract for Police Ombudsman Tim Burns. His contract has since been extended again until August of 2014.

NOV. 15: Former Spokane police Officer Karl Thompson is ordered to serve more than four years in prison for excessive force during the arrest of Otto Zehm (pictured) in 2006. After being struck with a baton, hogtied and Tasered repeatedly, Zehm died in police custody.

DEC. 19: Assistant Police Chief Scott Stephens allegedly makes a threatening comment after being told he will be demoted to captain. Straub puts him on administrative leave the following day, pending an investigation.


SPD Chief Frank Straub: “We’re not going to tolerate abhorrent behavior in this police department.”

DEC. 20: After a year of public input and evaluation, the city’s independent Use of Force Commission releases 26 recommendations for reforming the culture and operations of the Spokane Police Department.

DEC. 21: Straub announces a new department-wide strategic plan and reorganization of the command structure, including demotion of Stephens.

FEB. 5: A Spokane police officer shoots and kills 52-year-old Jacob I. Dorfman, who was armed with a handgun during an early morning confrontation on the South Hill. The Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office later finds the shooting justified.

FEB. 12: Spokane voters overwhelmingly support Proposition 1 to give the police ombudsman independent investigative authority and establish a Police Ombudsman Commission to provide additional civilian oversight of the police department.

FEB. 18: Straub orders the closure of the Knitting Factory music venue in the wake of two shootings and other disturbances originating at or near the concert hall. It reopens a few days later.

MARCH 25: Northeast Spokane resident Gail Gerlach shoots and kills suspected car thief Brendon Kaluza-Graham as he drives away in Gerlach’s SUV, splitting the community over self-defense rights. Gerlach now faces a charge of first-degree manslaughter.

JACOB JONES PHOTO

APRIL 15: City Council approves $1.1 million in additional spending for officer cameras, equipment and training to help the department implement the recommendations from the Use of Force Commission. ...continued on next page

. . COMING 11 12 12 13 OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 33


Cover Story | Police “CORRECTING COURSE,” CONTINUED... Spokane Mayor David Condon, who brought Straub in to be a reformer and innovator, says his administration is dedicated to supporting Straub’s efforts to curb out-ofcontrol property crime. “Crime is the No. 1 issue, bar none,” he says. “That’s the one [effort] I’d like to see more progress on. … I’m not pleased with our crime rate.” Straub notes the department does not have any open homicide cases. Investigators have arrested strong suspects in all of the cases this year, he says, adding he plans to continue shifting patrols and personnel in hopes of disrupting some of those crime increases. He says a budget proposal to add 25 new police officers also would help. “My goal is that by the end of the year we’re going to be able to talk about a reversal in property crime,” he says. “In 2014, we’re not going to be talking about upticks. We’re going to be talking about how much we’ve suppressed crime.”

I

n his efforts to redefine the Spokane police, Straub says one of his most difficult tasks involved familiarizing himself with the tangled and troubled history of the department. Straub says he found a city and police force traumatized and divided over the 2006 death of Otto Zehm. Within weeks of arriving in Spokane, Straub saw former Officer Karl Thompson sentenced to more than four years in prison for excessive force in the case. “The history of the department is really very important,” Straub says. “Really getting to fully understand what happened in the Zehm incident — what led up to it, what happened … the leadership reaction to it — early on those were very important things for me, because really that has been the catalyst for why I’m here in many ways.” Overall, Eichstaedt says the Center for Justice and other community groups have been pleased with Straub’s efforts to seek public input and partnership. He says Straub has proven to be accessible and open to new ideas. Police officials now seem interested in innovation and adapting to best practices. Eichstaedt says Straub has voiced support for increased

civilian oversight and other accountability programs, such as the introduction of officer-worn body cameras. He also has expanded training certification requirements and sent supervisors to other departments for cross-agency training. “By changing the way the department looks at these issues,” Eichstaedt says, “it changes the culture within the department.” Logistically, Straub also has dramatically changed how the department monitors and reacts to crime throughout the city. Based on his experience in Indianapolis and White Plains, N.Y., Straub has shifted the department to a CompStat enforcement model, which uses crime data to strategically assign patrol officers to crime “hot spots” in different neighborhoods. The CompStat approach also includes weekly meetings between the SPD and other regional agencies to share intelligence on crime trends and repeat offenders. Frank Harrill, supervisory senior resident agent with the Spokane office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, ...continued on page 36

YEAR ONE continued...

APRIL 26: City officials announce a $190,000 settlement with Stephens, who resigns after 27 years with the department.

MAY 7: Officer Darrell Quarles is placed on administrative leave pending an internal affairs investigation. Quarles is later suspended for two months for “associating” with a woman with an extensive criminal history.

MAY 7: Officer Timothy Moses pleads guilty to lying to federal agents during the Otto Zehm investigation and resigns. A judge sentences him to 12 months of probation and a $2,500 fine.

MAY 9: Officer Jeff Graves is placed on leave over stalking allegations. Graves later resigns.

MAY 16: Spokane officers shoot and kill 21-year-old Justin Cairns at his home in Nine Mile Falls. Cairns (pictured) was a suspect in a fatal shooting earlier in the evening. The shooting remains under review.

JUNE 27: The Spokane Police Department opens a small substation along Riverside Avenue in downtown to improve community access and police presence. ...continued on page 36

...........

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Cover Story | Police

Meanwhile, in Indy T

hroughout Frank Straub’s year in Spokane, he has continued to make headlines in Indianapolis, where his short term as public safety director left him entangled in ongoing legal battles and a new dispute over its Regional Operations Center. Indiana media outlets have aggressively covered Straub’s handling of an investigation into David Bisard, an officer with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department accused of killing a motorcyclist in a drunken driving crash in 2010. Reports from the Indianapolis Star, Fox 59 News and other outlets say Straub oversaw many aspects of the investigation personally. Officials have testified Straub had investigators secretly record interviews and download emails. After the crash, one of two vials containing samples of Bisard’s blood went unrefrigerated for five months before testing, calling into question the management of the case. “I stand by the investigation,” Straub tells the Inlander. “I stand by the way we proceeded with it. That’s about all I’m going to say.” Bisard’s criminal trial starts Oct. 14, with Fox 59 reporting Straub is listed as a potential witness. When asked if he expected to testify, Straub said he would wait and see if that becomes necessary. In a blow against one of Straub’s proudest accom-

plishments, the city’s Regional Operations Center also closed last month for emergency maintenance. The multi-agency center, which houses IMPD headquarters and offices for other public safety operations, was forced to evacuate staff amid concerns the building could be unsafe. Straub spearheaded the development of the center in 2011 as part of the city’s preparations for its hosting of the Super Bowl. With the new maintenance concerns, the city faces a potential lawsuit over repair costs associated with its 25-year lease on the building. The Indianapolis police union, an outspoken critic of Straub, has called for an investigation into the matter. While he has monitored the issue, Straub says he believes the conflict will come to a reasonable resolution. He says he remains pleased with how the center facilitated the integration of security efforts surrounding the Super Bowl, and he expects future news stories to clear up the dispute. “By everybody’s standards, that was one of the best Super Bowls ever rolled out, both from an enjoyment factor and a security factor,” he says. “That is the opinion of federal law enforcement, local law enforcement and NFL officials. That Super Bowl was incredibly well protected, and it went off without a hitch. I’m very proud of that.” — JACOB JONES

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Cover Story | Police says Straub has emphasized the importance of collaboration, strengthening the already close working relationship between federal and local jurisdictions. “Straub brings a whole new fresh set of ideas to the table,” Harrill says. “We’ve all been impressed. … An excellent course has been set.”

D

espite the department’s progress, Straub has encountered a few personnel and minor media scandals similar to those that dogged previous Spokane police chiefs. The most prominent of those may have been the internal investigation and eventual $190,000 severance settlement with former Assistant Chief Scott Stephens, a 27-year veteran of the department. Meanwhile, longtime Officer Timothy Moses resigned in May after pleading guilty to lying during the Zehm investigation. Two other officers, Jeff Graves and Darrell Quarles, faced misconduct investigations. Graves resigned, while Quarles was suspended for two months. Straub says he has not fired anyone during his first year. He notes the department is also introducing a new

“early warning” program in Internal Affairs to help identify officers who may be having personal problems that could interfere with their job performance or judgment. “We’re not going to tolerate abhorrent behavior in this police department,” he says. “It’s just not going to happen. We have policies and procedures that are in effect, and our obligation as people who have taken an oath of office is to follow those policies.” In August, Straub was condemned by national media outlets in the wake of the beating death of World War II veteran Delbert Belton, allegedly at the hands of two teens. Quickly distorted with racial overtones, Straub says national pundits twisted the story to fit their agendas while local outlets stuck to the facts. With police guild negotiations stretching longer than a year and a half, community groups have also voiced frustrations over whether the drawn-out talks are delaying important reform efforts. Straub says he believes the negotiations are coming to an end, saying the guild has a responsibility to its members. He describes the guild leadership as “good partners”

who challenge him to carefully evaluate new policies or programs. Officer John Gately, the guild president, says the union has a good working relationship with Straub’s administration. Gately says the chief has shown he respects the guild’s perspective and fought for the additional officers the department needs. “He lets people do their jobs,” Gately says.

A

s Straub stood before the city’s Use of Force Commission in August, commission Chairman Earl “Marty” Martin commended him on the department’s progress during the first half of this year. As someone who has drilled down into some of the institutional problems of the Spokane department, Martin says he appreciates Straub’s dedication to improvement. “He’s clearly taken our recommendations very seriously,” Martin says now. Martin says he and other members of the commission have been pleasantly surprised by the steps Straub has taken to improve training, transparency and accountability.

YEAR ONE continued...

JUNE 27: SPD launches Spokane Police Youth Athletic League basketball program at Liberty Park, pairing officer and community leaders with at-risk youth for weekly games.

AUG. 6: Condon releases a preliminary budget recommending the hiring of an additional 25 officers.

AUG. 21: Straub highlights new reforms while delivering a six-month update for city’s Use of Force Commission on the department’s progress.

AUG. 21: World War II veteran Delbert Belton (pictured) is beaten to death in North Spokane, launching a multi-day manhunt for two suspected teens and sparking national controversy.

AUG. 22: Spokane officers shoot and kill 40-year-old Danny C. Jones outside the Salvation Army. The shooting remains under review.

SEPT. 23: City Council approves $730,000 of its previously allocated $1.1 million to purchase 220 officer-worn body cameras and upgraded Tasers for the department. 

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Martin says some of the reforms won’t be “quick fixes,” but Straub has moved the conversation back into a positive and constructive dialogue between the department and the community. “They’ve still got, as [Straub] acknowledges, some work to do,” Martin says. “But they’re off to a great start.” The Spokane Police Department expects to undergo additional outside scrutiny later this month as the Department of Justice launches its Technical Assistance Review of the department and its use-of-force protocols. Spokane officials announced the federal review earlier this year, but Joshua Ederheimer, acting director of the DOJ’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, says the funding did not come through until last week. Ederheimer says Straub requested federal experts examine the department’s use-of-force policy, its officer-involved-shooting protocols and its de-escalation practices. The review will not re-investigate any cases, but will look for trends that indicate potential issues. Only one other department, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, has undergone this type of review. Ederheimer calls the process a collaborative, “proactive” approach to evaluating a department’s policies. He expects the review to take several months.

S

pokane Police Ombudsman Tim Burns has watched the department evolve in the years since his office was created in response to the Zehm controversy. While he waits

to see what the city will do with the Proposition 1 effort to expand the investigative powers of his office, he says he remains encouraged by Straub’s start. “If you look at what’s been accomplished in a year, it’s impressive,” Burns says. “He’s made tremendous inroads with the community.” Looking at 2013, Burns says citizen complaints against the department have continued to tick up, averaging about 21 each month through August. Reported incidents of officers using force have also held steady compared to recent years. But Burns sees the tide shifting. “[Straub] needs to continue down the path that he and the police department are headed down,” Burns says. Straub says that’s his plan. He wants to keep adapting and moving toward improvement. In the coming years, he wants to hire more officers and build toward a precinct policing model that could locate multiple substations throughout the city. He wants to strengthen the initial bridges he has built with the community and incorporate new technology into crime-fighting efforts. He wants Spokane to become an example that other departments look to for inspiration. “We’re getting there,” he says. “It’s a slow process. It’s one that’s going to take the same level of energy and commitment for several years. And I think we’re committed to doing that. We’re going to get that done.”  jacobj@inlander.com

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The Visual Arts Tour features new venues, new artists this fall The Visual Arts Tour is back. The last time you saw this event was back in February when art-goers took to the streets of downtown and beyond in droves. This time around, you’ll find a bevy of new galleries and places turning into galleries just for the weekend. Take a look at the featured artists and then use the handy map to locate the pieces of creativity you want to check out. DETAILS ON NEXT PAGE

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 39


s t r A tour

Visual

WEST DOWNTOWN

Riverside

DOWNTOWN

Sprague First

16

Riverside

11 20

Main

32

31

29 Monroe

6

2

5

Madison

22

15

Second

Bernard

27

Cedar

21

Adams

Spokane Falls Blvd.

Jefferson

7

Third

Sprague First Spokane Falls Blvd. Main Second

Riverside

33

Bernard

16 23 10 24

First

I-90

Second

3

Division

Sprague

Third

Browne

Washington

Stevens

13

4

Howard

Wall

28

Post

12

Lincoln

Monroe

EAST DOWNTOWN

18

Third

1. “A” GALLERY PHOTO/ART

728 E. Sprague Ave. (not on map) PHOTOGRAPHY | Christopher “CJ” DeFeo

2. AVENUE WEST GALLERY 707 W. Main Ave. PAINTINGS | Valerie Woelk

3. BALLET ARTS ACADEMY

109 W. Pacific Ave. DANCE | Performance by the Ballet Arts Academy and guest stars

4. BARILI CELLARS

608 W. Second Ave. MIXED MEDIA | The painting, pottery

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5. BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. Railroad Ave. MIXED MEDIA | Ben Joyce and Bruno Seghetti

6. THE BRICKWALL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY

530 W. Main Ave. PHOTOGRAPHY | Jen Mitsuko and Larry Blackwood

7. CHASE GALLERY IN CITY HALL 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. MIXED MEDIA | Group exhibition titled “Birds In Art”

8. CHERRY STREET STUDIOS

1123 S. Cherry St. (not on map) PHOTOGRAPHY | “The House of Black and White” by Bill and Kathy Kostelec

9. CLEARSTORY GALLERY

1202 N. Gov’t Way (not on map) PHOTOGRAPHY | “Worth Fighting” by Jim Van Gundy

10. COMMUNITY BUILDING

35 W. Main Ave. MIXED MEDIA: Group show: “Crosspollination: When Conservation and Art Collide”

I-90

11. DODSON’S JEWELERS

516 W. Riverside Ave. PAINTINGS | Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey

12. GR CELLARS

906 W. Second St. PAINTINGS | “Sirens” by Carrie Vielle

13. INTERPLAYERS THEATRE

174 S. Howard St. PHOTOGRAPHY | Photography from Brickwall Gallery

14. JUNDT ART MUSEUM AT GONZAGA

15. KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY 115 W. Adams St. CERAMICS | The Archie Bray Resident Exhibition

16. THE LIBERTY BUILDING

402 W. Main Ave. MIXED MEDIA | Shows from Rachel Dolezal, Christina Deubel, River Ridge Fine Arts mixed media show, Monarc Arts Club, Mandala art, Manic Moon Steampunk Art

17. MANIC MOON AND MORE

502 E. Boone Ave. (not on map) DRAWINGS | Drawn to the Wall V

1007 W. Augusta Ave. (not on map) PAINTINGS | Melissa Cole’s “India: Land of My Father”

Blue Moon® Harvest Pumpkin Ale Braised Beef Short Ribs SERVES: 4-6 | PREP TIME: 5-7min | COOK TIME: 90min-2hrs | DIFFICULTY: Easy INGREDIENTS 4-8 Beef short ribs Salt & Pepper 2 bottles of Blue Moon® Harvest Pumpkin Ale 6 Cloves 1 tbsp. Ground allspice 1 tsp. Ground nutmeg 1 tsp. Whole peppercorns 1/2 cup Apple cider vinegar 3-4 tbsp. Honey (or molasses) 1 Large leek, chopped in large pieces 1 Carrot, chopped in large pieces 2-3 Yams, peeled and quartered

INSTRUCTIONS Salt and pepper short ribs. Heat a large skillet until almost smoking. Place ribs in the skillet and brown each side. In a large pot, combine the rest of the ingredients (withholding leeks, carrots and yams) and bring to a simmer. Once the short ribs are browned, remove them from the skillet and place in pot with the remaining braising liquid. Add the chopped leeks, carrots and yams. Cover. Let short ribs braise for 90 minutes to 2 hours over low heat. Remove from pot, and serve.


18. MARKET PLACE WINE BAR 32 W. Second Ave. PAINTING | “A Fresh Perspective” by Emily Travis

19. NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE

2316 W. 1st Ave. (not on map) MIXED MEDIA | Works from the MAC Art Auction 2013 — to be held Nov. 9 at the Davenport Hotel — are on display

20. PATIT CREEK CELLARS

822 W. Sprague Ave. MIXED MEDIA | Abstract Art, Cool Jazz & Hot Fashion

21. POTTERY PLACE PLUS

203 N. Washington St. PHOTOGRAPY | “phoTEXTography” by Neil Clemons

22. RIVER PARK SQUAREKRESS GALLERY

808 W. Main Ave. PHOTOGRAPHY | “Abandoned Places and Forgotten Spaces” by Dan Miller

23. SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. Main Ave. MIXED MEDIA | Bernadette Vielbig’s “Middle Ground” and Dan McCann’s “Skinny Boxes”

24. SARANAC PUBLIC HOUSE 21 W. Main Ave. COMICS | “The Art of NO!” By Nathan O’Brien

25. SHOTGUN STUDIO

1625 W. Water (not on map) PAINTINGS | John Thamm, Charlie Hamm, Paul Van Roy, Jared Anderson

26. SPOKANE ART SCHOOL

809 W. Garland (not on map) INSTALLATION | “Intuitive Chaos” by Larry Ellingson

27. SPOKANE DOWNTOWN PUBLIC LIBRARY

906 W. Main Ave. MIXED MEDIA | “Three Little Birds” by Ericka-Paris Reese, Constance Brockett Murray, Krystn Parmley

28. STEAM PLANT

159 S. Lincoln St. MIXED MEDIA | Work from Angel Gallery artists Charleen Martin, Patsey Parsons, Lori Hintz, Jason Waskey and others.

