{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

HORSEMEN’S THE

JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


GULFSTREAM PARK

RACES

CHAMPIONSHIP MEET NOV29 - MAR29

EXPERIENCE WORLD-CLASS THOROUGHBRED RACING

901 S FEDERAL HIGHWAY // HALLANDALE BEACH // 954.454.7000 // GULFSTREAMPARK.COM


THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL CONTENTS | WINTER 2019 | VOLUME 66/#4

DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

02 Message from the National HBPA

07

31

37

Introducing Digital Tattoos

The Push to Administer Lasix at 24 Hours

A new Thoroughbred identification process will roll out in 2020

A look at what today’s science says

42 Shining a Light on Scopolamine and Environmental Contamination A commonsense examination of the circumstances is in order given the recent news about Justify

Industry News

20 14

HBPA News

18

Research & Medication Update

48

Affiliate News

Another All-Time High The 21st Claiming Crown sets new handle record at Gulfstream Park

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

1


MESSAGE FROM

THE CEO NATIONAL HBPA 3380 Paris Pike Lexington, KY 40511 P (859) 259-0451 F (859) 259-0452 racing@hbpa.org www.hbpa.org

PRESIDENT/ CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD Leroy Gessmann SECRETARY/ TREASURER Lynne Schuller CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Eric J. Hamelback VICE PRESIDENT EASTERN REGION Stephen Screnci VICE PRESIDENT SOUTHERN REGION Rick Hiles

W

e do not need to reinvent the wheel.

owners and trainers and a failure to assume responsibility

How do we as an industry fight

of the industry has led others to make decisions for them.

negatives cast against us when most are

Aside from the assimilation of prominent owners into the

not true? There is no doubt we all wanted

National Thoroughbred Association by John Gaines and Fred

to celebrate a successful Breeders’ Cup and showcase

Pope in the mid-1990s, no racehorse owners with their state,

everything that is magnificent about horse racing. Instead,

regional or national associations have made a concerted

mainstream media highlighted the fatality of Mongolian

effort to assert racehorse owners’ rights and interests with

Groom, who suffered a horrible injury to his left hind leg in

respect to the operating structures and business models

the Breeders’ Cup Classic.

of their industry. Instead, horsemen, including owners

The false narrative pushed by many in the media—even by some in our industry—is that our equine athletes are

distracted by years of efforts opposing proposed anti-Lasix

filled with performance-enhancing drugs while racing and

mandates, and as such, the current crisis has developed.

this contributes to fatal injuries. Most of us understand that

So I ask you: What organization exists with almost every

perception exists, and that it does create a serious problem

Thoroughbred industry alphabet soup at the table? Do the

for the industry. However, the vast majority of us know that

owners control that organization? Do the racetracks control

this created perception is not correct, and the facts prove

that organization? Does the breed registry control that

that. It pains me that one main problem is—and has

organization? What would the industry be like now if owners

been—the lack of a unified industry voice. What we truly

were the lead voice?

need is one messenger who promotes and defends

If our industry is to survive the challenges we are

our industry—not a racetrack, not a group or even a state.

facing, racehorse owners must support and join with one

We don’t need a federal bill for that—how do you see

voice under our elected horsemen’s representatives. Again,

American politics right now? Those of you who know me well

there is no need for a federal bill to accomplish this; we have

know I always push for industry participants to not “reinvent

the entities in place now. Owners must establish control

the wheel.” I have convinced stakeholders to not create a

and engage a coherent, owner-centric strategy enabling

new “TOBA,” I have talked people off the idea of creating

them to exercise the influence—commensurate with their

a new “breed registry,” and most recently tried to explain

investment in horse racing—to initiate the decision-making

to stakeholders that a governing body already exists in this

that will shape the course of the industry.

industry. Participants simply need to take control of the organizations that are currently operating. As I have noted before, horse racing is the only major

VICE PRESIDENT CENTRAL REGION Joe Davis

and trainers, have been forced to deal with and have been

industry in which the owners of the talent do not exercise primary control over the enterprise. This absence of an

We do not need to reinvent the wheel. Horsemen just need to take control of the steering wheel.