29. OLD MUSIC CITY BUILDING 1011 W. 1st Ave. EVENT | TERRAIN (See story in this section)

30. TINMAN GALLERY

811 W. Garland (not on map) MIXED MEDIA | “Still Vertical” by Harold Balazs and Mel McCuddin

31. TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. Adams St. CERAMICS | Gina Freuen, Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore

32. THE VAULT

120 N. Wall St. PAINTINGS/EVENT | The Black Tie Gatsby Masquerade and paintings by Kyle Mena

33. VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W. 2nd Ave. PHOTOGRAPHS | “Feeding the Soul “ by Michelle Inman

34. WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY’S BRYAN OLIVER GALLERY 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (not on map) MIXED MEDIA | “Compulsive Continuation: A Celebration of her 90th” by Pauline Anderson Haas

Art-y Party In its sixth year, Terrain has become a cultural powerhouse BY CHEY SCOTT

S

ix years in, it still strikes organizers just how much Terrain has grown since its grassroots inception. Although it’s become a can’t-miss night for many local artists and arts supporters, “every year we all cross our fingers that people will actually show up,” says event co-founder Ginger Ewing. And each year, she and co-founders Luke Baumgarten and Patrick Kendrick have expected the number of art submissions and attendees to flatten out, but both have continued to rise steadily. This year the annual, one-night-only showcase of emerging, local visual art, music, performance and interactive arts received roughly a third more submissions than last year from artists across the Inland Northwest, and some beyond. Naturally, as more artists across the region hear about the event and submit their work to the juried show, more curious people show up to find out what the hype is about. Baumgarten, a former Inlander staffer, estimates as many as 5,500 people attended Terrain last year. It’s unclear if that number will level off, but Terrain 6 is already the largest so far in terms of the amount of artwork both submitted and selected by the show’s jury of local established artists. More than 200 works of art from 103 artists are on display this Friday night, alongside film projects, live music, and spoken word and theater performances scheduled through the night.

As it’s been for the past several years, Terrain is staged in an otherwise vacant and unused space on West First Avenue that once housed Music City Spokane. But because of past shows’ high attendance, Terrain has caught the attention of the Spokane Fire Department fire marshal this year, prompting some pre-event panic among its organizers. Initially there was concern that the top floor of the building — a raw space of exposed brick and wooden support beams — wouldn’t be permitted for use this year. But after some fire code compliance issues were resolved, the second floor can remain open, Baumgarten says. Another concern from the fire marshal is ensuring the building doesn’t exceed its maximum capacity (a number Terrain organizers are still waiting for). Baumgarten expects there will be lines of people waiting to enter during the show’s busiest hours, which continue past midnight. Taking safety and the event’s growing crowd into further consideration, Terrain’s organizers received permission from the city to close First Avenue between Madison and Monroe Streets to traffic. Food trucks and other local vendors, as well as some larger art installations, will fill the street, and there are plans to set up speakers outside to project the performing bands’ (see more about Terrain’s music lineup on page 60) sets outside.  Terrain 6 • Fri, Oct. 4 starting at 5 pm • Free • Allages • 1011 W. First Ave. • terrainspokane.com

WHAT? SUPER ART SHOW! Check out Local Artist Derrick King’s Super Hero influenced artwork Limited edition hand pulled screen prints

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 41


CULTURE | WORDS

9 01 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 509.227.7638 5 09.227.7638

Spokane poets are ready to be on the world stage.

MEDIEVAL THEMED PROGRESSIVE ROCK BAND

Fri, October 4th|8pm

Rock and Roll Verse

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Rat bastards and hostage poems? Welcome to the weird, wonderful World Poetry Slam BY E.J. IANNELLI

Sat, October 5th | 7pm

A multi-media touring show about sex trafficking.

Sun, October 6 | 3pm

Friday, Oct 11 7:30pm & 10pm

Dress in 1920’s style!

Tour the theater while solving a murder!

SAT, OCT 12 7pm | $15 Drink at

Stay at

For Reservations Call: 509.747.1041 or visit www.hotelrubyspokane.com

*A $2 RESTORATION FEE IS ADDED TO EACH TICKET COST.

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42 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

I

n his poem “Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio,” James Wright spoke of high-school football players, sons of blue-collar men and women who “grow suicidally beautiful / At the beginning of October, / And gallop terribly against each other’s bodies.” For the past nine years, another kind of competition has taken place around the beginning of October in different cities across the U.S. and Canada. Though not as aggressive as football or as its name would suggest, the Individual World Poetry Slam (aka iWPS) nevertheless pits contender against contender until just one victor remains. This year the multi-day event of performances and workshops has come to Spokane. Isaac Grambo, the event manager for Spokane Poetry Slam as well as Host City Coordinator for iWPS 2014, says this simple fact offers multiple reasons to celebrate. For starters, iWPS is frequently held in the East. It was a minor triumph when a Northwest city, let alone a mid-sized one, secured the winning host bid. Also consider the recent tribulations of Spokane Poetry Slam. Despite the maturity of the local poetry scene and the unique involvement of area universities, the organization fell quiet for a year after the closure of the Empyrean, its longtime stomping ground, in 2011. Only this summer did SPS send a team — its first since 2010 — to participate in the National Poetry Slam in Boston. Grambo, an animated, mustachioed Boise transplant, was encouraged by veteran local poet Mark Anderson to make the bid for iWPS (pronounced “eye-whoops” in spoken shorthand) regardless. If nothing else, it would be an inventorial “exercise of seeing what we have in terms of a poetry community and in terms of a support community for venues and interest.” “So I filled [the form] out,” says Grambo, “and by the time I got done, I’d convinced myself that we can totally do this.” The acceptance call from Poetry Slam, Inc., the national body, came on New Year’s Eve — and with an added request: Could Spokane host iWPS in 2013, not in 2014 as initially planned? Clearly, Grambo — with help from Anderson,

Audrey Connor, Chris Cook, Teri Koski, Kurt Olson and Spokane Arts Fund program manager Karen Mobley — succeeded in doing so, lining up venues like Interplayers, Neato Burrito, Auntie’s and The Bing to host the various competitions. Poets — 72 in total — representing cities from all over North America are currently going head-tohead in bouts. A dozen of them will ultimately vie for the championship at the finals this Saturday. Hosting a national event like iWPS is an ideal way to pique wider interest in Spokane’s slam poetry scene, something Grambo sees as a way of countering the alienating misconception that slam is a closed shop. That’s because performance poetry, like, say, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, comes with its own jargon, etiquette and metrics. Take the judging process. “There can be things we refer to lovingly as ‘hostage poems,’” he says. “A hostage poem is something that is very emotional, but generally there is an accepted response. So if I’m doing something about cancer, you’re going to score that well. Because if you don’t, that means you like cancer.” As a result, mediocre poems with “hostage” topics can advance their orators in spite of themselves. And if the audience shouts, You rat bastard, you’re ruining it for everyone! in unison? That means a poet has exceeded the three-minute time limit. Fortunately, Grambo has prepared a handy iWPS reference guide to explain the “paradox of slam” and help newcomers feel more at home. Audience participation, he says, is a crucial aspect of performance poetry. “The stereotype of poetry is either guys in tweed jackets with leather elbow patches, or it’s beatniks and a lot of snapping and bongo drums,” he says. “Slam is a lot of cheering, yelling — and that’s just from the audience. It’s the rock ’n’ roll version of poetry.” n arts@inlander.com Individual World Poetry Slam • Through Oct. 5 • Various venues • Event pricing ranges from free to $60 festival passes • Finals: Sat, Oct. 5, 7 pm, at the Bing • iwps.poetryslam.com


CULTURE | DIGEST

FOOTBALL BY THE DIGITS %

90.2 1,052

PERCENTAGE OF IDAHO’S TOTAL YARDAGE QUARTERBACK AND COEUR D’ALENE NATIVE CHAD CHALICH WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR IN THE VANDALS’ 26-24 WIN OVER TEMPLE ON SEPT. 28. CHALICH, A REDSHIRT FRESHMAN, PASSED FOR 310 YARDS AND RAN FOR ANOTHER 114 TO SNAP THE VANDALS’ 10-GAME LOSING STREAK.

COMBINED TOTAL YARDAGE AMASSED BY EASTERN WASHINGTON AND SAM HOUSTON STATE IN A 49-34 SHOOTOUT IN HUNTSVILLE, TEXAS, ON SEPT. 28. SAM HOUSTON BEAT THE EAGLES FOR THE SECOND TIME IN LESS THAN A YEAR.

13

CONSECUTIVE GAMES LOST TO GONZAGA PREP BY SHADLE PARK HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE SHADLE THUMPED G-PREP 42-13 ON SEPT. 27.

1.71

INCHES OF RAIN — AN ALL-TIME RECORD FOR SEPT. 28 — THAT FELL IN SEATTLE, WHERE WASHINGTON STATE HAD TRAVELED TO HOST, AND LOSE TO, STANFORD AT CENTURYLINK FIELD.

September 19 - October 12, 2013

Box Office (509-455-7529) or TicketsWest (800-325-SEAT) and TicketsWest.com www.interplayerstheatre.org

— COMPILED BY MIKE BOOKEY

For Your Consideration BY DEANNA PAN

TV | Marvel’s AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D. premiered on ABC last week; so far, it’s living up to the hype. An offshoot of 2012’s megahit The Avengers, the series picks up where the movie ends: New York City is still reeling from a thrwarted intragalactic scheme to subjugate Earth and the public knows superheroes exist. It’s up to a secret team of international agents to investigate superhuman people and otherworldly weirdness. With Buffy the Vampire Slayer creator and Avengers director Joss Whedon at the helm, you can expect snappy dialogue, dazzling explosions, kick-ass leading ladies and city blocks of public property razed to rubble and ashes. Watch it Tuesdays at 8 pm.

CARTOONIST | Sometimes, our country’s ongoing political drama is so maddening, you have to laugh to keep from crying. Enter MATT BORS, a Pulitzer Prizenominated editorial cartoonist, with smartly funny and wincingly ironic antidotes to your despair. Flip through his newest book of cartoons and essays, Life Begins at Incorporation, and you’ll meet the “Avenging Uterus,” protector of reproductive rights and shamer of misogynistic assholes, or “Ultra Awareness Man,” who jogs for the “cure(s)” to dozens of diseases while raising awareness for banal causes and tweeting. You can follow Bors’ comic genius online at Medium.com’s The Nib blog or the digital magazine NSFWCorp.

POPE | I was raised Catholic, but the church’s stodgy perspective and scandal-plagued history left me uninspired and unbelievin’. But POPE FRANCIS has, to some extent, reinvigorated my faith in the Catholic Church. In a candid and widely publicized interview with several Jesuit publications, the Pope said the Church should reprioritize and focus on social justice, rather than contraceptives, abortion and gay marriage — issues he’s purposely stayed away from. I’m not going to reconvert anytime soon, but I do admire a man who believes inclusivity trumps exclusivity and in kindness over judgment. He also just got a sweet used car that he actually drives around Vatican City.

Alexie at the Bing

The Bing Crosby Theater 901 W. Sprague Ave.

Wednesday, October 9, 7:00 pm

No ticket is required, but we ask for a suggested $5 donation at the door to help pay for the venue.

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 43


CULTURE | BOOKS

A Place to Call Home Maria Semple had to hit bottom to find Bernadette BY LEAH SOTTILE

T

he rain, the people, the lackluster dye jobs, the goddamn five-way intersections. When Maria Semple uprooted herself from sunny Los Angeles to cloudy and cool Seattle, she absolutely hated it. But soon, Semple realized that her hatred was forming her second novel, Where’d You Go, Bernadette. The book, chosen as this year’s Spokane Is Reading selection, chronicles the hilarious and deeply painful breaking point of Bernadette, a once-brilliant architect whose anxieties have left her bitter, confused and in total opposition to everything Seattle. The

Inlander got on the phone with Semple to ask just how much of her is in Bernadette, talk about the massive task of writing an epistolary novel and find out if she’s gotten used to driving in Seattle. INLANDER: Tell me about what inspired you to write Where’d You Go, Bernadette. SEMPLE: I had moved to Seattle from Los Angeles, and I really believed that the transition would be easy. … I moved here and I felt really rejected by the people. When I moved up here, I would have simple

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try… a lot of her pain is very personal. I [had] a general low-grade consternation [with Seattle], like “Why do all the kindergarten moms have gray hair? And why are they dressed in clogs?”

Maria Semple, author of Where’d You Go, Bernadette. conversations and would find that people would say things to me like, “Hey, you better switch to decaf,” or “Tell us what you really think!” I felt really misunderstood and very alone. And at the same time, not helping matters, my first novel had been published and come out and failed to sell. … I took it very personally, and I thought I’d never write again. Here I was, in a place where I didn’t know anyone, and I felt like nobody liked me … Luckily, the comedy writer in me was able to see the essential humor in that. It’s kind of funny to feel like a failure. Instead of taking responsibility for bouncing back after a failure, I blamed an entire city of people I’d never met. I thought, “Hey, maybe there’s a character there!” So you are Bernadette? I think she’s an exaggerated version of me. I didn’t fit in, I didn’t like the people, I found the city very hard to navigate. But [unlike Bernadette] I was actually really engaged in the city. I took it upon myself to really

When I first heard this book was written in the form of letters and emails, I didn’t think I’d like it. But it really works. I still cringe, and I feel like gagging, when I hear about books written that way. I think, “Oh my God, what a lazy, half-assed choice. Why don’t you write a novel next time?” … Almost more elaborate than my document — than my manuscript — was my outline. … It was incredibly complicated, and it totally holds up. The copy editor was totally blown away. They love to rub your nose in all the inconsistencies. But this one was like, “OK. Respect.” Has Seattle gotten any better for you? I love it. I really consider it home. I love it — especially now that the winter is rolling in. I always knew I couldn’t blame my problems on Seattle. I was really trying to push away the positive feelings about Seattle, because I knew that the fuzzy, positive feelings I would be able to write about forever, but this irrational hatred I wanted to capture while I could. I was trying to stoke that until I got done with my first draft. n leahs@inlander.com Spokane Is Reading feat. Maria Semple • Thu, Oct. 10, at 1 pm • Spokane Convention Center Auditorium • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • Additional reading at 7 pm • CenterPlace • 2426 N. Discovery Pl., Spokane Valley • Free • spokaneisreading.org • 444-5307

The Spokane Renaissance Faire Benefitting 2nd Harvest Food Bank

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 45


Caveman Convenience As the Paleo diet becomes more popular, local businesses are making it tastier and easier to follow BY LISA WAANANEN

T

he aroma of pepperoni fills the commercial kitchen as Crystal Scott carefully pulls a hot tray out of the oven. Cavemen didn’t eat pizza. They never knew what they were missing. But modern humans who follow the increasingly popular Paleo diet — they know. That’s why Scott is putting on the table a steaming-hot answer to a difficult riddle: How do you make a pizza with only ingredients a caveman might have eaten — without cheese, grains, eggs or soy? Scott started preparing Paleo recipes for her family several years ago, and late last year started a business, Paleo Rx, that offers a colorful menu of meals like bacon meatloaf, chicken enchiladas and honey cinnamon pork over apples, delivered in individually labeled containers. “I love to cook, so it’s fun to just get in the kitchen and experiment,” she says. “I like making a meal that’s like your typical spaghetti or lasagna, and making it a healthier version without the grains and the dairy.” The Paleo diet, popularized through the CrossFit fitness training program, urges eating only foods our ancient hunter-gatherer ancestors might have eaten before the advent of farming. Heavy on meat, fresh fruits and vegetables, with healthy fats like olive oil and avocados, it has some characteristics in common with other healthful diet plans — no processed foods, no refined sugars — but also eschews some food groups typically considered healthful, like legumes and whole grains. That pizza steaming on the counter? To avoid grains, the vegan crust is a made-from-scratch mix that includes almond flour and cauliflower. The coconut milk “cheese” is indistinguishable from mozzarella. Scott counts on her fingers the various diets she’s tried in the past — “every diet out there,” she says — and credits this one as a

Crystal Scott’s Paleo Rx gets dieters in line with the paleo way with pre-prepared meals. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

46 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013


turning point in improving her health and spurring her interest in nutrition. She’s now in school to get her master’s in nutrition. “I’m healthier at 32 than I ever was at 22,” she says. The biggest challenge in sticking with the Paleo diet isn’t a lack of variety — it’s a lack of time. Because eating Paleo-style requires so much fresh meat, fruit and vegetables, meals are timeconsuming to shop for and prepare. Modern humans don’t have all day to hunt, gather and worry about the next meal. “I’ve been there — working full time, having children, going to the gym, having a busy schedule — it’s hard to eat healthy,” she says. “And that’s one of the reasons I created this.” Businesses like Paleo Rx are bridging the gap, with prepared meal plans that combine prehistoric nutrition with a very modern emphasis on convenience. Twice a week, Paleo Rx meals are delivered to clients at their gyms or homes in individually labeled containers. Each meal is carefully planned and weighed to also adhere to the measuring-based Zone diet, also popular in the CrossFit community. Each week the business goes through hundreds of pounds of grass-fed beef, free-range chicken and other fresh fish and meat. A whole side of the walk-in cooler is filled with asparagus, broccoli and boxes of other produce when they get their weekly delivery.

$17.Salad9Entrée5 Dessert

NEW 3-Course Dinner Menu 3-6 pm daily

NEW MENU SELECTIONS SALAD Caesar or Garden ENTRÉE Braised Short Ribs • Coconut Prawns • Herb Grilled Wild Salmon Creole Chicken Pot Pie • Pan Roasted Chicken Penne Pasta DESSERT Signature Davenport Cheese Cake Cavemen didn’t have pizza, but you can eat it on the Paleo diet.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

A similar business called On The Go Paleo got started several months ago, almost by accident. After Vanessa Wesley moved to Spokane last year, a friend got her interested in trying a class at CrossFit Spokane Valley. CrossFit emphasizes that nutrition is key for performance, and encourages people to think of “diet” in the broader sense of what fuels an active body. When Dan Staton, the owner of the gym, heard that Wesley had a culinary school degree and a background in catering, he suggested she might be able to help people struggling with their nutrition goals. “I said to her, ‘Hey, help me win that battle,’” he says. Wesley had already been avoiding dairy and gluten for a long time, but she wanted to make sure the Paleo diet was something she could get behind. “I felt like it really made sense when I did the research,” she says. “And it’s had really positive results for me.” Now a lot of her clients aren’t even involved with CrossFit, and got interested in the Paleo diet other ways. Many of them had resorted to making the same Paleo meals over and over, and Wesley is trying to “expand people’s taste buds” with flavors and ideas they might not prepare for themselves. A favorite so far is pulled pork barbecue with mashed cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes. A Banh Mi salad was a recent hit. “You’ve got to get creative,” she says. “But, you know, cauliflower is amazing. You can do a lot of things with that.” Both Scott and Wesley say they don’t eat Paleo exclusively — they aim for the “80/20” mix promoted in the Paleo community as a way to keep the diet realistic and not overly restrictive. Scott says she’s learned it’s a good idea to go out and “cheat” with a really bad meal every once in a while, if only to notice how much worse she feels afterward. “You’re human, so you’re going to make mistakes along the way,” she says. “And I realized that one meal isn’t going to derail your whole lifestyle. You just pick up where you left off and keep going.” n Paleo Rx • facebook.com/PaleoAsRx On The Go Paleo • facebook.com/OnTheGoPaleo

Herb Grilled Wild Salmon

509 789 6848 • palmcourtgrill.com Historic Davenport Hotel 10 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 47


FOOD | OPENING

Bygone Era

The ambidextrous cocktail is just one of the Volstead Act’s lavish cocktails.

! n e s o h C s r e n n i W 10

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

The Volstead Act’s craft cocktails take inspiration from Prohibition-era speakeasies BY CHEY SCOTT

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lmost 94 years ago, on Oct. 28, 1919, the Volstead Act was voted into law, setting the guidelines that soon after enforced the ban of alcoholic beverages in the U.S. By Jan. 17, 1920, the 18th Amendment, which established Prohibition, went into effect. In the present, the Volstead Act is the name of a new craft cocktail bar in downtown Spokane, opening its doors to curious customers last week. Though the bar’s overall atmosphere was inspired by a 1920s-era speakeasy, the Volstead Act’s menu and contemporary decor offer a modern take on what’s become a trendy throwback to a bygone era. The Volstead Act is owned by Matt Goodwin, the local restaurateur behind Press Public House on the lower South Hill, and the forthcoming Boiler Room, an artisan pizza restaurant and bar at Five Mile set to open by early November. He also co-owned the MarQuee, which closed over the summer. Craft cocktails like those offered on the Volstead Act’s menu — using fresh-squeezed fruit juices, herbs and garnishes and unusual liqueurs, syrups and bitters — have been rising in popularity for a while now, catching hold first in metro areas like Seattle, Portland and San Diego, Goodwin says. The thought behind the Volstead Act was to

introduce a similar experience in Spokane. The bar’s signature drinks ($9), like the Kentucky Fields, with bourbon, cynar (a liqueur made from artichokes), lemon juice and strawberries, were created by Goodwin’s friend Ryan Walsh, a former Spokanite who now bartends at a craft cocktail bar in San Diego called Craft & Commerce. Although Goodwin says the original plan for the Volstead Act’s interior was to create a vintage-feeling speakeasy setting, the space on North Post — most recently occupied by the short-lived French eatery Fraiche, and before that, Niko’s — with large, street-facing windows wasn’t conducive to creating a dark, underground feel. Instead, the cocktail bar’s decor, by HDG Design Group, features a contemporary modern feel, with a dark butcher-block bartop and utilitarian, black and red metal stools around bar-height tables. On the space’s focal wall, the front page of a January 1919 newspaper front page serves a dual purpose of wallpaper and art, with the bold, all-caps headline: “U.S. Voted Dry.” One thing’s certain, though — the Volstead Act’s bar won’t be running dry anytime soon. n Volstead Act • 12 N. Post St. • Mon-Thu, 3 pm-2 am; Fri-Sun, 5 pm-2 am • facebook. com/VolsteadAct • 869-2242

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48 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013


FOOD | COMING SOON

Making a Home Plans to build three more local restaurants move forward in Kendall Yards BY LISA WAANANEN

O

n a blustery afternoon last week, a crowd stood outside in the burgeoning Kendall Yards neighborhood clutching cups of Doma coffee for the official ribbon-cutting of the new segment of the Centennial Trail. The Veraci Pizza trailer oven, a traveling favorite at local farmers markets, was fired up to offer wood-fired slices — and a tantalizing taste of what’s yet to come. New signs posted in the ground along Summit Parkway show three restaurants planned for Kendall Yards, one of which is a permanent Veraci Pizza home. Owner Seth Carey says it’s too soon to comment, and the lot right now is an untouched patch of dirt. But the sign posted last week shows a Veraci Pizza logo adorning a one-story brickand-glass building next door to the existing Central Food, which opened late last year. On the other side is the new Inlander building, which became the paper’s headquarters in July. Across the street and a little to the east, work crews and backhoes have been laying the groundwork for two other neighboring restaurants, both reportedly projects of Adam Hegsted, executive chef at Coeur d’Alene Casino. The Yards, described as a “contemporary-style diner,” serves an eclectic breakfast and lunch menu — yes, that means brunch seven days a week — with a planned opening early next spring. For the evenings, the Wanderting Table will feature an upscale American-style tapas menu and craft cocktails with an emphasis on Northwest flavors. The architectural rendering shows the two restaurants joined by an outdoor patio area, with an additional second-story patio at the Wandering Table overlooking the street. An adjacent mixed-use building will house a half-dozen boutique retail shops and living spaces on the upper levels. Adam Jones of Greenstone Corp., the Kendall Yards developer, says the restaurants and mixed-use building are all scheduled to be open by early next summer. n

JOIN THE INLANDER TEAM The Inlander is looking for an energetic Advertising Sales Assistant to help our account executives manage the details of the sales process. This job includes creating dynamic sales presentations and sales materials. Should be able to work with a variety of software (online and off) including InDesign and Google Docs. Must possess strong customer service skills, be able to work with diverse personalities and able to multi-task projects and deadlines. If you are a qualified candidate send in your resume today. EMAIL TO: hr@inlander.com or MAIL RESUME TO:

THE INLANDER Attn: Advertising Manager 1227 West Summit Parkway | Spokane, WA 99201

O c t 11•12•13

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 49


FOOD | UPDATE

Baroque TubaFest featuring S.P.A.R.C.

Sat. Oct. 5 from 1-2 p.m. River Park Square Atrium, Spokane

FREE! Photo by Rick Singer

Craft courtesy of Mobius Kids! Event Donors

SpokanePublicRadio.org

Sunday, Oct 6th Chutes & Ladders: A Simple Path Toward Enlightenment

Camp Fire Inland Northwest, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Numerica Credit Union, Rocket Bakery

Mizuna: a downtown gem.

MIZUNA

214 N. Howard St. | 747-2004

A

perennial contender for all of Spokane’s fine dining accolades, Mizuna has found success in keeping things fresh. This means rotating its menu with the seasons, ensuring that much of what you eat at the cozy downtown eatery comes directly from area farms to your plate. This fall, for example, the menu has been altered to showcase some of the items found in the region. Most specifically, you’ll find mushrooms — and lots of them — in a variety of dishes, including a wild mushroom risotto,

a shiitake mushroom lettuce wrap and mushroom and eggplant meatballs. It’s not all ’shrooms, though; server Stefani VanDeest says the grilled Idaho rainbow trout, served with fresh baby bok choy, has been very popular this season. Mizuna gets rave reviews for its dinners, but don’t overlook its affordable lunch menu (11 am–3 pm, Mon-Sat) full of creatively inspired burgers, wraps, salads and more. — MIKE BOOKEY

WHITWORTH’S EVENING

TEACHER CERTIFICATION HELPED BRENT GO FAR.

Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, Minister

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Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

After a career as a television advertising executive, Brent Murakami changed paths by enrolling in the evening teacher certification program. Student teaching in Hawaii led to a permanent teaching position at Waipahu High School.

SOCIAL SECURITY OR SSI?

And he’s not done yet! Brent is now completing an online master’s degree at Whitworth, most likely while sitting on the beach.

WE CAN HELP! Deissner Law Office 509.462.0827 www.deissnerlaw.com 1707 W. Broadway Spokane, WA 99201 Licensed in Washington & Idaho

50 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

Become a teacher. Enroll now. whitworth.edu/etc 509.777.3222


FOOD | SAMPLER

VENDOR BOOTHS AVAILABLE

VEGETARIAN FRIENDLY BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE 24 W. Main Ave. | 703-7223 High ceilings, exposed brick walls and artsy murals make this one of the prettiest spots downtown. But it’s the creative, artfully executed vegan and vegetarian bistro fare that’s creating such a buzz. Spokane’s first bakery/bar, Boots is now a fixture in the downtown food scene. In the vegan community, Alison Collins — former Mizuna bar manager, now Boots owner — holds celebrity-chef status for her contributions to Mizuna’s repertoire, specifically its vegan carrot cake (and yes, the carrot cake is at Boots and in cupcake form). Behind the bar, she slings thoughtful, simple drinks, often created on the spur of the moment, and always with the recipient in mind. GORDY’S SICHUAN CAFE 501 E. 30th Ave. | 747-1170 Daily soup specials, like chili-lemontofu-cilantro, warm a cold, foggy day at this classic off-the-beatenpath cafe nestled on the South Hill. Among the specialties are the Black Date Sweet Potato Chicken and the Dan-Dan Noodles. Most of the menu

Inventory is Limited

is either vegetarian/vegan, or can be made so — just ask to replace the protein. Add a plate of Ma Po Tofu, true Chinese comfort food (made here with ground pork) and you’ll leave thoroughly warmed and sated. METHOD JUICE CAFE 718 W. Riverside Ave. | 473-9579 Believe it or not, 16 ounces of juice from Method can fill you up as much as any meal from a neighboring restaurant. Method Juice Cafe offers fresh juices and smoothies, most of which are raw and gluten-free, and all are vegan and 100 percent organic — good news for those with dietary restrictions or just the healthconscious. The ‘Legit’ smoothie packs all the punch of a milkshake without the guilt, and is made with rice milk, cacao, banana and peanut butter. Or pick up a veggie-heavy juice like the ‘Prime’ with apple, pear, beet, cucumber, pineapple and a hint of ginger. If a classic juice isn’t enough, try one of their daily soups, salad, or heaping rice and quinoa bowls with peanut sauce or lemon tahini and vegetables.

NEATO BURRITO 827 W. First Ave. | 847-1234 Get in line at this downtown spot and grab one of the best burritos in the whole damn city. Pick your tortilla (flour, spinach, or what have you), bean (black, pinto), meat (or tofu), sour cream, salsa — you get the point. Prices are low and portions monstrous. While munching on your veggie-friendly burrito goodness, take in the sounds of whoever happens to be playing at the Baby Bar that night and grab one of their beers on tap or a clever cocktail.

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STELLA’S CAFE 917 W. Broadway Ave. | 326-6475 Head to Stella’s during the weekday lunch rush, and you’ll see eager customers lined up out the front door, waiting to sink their teeth into one of Stella’s gourmet-style yet moderately priced ($8) sandwiches, like the longtime favorite tofu banh mi. Since Tony Brown and his mom Marti opened the cafe in 2012, they’ve more than doubled the seating and added a savory breakfast menu to complement the cafe’s eclectic sandwiches, rotating soups and salads and scratch-baked goods. 

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 51


Magic Show Gravity can be overbearing at times, but it’s a hell of a space movie BY SCOTT RENSHAW

I

t’s a fascinating, disorienting experience watching the first 10 minutes of Alfonso Cuarón’s lost-inspace adventure Gravity. Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope; veteran space jockey Kowalski jetpacks his way around the structure spinning out jokey anecdotes; rookie engineer Stone nervously tries to do her job. Soon, mission control (Ed Harris) is warning of approaching debris from an exploding satellite, and the eventual catastrophic collision sends Stone and Kowalski hurtling into open space while killing the rest of their crew. Simple survival of these characters is at stake — and all I could find myself thinking is, “Hey, has this all been one single, sustained shot for the first 10 minutes?” The answer is yes — with plenty of digital-age caveats — and it’s the thing that makes Gravity so frustrating even in its sometimes gasp-inducing set pieces. Because Cuarón now just can’t seem to resist the opportunity to turn his movies into showcases for “how did he do that” stunt camera work, like the single shot that swoops in and out of a moving car in his 2006 science-fiction yarn Children of Men. When revolutionary visual trickery is integrated seamlessly into a story, it can be part of what makes the movies magic; when it waves its arms and screams at you to pay attention to it, it can feel like a

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

movie is starting to turn into a full-length teaser for a abundantly clear that he knows it. He makes magbehind-the-scenes DVD featurette. nificent use of the loss of equilibrium in zero-gravity There’s still a load of excitement in the setup for environment, and there’s a moment-to-moment sheer Gravity that often pulls away from Cuarón’s attempts momentum that keeps the tension high. But such to overwhelm it. As Kowalski and Stone realize that experiences generally work best when it’s possible to their shuttle is beyond repair — with oxygen supplies lose yourself in the plight of the characters — to forget, in Stone’s suit running particularly low — they decide if only briefly, that you’re watching a movie. As long as that their only hope is to use Kowalski’s jets to make Cuarón is determined to show off what he can do by their way to the relatively nearby Internaslipping his camera perspective from GRAVITY tional Space Station, and try to use one of outside Stone’s space suit helmet to inRated PG-13 its shuttles to make their way back to Earth. side for her point of view, you’re never Directed by Alfonso Cuarón Thus begins a series of domino-effect crises: going to get that moment of immersion. Starring Sandra Bullock, George Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life Gravity spends little time establishClooney, Ed Harris to make it to the station alive? Will they find ing its characters, beyond the rudimena functioning shuttle when they get there? tary knowledge that Kowalski is on And is it possible that the chain reaction of satellite deHis Last Mission Before Retirement®, and Stone has a struction will soon send another tornado of space junk tragedy in her past she’s trying to escape. It might have in their general direction? been better to leave out all backstory rather than inCuarón has a keen enough sense of suspense struccluding such perfunctory details, but the movie’s thrills ture that the various dangers facing our heroes result aren’t diminished by its purely functional character arcs. in plenty of visceral thrills. Running on fumes as they It’s more indicative of Gravity’s problems that when make their way toward the space station, Kowalski and Cuarón does want to give us emotion, he has Stone cry Stone find themselves spinning and grasping frantically inside a zero-gravity environment, then pulls the focus for something to keep them from sailing out into open forward to make sure we know he can create a 3-D, space once again. zero-G floating teardrop. Gravity is simply a fairly effecThis is effective, eye-popping stuff Cuarón’s serving tive magic show, one where the magician never lets you up here — and there’s rarely a moment when it’s not forget that he can do all these tricks. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE ACT OF KILLING

Director Joshua Oppenheimer challenged Anwar Congo, a murderer who took over 1,000 lives in Medan, Indonesia, and currently holds a position of prestige and power in the new government to recreate his memories of the killings in a theater format.  What follows is a surreal depiction of death through the use of musical numbers, cowboys and gangsters. As Anwar begins to experience the deaths once more, his perspective shifts in this surreal documentary. A Magic Lantern feature film. (ER) Unrated

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s ex-husband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

GRACE UNPLUGGED

Grace Trey (AJ Michalka)  wants to sing about something other than God. As a talented performer in her church’s worship band, Grace wants a taste of her pop star dad’s fame, before he gave it all up to become a pastor. Running away from home and gaining stardom is more than little Grace bargained for, and she begins to think she should listen to her dad (James Denton) and cute intern (Michael Welch) and give up her new-found success to worship and serve the big man upstairs in this Christian drama. (ER) Rated PG

GRAVITY

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

PARKLAND

Next month, it will be 50 years since the nation sat in stunned silence at the news that President John F. Kennedy has been shot. But behind the doors of an operating room in Dallas, doctors were trying to keep the president alive and that’s

the scene we have here in Parkland. And at the same time, authorities were scrambling to track down the shooter. Zac Efron, Billy Bob Thornton, Marcia Gay Harden and Paul Giamatti all star in this historical thriller. (MB) Rated PG-13 1958. A boy, a girl and a typewriter. Rose Pamphyle (Déborah François)  is a small town girl living in the big city and, incidentally, a terrible secretary. Her handsome boss (Romain Duris) wouldn’t have hired her, except for the fact that her abilities on the typewriter are top notch. Determined to train young Rose to be the winner he wasn’t, boss-man Louis Echard takes Rose’s fast fingers on the road to compete in the sport of speed typing, attempting to gain fame and fortune along the way. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated R

RUNNER RUNNER

There’s not much to see here. Mostly it’s just Justin Timberlake sitting at computers for a bit — not  even naked or anything — and later he is vaguely menaced by Ben Affleck… with words only, except for some hints of threats of being fed to mostly off-screen crocodiles. Timberlake is a student at  Princeton, working on a masters degree in financial shenanigans — he was, we’re meant to understand, the sole guy on Wall Street in 2008 who was actually honest in his work, and so he lost all his dough in the crash. Now, he tries to take down Affleck, who plays an online gambling mogul. (MJ) Rated R

THÉRÈSE 

As a child,  Thérèse  Raquin, portrayed here by Elizabeth Olsen, knew she was to marry her first cousin, Camille (Tom Felton). When these promising dreams of ultimate happiness are dashed by reality as her ideal mate begins to control her every action,  Thérèse  finds herself with ideas she shouldn’t have. With the potential of an affair that could end her,  Thérèse  must decide whether the duties of wife and family take precedence over the freedom of being a woman. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated R

Montana Moore (Paula Patton) has some serious man issues. Her little sister is getting married, and to show up to the rehearsal dinner without a handsome fiancée as well would pretty much ruin her life. So, with the help of her two best friends, Gail (Jill Scott,) and Sam (Adam Brody,) she decides to run through her

1993’s

DAZED & CONFUSED

THU. OCT 17

BING CROSBY THEATER $

4 MOVIE $ 3 BEER

BEER FLOWS AT 6:30PM MOVIE SHOWS AT 7:30PM

With an intermission for your beer drinking pleasure

RETURNING:

AUSTENLAND

Keri Russell stars as an American woman so obsessed with the works, life and everything else of Jane Austen that she decides to blow most of her savings to go to a resort in England called Austenland. As you might guess, that resort is for Austen freaks to pretend they are living in the time of Jane. And, of course, our heroine soon finds a couple of love interests to keep her busy. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG-13

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list of ex-boyfriends, and stage casual meetings with them on the most romantic spot on Earth: an airplane. In typical rom-com fashion, these uber-romantic pass-me-the-peanuts meet and greets end up revealing Montana’s true love, who was right under her nose the whole time. (ER) Rated PG-13 ...continued on next page

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INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100 355) 655 950 RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1250 340) 635 920 LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1205 PM)

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ELYSIUM [CC,DV] (R) Fri.(115 350) 705 940 Sat.(350 PM) 705 PM 940 PM Sun.(115 350) 705 940 PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1245 320) 630 910 WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(120) 410 645 925 DESPICABLE ME 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(105 335) 625 955

RUNNER RUNNER [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(130) 400 730 1000 Sun.(130) 430 730 1000 GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(330) 430 630 700 930 1000 GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) 500 PM DON JON [CC] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1200 230) 730 1000 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(115 355) 645 930 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE 2 IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM 330 PM) RUSH [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 335) 640 940 PRISONERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) 450 PM 845 PM THE FAMILY [CC] (R) Fri. - Sat.(110 345) 635 940 Sun.(110 345) 635 915 INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(125) 400 700 930 RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(130) 410 655 950 Sun.(130) 410 655 940 LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.630 PM 930 PM PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(200 PM)

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54 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the have-nots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

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Flint Lockwood (voice of Bill Hader,) the lovable inventor, has achieved his dreams and is now working for his idol, Chester V, creating things to benefit society. But when he learns that the food machine he thought he had destroyed is still up and running this time producing scary humanoid food hybrids including melonheads, mosquitoasts,  and shrimpanzees he and his team, including love interest and weather girl Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris,) must get rid of the machine once and for all in this animated flick. PG (ER)

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writing-directing feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

THE FAMILY

Luc Besson directs this film in which a not so typical family, the  Manzonis,  are relocated under the witness protection program from their Brooklyn home to a small town in France. The former mobsters, now turned snitches, handle their problems in their new lives via violence, bribery and the occasional explosion. As the odd events pile skyward, it becomes apparent that their new location is still not enough to hide them from their former mafia cronies. Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer and Tommy Lee Jones star. (ER) Rated R

GETAWAY

Ethan Hawke gave us an amazing performance in the remarkable Before Midnight earlier this year, so it’s OK for him to take some time to do something, well, less remarkable. Here, Hawke plays Brent Magna, who used to be a professional race car driver, which comes in handy when his wife is kidnapped by some jerk and he has to steal some other chick’s car (that chick is a post-Bieber Selena Gomez; the car is a Shelby Mustang) and drive really fast to rescue said wife. (MB) Rated PG-13

GMO-OMG

GMO-OMG goes deep into the world of

genetically modified food and its potential repercussions.  Directed by Jeremy Seifert, this documentary follows a family trying to avoid eating GMOs in a world where it has become harder and harder for the average consumer to do just that.  At Magic Lantern. (ER) Unrated

IN A WORLD...

Lake Bell wrote, directed and stars in this big-hearted comedy that goes behind the scenes of the voiceover industry — in other words, the dude who says “In a world..” at the beginning of those action movie previews. As Carol, Bell gives us a luckless daughter of a voiceover master who is trying to forge her own career in the industry while also dealing with her nutso family. It’s quirky and full of laughs, but also a sign that Bell is an indie director to keep an eye on. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R.

INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2

The Lambert family returns in the sequel to the bone-chilling thriller aptly named Insidious: Chapter Two. Patrick Wilson stars as Josh Lambert, the reassuring father to the now healing family, attempting to erase the events of the past.  But as unusual things begin to once again happen in the household, Renai Lambert, played by Rose Byrne, begins to suspect that perhaps her husband’s reassurance is simply denial, and something has followed her hubby out of the spirit-world, (ER) Rated PG-13

LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER

Forest Whitaker plays the lead role in this loosely interpreted story of former White House butler Eugene Allen, turned here into a fellow named Cecil Gaines. His ability to avoid conflicts and please people catches the eye of a White House staff recruiter, who brings Cecil on during the Eisenhower administration, beginning service that would take him into the Reagan years. Also stars Oprah Winfrey! (SR) Rated PG-13

METALLICA: THROUGH THE NEVER 

They’ve made 10 albums, played hundreds of sold out concerts, and now, the heavy metal band have their own movie. Trip, played by Dane Dehaan, is a young roadie on tour with Metallica who is sent out to pick up some precious cargo.

Along the way, he crashes his car, and must go head to head with a masked horseman. Features Metallica’s music as background to Trip’s epic adventure, as well as radically cool visuals. (ER) Rated R

PRISONERS

The kidnapping-revenge genre gets a refreshing makeover when a child goes missing, Dad gets mad, and the cops don’t know what to do. It stars Hugh Jackman (the dad) and Jake Gyllenhaal (the detective). This goes places that Taken and Frantic never thought of going. A real nail-biter that’s violent and unpredictable. (ES) Rated R

RUSH

The action begins with a crucial race in 1976, before flashing back to the early years of the rivalry between Formula 1 race car drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda on the minor leagues of the European racing circuit. Director Ron Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan — who collaborated on Frost/Nixon — effectively set up the initial parallel between the two men as children of privilege who rebel against the expectations of their families, before focusing on the clash of styles that differentiated them. (SR) Rated R.

THE WAY, WAY BACK

Fox Searchlight continues to establish itself as, perhaps, the premier indie film distributor. From them we’ve received films like Sideways, Juno and Slumdog Millionaire. Their newest film seems to contain the same charm they’ve become known for. This time around, Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Maya Rudolph and a young actor named Liam James look to deliver said charm with a tale about a forlorn kid who finds a new life with a summer job at a water park. At Magic Lantern (JR) PG-13

WE’RE THE MILLERS

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time pot dealer who finds himself in major debt to his supplier (Ed Helms). He’s then forced to make a trip to Mexico to pick up some bud, and he believes he’ll keep a lower profile if he crosses the border with his family. Without one, he recruits a nerdy boy, a punk girl and a stripper (Jennifer Aniston — as a stripper!) to pose as his kin travelling in an RV. (JR) Rated R 

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METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

In a World

79

Rush

75

Prisoners

74

The Butler

67

Don Jon

59

Austenland

41

Runner Runner

37

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R Daily (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35 Sat-Sun (11:15) (1:15)

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THE FAMILY

BY MARYANN JOHANSON ou may have heard that at some press 2008 who was actually honest, and lost all his screenings, critics are required to hand dough in the crash. Which is why he’s desperover our smartphones to security people, ate to make some money to pay his tuition and who hold them in a location outside the theater, gets suckered by online gambling, losing every lest we sneakily attempt to pirate the entire movie last cent playing poker when he should have, — or even merely key exciting scenes — and mathematically speaking, won a bundle. upload our blurry, shaky footage to YouTube So he decides to go after billionaire scumbag and spoil the cinematic experience for Ben Affleck and his gambling the entire Internet. The fact that no RUNNER RUNNER website and get his money back. pirated footage has ever come out of This requires traveling to Costa Rated R press screenings is no deterrent to this Directed by Brad Furm Rica — the Caribbean is where practice. And now, with Runner Runall these gambling sites operate, Starring Justin Timberlake, ner, neither is the complete lack of as it’s a legal Wild West down Ben Affleck juicy pirate-able footage. there… and also it’s where the Badass aliens who want to steal FBI, in the person of agent Anour water in their mile-wide spaceships do not thony Mackie, has no jurisdiction and no rules invade halfway through the movie. There are no for its operations. spectacular car chases featuring tanks and monSo does Timberlake start planning an imster trucks and a god-awful innocent-bystander mensely clever takedown of Affleck and his body count. Mostly it’s just Justin Timberlake empire? Not at all. He completely buys Affleck sitting at computers for a bit — not even naked blaming it all on unscrupulous underlings and or anything — and later he’s vaguely menaced by takes a job with him! That requires that he sit in Ben Affleck… with words only, except for some front of more computers, then get beaten up by hints of threats of being fed to mostly off-screen someone Affleck has pissed off, before he realizes crocodiles. his boss is not a decent or honest person. We just It didn’t have to be this way. This could have want to see Timberlake give Affleck what he has been a new Ocean’s Eleven (the cool Soderbergh coming in a funny, perhaps ironic way. Runner one, that is), and that’s what the promising Runner is only 90-something minutes long, yet setup appears to hint at. Timberlake is a student feels like it’s about three hours, there’s so little at Princeton, working on a master’s degree in compelling happening for most of the runtime. financial shenanigans — he was, we’re meant Timberlake doesn’t even get to feed Affleck to to understand, the sole guy on Wall Street in the crocodiles! 

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GRAVITY

Daily (12:30) (1:00) (1:25) (2:40) (3:10) (4:50) (5:15) 7:00 7:20 7:50 9:10 9:30 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:45) (11:20) In 2D Daily (3:40) (5:45) 10:00 Fri-Sun (11:00)

Monsters University Wed 1:00

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2

PG Daily (1:20) (3:30) (5:40) 7:45 In 2D Daily (12:50) (3:00) (5:10) 7:15 9:15 Fri-Sun (10:50)

RUNNER RUNNER

R Daily (1:10) (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:50 Fri-Sun (11:00)

RUSH

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

R Daily (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:00)

DON JON

R Daily (1:15) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:15)

PRISONERS

R Daily (3:00) 6:20 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:35)

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2

PG-13 Daily (2:40) (5:00) 7:20 9:40 Fri-Sun (12:20)

THE MAGIC LANTERN OCTOBER 4TH - OCTOBER 10TH

AUSTENLAND (96 MIN -PG13)

Fri: 8:30, Sat: 2:15, 8:30, Sun: 2:15, Mon-Thurs: 7:30

THE FAMILY

POPULAIRE (111 MIN-R)

LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER

GMO-OMG (82 MIN-PG)

R Daily (1:50) (4:20) 6:50 9:25 Fri-Sun (11:30) PG-13 Daily (12:45) (3:30) 6:30 9:20

WE’RE THE MILLERS

R Daily (2:00) (4:35) 7:10 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:30)

DESPICABLE ME 2

PG Daily (2:00) Fri-Sun (11:50)

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS PG Daily (4:20) 6:30

RIDDICK

R Daily 8:50

Fri-Sun: 6:15, Mon-Thurs: 5:30

Fri/Sat: 5:00, Sun-Tues: 7:00

THE WAY WAY BACK (96 MIN- PG13) Fri-Sun: 4:15, Mon/Tues: 3:15

THERESE (110 MIN-R)

Fri/Sat: 6:45, Sun-Tues: 4:45, Weds/Thurs: 3:45

IN A WORLD (96 MIN- PG13)

Fri: 8:45, Sat: 3:00, 8:45, Sun-Tues: 3:00

THE ACT OF KILLING (115 MIN -R) Thurs: 7:00

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 10/4/13-10/10/13

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 55


OCT 3rd - OCT 9th

FRI

THURS

415 W. Sprague Ave. 509.624.4450

LADIES NIGHT

$5 Double Martinis

CALIFORNIA BAD BOYS MALE REVIEW

56 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

SAT

ZOMBIE BAR CRAWL

SUN

SEASIDE BAR CHURCH at 3

MON

MARTINI MADNESS

TUES

TWINTINI TUESDAY

WED

Doors 8pm • Show 9pm • $10

TRIVIA

Dance with the dead till 2

Live music 5-10pm

$5 Doubles

$5 Doubles

Starts at 7


Swords and Axes The Alliance is about to rock the Dark Ages into the present BY LAURA JOHNSON

W

hen Robert Jibby answered an online ad back in March, it merely stated that a band needed a drummer. The ad didn’t mention the dress code. There was nothing about how he would be signing on for a medieval-themed band that plays original ’80sinspired rock music while wearing tights, smocks, chain mail and velvet. “It wasn’t until after I heard the music, and really liked it, that James [Trocke] told me I would have to wear a costume,” says Jibby, a tall, polished marketing professional one would never suspect is in a band, let alone one

wearing period clothing. “I remember telling my wife, ‘How am I going to do that?’” But Jibby, who had taken up the drums in recent years and had only played in a Christian rock group, was convinced to keep the beat for Trocke’s band, The Alliance. Just south of the Canadian border in Bonners Ferry, the group practices in a dungeon of sorts — James and Coleen Trocke’s basement. The walls are decorated in an appropriate theme, lined with colorful banners and battleaxes. It’s here that James, the lead singer, has taught his

six-piece the songs he’s written, practicing for hours on end during the weekends — the only time the members, who dot the North Idaho map, can congregate. James started The Alliance 20 years ago when he and his wife were living in San Diego. Back then, it was just a “normal” rock band that he says sounded a lot like a pumped-up Kansas or Rush. Intrigued by the courage of knights and their devotion to their king, James decided last year to turn his band into a medieval rock group. What he’s created for the stage is a rock opera of ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 57


Booger Needs Your Help! Booger is a companion dog to a quadriplegic man in the Palouse area. Unfortunately, Booger has developed cataracts. His impaired vision is making him scared of the medical equipment and unable to assist his dad. The surgery will cost $3,500 at WSU Animal Eye Clinic. Please consider helping Booger and his family by making a donation to Booger’s Fund on the Cooper’s Legacy Foundation web site.

www.CoopersLegacyFoundation.org Mail donations to: Cooper’s Legacy Foundation P.O. Box 532 Pullman, WA 99163

Special Thanks To:

MUSIC | ROCK “SWORDS AND AXES,” CONTINUED... sorts. Swords clash as double guitar solos soar, a prince finds his princess to an incessant trap-set beat, and in the end, good triumphs over evil. “We actually discussed the idea of a medieval-themed band 20 years ago when we were engaged,” says Coleen, who plays keyboards. “I remember saying then that I could paint the sets. It’s been so cool that it’s happening now.” The challenge was finding new bandmates to round out the sound. Once Jibby (who also took over the band’s marketing) was on board, more joined up, with Gary Buettner and Evan Cookman on guitars and Josh Bladzik on bass. “It was hard to find the right people to ‘get this,’” says James, who goes by “King James, the Lion Hearted” and affects a British accent onstage. “But what’s so special about this band is that with every song we’re telling a story.” James has had some of the songs since the band’s inception; others are new. A brand-new album, Writing on the Wall, featuring some of the more than 20 songs performed at their shows, was released last month. Despite having an album, which doesn’t include all of the actual members, the band’s current incarnation has only a couple of shows under their sword belts. They first unleashed their spectacle at the Schweitzer Fall Fest in September. For the first full hour of the set, rain hammered down on the tentcovered stage with a castle backdrop; a speaker even blew. “We thought we might get electrocuted,”

U-Pick Apples & Pumpkins, Live Music, Pony Rides, Face Painting, Trampoline Bungee JUMP, Corn Cannon, Pea Box, Breakfast, BBQ, Caramel Apples & Sweet Treats in Cafe, and Much More!

58 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

appleranch.com • 505-238-4709

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

KARAOKEE W/ MATTY

at Irv’s 6pm-10pm

DANCE TILL DAWN

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at Irv’s 8pm-2am

KARAOKEE W/ MATTY KARAOKEE W/ MATTY

WED

Weekends sept 21 - oct 27

W/ LIVE WIRE

MON

Apple Festival

KARAOKEE

TUES

SUN

SAT

FRI

THUR

OCT 3RD - 9TH

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

LE GIRLS FEMALE IMPERSONATORS

Fiercest of the Fall Starts at 9:30pm

415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450

Jibby says. But despite the downpour, the show in front of the band — artfully choreographed by the Trockes, featuring a dungeon-wall backdrop — persevered, and a group of curious onlookers were pulled into the spectacle. Friday, The Alliance kicks off the Spokane Renaissance Faire weekend with an indoor performance at the Bing Crosby Theater; Saturday, they head up to Sandpoint for Oktoberfest. But the Renaissance and Middle Ages, the latter period the one to which the band pays tribute, are completely different eras. The anachronism is not lost on them. “So yes, we’re a band in medieval costumes playing rock music playing for Renaissance festivals,” Jibby explains. “It’s all very confusing. We’re not even quite sure where we fit in.” Actually, standing out is the whole idea. James knows his band’s tack could be taken as a way to get noticed — a ploy of sorts — but he doesn’t think that’s such a bad thing. He has a story to tell with his music, even if it’s all been told before. “Of course, in the end good always wins,” he says. “But what we’re doing musically, we’re so new and fresh, once people see us, I think it’s going to catch on.”  lauraj@inlander.com The Alliance • Fri, Oct. 4 at 8 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • $12 • All-ages • bingcrosbytheater.com


MUSIC | SOUL

Beer Cocktails Music Food 120 E. Sprague Ave.

AUTHORITY ZERO STORM NORMANDY ALL AGES | 7:00 PM | $10

Pickwick’s lead singer, Galen Disston, says Spokane was the first city to embrace his band.