SINCERELY, ERIC J. HAMELBACK

established unified leadership voice among racehorse

VICE PRESIDENT WESTERN REGION J. Lloyd Yother

2

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


CONTRIBUTORS

THE

NATIONAL HBPA

AFFILIATES

WOULD LIKE TO THANK ITS CORPORATE

DENIS BLAKE

SPONSORS

BOARD OF DIRECTORS - AFFILIATES Dr. David Harrington, Alabama Norm Castiglione, Alberta Robert Hutton, Arizona Bill Walmsley, Arkansas David Milburn, British Columbia and Canadian National James Miller, Charles Town Kent Bamford, Colorado Chris Vaccaro, Finger Lakes Stephen Screnci, Florida Marta Loveland, Idaho Jim Watkins, Illinois Joe Davis, Indiana David McShane, Iowa Rick Hiles, Kentucky Benard Chatters, Louisiana Blaine McLaren, Manitoba George Kutlenios, Michigan Dr. Scott Rake, Minnesota Jami Poole, Mountaineer Park Robert Moser, Nebraska Anthony Spadea, New England Joe Poole, Ohio David Faulkner, Oklahoma Sue Leslie, Ontario Ron Sutton, Oregon Sandee Martin, Pennsylvania Eddie Esquirol, Saskatchewan Robert Jeffries, Tampa Bay Downs David Ross, Virginia Pat LePley, Washington

Dr. Kimberly Brewer Dr. Clara Fenger Eric Hamelback Jake Machin Judy L. Marchman Peter Sacopulos Dr. Thomas Tobin

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ackerley Images Benoit Photo Denis Blake Breeders’ Cup/Eclipse Sportswire Coady Photography Coglianese Photos Dustin Orona Photography Emerald Downs Cheryl Ann Quigley – stock.adobe.com Cody – stock.adobe.com Kellyvandellen – stock.adobe.com Mrak – stock.adobe.com Ruckzio – stock.adobe.com

STAFF Denis Blake Editor P (512) 695-4541 hj@hbpa.org Jennifer Vanier Allen Advertising Director P (716) 650-4011 F (509) 272-1640 jallen@hbpa.org Limb Design www.limbdesign.com Graphic Design THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL 3380 Paris Pike Lexington, KY 40511 P (512) 695-4541 F (859) 259-0452 hj@hbpa.org HBPA WEBSITE: www.hbpa.org COVER PHOTO: Leitone (Chi) wins the Claiming Crown Jewel at Gulfstream Park Photo by Coglianese Photos/ Ryan Thompson

The opinions, representations and viewpoints expressed by the authors in the articles contained in The Horsemen’s Journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions, representations and viewpoints or the official policies or positions of The Horsemen’s Journal, National Horsemen’s Administration Corporation or National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association Inc. and its affiliates (collectively “HJ”). HJ is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to or reliance on any information contained within this issue. Information in this issue may become outdated due to the rapidly changing nature of the horse industry. The publication of any advertisements or articles should not be construed as an endorsement of any product, service or position unless specifically stated. The Horsemen’s Journal, Volume 66 #4. Postal Information: The Horsemen’s Journal (ISSN 0018-5256) is published quarterly by the National Horsemen’s Administration Corporation, with publishing offices at P.O. Box 8645, Round Rock, TX 78683. Copyright 2019 all rights reserved. The Horsemen’s Journal is the official publication for members of the Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association, a representative association of Thoroughbred owners and

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

trainers. HBPA is a non-profit 501(c)6 Kentucky corporation. Members receive The Horsemen’s Journal as a benefit of membership paid by the national office from affiliate dues. Annual non-member subscriptions are $14. Single-copy back issues, if available, are $7. Canadian subscribers add $6. All other subscriptions outside the U.S. add $20 payable in U.S. funds. To order reprints or subscriptions, call (866) 245-1711. The HBPA National Board of Directors has determined that the publication of this periodical is necessary in the transaction of the public business required of the association. Views and opinions expressed are those of the authors and/or advertisers and do not necessarily represent the opinion or policy of the publisher or HBPA board or staff. Query the editor prior to sending any manuscripts. Periodicals Postage Paid at Round Rock, Texas and additional mailing offices. CANADA POST: Publications mail agreement no. 41530527. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: P. O. Box 503, RPO West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4R6. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Horsemen’s Journal, P.O. Box 911188, Lexington, KY 40591-1188.

3


OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of


6

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Breeders’ Cup Announces Strong Handle and Attendance Numbers

T

he Breeders’ Cup announced solid figures for common pool wagering and on-track attendance for the 2019 Breeders’ Cup World Championships, which took place at Santa Anita Park on November 1-2. Total handle for the two-day event was $174,000,574. Total common pool handle on Friday’s 10-race program was $56,517,228, and the total handle on Saturday’s 12-race program was $117,483,346. The total handle marks a new high for the event in the current two-day format and was an increase of 10.5 percent from last year’s handle at Churchill Downs. Saturday’s on-track attendance at Santa Anita was 67,811, completing a two-day attendance total of 109,054. A total of 41,243 attended on Friday. The

two-day attendance total was the fourth-highest among runnings with the two-day format and a slight decrease from the 112,667 reported last year at Churchill. This marked the 10th time the Breeders’ Cup was held at Santa Anita Park. The 2020 Breeders’ Cup will be held at Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Kentucky, and the 2021 event at Del Mar racetrack in Del Mar, California. Breeders’ Cup Chairman Fred Hertrich III said, “Breeders’ Cup would like to thank the staff and management at Santa Anita Park and The Stronach Group for their hard work and support of the 2019 World Championships, along with Arcadia, Pasadena and the surrounding communities, our loyal fans around the world and, especially, the owners, breeders and nominators who make our event possible. Last but certainly not least, Breeders’ Cup would like to recognize our equine athletes, the horsemen and women, grooms, jockeys, trainers, veterinary teams, security personnel and all volunteers for their tireless efforts and dedication to our event.”

Sixth Thoroughbred Owner Conference Focuses on Industry Progress and Need for Further Improvement

T

COURTESY OWNERVIEW

he sixth Thoroughbred Owner Conference, held in advance of the November 1-2 Breeders’ Cup World Championships at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, California, featured an emphasis on the various ways the industry has changed and progressed in recent years while acknowledging areas in which the sport needs to improve. The two-day conference, which was co-hosted by OwnerView and BloodHorse and presented by The Stronach Group, was attended by approximately 160 participants, including new, prospective and longtime horse owners.

LEGENDARY TRACK ANNOUNCER TOM DURKIN SERVED AS MASTER OF CEREMONIES FOR THE CONFERENCE.

The highlight of the event was the “State of the Industry” panel, which included insights from industry leaders Aidan Butler, chief strategy officer

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

and acting executive director of California Racing Operations for The Stronach Group; Everett Dobson, a trustee of Keeneland and the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association and a steward of The Jockey Club; Craig Fravel, president and chief executive officer of Breeders’ Cup Limited; James L. Gagliano, president and chief operating officer of The Jockey Club; and Kip Levin, the CEO of TVG and president and chief operating officer of FanDuel. Topics addressed by the panelists included medication rules, use of the whip, safety, the need for uniformity, sports betting and creating new fans. Butler delved into the steps that have been taken to improve safety at Santa Anita and efforts made by groups in California to come together given the tumultuous state of the industry. Levin discussed the need for large events to bring in fans. “We get 60 percent of our new customers around the Triple Crown events and the Breeders’ Cup,” he said. He also mentioned that TVG has made a concerted effort to tell the positive stories in horse racing. “We have spent a lot more time over the past year telling the good stories, and we are intending to do more of that,” he added. Other panels at the conference spanned a variety of topics including the business of ownership, syndicates, pedigrees and aftercare as well as insights from successful owners, trainers, jockeys and veterinarians. Attendees could also attend the Rood & Riddle Post Position Draw for the Breeders’ Cup, watch workouts from Santa Anita’s Trackside Breakfast Marquee, take tours of the track and enjoy a wine and dine. “We were pleased to bring the Thoroughbred Owner Conference back to Santa Anita this year, and the event again delivered on its goals to educate new and prospective owners on the intricacies of the Thoroughbred industry in a world-class setting,” said Gary Falter, project manager for OwnerView. “This conference provides an unmatched opportunity for owners to gain access to the sport’s most prominent and successful individuals.” Tom Durkin, the master of ceremonies, concluded the conference by announcing that the seventh Thoroughbred Owner Conference is planned for the summer of 2020 at Saratoga Race Course in New York. A video replay of all conference panels is available at ownerview.com.

7


Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit IX Scheduled for June 23, 2020

T

he Jockey Club and Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation announced that the ninth Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit will be held Tuesday, June 23, 2020, at the Keeneland sales pavilion in Lexington, Kentucky. The summit, which brings together a cross-section of the breeding, racing and veterinary communities, again will be underwritten and coordinated by The Jockey Club and Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation and hosted by the Keeneland Association. The first summit was held in October 2006. Subsequent editions were held in March 2008, June 2010, October 2012, July 2014, July 2015, July 2016 and June 2018. “The Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit demonstrates our industry’s dedication to the safety of our equine and human athletes,” said Jamie Haydon, president of Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation. “Improving health, safety and welfare are more important than ever, and this summit continually provides an opportunity for industry experts to share their best practices, research findings and offer recommendations. We are thankful for Keeneland’s support of this event since its inception.”