A Big Year

Pickwick’s souled-out rock never stops evolving BY MIKE BOOKEY

I

t was a big crowd for a Sunday night in allowed Disston to quit his day job at a health Spokane, and Galen Disston and the rest care nonprofit. of Pickwick were eating it up. Hundreds Somehow, a huge groove comes out of six of Elkfest attendees had packed the streets of seemingly dorky-looking Seattle dudes; Disston Browne’s Addition, getting down to the Seattle says this is just what’s coming out of the creative band as it cranked out one soul-infused rocker process these days. after another. “Before, I was writing the songs and the band Disston thanked the crowd before the sixwould arrange them. But now we write the songs piece act wrapped up a festival-capping set, telling together in a basement,” says Disston. “It’s a tothem it was Spokane, not Seattle, that first truly tally different creative process because it’s collabembraced this band. orative. Working with a group is better because Three months later, sitting on a bench in we don’t let a lot of stuff out of the basement — it New York’s Central Park on a phone call to Spohas to make it through the gauntlet.” kane, Disston, Pickwick’s big-haired, big-voiced The change has worked out. This spring, frontman, says he really meant that. Pickwick played a headlining national tour before “The shows that we’d come over to play at hitting the road again during the summer and [former Spokane venue] the Empyrean were betearly fall to open shows for Neko Case, and on ter than the shows we were getting in Seattle at this particular September day, Black Joe Lewis. the time,” says Disston. Going from sweaty club and Through those early shows, street festival shows — they headlined Disston met Karli and Caleb Visit Inlander.com for complete a night of Seattle’s ultra-hip Capitol Ingersoll, the couple who now Hill Block Party a couple months listings of local events. play in Cathedral Pearls and back — was an adjustment. are starting up the soon-to-open “We learned that sweating our Bartlett music venue (where Pickwick’s Sunday balls off in front of people who are sitting down night show was originally to be held). Pickwick in very austere theaters maybe isn’t the best aphas come back to Spokane a number of times proach,” says Disston of opening for Neko Case. now, their sound evolving from ambient folk to a But if any band can adapt to their surroundpunchy, groove-filled soul attack. In the process, ings, it’s this one. n their hometown finally took notice in a big way, while their recent album Can’t Talk Medicine let the Pickwick, Tomten • Sun, Oct. 6 at 8 pm • nYne rest of the country in on the secret. Strong album Bar and Bistro • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • $12 sales, viral videos and hometown stardom finally advance, $14 door • thebartlettspokane.com

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OCT 04 | 7PM

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21+ ONLY | 7:00 PM | $10 ADV

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

THE RADICAL SOMETHING

DOWN WITH WEBSTER ALL AGES | 7:00 PM | $12 ADV

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

OCT 12 | 7PM

LIONS LIONS OCT 15 | 7PM

A LOT LIKE BIRDS | INDIRECTIONS ANCHORLINES ALL AGES | 7PM | $10 ADVANCE

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

THE CENTER TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: THECENTERSPOKANE.COM 6425 N. LIDGERWOOD

FRIENDLY SERVICE & C LA SS IC C O C K TA IL S

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SUN-THURS 4pm-MI D NI G HT | FRI - SAT 4pm-2am OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 59


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

EDM DISCLOSURE

EVENT TERRAIN MUSIC

S

T

ure, Terrain is mostly known for the 200-plus artists it features, but there are 10 awesome bands performing for the one-night-only event as well, and this year they have a bigger stage to do it from. The event’s main goal is to celebrate emerging local artists, but promoters also want to expose people to creativity outside of the area, which is why the two music headliners come from other places — The Pack a.d. hails from Vancouver, B.C., and The Hood Internet is shipping in from Chicago. A jury selected the other eight up-and-coming acts (all ones you should be getting excited about). Be sure to show up early; the event is free but the space quickly fills to capacity. Just in case, there’ll be speakers outside blasting the inside music. — LAURA JOHNSON

he UK dubstep duo of brothers Guy and Howard Lawrence first gained notice in 2010 when their tracks on Myspace (yes, some people still used that site back then) got more traction than expected. Since then, Disclosure has played Coachella, Lollapalooza and sold out a show at New York’s Central Park. June marked the release of their first full-length album, Settle; check out the track “Latch” immediately. This show is a part of the Knitting Factory’s The Big Ticket: Fall EDM Pass. — LAURA JOHNSON

Terrain feat. The Holy Broke, Ehrler Vogel, Duke Hogue, Infinite Penz, Lucid Faces, Blackwater Prophet, Mama Doll, The Pack a.d., The Hood Internet and house DJs Brothers ov Midnite • Fri, Oct. 4 at 5 pm • 1011 W. 1st Ave. • Free • All-ages • terrainspokane.com

Disclosure with T. Williams • Thu, Oct. 10 at 8 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • $20 • All-ages • sp.knittingfactory.com

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/3

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn J CALVARY CHAPEL OF SPOKANE (467-2860), Steven Curtis Chapman, Laura Story, Jason Gray CARR’S CORNER, Lexington Field, Barnacle Burn, Sweet Reble D J THE CENTER, The Novocaines, The Copper Gamins, Exile Parade COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny J EASTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY (359-7870), Beverly McClellan GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Chemical Restraint, Blame Shifter, Sweet Grass Band J KNITTING FACTORY, Bullet for My Valentine, Black Veil Brides, Stars in Stereo, Throw the Fight J LAGUNA CAFE, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind J MOOTSY’S, Terrible Buttons Vinyl Release with Cedar & Boyer NYNE, Beverly McClellan (aftershow), The Divine Jewels O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, Jeremy Serwer, The Tone Collaborative RICO’S (332-6566), Palouse Subter-

60 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

ranean Blues Band SPLASH, Steve Denny THE VAULT (822-7090), DJ Seli

Friday, 10/4

BABY BAR, Circular Logic with DJ Ca$e and Mirror Mirror BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn J BING CROSBY THEATER, The Alliance (See story on page 57) BOLO’S (891-8995), YESTERDAYSCAKE BUCER’S (208-882-5216), Simba Land CARR’S CORNER, Soblivious, One Fall, Structural Damage J THE CENTER, Authority Zero, Storm Normandy COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Protocol, Kosh COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Touch of Jazz THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), Hollow Point CURLEY’S, Shiner EICHARDT’S, James Adam Smith Band FEDORA PUB, Truck Mills FIRST STREET BAR & GRILL (2762320), Karma’s Circle FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S, Torino Drive GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GRANDE RONDE CELLARS (4558161), Eugene Jablonsky Trio J THE HOP!, Stop the Violence show feat. Loss Monstarz, DC Gesus,

Unique, Level Ground, Tone Kang and more IRON HORSE, Bruiser IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy J KNITTING FACTORY, Dustin Mundell Memorial Concert feat. Sammy Eubanks and friends J KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS (208-765-4969), Earl Wear and Haywire Band J LAGUNA CAFE, Pamela Benton LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), House Arrest PEND D’OREILLE WINERY (208-2658545), Ron Keiper J THE PHAT HOUSE, Java Cola, Civilized Animal J TERRAIN 6 AT MUSIC CITY BUILDING, (See stories above and on page 41) The Hood Internet, The Pack A.D., Mama Doll, Blackwater Prophet, Lucid Faces, Infinite Penz, Duke Hogue, Ehrler Vogel, The Hole Broke, Brothers ov Midnite TWELVE STRING BREWING (9908622), The SpoCats VIKING, Jesse Weston Trio

Saturday, 10/5

BABY BAR, Jay Arner, Camaros, Cult Babies BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BOLO’S (891-8995), YESTERDAYSCAKE

BUCER’S (208-882-5216), Mise COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Protocol, Kosh COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Steven Harris COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Devon Wade THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), Hollow Point CURLEY’S, Shiner EL PATIO (208-773-2611), Bad Monkey FEDORA PUB, Truck Mills FIRST STREET BAR & GRILL (2762320), Karma’s Circle FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S, Torino Drive GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos IRON HORSE, Bruiser IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy J JONES RADIATOR, B Radicals LEFTBANK WINE BAR, The Family Band feat. Ricky Raccoon and Rusty Nail MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), House Arrest J MOOTSY’S, The Valley, Dark White Light, Laylah’s Drink NEATO BURRITO/BABY BAR, Jay Arner NYNE, Nixon Rodeo, DJ C-Mad J THE PHAT HOUSE, World Bandits RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve SANDPOINT OKTOBERFEST, RFB, Miah Kohal Band, The Alliance Benny & Bonnie J THE SHOP, The Oracle’s Kitchen

J SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES (922-3433), Battle of the Bands Toys for Tots benefit feat. Ashley Honnell, Black Hills Gold, Texas Twister, Johnny & The Moondogs, Mingo, Kenny Walker, Oasis TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE (4739766), Two Seven Oktoberfest feat. Jenny Jah, Hey! is for Horses, The Rustics, Real Life Rockaz

Sunday, 10/6

CARR’S CORNER, Vox, 7upper, Cruz, Big P COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J NYNE BAR, Pickwick (See story on page 59), Tomten J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open mic J SPOKANE ARENA, Bon Jovi WSU COMPTON UNION BUILDING, Thomas Rhett

Monday, 10/7

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ (3217480), Open mic J CALYPSOS COFFEE (208-6650591), Open mic CARR’S CORNER, Tyler Aker EICHARDT’S, Blue Jams hosted by Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Hymn for Her, The Hep Cats, Bad Hex, Eliza Johnson, Joshua James Belliardo, Mayfair’s Promise, Ian Miles


Tuesday, 10/8

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn FEDORA PUB, Jam Night with Truck Mills J JOHN’S ALLEY, Fox Street Allstars KELLY’S IRISH PUB (208-667-1717), The Powell Brothers J KNITTING FACTORY, Krewella, Seven Lions, Candyland, Eddie P J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Jam Session J RED ROOSTER COFFEE (2029138), Open mic THE VAULT (822-7090), DJ Q

Wednesday, 10/9 J BABY BAR, Hollow Boys, Normal Babies, Strange Mana BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S, Kicho

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. J THE HOP!, K.O.E., Dirty Savage, Mutiny INC, Jake Brown, The Krisis, Manwithnoname, Kagah, Hounds of Hell, Firing Squad, The Pharmacist IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Ken Davis and Tui J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open mic RICO’S (332-6566), WSU School of Music Jazz Band SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT (822-7090), DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared

Coming Up…

THE HOP!, Diamond Head, Oct. 10 J KNITTING FACTORY, Disclosure (See story on facing page), T. Williams, Oct. 10 J CARR’S CORNER, Coliseum, Red Hare, Heiress, Losing Skin, Oct. 11 THE CENTER, Har Mar Superstar, Oct. 11 THE HOP!, Koffin Kats, Oct. 11 KNITTING FACTORY, Kid Ink, Oct. 11 BABY BAR, Kramer, Oct. 12 THE CENTER, The Radical Something, Down With Webster, Oct. 12 JONES RADIATOR, Oooob, Xerox Machine, Rice Queen, Oct. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, The Revision Scheme, T-180, Extortionist, Upbeat For Sundown, Oct. 12 MIK’S (208-666-0450), EDM Fright Night feat. F3lon, Johnny Disco, Digi, Oct. 12 MOOTSY’S, The Hoot Hoots, Oct. 12

REPUBLIC BREWING CO. (775-2700), Birds of Chicago, Oct. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Gwar, Whitechapel, Iron Reagan, A Band of Orcs, Oct. 13 HOP!, Hemlock, Oct. 14 KNITTING FACTORY, Zeds Dead, Paper Diamond, DJ Green Lantern, Branchez, Oct. 14 RICK SINGER PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO (838-3333), Pearl Django, Oct. 14 CENTER, Lions Lions, Oct. 15 JOHN’S ALLEY, Brothers Gow, Oct. 16 CENTER, Red Fang, Helms Alee, Gaytheist, Oct. 17 THE HOP!, Elektroween feat. The Sauce, DecibelKaos, SFD, Vexxem, DerpyDash, F3lon, Foxtale, Hapi, Dave Keset, Mac Mumble, Deane, Miraj, Oct. 18 KNITTING FACTORY, Passion Pit, The Joy Formidable, Oct. 18 NORTHERN QUEST, The Moody Blues, Oct. 18 PACIFIC AVE PIZZA, AVEtoberFest feat. The Winter War, Strange Mana, McDougall, Primal Shakes, Acoustic Noir, Oct. 18 - 19 BABY BAR, Posole, Oct. 19 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, The Avett Brothers, Nicholas David, Oct. 19 KNITTING FACTORY, Living Colour, Oct. 19 THE HOP!, Monsters Scare You!, Victory Heights, Lion I Am, Measures, The Perservering Promist, Almost Home, Oct. 20 FOX THEATER (624-1200), Joe Satriani, The Steve Morse Band, Oct. 21 MIKEY’S GYROS (208-882-0780), Joe Pug, Vandaveer, Oct. 21 KNITTING FACTORY, The Used, William Control, Oct. 22 KNITTING FACTORY, Hank 3, Oct. 23 SPOKANE ARENA (279-7000), Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Talib Kweli, Big KRIT, Oct. 23 KNITTING FACTORY, David Nail, Oct. 24 THE BARTLETT, Federico Aubele, Lisa Alma, BIAS, Oct. 25 MOOTSY’S, Jaeda + Half Zodiac & Keyser Soze, Oct. 25 SPOKANE FALLS COMMUNITY COLLGE (533-3500), Patricia Barber Trio, Oct. 25 BLUZ AT THE BEND (483-7300), Halloween Party feat. Bakin’ Phat, Oct. 26 BABY BAR, Couches, Normal Babies, Oct. 27 CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, Styx, Oct. 27 KNITTING FACTORY, Okkervil River, Matthew E. White, Oct. 28 KNITTING FACTORY, Trapt, Devour the Day, Thirty Three, Nov. 2 BARTLETT, Grand Opening weekend feat. Blouse, Psychic Rites, Dead Serious Lovers, The Cave Singers, Radiation City, Kaylee Cole, yphoon, Silver Torches, Le Wrens,Terrible Buttons, Mirror Mirror, Scott Ryan, Nov. 7 - 10 THE CENTER, The Black Dahlia Murder, and more Nov. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Rittz, Snow Tha Project and more Nov. 12

MUSIC | VENUES

Organic: Made in USA Low Impact Dyes Open Mon-Sat: 10-5:30

35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

Meet the Vendors

AT SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET

Natural Start Coffee offers Doma Coffee. Republic of Tea & more. Have a cup or buy the tin. We also havehandmade bird houses and craft items.

- JESSICA

JOHN’S ALLEY, Fox Street Allstars J THE PHAT HOUSE, Bebop Jazz PJ’S BAR & GRILL (328-2153), Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck RICO’S (332-6566), Open mic

THANKS FOR SUPPORTING YOUR ONLY INDOOR, YEAR ROUND MARKET. DOWNTOWN AT 2ND & BROWNE (24 W. 2ND AVE) THUR-SAT, 10AM -6PM, SUN 11AM-5PM SPOKANEPUBLICMARKET.ORG

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BELLTOWER • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 THE CENTER • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 CURLEY’S BAR & BISTRO • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROTHERS • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 315-8623 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 MOON TIME • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPLASH • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 61


JENNIFER DEBARROS PHOTO

THEATER COLLEGIATE LAUGHS

Gonzaga’s funniest little secret might just be the Boone Street Hooligans (yeah, Boone is technically an avenue, but whatever), the university’s very own sketch comedy troupe. This is not improv (the scenes are scripted) but the sketches are pretty damn funny — funny enough, in fact, to land the Hooligans in Sketchfest Seattle 2013 last month. This is carried out exclusively by GU students and is directed by former Inlander intern to the stars Jeff Rutherford, along with Matt Dargen. There’s also a musical performance by singer/songwriter Leo Francovich. These guys are popular and the theater is small, so we suggest getting there early for a seat. — MIKE BOOKEY Boone Street Hooligans • Fri, Oct. 4 at 8 pm • Gonzaga’s Magnuson Theatre • 502 E. Boone Ave. • Free • Donations to Cool Cup of Water nonprofit bike shop accepted at the door

COMEDY POLITICALLY INCORRECT

The Capitol Steps don’t just lampoon politicians; the group skewers them, ties them on a pole and roasts them on a spit, and they’ve been doing so for more than 30 years. As if SNL or the Daily Show wasn’t enough, this sketch comedy show takes it to a whole new level — adding song. The theater troupe’s tag line “We put the mock in Democracy” describes the stage action most acutely. Their Sunday show at the INB Performing Arts Center will most likely contain much from the group’s newest album Fiscal Shades of Gray. Oh yes. — LAURA JOHNSON The Capitol Steps • Sun, Oct. 6 at 6:30 pm • $25-$38.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac. com • 325-7328

62 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

PERFORMANCE TRAFFICKING TRUTH

Written by former Spokane resident Megan Becker and presented by Seattle’s Dry Bones Production Company, Costly Desires follows three people caught up in the web that is sex trafficking. There is Maria, a young runaway who finds herself in a terrible situation after relying on the kindness of a stranger. Yen, a woman smuggled into the U.S. to help support her child, discovers that the work intended is not the American opportunity she thought it would be. Then there’s John, a married man who hires prostitutes frequently. — EMERA RILEY Costly Desires • Sun, Oct. 6 at 3 pm • $12-$20 • Bing Crosby Theatre • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com • 325-7328


GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. NORTHSIDE

SPOKANE VALLEY

9719 N. Division St. 509-455-8290

15110 E. Indiana Ave. 509-924-8187

THE AREA’S BIGGEST HARDWOOD SELECTION!

THEATER LOVE ON THE HIGH SEAS

Anything Goes has just about everything audiences should expect from a continually revived Broadway musical of its caliber. It’s high-energy, lively and even a bit sassy — and appropriately so, as the show portrays an unlikely love story, confined to the setting of an ocean liner at sea in the mid-1930s. Originally produced on Broadway in 1934 and featuring music by famed composer Cole Porter, Anything Goes’ cast of eclectic characters includes stowaway Billy, who’s in love with the beautiful, engaged heiress Hope Harcourt. Also on board is nightclub singer Reno Sweeney and a runaway gangster, who aid Billy in his quest to win over Hope. On the surface, the love story sounds somewhat reminiscent of Titanic, but trust us — it’s waaay more lighthearted and, of course, there’s no sinking ship to ruin the mood. — CHEY SCOTT Anything Goes • Oct. 10-13, show times vary • $33-$73 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com • 325-7328

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COMPETITION SHOW US YOUR WHISKERS

If all the contestants in a Miss America pageant transformed into burly dudes sporting breathtaking facial hair, it might be something like the Spokane Beard and Mustache Club’s annual regional competition. Expect styled mustaches, glorious muttonchops and beards that have been growing since before all today’s bearded hipsters even sprouted peach fuzz. Overall presentation and crowd reaction factor into the scoring, so it’s not just about the beard; it’s how you wear it. Along with the battles of beards and mustaches, competitors show off their creativity in the “freestyle” category and the “whiskerina” competition for ladies. Proceeds benefit the Spokane Guilds’ School. — LISA WAANANEN 2013 Epic Beard Competition • Sat, Oct. 5 at 7 pm • $5 admission, $20 entry fee • The Vault • 120 N. Wall St. • spokanebeardmustache.com

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 63


events | trivia

events | calendar

Benefit

Monday

Jones Radiator, 120 E. Sprague Press, 909 S. Grand Blvd. Valhalla, 1000 NE Colorado St., Pullman

Tuesday

Fieldhouse Pizza and Pub, 4423 W. Wellesley Ave. Valhalla, 1000 NE Colorado St. Rico’s, 200 E. Main St., Pullman

Wednesday

Flamin’ Joe’s, 7015 N. Division St., Flamin’ Joe’s, 2620 E. 29th Ave. Flamin’ Joe’s, 11618 E. Sprague Applebee’s, 12217 E. Mission Ave. LeftBank Wine Bar, 108 N. Washington St. Morty’s, 5517 S. Regal St. The Bar at Pizza Pipeline, 1403 N. Division St. Shots, 412 W. Sprague Ave. Satellite Diner, 425 W. Sprague

Valhalla, 1000 NE Colorado St.