The summit is open to the public, and a live webcast will be available. A formal agenda and a list of speakers will be announced at a later date. Industry participants will be able to provide feedback on those issues they rank as most related to the safety, health and welfare of the industry through an online survey until the end of the year at surveymonkey.com/r/2020WSS. “Keeneland strongly supports the Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit, and we are honored to again host this important industry event,” Keeneland President and CEO Bill Thomason said. “Many of racing’s most exciting safety advances have germinated from these expert discussions, and it is critical that we continue this dialogue.” Among the major accomplishments that have evolved from the previous eight summits are the Equine Injury Database; the Jockey Injury Database; the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory; a uniform trainer test and study guide; the racing surfaces white paper and publication of educational bulletins for track maintenance; the publication of stallion durability statistics; the Hoof: Inside and Out DVD, available in English and Spanish; protocols for horses working off of the veterinarian’s list; recommended regulations that void the claim of horses suffering injuries during a race; and inclement weather protocols.

Applications Now Open for 2020 Thoroughbred Makeover

T

he Retired Racehorse Project announced that applications are open for the 2020 Thoroughbred Makeover, presented by Thoroughbred Charities of America. Applications will be accepted through January 15, and accepted trainers will be announced on February 15. Now in its sixth year, the Thoroughbred Makeover features competition in 10 disciplines for recently retired Thoroughbreds in their first year of retraining for a second career after racing. Disciplines include barrel racing, competitive trail, dressage, eventing, field hunters, freestyle, polo, show hunter, show jumper and ranch work. Horses and trainers will compete for more than $125,000 in total prize money, plus the coveted title of Thoroughbred Makeover Champion, at the Kentucky Horse Park on October 7-10. The Thoroughbred Makeover and National Symposium includes not just the competition, but educational seminars, a vendor fair, the Makeover Marketplace horse sale and the Makeover Master Class featuring demonstrations and insight from leading trainers. The Makeover finale features the top five horses in each discipline and will be livestreamed for viewers at home. “The Retired Racehorse Project was created to drive demand for Thoroughbreds after racing as sport horses, and the Thoroughbred Makeover

8

is one of the most successful executions of this mission,” said RRP Executive Director Jen Roytz. “Each year the event has grown in both size and scope and we’re seeing more and more Makeover graduates representing the breed on the national stage.” The Thoroughbred Makeover is open to professionals, amateurs, juniors (ages 12 and older) and teams. Applicants are required to provide information about their riding and competition background as well as references, including one from a veterinarian. Applicants are encouraged to provide links to riding video, which is a requirement for first-time competitors. Competitors do not need to have acquired their horse at the time of application, though they must declare their horse no later than July 31. Approved trainers may acquire eligible Thoroughbreds through whatever source they choose or can ride under contract for an owner. Eligible horses must have raced or had a published work on or after July 1, 2018, and must not have started retraining for a second career prior to December 1, 2019, other than a maximum of 15 allowable rides. The 2020 Thoroughbred Makeover Rulebook outlines all rules and information relevant to the competition, with changes for 2020 marked in red and clarifying information marked in blue. The Thoroughbred Makeover is made possible each year by the generosity and support of sponsors and donors. In addition to the Makeover, the RRP publishes Off-Track Thoroughbred Magazine; maintains the Retired Racehorse Resource Directory, the online Thoroughbred Sport Tracker (the only user-driven database for Thoroughbred bloodlines in second careers) and a library of educational materials online; and produces educational demonstrations around the country at clinics and expos, all with the goal of increasing demand for Thoroughbreds in second careers. For more information, go to retiredracehorseproject.org.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


Thoroughbred Industry Employee Award Winners Announced for 2019

T

he Thoroughbred Industry Employee Awards, now in its fourth year in the United States, was presented October 11 with Keeneland hosting the ceremony in Lexington, Kentucky. Jill Byrne, vice president of racing operations at Colonial Downs, was once again the master of ceremonies, with Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott on hand to present the awards. Jimmy Bell, president of Godolphin in America, commented, “Keeneland has always been such a great philanthropic partner to many, not only in the local community, but to the Thoroughbred industry as a whole. We sincerely appreciate their generosity once again in hosting this year’s awards ceremony. Thank you to our corporate and media partners who are crucial players in the implementation and facilitation of this months-long process and spreading the

D edication to Racing Award Winner: Leslie McCall, Stable Pony Rider, Moquett Racing (Runners-up: Cristobal Trejo, Groom, Tomlinson Thoroughbred Training; Janeen Painter, Exercise Rider, Richard Mandella) D edication to Breeding Award Winner: Ernest Blair, Senior Broodmare and Sales Assistant, Lane’s End Farm (Runners-up: Barrett Midkiff, Horse Transport, Taylor Made Farm; Steve Clark, Stallion Groom, Godolphin at Jonabell) Newcomer Award Winner: Amy Stokes, Management Assistant, Godolphin at Stonerside (Runners-up: Courtney Schneider, Director of Sales, Shawhan Place; Michael Norris, Foreman, Katherine Ritvo Racing Stable