Thursday

Applebee’s, 9634 N. Newport Hwy. Applebee’s, 2007 E. 29th Ave. The Tailgater, 1221 N. Howard nYne Bar, 232 W. Sprague Ave. Soulful Soups, 117 N. Howard St. Valhalla, 1000 NE Colorado St.

Friday

The Sidebar & Grill, 1101 W. Broadway Ave. Valhalla, 1000 NE Colorado St.

Saturday

Stella’s Cafe, 917 W. Broadway Valhalla, 1000 NE Colorado St. n Visit Inlander.com/events for complete listings of venues hosting karaoke, trivia, bar games and open mics.

Into AfricaPartnering for Progress’s annual fundraiser gala, featuring an African-themed dinner, auctions and more to benefit the nonprofit’s medical and water projects in Kenya. Oct. 4 at 6 pm. $65/ person. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. intoafricaauction.org (720-8408) Hoedown for HopeThe Spokane HOPE School’s annual fundraiser features dinner, cocktails, live music and more. Oct. 5 at 5 pm. $55. Rockin’ B Ranch, 3912 Spokane Bridge Rd., Liberty Lake. spokanehopeschool.org Walk for Wishes5th annual fundraiser event benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation, which grants wishes of local children with life-threatening illnesses. Oct. 5 at 8:45 am. Min. fundraised amount of $100. Mirabeau Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway. akwawish.org Circle of HopeBenefit breakfast supporting The Spokane Guilds’ School’s services for children and their families. Oct. 6 from 7:30-8:30 am. Free. The Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post. (326-1651) Run for the Angels5K run/walk benefiting the Inland Northwest SID Foundation. Oct. 6 from 4-7 pm. $15-$30. Riverstone Park, 1800 Tilford Lane, CdA. inwsids.org (208-557-4371) Signature Chefs AuctionAnnual fundraiser event for the March of Dimes featuring an auction, food prepared by notable Inland Northwest chefs and beverages from local wineries and breweries. Oct. 12 at 6 pm. $150. Red Lion at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. marchofdimes.com

Comedy

Stand-Up ComedyLocal comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) Open Mic ComedyLive stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Ages 21+. Chan’s Red Dragon, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) Short StacksLive improvised comedy show. Oct. 4 at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) Safari Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) ComedySportz Comedians from Seattle and Spokane face off in an audiencejudged comedy showdown. Oct. 5 at 7 pm. $8-$10. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-4045) Comedy Open MicStand-up comedy open mic night. Oct. 8 at 6 pm. Free. All-ages. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) Vicki Lawrence & MamaLive comedy show by the actress and comedian, in celebration of her character’s 40-year anniversary. Oct. 13 at 7:30 pm. $35$55. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700)

Community

Colville Corn MazePumpkin patch, corn maze and more. Through Oct. 31. Mon-Fri 4 pm to dusk, Fri 4-9 pm, SatSun 11 am-9 pm. $5-$7. Colville, Wash. colvillecornmaze.com (684-6751)

Spokane Fatherhood ProjectVolunteer fathers over age 30 are needed to mentor young fathers as part of the Spokane Fatherhood Project, a free service offered by Catholic Charities Spokane. Meets on Mondays from 5:30-7:30 pm. Location TBA. (455-4966) Incredible Corn MazeThree corn mazes, haunted maze (Oct.), drive-in movies (Saturdays in Oct. at 8 pm), pumpkin patch, concessions, games and more. Through Oct. 31, Fri 5-11 pm, Sat 11 am-11 pm, Sun noon-5 pm. Incredible Corn Maze, 3405 N. Beck Rd. (993-5242) Friends of the Library Book Sale Book sale offering books, books on tape, DVDs, CDs and more, with proceeds benefiting library programs. Oct. 4-5 from 10 am-4 pm. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. (893-8400) Blood DriveDonate blood to the Inland Northwest Blood Center’s blood bank. Oct. 4 from 8-11 am. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. inbcsaves. org (208-667-1865) Scarywood Annual haunted Halloween-themed festival and walk-through at Silverwood. Oct. 4-Nov. 1. Fri-Sat from 7 pm-1 am, Thu, Oct. 10, 17 and 24 from 6:30-11 pm, Nov. 1-2 from 7 pm-12 am. $21-$40. Silverwood Theme Park, Athol. scarywoodhaunt.com Family Dance and PotluckLearn circle, line, contra, folk and other styles of dance to live music. Oct. 4 at 7 pm. Potluck at 6:30 pm. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) Bark for LifeFundraiser dog walk benefiting the American Cancer Society, and honoring pets lost to cancer, featur-

Is your life controlled by drugs or alcohol? Take charge of your life. Call 1-800-939-CARE today. New Vision is a hospital-based medical stabilization program offering crisis intervention, assessment, screening, hospital admission, stabilization and discharge planning. The average length of stay is three days. 64 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013


ing vendors, adoptable pets and more. Oct. 5 from 11 am-2:43 pm. $10-$25. Whispering Pines Park, Eagle Ridge Community. relayforlife.org/barkspokanewa INTERFAITH POTLUCK Game night and potluck dinner hosted by the Spokane Interfaith Council and On Peace, Many Paths. Oct. 5 at 5 pm. Free, bring a dish to share. Bethany Presbyterian Church, 2607 S. Ray. onepeacemanypaths.org BOOKTOBER BOOK SALE The Spokane Humane Society’s annual used-book sale benefits the nonprofit, no-kill shelter. Oct. 5-6, Sat from 8 am-4 pm, Sun from 9 am-3 pm. Free admission. Spokane Humane Society, 6607 N. Havana St. (467-5235) SPOKANE CAREFEST Community rally against violence featuring cultural activities and demonstrations, resource fair, health fair, live entertainment and more. Oct. 5 from noon-7 pm. Mission Park, 1208 E. Mission Ave. spokanecarefest.us (270-6531) CDA EXPLORATION WEEK Workshops, activities and more throughout the week, during which Coeur d’Alene residents are asked to answer the question of what they want the city to be like by 2030. Oct. 7-11, dates, times and locations of events vary. Visit cda2030.org. GANG AWARENESS STRATEGIES Community workshop and discussion on realistic methods to addressing gangs within youth, presented by the Spokane Violent Crimes Gang Task Force. Oct. 8 from 6-8 pm, Southside Senior Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. Oct. 15 from 6-8 pm, Messiah Lutheran Church, 4202 N. Belt St. (835-4572)

ACT SIX SCHOLARSHIP INFO Informational sessions on the YMCA’s Act Six Scholarship program. Oct. 9 from 6:308 pm, Gonzaga University Jepson Center. Oct. 12 from 9:30-11 am, Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. actsix.org TOUR SPOKANE’S YOUTH & SENIOR CENTERS Nine Spokane-area youth and senior centers host open houses as part of “An Evening with the Young and the Restless,” featuring demonstrations, activities, information, live music and more. Oct. 9 Centers include: Corbin, East Central, Hillyard, Mid-City Concerns, Northeast Youth, Peaceful Valley, Project Joy, Sinto, Southside and West Central community centers. (535-0803) SPOOKY SPOKANE Walking tours highlighting haunted areas and buildings in downtown Spokane. Oct. 10-25, Thu-Fri at 7 pm. $15. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (624-1200) HAUNTED ZOMBIE HIKE 2nd annual fundraiser event benefiting the Riverside State Park Foundation, featuring a scary hike through woods filled with zombies. Oct. 11-26, Fri-Sat from 6:30-9:30 pm. $5, no Discover Pass required. Riverside State Park Equestrian Area, 3402 N. Aubrey L. White Pkwy. (465-5064) SPOKANE FIREFIGHTERS MEMORIAL Benefit auction to raise funds for a visual tribute to fallen Spokane firefighters, featuring music, hors d’oeuvres and more. Oct. 12 from 7-11 pm. $15. Mukogawa Fort Wright Commons, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. (998-3617) BULL-O-WEEN PARTY Dog costume par-

ty featuring Maddie the Gonzaga mascot, benefiting the Washington Basset Rescue and the Northwest Boxer Rescue. Oct. 12 from 6-8 pm. Free. George Gee Automotive, 21602 E. George Gee Ave., Liberty Lake. (210-2000)

ETC.

FALL FESTIVAL OF HOMES Tour 32 new homes constructed by 18 Spokanearea builders during the 9th annual event. Oct. 4-6 from 10 am-5 pm each day. Free. Locations vary. spokanefestivalofhomes.com ROTARY MEN OF FASHION Fashion show fundraiser featuring local Rotarians in a benefit for the Spokane Valley Rotary’s Books for Kids program. Oct. 4. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place. (290-5514) FALL ANTIQUE & COLLECTORS SALE Vintage and antique dealers, handmade and artisan items and more. Oct. 4-6, Fri 4-9 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm. $6 admission. Spokane Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. (924-0588) GENEALOGY WORKSHOP Workshops offered by the Eastern Wash. Genealogical Society, with potluck lunch and classes offered through the day. Oct. 5 from 9 am-3:30 pm. Country Homes Church, 8415 N. Wall St. (328-0786) EPIC BEARD COMPETITION Fundraising event benefiting the Spokane Guilds’ School, hosted by The Spokane Beard and Mustache Foundation. Oct. 5 at 7 pm. $5/spectators, $20/competitors. The Vault Social Club, 120 N. Wall St. facebook.com/SpokaneBeardMustache

THE INLANDER HAS THE SEASON OF SNOW COVERED. Look for the REGIONAL SKI MAP & FIVE PRINT EDITIONS in The Inlander throughout the season. MOUNTAIN UPDATES • EVENTS • EPIC REGIONAL JOURNEYS & MORE

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 65


events | calendar Body Soul Planet ExpoAlternative living expo and conference featuring vendors, workshops, presentations, demos and more. Oct. 5 from 9 am-6 pm. $8-$40. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bodysoulplanet.com (939-8740) Local Talent ShowTalent showcase featuring local models, actors, dancers, vocalists and other variety performers as part of the 2013 Star Searchin’ contest. Oct. 5 at 7 pm. $15-$18. All-ages. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. sp.knittingfactory.com (216-1535) Fire Protection ProjectVolunteer cleanup of the High Drive trail system to reduce fire risk, hosted by Friends of the Bluff. Oct. 5 from 9 am-noon. Meets at High Drive at 33rd Ave. (477-2157) Shabby Stems Vintage SaleVintage, handmade and antique items. Oct. 5 from 9 am-3 pm. Residence at 3225 W. 7th Ave. shabbystemsblogspot.com Share the Dharma DayGuided meditation, vegetarian potluck, discussions and talk on the topic of “What You’re Doing: Your Actions Have Results.” Oct. 6 from 9:45 am-3 pm. Sravasti Abbey, 692 Country Lane, Newport. (447-5549) Conflict Free CommunicationIntroductory workshop on communication that leads to understanding for teens and adults. Oct. 7 from 6-9 pm. Class meets for 8 weeks starting Oct. 14. Lutheran Community Services, 210 W. Sprague Ave. (343-5004) Become Debt FreeWorkshop hosted by STCU. Oct. 8 from 6-7 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (755-3980)

Affordable Care Act (Idaho) Info A representative from “Your Health Idaho” will be on hand to answer questions about the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) open enrollment process. Oct. 8 at 6:30 pm, Post Falls Library. (208-7731506) Oct. 10 at 6:30 pm, Athol Library. (208-683-2979) Prevent Identity TheftLearn to protect your finances in a workshop hosted by STCU. Oct. 10 from noon-1 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5307) Beyond Pink4th annual designer bra fashion show fundraiser to help pay for women to receive thermography breast scans. Oct. 11 from 5-9 pm. $35. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. beyondpink.net Veterans Estate Planning Clinic Free estate planning services and planning documents provided to veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces. Oct. 12 from 9 am-noon and 1-5 pm. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. Register online at wavetswillclinic.com/sign-up

Festival

Humanitas Inaugural world arts festival featuring world music, dance, cuisine, workshops and more. Oct. 3-5. All events free and open to the public. Washington State University, Pullman campus, locations vary. performingarts. wsu.edu/humanitas (335-8522) Art From the HeartCommunity celebration of arts featuring workshops, kids’ programs, concerts and more. Oct. 3-12, times and locations of events vary. artsincda.org (208-292-1629)

Apple FestivalActivities throughout Green Bluff’s member farms, including produce and fruit for sale, live music, local vendors, kids activities and more. Weekends through Oct. 27. Visit greenbluffgrowers.com for map of and hours for participating farms. Harvest PartyPotluck dessert, appetizers, beer tasting, kids’ activities and more. Oct. 4 from 6-10 pm. Main Market Co-op, 44 W. Main St. mainmarket.coop (458-2667) Spokane Renaissance FaireThird annual “Tournament of the Golden Apple,” a fundraising festival hosted by the Spokane Entertainers Guild, benefiting Second Harvest Food Bank. Oct. 5-6, $5-$10. Green Bluff, Cowgirl Co-op, 20424 N. Dunn Rd. theguild2010.org Oktoberfest Traditional Oktoberfest celebration featuring traditional German music, dancing, food, beer and wine and more. Oct. 5 from 6 pm-midnight. Ages 21+. $7-$10. German-American Society of Spokane, 25 W. Third Ave. (747-4626) Sandpoint OktoberfestLive music, dog costume contest, beer stein competitions, food, local vendors, traditional food and drink and more. Oct. 5 from 11 am-7 pm. Old Granary, 513 Oak St. sandpointchamber.org (208-263-2161)

Film

GMO-OMG Documentary on genetically modified organisms in food sources. Oct. 3-8, show times vary. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (209-2211) Not My LifeScreening of the documentary on human trafficking with a post-

film panel hosted by Sandie Morgan of the Global Center for Women & Justice. Oct. 3 at 6 pm. $8.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) The CroodsAnimated family film. Oct. 4 at 2:30 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. (208-667-1865) Deaf JamScreening of a film about a deaf teen who competes in poetry slams, hosted by the Gonzaga Unity Multicultural Education Center. Oct. 4 at 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-5835) Man of SteelDrive-in-style screening of the summer blockbuster. Oct. 4 at dusk. Free. SFCC Parking Lot No. 9, 3410 Ft. George Wright Dr. (533-4197) G-DogScreening of the award-winning documentary. Oct. 5 at 7:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) Faith, Film and Philosophy“Darwin Goes to the Movies: A Naturalistic View of Filmic Imagination” lecture by Gonzaga philosophy professor Richard McClelland. Oct. 9 at 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga, Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone Ave. (592-0377) Eight Men OutScreening of the film as part of the library’s “Great Films at the Library” series. Oct. 9 at 5:30 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5307) The Act of KillingScreening of the documentary on Indonesian gangsters who killed alleged communists in the country. Oct. 10 at 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (209-2211)

Faith, Film and Philosophy“Bedazzled, The Devil and Freedom” lecture by Katherin Rogers, philosophy professor at the University of Delaware. Oct. 10 at 7 pm. Free. Whitworth University, Weyerhaeuser Hall. (592-0377) Faith, Film and Philosophy“The Metaphysics of Elfland” lecture by Michael Foley, professor of patristics at Baylor University. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga, Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone Ave. (592-0377) Banff Radical ReelsScreening of the touring action sports film festival. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208-263-9191)

Food

Oktoberfest Release of Bavarianstyle beers, traditional German food, live music and more. Oct. 4-5. Republic Brewing Co., 26 Clark Ave., Republic, Wash. republicbrew.com (775-2700) Palouse Beer DinnerBeer tasting and three-course dinner hosted by local beer enthusiast Rick Bonino. Oct. 4 at 5:30 pm. $25-$45. On Sacred Grounds Coffee Shop, 12212 E. Palouse Hwy. (747-6294) Wine TastingSample selections from Vino’s Wine of the Month club. Oct. 4 from 3-6:30 pm. $10. Tasting with Kerloo Cellars of Walla Walla, Oct. 5 from 2-4:30 pm. $15. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) Zombie Pub CrawlZombie-themed pub crawl to downtown bars featuring live music, event T-shirts and more. Oct 5 at 6 pm. $20. Participating bars: nYne, Club 412, The Wave, Bowl’z Bitez & Spir-

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www.beyondpink.net A non-profit “Fun”-raiser with proceeds to go to women who can’t afford Thermography

66 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013


itz, Knitting Factory/The District, The Blind Buck, Lion’s Lair and the Satellite. facebook.com/spokanezombiecrawl KOMBUCHA TEA WORKSHOP Learn to make the sugar-sweetened, fermented tea. Oct. 5 from 11 am-1 pm. $22, registration required. Sun People Dry Goods, 32 W. Second Ave. sunpeopledrygoods.com (368-9378) GENETIC ROULETTE & I-522 Q&A Screening of the documentary on GMOs, followed by a Q&A session with volunteers in support of I-522. Oct. 5 at 4 pm, Shadle Library, Oct. 6 at 1 pm, Spokane Valley Baptist Church, Oct. 7 at North Spokane Library. CRAFT BEER & COOKIES Fundraising event featuring local craft beer paired with classic Girl Scout cookies. Oct. 5 from 4-8 pm. $20-$25, includes three 4 oz. tastings, cookies and a bratwurst. Ages 21+. Girl Scout Program Center, 1404 N. Ash St. (747-8091) LANDS COUNCIL BREWS CRUISE Third annual bicycle pub crawl benefiting The Lands Council, featuring stops at three Spokane breweries. Oct. 6 at 1 pm. $15-$20. (838-4912) CHATTAROY CHEESE OPEN HOUSE Visit the creamery for tours, river walks, activities, and products for sale. Oct. 6. Chattaroy Cheese, 23720 N. Crescent Rd. (238-9496) OKTOBERFEST COOKING German cooking class with Chef Bob Black. Oct. 9 at 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) SOUP FOR THE SOUL Participating restaurants are donating a portion of pro-

ceeds from sales of soup to supports Providence’s Arts in Healing program. Wednesdays from Oct. 2-30. For participating restaurants visit washington.providence.org/events SMOKED FOODS & BARBECUE Cooking class on wood-fired smoking with Chef Adam Hegsted. Oct. 9 from 6-8 pm. $50. Orlando’s, SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark.scc.spokane.edu COFFEE POUR COMPETITION Handbrewed coffee competition with judging on aroma, flavor, aftertaste and other characteristics, with prizes for 1st-3rd place. Oct. 11 from 7:30-10:30 pm. Free. Indaba Coffee, 1425 W. Broadway Ave. (443-3566)