COURTESY TIEA

Thoroughbred Industry Community Award Winner: Bobby Lillis, Executive Director, Maryland Horsemen’s Assistance Foundation The Thoroughbred Industry Employee Awards, with total prize money of $128,000, was managed and administered by The Jockey Club, the National HBPA and TOBA. Media partners are Thoroughbred Daily News, BloodHorse, Daily Racing Form, The Paulick Report and TVG.

A TOTAL OF $128,000 IN PRIZE MONEY WAS AWARDED TO THE WINNERS.

word about these important awards. To the nominators, thank you. If not for you we wouldn’t be able shine the spotlight on all of these deserving people that dedicate their lives to taking care of these magnificent animals. And last but not least, congratulations to all the nominees, finalists and winners. We hope that by being recognized for your hard work that you know that you are truly appreciated and placed in the highest regard and we are forever in your debt.” Dan Metzger, president of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association, said, “Although this is a different year for these awards, one thing that hasn’t changed during the first four years is a common theme of tremendous talent and dedication of the candidates. These are the people that are so vital to our racing and breeding industry and it’s just tremendous to see them being recognized in this way. And on behalf of TOBA, The Jockey Club and the National HBPA, thank you to Godolphin for bringing this program to America and for allowing us to be industry partners in such a great event.” The full list of winners and runners-up is as follows: Administration Award Winner: Bessie Gruwell, Executive Director, Delaware Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association (Runners-up: Andrea Greathouse, Sales Coordinator, Paramount Sales; Maria Catignani, Executive Director, Charles Town HBPA) Leadership in Racing Award Winner: Saul Castellanos, Assistant Trainer, Mark Hennig Racing Stable (Runners-up: Destin Heath, Assistant Trainer, WinStar Farm; Thomas Brandebourger, Assistant Trainer, Chad Brown) Leadership in Breeding Award Winner: Jenny Carpenter, Farm Manager, Buttonwood Farm (Runners-up: Joe Peel, Stallion Manager, Claiborne Farm; Mark Cunningham, Farm Manager, Airdrie Stud)

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

9


The Jockey Club Releases 2018 and 2019 Breeding Statistics

T

he Jockey Club reported that 1,630 stallions covered 32,508 mares in North America during 2018, according to statistics compiled through September 26, 2019. These breedings have resulted in 20,363 live foals of 2019 being reported to The Jockey Club on Live Foal Reports. The Jockey Club estimates that the number of live foals reported so far is approximately 90 percent complete. The reporting of live foals of 2019 is down 3.6 percent from last year at this time when The Jockey Club had received reports for 21,130 live foals of 2018. In addition to the 2019 live foal report total through September 26, The Jockey Club also received 2,405 No Foal Reports for the 2019 foaling season. Ultimately, the 2019 registered foal crop is projected to reach 20,800. The number of stallions declined 8.3 percent from the 1,778 reported for 2017 at this time last year, while the number of mares bred declined 5.2 percent from the 34,288 reported for 2017. The 2018 breeding statistics are available alphabetically by stallion name on the Fact Book page, found under the Resources link on The Jockey Club homepage at jockeyclub.com. Kentucky annually leads all states and provinces in terms of Thoroughbred breeding activity. Kentucky-based stallions accounted for 53.7 percent of the mares reported bred in North America in 2018 and 59.9 percent of the live foals reported for 2019. The 17,446 mares reported bred to 241 Kentucky stallions in 2018 have produced 12,200 live foals, a 1.4 percent decrease on the 12,370 Kentucky-sired live foals of 2018 reported at this time last year. The number of mares reported bred to Kentucky stallions in 2018 increased 0.3 percent compared to the 17,401 reported for 2017 at this time last year. Among the 10 states and provinces with the most mares covered in 2018, three produced more live foals in 2019 than in 2018 as reported at this time last year: California, Louisiana and Maryland. The Jockey Club also released Report of Mares Bred (RMB) statistics for the 2019 breeding season. Based on RMBs received through October 16, The Jockey Club reports that 1,134 stallions covered 29,218 mares in North America during 2019.