MUSIC

BEVERLY MCCLELLAN Finalist on NBC’s The Voice performs a backto-school concert, hosted by EWU’s Pride Center. Oct. 3 at 4 pm. Free. EWU Pence Union Building. (359-7870) THE ALLIANCE Concert by the medieval-themed progressive rock band. Oct. 4 at 8 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) THE MET LIVE Live HD simulcast of the Metropolitan Opera performing Tchaikovsky’s “Eugene Onegin.” Oct. 5 at 9:55 am. $18-$24. Regal Cinemas Northtown and Riverstone (CdA) fathomevents.com OMAR FARUK TEKBILEK Sufi, Anatolian and Middle Eastern music style concert. Oct. 5 at 7:30 pm. $15-$20. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. (208-457-8950)

BAROQUE TUBAFEST Concert as part of KPBX’s Kids’ Concert series, featuring the Spokane Piston and Rotary Club’s tuba quartet. Oct. 5 at 1 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. (328-5729) PIANIST MARK VALENTI Master class concert. Oct. 5 at 8 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, Music Building Recital Hall, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3280) NORDIC SPIRIT Traditional Scandinavian music concert. Oct. 5 at 2 pm. $10. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) BON JOVI Rock concert. Oct. 6 at 7:30 pm. $60-$180. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (325-SEAT) NEW HORIZONS ORCHESTRA The musical group rehearses on Monday nights from 6:30-8:30 pm. $40/month membership. Holy Names Music Center, 3910 W. Custer Dr. (481-1753) BLAZE & KELLY Singer-songwriter concert. Oct. 10 at 7:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191) HEART Rock concert. Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm. $60. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Blvd., Pullman. ticketswest.com LIFE IN COLOR Electronic dance music paint party. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. $37-$60. Ages 16+. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (279-7000) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY “Picture This!” concert featuring the Whitworth University Orchestra. Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm, Oct. 12 at 2 pm. $8-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. cdasymphony.org (208-765-3883)

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OCTOBER 3, 20139/5/13 INLANDER 67 4:14 PM


relationships

Advice Goddess Office Despot

I just started a new job. My boss and I were having a meeting, and he started asking me about my personal life — whether I have a boyfriend, who I live with. No biggie. He then began grilling me as to why I don’t have a boyfriend and whether I’ve ever had one. I started deflecting these prying questions back to him, and he told me that he lives only with his younger brother, so he understands me well. Weird, but whatever. Well, amy alkon it turns out he actually has a wife and a 4-year-old daughter! This isn’t my first experience with managerial prying, either. In a previous job, my married manager scheduled after-work “meetings” with me, delving into non-work topics. When I’d go to leave, he’d say, “Sit down! You have nowhere to be!” My exit statement every time? “Uh, well…I have to change my cat’s litter.” I’m definitely leaving this job. My last boss was an ethical kinda guy, and that’s the kind of person I want to work for. —Creep Inc. Employee We usually feel sorry for a man who has lost his wife and child. Of course, this is usually a tragically permanent event; they don’t pop back into existence as soon as he gets home from taking a detailed ex-boyfriend history from his hot employee. Some people would tell you to sprint to the nearest sexual harassment lawyer’s office and sue your employers until they’re living out of a dumpster. The truth is, these cases can be hard to win; your supervisor can retaliate in ways that are hard to prove; and having a claim on the record can make it hard for you to get another job. Also, after a single creepy line of questioning from your boss (even one that makes you suspect that — eeuw! — he wishes he could make sex biscuits with you), you aren’t exactly ready to pick out an outfit to wear to court. Wayne State University law professor Kingsley Browne explains in “Biology at Work” that the “hostile environment” type of sexual harassment involves a work environment “permeated with sexuality.” Browne told me via email: “The legal question is whether the harassment is sufficiently ‘severe or pervasive,’ and the way you show that something is pervasive is to show that there’s a lot of it.” There’s probably no need for things to get to that point. As for your approach, if you’d like a role model, think more Sigourney Weaver in “Alien” than Bambi in “Bambi.” This doesn’t mean you pull out your flamethrower every time some guy says, “Hey, nice dress.” You just need to be firm and immediate in shutting down any situation that’s uncomfortable for you, and you did a superb job of that the last time. You didn’t go limp or hysterical; you coolly informed the guy that the closest he’d get to your personal life was a status update on your cat’s turds. You might also consider whether you should dial back on how bubbly and open you are at the office and maybe err on the side of a vibe that says, “Talk to me about some boring work question!” And here’s to finding a more admirable new boss — one whose remarkable qualities don’t include the ability to make his wife and child disappear without doing jail time.

Wane Man

Is it a no-no to just cut off communication to break up? I am 27 and was dating a 25-year-old guy for three months. This past month, he started texting way less, ignoring many of my texts, and making excuses not to hang out. Realizing he was taking the easy way out of dumping me, I blocked his number and email. If he was looking to ignore me until I went away, I figured I’d do the same. Help! It feels terrible ending things this way. —Regretful There are times a man can’t help but disappear on a woman, like when he���s kidnapped by revolutionaries who happened to stop off for Slurpees and hostages when he was at 7-Eleven. Otherwise, there’s only one good explanation for his not telling you it’s over: On the manliness scale, he’s a little old lady’s dishtowel. Where you go wrong is in letting his bad behavior shape your breakup behavior, effectively letting him shape who you are in a small way. Do the decent, adult thing. Call him and say something like, “I thought we should have a nicer ending than we did, so I just wanted to say thanks for the good times and wish you the best.” You’ll surely feel better ending things classy, and who knows, maybe he’ll be inspired by your example — at least enough for his next girlfriend to get the message when his mom calls to tell her it’s over. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

68 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

events | calendar

Performance

Step AfrikaPerformance by the professional dance company of the contemporary dance genre created by African American college students. Oct. 3 at 7:30 pm. Free. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Ave., Pullman. performingarts.wsu.edu (335-8522) Veggie Tales Live“Happy Birthday Bob & Larry” celebrating 20 years of the characters’ stories and songs. Oct. 4 at 7 pm. $18. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) Okaidja & Shokoto Traditional and contemporary African and world music performance as part of WSU’s Humanitas Festival. Oct. 4 at 10 am, Dahmen Barn, Uniontown. 7:30 pm at Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman campus. (335-8522) “Bad Girls” Play ReadingReaders theater performance of “Bad Girls, I’m Talking ‘Bout Them Bad Girls” in a benefit for Fields of Diamonds House of Blessings. Oct. 4 at 8 pm. $15. SCC Lair, 1810 N. Greene St. (443-5717) Aché BrasilPerformance by the touring performance group fusing the culture, traditions and music of Brazil. Oct. 5 at 7:30 pm. Free. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Ave., Pullman. performingarts.wsu.edu (335-8522) Costly DesiresMultimedia show on the issue of sex trafficking, presented by Seattle-based Drybones Artist Collective, incorporating dance, music and theater. Oct. 6 at 3 pm. $12-20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638)

Sports

Pro-West Rodeo FinalsRodeo circuit finals for Wash., Ore., Idaho and B.C. Oct. 4-5, Fri at 6 pm, Sat at 5 pm. $8-$10. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. kcfairgrounds.com (208-765-4969) Badminton Tournament12th annual Lilac City Badminton Tournament. Oct. 5-6, Sat 8 am-6 pm, Sun 9 amnoon. $25-$30. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602) Party in PinkZumbathon fundraiser benefiting Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Oct. 6 from 10 am-noon. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. $20-$25. (Packet pick-up and vendor fair Oct. 5 from 10 am-1 pm at The Warehouse, 800 N. Hamilton St.)

spokanepartyinpink.com Wilderness First Aid CourseTwoday course on basic wilderness medicine and other life support skills. Oct. 5-6. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu/wft (208-769-7809) Disk Golf TournamentThe 2013 General Store Open disk golf tournament. Oct. 5-6. Takes place at Highbridge, Downriver and Camp Sekani disk golf courses. (230-6149) Spokane ChiefsHockey game vs. Kelowna Rockets. Oct. 8 at 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (279-7000) Table Tennis Tournament2013 Spokane Ultimate Table Tennis Tournament, a four-star USATT-sanctioned event. Oct. 12-13. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602)

Theater

Brighton Beach MemoirsBroadway comedy by Neil Simon. Through Oct. 12, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat matinees at 2 pm on Oct. 5, 12. Sun at 2 pm. No performances on Oct. 3, 4. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. (455-7529) Les MisérablesStage musical adaptation of the Victor Hugo novel. Through Oct. 27, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $26-$33. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) Ordinary TimeDrama/satire by Spokane-based playwright Sandra Hosking. Oct. 3-13, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8-$10. Hartung Theatre, University of Idaho, Moscow. uidaho. edu/theatre (208-885-7212) The CounselorPerformed by Sandpoint Onstage. Through Oct. 12, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm. $10-$12. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. (208-263-9191) Ax of MurderPerformance of three one-act murder-mystery plays performed in a dinner theater format. Oct. 4-5, Oct. 11-12 and Oct. 18-19, dinner at 6:30 pm, show at 7:30 pm $12-$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off Hwy. 2, Newport. (208-448-1294) Enter Fairy GodmotherA fairy godmother gives lesser-known folktales a magical twist. Oct. 4-20, FriSun, show times vary. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia St. (328-4886) Capitol StepsPerformance of the musical as part of the Best of Broad-

way series. Oct. 6 at 6:30 pm. $25$38.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) Anything GoesPerformance of the Tony Award-winning musical as part of the Best of Broadway series. Oct. 10-13, times vary. $33-$73. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) Sacagawea Performance benefiting the SFCC Revelers Club. Oct. 10 at 7:30 pm. SFCC Spartan Theater, 3410 Ft. George Wright Dr. (533-3592) Murder at the BingMurder-mystery show performed by the Lion’s Share Theatre featuring audience-participation activities. Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm and 10 pm. $17-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638)

Visual Arts

Mapping the Spokane RiverGallery installation and community project featuring photos, stories, samples of river water from community members and more. Through Oct. 18. Lecture and reception Oct. 18 at 11:30 am. SFCC Fine Art Gallery, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org Robert Kraut“Castings & Wrappings,” from The Paintskin Continuum. Exhibition runs through Nov. 1. Gallery hours Mon-Fri 10 am-4 pm. Boswell Corner Gallery at North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave., CdA. nic.edu Palouse Watercolor SociusExhibition of members’ work featuring paintings in varying size and subject matter. Oct. 3-27, reception Oct. 6 from 1-3 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown, Wash. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) Terrain 6th annual juried art, music and performance art showcase featuring 200 submissions from local and emerging artists. Oct. 4 at 5 pm. Free. Music City Building, 1011 W. First Ave. terrainspokane.com Visual Arts TourLocal galleries and business host an extended version of First Friday, with more than 30 art exhibitions throughout Spokane. Oct. 4-5, starting Friday at 5 pm. Free. Locations vary. spokanearts.org For more information see page 39 or visit Inlander.com/FirstFriday. Harold Balazs & Mel McCuddin“Still Vertical” group show featuring all new work by the two prominent local artists. Oct. 4-Nov. 16, artist reception Oct.

Scenic Excursion

Train Rides “Autumn Colors”

Every Weekend In October

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

Twenty-mile roundtrip route through beautiful back country. Passing through the 800 ft Vail tunnel and crossing the Pend Oreille River

11 am | 1 pm | 3 pm Train leaves from Ione Station Tickets: $1500

Seniors 65+ & Children 2-12: $10 00 Children under 2 - Free

For information & reservations visit lionstrainrides.com or call 1-877-525-5226 Reservations highly recommended.


4 from 5-9 pm. Free, art sale proceeds benefit Spokane Art School. Tinman Gallery, 811 W. Garland Ave. (325-1500) Jim Van Gundy“Worth Fighting” photography exhibit. Oct. 4-Feb. 15, 2014. Reception Oct. 4 from 5-9 pm featuring live music. Clearstory Gallery, 1202 N. Government Way. (499-2678) Linda BesseNew works by the nationally recognized artist. Oct. 4-31, artist reception Oct. 4 from 4-7 pm. Gallery hours Tues-Fri 10 am-6 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm. Pacific Flyway Gallery, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. (747-0812) Jim Dine: A Self Portrait on the Walls Screening of the film about artist Jim Dine, who inspired the Jundt’s current exhibition “Drawn to the Wall V.” Oct. 5 at 1 and 3 pm. Free. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6611)

Words

Chet CaskeyThe local author reads from and signs copies of his new book “Haunted Spokane.” Oct. 3 at 7 pm. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Religion Scholar Dominic Crossan Lecture “Paul: An Appealing or Appalling Apostle?” Oct. 3 at 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Gonzaga University, Cataldo Hall. Presentations Oct. 4 at 10 am, 1:30 pm and 7 pm at St. Pius X Catholic Church, CdA. gonzaga.edu Father Robert Spitzer Lecture “The Contemporary Scientific Evidence for the Existence of God” lecture by the former president of Gonzaga

University. Oct. 3 at 6 pm. Free. Providence Auditorium at Sacred Heart, 101 W. 8th Ave. (838-1010) Nabeel Jabbour“The Muslims’ Worldview” lecture from the Syrianborn author. Oct. 3 at 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4516) Spokane Authors & Self Publishers The local literary group’s monthly meeting features speaker Russ Davis of Gray Dog Press on the topic of epublishing. Oct. 3 at 11 am. $10 buffet. Teppanyaki Buffet, 5504 N. Division St. (991-4011) Historian Douglas Brinkley“And That’s the Way It Is: Walter Cronkite and 20th Century Journalism” lecture as part of the Idaho Humanities Council’s 10th annual Distinguished Humanities Lecture and Dinner. Oct. 3 at 7 pm. CdA Resort, 115 S. Second St. (888-345-5346) Page Loves Stage PanelPanel discussion as part of the Individual World Poetry Slam, exploring the relation between performance poetry and literary works. Oct. 3 from 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) Tess TaylorReading and book signing by the award-winning poetry and author. Oct. 4 at 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) Individual World Poetry Slam Finals Events run Oct. 3-5 at various locations in Spokane. Culmination of the three-day individual poetry slam competition featuring 12 finalists is on Oct. 5 at 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. Full schedule at

iwps.poetryslam.com (227-7638) John Keeble Book LaunchThe author and professor emeritus at EWU releases his book “The Shadows of Owls.” Oct. 5 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) BootSlamPoetry slam night, open to all ages. Oct. 6 at 7 pm. $5 suggested donation. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) Linda WhittenbergReading, discussion and book signing with the former pastor of Spokane Unitarian Universalist Church. Oct. 6 at 1:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) Paul BogardReading and book signing by the author of “The End of Night.” Oct. 7 at 4 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) Is There a Soul?Reading and performance by Madeline McNeill, author of “Is There a Soul?” Oct. 8 from noon12:50 pm. Free. EWU JFK Library, Cheney. (359-2829) Sherman AlexieThe Inland Northwest native reads from his latest book “Blasphemy.” Oct. 9 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) Spokane is ReadingAnnual literacy event featuring presentations by best-selling author Maria Semple, of “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” Oct. 10 at 1 pm, Spokane Convention Center. Also at 7 pm at CenterPlace. spokaneisreading.org (444-5307) n

more events

Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

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INDOOR GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET

Hear Dr. Pat Dougherty, D.C. speak on

5100 Riverbend Ave. Post Falls, ID

“Using Nutrition to Be Healthy”

Greyhound Park & Event Center October 11 & 12 // 9am - 4pm

Admission 2 12 yrs & Under FREE Great Variety - Easy Access Free Parking Lots of Food, Drinks & Fun!! Vendor Space Available // For more info call 208-773-0545 ext 203 $ 00

] - 5:30pm m a 0 3 : 8 [ i. Mon. - Fr(509) 444-7355 lander.com : E N PHO BulletinBoard@In it Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Summ 1 : 20 IN PERSON Spokane, WA 99 Large Reward for return of cassettes of music removed from white Avalon recenty. No questions asked, 509-995-9420

FREE SQUARE DANCE FUN PARTY & ICE CREAM SOCIAL

Oct 4th at 8pm

North Spokane Dance Center

BARK FOR LIFE

A CANINE EVENT TO FIGHT CANCER

Western Dance Center

$25 per person | $50 per family includes event registration 5k walk begins at 10:00am | 5k run begins at 10:30am

EVERYONE WELCOME! Have fun & Stay in shape!

509.979.2607

squaredancespokane.org

INFO & TICKETS AT BODYSOULPLANET.COM

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

OCTOBER 5 | WHISPERING PINES PARK At EAGlE RIdGE

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The WSU Spokane Sleep Center needs smokers 22-40 willing to quit cold turkey. Earn up to $285. 509-3587756 for more info. IRB#13177

OCTOBER 5th SPOKANE, WA SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER

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Oct 5th & 11th at 8pm Smokers Wanting to Quit Needed

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5k “take a Bite Out of Cancer dog & Me Fun Run”

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Desert Jewels Nursery 10 Winners Chosen!