The Jockey Club estimates an additional 2,500 to 3,500 mares will be reported as bred during the 2019 breeding season. The number of stallions declined 6.6 percent from the 1,214 reported at this time in 2018, and the number of mares bred decreased 3.5 percent from the 30,274 reported last year. Consistent with prior years’ reporting of stallions by book size, the number of stallions covering 125 or more mares increased from 62 in 2018 to 65 in 2019. Further book size analysis shows a 6.7 percent increase in the number of mares bred to stallions with a book size of 125 or more in 2019 as compared to 2018 numbers reported at this time last year; a 9.1 percent decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 100 and 124; a 9.1 percent decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 75 and 99; a 16.7 percent decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 50 and 74; a 12.4 percent decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 25 and 49; and a 1.0 percent increase in mares bred to stallions with a book size fewer than 25. The percentage of broodmares covered by stallions serving 125 or more mares increased from 31.9 percent in 2018 to 35.3 percent in 2019. From 2015 to 2017, this percentage had remained fairly constant at approximately 29 percent, up from 20.5 percent in 2014. The proportion of stallions with book sizes of 125 or more mares grew from 5.1 percent in 2018 to 5.7 percent in 2019. It had previously grown from 3.1 percent in 2014 to 4.5 percent in 2015–2017. RMB statistics for all reported stallions in 2019 are available through the Fact Book section of The Jockey Club’s website. The stallions Justify and Mendelssohn led all stallions with 252 mares bred by each in 2019. Rounding out the top five by number of RMBs were Into Mischief, 241; Uncle Mo, 241; and Goldencents, 239. During 2019, Kentucky’s 220 reported stallions covered 17,123 mares, or 58.6 percent of all of the mares reported bred in North America. The number of mares bred to Kentucky stallions decreased 1.1 percent compared with the 17,322 reported at this time last year. Of the top 10 states and provinces by number of mares reported bred in 2019, Pennsylvania and Oklahoma stallions covered more mares in 2019 than in 2018, as reported at this time last year.

TAA Announces Accreditation of 40 Organizations

T

he Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance announced that 40 Thoroughbred aftercare organizations have been awarded accreditation effective immediately. The list includes 32 organizations that were reaccredited and eight that received accreditation for the first time. The TAA, the only accrediting body in Thoroughbred aftercare, now has a network of 74 organization with approximately 160 facilities in North America. “Congratulations to the aftercare organizations that earned TAA accreditation this year,” TAA President Mike Meuser said. “The process isn’t easy, and every accredited organization should be proud to reach these high standards of operation.” The 40 organizations that received accreditation this year are ACTT Naturally, After the Homestretch, After the Track, Akindale Thoroughbred Rescue, Beyond the Roses, Blue Bloods Thoroughbred Adoption and Placement, Brook Hill Retirement Center for Horses, CANTER California, Days End Farm Horse Rescue, Equine Encore Foundation, Equine Rescue of Aiken, Florida TRAC, Hope

10

After Racing Thoroughbreds, Horse and Hound Rescue Foundation, Kentucky Equine Adoption Center, Life Horse Inc. at Breezy Hill, LongRun Thoroughbred Retirement Society, LOPE Texas, Lucky Orphans Horse Rescue, MidAtlantic Horse Rescue, Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center, New Beginnings Thoroughbreds, New Stride Thoroughbred Adoption Society, New Vocations, Old Friends, Peaceful Ridge Rescue for Horses, Racing for Home, Redwings Horse Sanctuary, ReRun, Southern California Thoroughbred Rescue, Second Wind Thoroughbred Project, South Florida SPCA, The Exceller Fund, Thoroughbred Placement Resources, Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation, Thoroughbred Retirement of Tampa, United Pegasus Foundation and Win Place Home. TAA-accredited organizations undergo a thorough application and inspection process prior to accreditation being awarded to ensure they meet the TAA’s Code of Standards, which cover five key areas: operations, education, horse health care management, facility standards and services, and adoption policies and protocols. Facility inspections are conducted at all facilities housing Thoroughbreds for each organization. Ongoing updates and reinspections are

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


required of all organizations as a condition of TAA accreditation. Initially, organizations will be reaccredited every other year, with intervening random inspections to ensure that the Code of Standards are consistently upheld. All organizations that hold TAA accreditation are eligible to receive financial grants to support the care of their Thoroughbreds. Grant applications were being reviewed and the total grant amount awarded by the TAA was

to be announced in December. To date, the TAA has awarded almost $14 million to accredited organizations. The full list of 74 accredited organizations, information about the accreditation process and TAA’s Code of Standards can be found at thoroughbredaftercare.org.