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36. Sign on a tip jar at a bakery? 41. Saucony rival 42. “And ____ called the light 40-Down”: Genesis 43. Org. for Federer 44. Speaker’s stand 46. Dude 48. HDTV feature, often 51. “How could you?!” 52. ____ Pieces 54. Onetime host of “The Tonight Show” 55. Sign on a tip jar at a pet store? 57. Kind of shark 60. Fifty bucks, perhaps 61. Cosmetics giant Lauder 62. Cereal brand that operates the website sillyrabbit.com 63. Kipling’s “Rikki-Tikki-____” 64. Manicurist’s file 65. MTV’s original target audience

66. Fashion designer Cassini 67. Viking language Down 1. “This Is 40” director 2. Actress Okonedo of “Hotel Rwanda” 3. World Cup event 4. Foreshadowers 5. Deck chair wood 6. NBA star who founded the summer program Kobe Basketball Academy 7. In any way 8. Roll out a product for a second time 9. “Great Taste. 0 Calories” sloganeer 10. Skyline obscurer 11. Prefix with system 12. “Dancing With the Stars” judge

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34. “____ be my pleasure” 36. First name in animation 37. Holiday party times 38. Accepted, as terms 39. Successful negotiation 40. “And 42-Across called the light ____”: Genesis 45. Afore 46. Yankee in “Pride of the Yankees” 47. Put into service 49. Works a wedding, perhaps 50. There may not be one “in the house” during a tearjerker 53. “Boardwalk Empire” actor Buscemi 54. California’s ____ Beach 55. Oscar-winning actor Jamie 56. Gung-ho 57. Part of a business sched. 58. Live and breathe 59. Relations


PHONE: (509) 444-SELL EMAIL: sales@inlander.com We’re clearing out the barn for the holiday season! Lots of amazing deals inside and out!!

ping

Dip Year Round Skinny (208) 686-8686

Volunteers wanted. The Crisis Response Advocate Team at Lutheran Community Services Northwest will begin it’s training on Tuesday, October 15th. Our advocates provide a 24/7 crisis line, response to hospitals and work with vicims of sexual assault and other major crimes. For those interested in fostering a safe environment where victims/survivors can tell their story and be heard without judgment please contact Sue Holly at

Relax Spa Foot Relax 30 min now

Maplewood Gardens Craft Fair Hotdog, & Pie Sale October 12th at 10am-2pm. 1100 N Superior St. Spokane. Come & find some new treasures! 509-489-9510

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72 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

It’s free

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Cheers

Taco TimeTo the blonde working at Taco Time on Tuesday evening in Northtown Mall. I was the dapper red head that kept asking for water cups so I could keep talking to you. I was really surprised to see someone with your personality working at Taco Time. Maybe we can get together sometime for coffee or Taco Bell?

the hospital while we got the boat to the takeout. When we arrived at the hospital 45 minutes later our friend was doing great and ready to head home. There is no doubt in our minds that you saved his life. Our friend may not have made another 45 minutes on the river. We asked that you leave a name but you didn’t so THANK YOU from three very grateful fisherman. The cold water your daughter gave us was much appreciated as well. We will all remember this act and play it forward.

days (and I’’m sorry I didn’t have a spare cig for you). Hillyard, never a dull moment. Wonderful accepting diverse people of Spokane, I will miss you too. I will miss the small/ big city life I had with you. I’ll miss not having to have an excuse to go downtown, because there was always something beautiful to see. Talented musicians playing for a buck outside of Olive Garden. Always someone you know coming around a corner and that awkward reunion with them. I’ll miss the artsy coffee drinking attitude I sense so often. I’ll even miss the drivers, ha ha. I built a life here and it was truly an adventure. Time for me to move on for good, but I will be back to visit. I hope others will take a look at the good in this city and feel grateful like I do. Thanks for the 13 years, Spokane. Yours, J

brighter. I went into the building to ask if anyone knew who had left the note so I could buy them a coffee or lunch, but no one knew. Thank you again. I will pay back your kind deed with kind deeds to others. Cheers!

Foothills Drive Driving down Foothills in a green Jeep with a sticker of some kind on the left of drivers side. I looked at you in the rear view and side mirrors of my golden or tan 4Runner. When we were at a light we looked at each other and I looked away quickly and smiled. Want to meet for coffee? Greyhound Park 9/21/13, Greyhound Park Post Falls ID. Jenny “FREE AGENT”- You and I met while tail gating @ ROCK HARD @ THE PARK, from then on we where nearly inseparable and were getting along great, up until I lost contact with you. When you went back to the mosh pit,and ( like an idiot) I didn’t follow you. Would like to reconnect with you again, if you would be interested in doing so also (and I’m hopeful that you are), please respond to this message, take care Tom (aka FLASH) Colville Super Onefor 9-11 Memorial Ride. You: tall, 6’3” or 6’4”. Me, blonde, with a group of 4 that had a “blonde bombshell”, my friend. All stops we made that day, our eyes met. Would love to take a spin on our bikes together.

You Saw Me Mona Lisa Smile I am a mature woman with a Mona Lisa smile. Will the mature man in the polo shirt give more detail as to where we may have exchanged mysterious smiles? RE: Rocket Bakery VanYes, love to have coffee, seems you know how to find me.

Cheers Lifesavers! Thank you to the Lifesavers from Liberty Lake that stopped on the freeway between Dry Creek and Superior, Montana on September 20th. Our friend was stung by a yellowjacket while we were floating the Clark Fork River and had a terrible reaction. The only option was to get him up to the freeway and hope someone would stop and take him the the ER in Superior. After a number of cars passed by you stopped and unbelieveably had an Epi-pen and benadryl in your emergency kit. After giving that our friend started doing better. You then took him to

Adieu We saw you now and then walking down the street, calling on your many fans. We saw you making new friends and being a friend to anyone you met. We saw you in the rain and we saw you in the sun. We saw you searching for

To connect

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” more and we saw you content to be you. We saw your heart and soul. Our community saw the “World’s Best Grandpa” and will miss your presence, your kindness. Your elders have awaited you, Zach. As your spirit soars with the eagles your serenity remains with us. We know you will be a great addition to Heaven as we look forward to meeting you again. Your Booze Brothers, family, fans and friends feel your absence. Your daughter would have been blessed to know you as you began your journey to find her. There is no word for ‘goodbye’ in Shoshone so we will remember to say Pehnaho in those when we catch your reflection unexpectedly. Adieu, Zach. Wonderful LadiesCheers, to the wonderful ladies I had the pleasure of waiting on September 24th for a birthday celebration. My car window was busted the evening of September 23rd (which was the first day of class) and my book bag, with all of my brand new books was stolen. I was considering cutting a class and using my tuition refund to purchase the books I had stolen from me, but your generosity allowed me to purchase one of my books. Thank you so much for your kindness! I promise to study hard. Much Love, Crash and Burn. My Lovely HomeI will miss the rocks and loud people at Boulder Beach. I will miss the fries and coffee at the Satellite. The nights of karaoke, dancing, and drag queens will never be forgotten. Plaza rats, you made life interesting on my errand

Happy Again!The deep blue water with the smell of sea salt a light breeze in the air, you by my side holding me firmly, gazing into your eyes. your kiss so tender makes me melt. I long for your passionate love that only you can offer. To know our souls belong is everything to me. My heart is happy again. Wonderful Customer Service To the long-haired guy at Starbucks Indian Trail, thanks for making us smile. Your humor and positive energy brighten the morning! Keep up the good work! Warm Thoughts Cheers to John in Hayden, who treated us professionally when we called to purchase wood from him. After going through the ringer with at least 15 other “wood suppliers”, we were exhausted, discouraged and stressed about what felt like a dead end road for our winter heating needs. Good communication and service from John means now I can sleep peacefully tonight knowing that we won’t be left freezing this winter.

Forever! You came into my work a little over a month ago. You just happened to come in with a mutual friend. Since the first moment of meeting you my life has forever been changed! I still have to pinch myself to make sure this is not a dream. I hope the magical moments that we share never end!! Thank You! September 24th. Cheers to the two lovely little girls dancing on the street corner having a blast. You precious angels could not have known how bad of a day I was having. It was horrible! Yet, as I drove past you two, a smile lit up my face from ear to ear! Seeing two girls dancing very silly with giant smiles on their faces looking up to see my reaction, made my day. Helped me in a way you two will never know but keep it up-keep up, you’re beautiful attitudes and a thousand “Thanks You’s” for making my horrible day special:-D Paying It ForwardI just want to say thank you to the man behind me in line at Safeway on 29th Ave. You and I were both waiting behind the old lady getting $200 worth of groceries at 11:00 PM and using half a dozen coupons to do so. Finally it was my turn to be rung up; $24.97 was my total. I paid with me new debit card which I was positive had the funds to cover the cost. Unfortunately my card was somehow declined. I got prepared to take my groceries back to the isles I found them when the man behind me in line with peppery dark hair and a suit that looks like it’s worth more than my car gave the cashier $30 to pay for my groceries. My first instinct was to decline his offer and to be honest I was offended, I didn’t need his handout. But when I told him, “you don’t have to do that” he looked at me and said with a smile “yes I do, pay it forward”. At that moment I realized this man knew he has more money that he knows what to do with

A Kind DeedTo whomever placed a note on my truck while it was parked out of the Inlander Building. At first I was concerned. Walking up to my car, the little yellow piece of paper tucked beneath my wiper blade looking like a glaring ticket, a punctuation mark in an otherwise trying day. I had had car troubles in the morning, electrical problems that kept my windows stuck down, and while I don’t keep anything of value in my Joshua P. is this week’s winner truck, I have had it stolen of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! before and wanted to take Send in your CHEERS so no chances. I parked in what you too can be enI thought was a free parking zone, but, as the note detailed, tered to win 1 dozen it is a limited loading zone. Still, “Cheers” cupcakes at the kind-hearted soul who left the Celebrations Sweet note also said that they had talked Boutique. me out of a ticket. Thank you so much for not making a bad a little

WINNER!!

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


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Cheers

Cheers

Jeers

and he was just trying to “pay it forward”. Thank you so much peppery hair man at Safeway, I will surely be paying it forward.

challenges and passing of time. I will always seek to find a way to be near you, in whatever capacity I am able.

I Love You DarlingTo my polka dotted man! You are everything I have ever wanted and I am so blessed to have you by my side. I love our inside jokes, the way your eyes light up when you laugh, having coffee and cigarettes in the morning and the fact my son adores you and you adore him, there is no better feeling. You are truly my best friend just as much as you are my lover. You have touched my soul and brought so much healing into my heart, there is no way I could ever repay you, but I want to spend the rest of my life trying to do just that. I love you, Dottie moo.

Bus RidersJeers to bus riders who step onto the bus and then proceed to fumble around in their pockets or purses looking for their bus pass or money, thereby delaying the bus from proceeding until they pay and sit the heck down. Considerate people have their fare ready BEFORE boarding the bus. The fact that a bus has stopped to pick you up should not be coming as a surprise, after all, you are waiting at a bus stop. So please, in the interest of being courteous to the other humans who are sharing your journey on public transportation, have your bus fare ready and accessible! Many thanks!

a reason. Maybe Mom didn’t make her payments? Maybe she was supporting your crack habit? You went on to insult every single person that walked by or into the Chase Building downtown. Do you know there are tons of others businesses leasing the offices in that building? Did you know that Chase does not even own that building? You were annoying as hell and made a fool of yourself. If the bank “stole” your mom’s house, I’m sure you could legally get it back, and yelling on the street is not the time or place. Peace set in once again the minute you left for your next fix btw.

I Have Found YouAs I dream and reflect on how this all came to be, my skin starts to prickling, my heart beats relentlessly...A long time ago, on ancient shores by the sea, your beauty, breathtaking, was how you first captured me. I fell hard for you then, my sword given for your royal keep, but lost you, so tragic, our love stricken, forever bound to sleep... So I harnessed my memory, trained and sharpened my thought, I set out to find you and undo what time tried, but surely could not... When in the instant I saw you and our stares once again met, I remembered your eyes, so familiar, like emeralds, ever haunting me yet... Then in that one moment of closeness, my body begins trembling as if on cue, I touched you, I kissed you, an explosion and suddenly I knew... Our love has awakened, spectacular, undeniable and so emphatically true, yes, my Queen... believe it... I have finally found you...

Jeers

You Are My LoveI spend everyday with you in my heart and mind, as I too, instinctively recognized that eternal magnetism that called us back together again. Our love and trust transcend much more than the now... so know that doubt has no place to interfere, despite the

Cause and EffectIf you are standing in any row between 1-10, you will be crushed and it isn’t the dude right behind you, it’s the other 5,000 behind him, so don’t get pissed off if you do get crushed or someone pushes up against you. Leave your 12 year old at home or don’t bring him to the front row against the railing, oh and also tell your wife to stay home to, cause no-one cares if she’s a woman, she will be crushed, and no I don’t enjoy getting that close to ugly chic’s at a rock concert, so no, I am not trying to feel her up! So getting pissed off and throwing a temper tantrum isn’t going to get you anywhere. Please contain your whining and complaining about the show ending at 10 pm and not about being in the front row and getting bumped into. I get so sick of the complaining and bitching by either of the above about getting crushed or slammed into! It’s a rock concert for God’s sake! Thanks the tall guy trying to enjoy the show and “Rock Hard @ the Park”!!!

Obnoxious Picketer at Chase: You were out there this morning (Tuesday) with a handmade cardboard sign that says who knows what. Yelling at the top of your lungs H E L D that JP Morgan D R A B T O A S P Chase “stole” A C E D R T E I your mother’s P O E M E E N O Z house. Really? Y A L E A P N E A They just don’t L A T T E A S K N A H T P O T take houses K C U L N I away from O I L S N O T S U R E people without E X T W E T C E O P I C K Y A K E D O U G H H T ’s D A E N W E K THIS WEEK! A T P G O D ERS W S N A V I A A L C D G U Y L E C T E R N A A R P S E R E E S T S K K I T T Y E H T D E E F E S T E E D E E R M A K O E M E R Y I V A T T R I X N O R S E O L E G G E N X jar tip

Unprofessional Jeers to all of the folks advertising wood for sale and being terrible with customer service and follow-up. My husband and I have called over 15 people regarding our wood needs over the last 2 months and have set up times for our delivery - often ending up wasting a day at home waiting around for a no-show. We are polite, have cash in hand, explain our needs and still feel like we are dealing with some of the most idiotic people around. If you’re offering a service and we are able to pay for it, please consider being professional and prompt ... and communicate with us. If you can’t follow through on a commitment, just say so! Re: Fellow Neighbor To the neighbor that jeered you for the noise, deal with it, you could be hearing them fighting and beating the crap out of each other, and to the obviously happy and passionately in love couple, cheers to you guys for letting the world know!!

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SmellsWhat a rant from the person finding perfume so offensive. Wonder what chicken farm he/she was raised on to think people only wear fragrance instead of taking a bath? If you have asthma at least there is medication for that. I wish there was medication for all the body odors and unwashed hair I have to endure downtown and on the bus. I’d much rather smell Chanel No. 5 on someone than old sweat and urine-stained clothes. Child Endangerment September 27th at Lindeke and 15th on railroad right-of-way a group of adults, evidently protesting coal trains, gleefully romped and mugged for a cameraman on the train tracks. That this group included, small children who were allowed to play on these tracks at worst you are, indicates their sad disregard for their children’s welfare. Protest all you want just don’t put your young children on the tracks. At best you are using them endangering them.

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OCTOBER 3, 2013 INLANDER 73


The Pet Whisperer After a near-death experience, Shirley Scott claims she acquired telepathic abilities BY CHEY SCOTT

W

hat Shirley Scott is telling me is eerily accurate. Scott, a pet communicator, has never met my cat, and the only two things she currently knows about Alice are her name and age, which I told the self-proclaimed pet clairvoyant seconds before. Over the phone from her rural home in eastern Oregon, Scott (no relation) tells me, between slight pauses, that Alice loves being an only cat and the center of attention — the “queen” of her domain, as she puts it. This is true, I agree, and Scott’s words give me chills because I joke all the time that Alice is the queen of the house. Scott continues, telling me other thoughts that Alice is supposedly communicating to her telepathically. My cat also doesn’t feel like she’s 10 years old, more like an energetic 7. By this point, I confess, I’m feeling slightly giddy over what Scott is saying. I later gush to coworkers and family about Scott’s insights. It’s then that I quickly return to reality as friends openly scoff, saying that simply knowing Alice’s age and that she’s an only cat would be enough to make educated guesses about her. The fantasy was nice while it lasted.

S

cott admits she’s not always 100-percent accurate with her psychic readings of animals or people, and encountering skepticism is something she’s become very familiar with over the years. But to her, the nonbe-

74 INLANDER OCTOBER 3, 2013

lievers don’t matter. “I don’t care if they believe if I can do it. It’s not about being right or wrong or trying to prove myself. I’ve proven [it to] myself and to my clients,” Scott says. She recalls doing a reading about five years ago for a couple in Portland who wanted to know if their cat, suffering from stomach cancer, was in pain and wanted to die. Yes, their cat was ready to go, Scott told them. Later, the couple contacted Scott again to see if she could check on their deceased cat’s spirit to see how it was doing, and if it was happy. “The cat was telling them it could eat well now,” she remembers. “All this information was coming through about that it felt great, and it had been met with other cats when it crossed over, and [the couple] started crying because they’d had four other cats in their lifetime,” Scott tells me, adding she had no prior knowledge of the couple’s four past cats. The first time Scott says she realized she could read animals’ thoughts was at a dog show in Moses Lake, Wash. While there, a woman approached Scott and said her dog, a Shih Tzu, would not behave properly in the ring, even though it had been extensively trained. Scott says she found out the dog was simply afraid of a hat one of the judges wore, and through her telepathy, she says, she was able to soothe the dog’s fears. It ended up winning first place.

JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

F

ourteen years ago, Scott, now 61, says she almost died after experiencing a severe allergic reaction to the artificial sweetener aspartame. After recovering, she says she’d acquired the ability to read people’s thoughts. She says her telepathy works like electricity, and she connects to subjects through the physical energy a person or animal’s thoughts emit into the universe. “If someone calls and tells me their dog’s name and they’re currently thinking about their dog, I get in touch with that energy,” she says. The animal then “talks” to Scott using mental images, but “sometimes, I actually hear words from them,” she adds. Besides telepathy, Scott believes experience from her past, such as a stint as a dog trainer for the Washington State Penitentiary’s prison dog training program, may have played a role in establishing her abilities. Dr. James Ha, a Seattle-based, board-certified animal behaviorist and psychology research professor at the University of Washington, doesn’t buy into the idea of communicating with animals through supernatural powers. “I have no issue with pet communicators — many are pure fakes — but many probably do know dog communication and language very well and are very sensitive to it,” Ha says. “Not everyone can see the subtle behaviors, and if you can, it gives you lots of clues, so maybe there is a natural ability.” For me, for a moment, it was indeed comforting thinking I could know what goes on in the mind of my beloved cat, Alice.  Pet communicator Shirley Scott hosts a workshop at the Body Soul Planet conference this weekend at the Spokane Convention Center, Oct. 5 at 3 pm. Visit bodysoulplanet.com.


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Inlander 10/3/2013