Foal Patrol to Return for a Third Season

T

he National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame will debut Foal Patrol Season 3 online on December 27 at foalpatrol.com. Also, a family-friendly celebration of the new season, “Foal Patrol Kids!,” will take place at the museum in Saratoga Springs, New York, that day from 10 a.m. to noon. This open house event will feature numerous educational and entertainment initiatives relating to Foal Patrol with free museum admission throughout the day. The first two seasons of Foal Patrol, a one-of-a-kind collection of

live cameras following the daily activities of in-foal mares, had more than three million views from December 2017 through September 2019. The museum will reveal the farms and horses participating in Foal Patrol Season 3 in advance. Weekly announcements will lead up to Season 3, which will feature a new farm, new stallion and a Hall of Fame mare among its many highlights. The “Foal Patrol Kids!” event at the museum will include a variety of fun and educational activities, as well as healthy snacks, giveaways and special guests. Visitors are invited to explore the Foal Patrol website on museum iPads to learn about the new in-foal mares, participate in an arts and crafts activity, ride an equipony and see the HorsePlay! Gallery to groom a life-sized stuffed animal horse, dress in jockey attire and investigate objects related to the many careers associated with horse racing. HJ

THE GRASS IS GETTING GREENER IN TEXAS! With an additional $25 million expected to be pumped into Texas racing and breeding each year, now is the perfect time to bring an infoal broodmare in from out of state and then breed her back to one of the many top stallions standing in the Lone Star State. All you need to do is have her accredited and in the state before she foals, and you can take advantage of the new funds!

he Miss t Don’t 2YOs Texas Sale ining in Tra t ril 3 a on Ap k! a P tar r Lone S

For more information, call the Texas Thoroughbred Association office at 512-458-6133 or go to texasthoroughbred.com.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

11


ARE YOU COVERED?

OWNERS’ AND TRAINERS’ LIABILITY PROGRAM THROUGH THE STARNET INSURANCE COMPANY Endorsed by

THE NATIONAL HORSEMEN’S BENEVOLENT & PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION, INC. WHAT IS IT? A program to protect your assets in case of an injury or damage to property arising from your equine activities (breeding, racing, sales, training). This is not a substitute for workers’ compensation coverage. HOW MUCH DOES IT COST? $90 per horse and $180 minimum premium—Beginning November 1st WHAT DOES IT COVER? • Liability claims arising from injuries to participants (non-employee jockeys and exercise riders) • Contractual liability (i.e. hold harmless in Race Track Stall Agreements) • Premises and Operations liability coverage for all equine operations including breeding, boarding, training and racing HOW MUCH DOES IT COVER? Each member additional insured has their own $1,000,000 coverage for each occurrence or offense and $2,000,000 general aggregate. Damage to premises rented to you or occupied by you with the permission of the owner is provided with a limit of $50,000. Medical Payments coverage applies as well in the amount of $5,000 per person.

WWW.LAVININSURANCE.COM PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: STONE LANE, LLC (KEVIN S. LAVIN)

P.O. BOX 1001 PEWEE VALLEY, KENTUCKY 40056 — 502.228.1600 (TELEPHONE) — 502.638.5060 (FAX) 12

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


IOWA NEW MARE BONUS NOMINATION FORM

For Mares that have never foaled in the State of Iowa or Maiden Mares for 2020 Foaling Season

RECEIVE UP TO $20,000 BONUS BY FOALING YOUR NEW OR MAIDEN MARE IN IOWA By nominating your mare, you are eligible for a $10,000 Bonus if that foal is the leading money earner (from mares nominated) at Prairie Meadows for any season, starting in 2022. That foal is only eligible to win the Bonus one year.  $5,000 Bonus if that foal went through the sales ring as a weanling or yearling during the

ITBOA Fall Sale.

 $5,000 Bonus if the foal is by a stallion that sold in the Dec. 2018 ITBOA Stallion

Season Auction.

TOTAL OF $20,000 IN BONUSES AVAILABLE

This is non-transferrable. Bonus will only be paid to the Breeder of the foal, as long as it is the same entity that nominates the mare. Name of New or Maiden Mare:

Sire:

Dam:

2020 Foal Sired By:

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________

Nomination Schedule: July 1, 2020 ……….……….…..$200.00 (ITBOA Members) $300 (non-members)

Late entries by September 1, 2020 ………...………..$500.00 OWNER_____________________________________________________

I have enclosed payment to the ITBOA for

ADDRESS___________________________________________________

$___________

CITY__________________________ST________ZIP________________

Please return this form with payment to the ITBOA Office: 1 Prairie Meadows Dr. Altoona, IA 50009

TELEPHONE___________________E-MAIL:______________________

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call the ITBOA Office at 1-800-577-1097 or email at: itboa@msn.com FOR OFFICE USE ONLY:

Received:

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

Check #:

Amount:

13


NEWS

COADY PHOTOGRAPHY

HBPA NEWS

NATIONAL HBPA CONVENTION SET FOR OAKLAWN RACING AND GAMING IN MARCH The National HBPA is pleased to announce that its 2020 annual convention will be held March 24-28 at Oaklawn Racing and Gaming in Hot Springs, Arkansas. The Arkansas HBPA is hosting the event. The Embassy Suites in Hot Springs will serve as the convention hotel, with a room reservation deadline of February 24. Reservations can be made by calling (800) 445-8667 or through the convention page on the NHBPA website at hbpa.org. 14

“Oaklawn and the Arkansas HBPA are shining examples of success in our industry,” NHBPA CEO Eric Hamelback said. “We are really excited to bring our members to Hot Springs, and I anticipate a strong slate of speakers and seminars as we continually work to improve this great industry.” More information about the convention, including registration details and the agenda, will be posted soon at hbpa.org.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


NEARLY 1,000 STAKEHOLDERS FROM ACROSS THE RACING INDUSTRY SIGN PUBLIC LETTER IN SUPPORT OF PROTECTING LASIX AS A RACE-DAY CHOICE A unified industry group believes banning Lasix will adversely impact the health and welfare of racehorses as well as the strength of the industry. On September 20, a letter (included below) was released by the National HBPA with more than 600 signatures in support of protecting Lasix as a choice for horsemen and veterinarians to administer on race day for the well-being of equine and human athletes. The initial round of signatures from racing stakeholders featured individuals from across the industry, and since the initial announcement, the list has grown to nearly 1,000 names. Signatures will continue to be collected going forward. To view the complete list of horsemen who have signed the letter, or to be added to the list, go to hbpa.org.

Public Letter on Stance to NOT Eliminate the Choice to Administer Lasix on Race Day A recent open letter proclaimed that “horse racing is at a pivotal moment in its long history in the United States.” On this we agree. We also agree all of us love and cherish the equine athletes upon which our industry is built. To that end we believe in practicing the highest standards of horsemanship, and we continually work to improve the care, health and safety of our Thoroughbred racehorses. In that regard, we support horsemen and our veterinarians having the continued option to run a horse with a race-day administration of the therapeutic and protective medication furosemide (Lasix). We, too, are ready for change and will eagerly embrace change if the alterations are done for the greater good of equine health and welfare. We are committed to reforms emphasizing transparency and developments that will

address misunderstandings from those in the non-racing public as well as ensuring our horses are treated with the highest degree of care. The eradication of our choice to administer race-day Lasix will not do any of those things. It is our belief that banning Lasix will adversely impact the health and welfare of our racehorses as well as the strength of our industry. Research also proves an increased number of horses will bleed significantly out of their nostrils or in their lungs, and an increased number will die. We understand and agree things can and should be done to improve the safety and welfare of our equine athletes. It is just as important to understand what is NOT causing catastrophic injuries as it is to understand the underlying causes. Many continue to claim Lasix will interfere with post-race drug testing due to dilution, but this argument has long been disproven. Lasix is a shortacting diuretic, and the dilution effect is gone in two hours. However, the tightly regulated administration of Lasix is required four hours before a race. Thus, Lasix has no ability to interfere with blood or urine testing after a race. No one takes our stance on this position casually, but we believe we must not be led down a path created by perception and not facts. For this reason, we must stand for what is in the best interest and safety for our equine and human athletes. “Lasix has proven to be an effective and benign therapeutic remedy for bleeding and is more humane than taking away a horse’s access to water,” said Steve Crist, a horse owner and retired chairman of Daily Racing Form. “The current, well-regulated system of administration and disclosure works well for horses, horsemen and horseplayers alike. Criminalizing its use would be a huge step backwards for American racing and its customers.”

NATIONAL HBPA CEO: WE APPRECIATE ANNOUNCEMENT OF COALITION SEEKING IMPROVED SAFETY WITH TRANSPARENCY, ACCOUNTABILITY On November 19, several of the nation’s leading Thoroughbred racetracks and the Breeders’ Cup announced the creation of an effort to unify the industry in enhancing existing protections and working together to develop new reforms to ensure the safety of the sport’s equine and human athletes. Eric Hamelback, the CEO of the National HBPA, released the following statement in response: “We applaud the group, announced as the Thoroughbred Safety Coalition, which seeks to create and implement a series of significant safety, medication, operational and integrity guidelines across Thoroughbred racing to ensure the well-being of horses and jockeys and to increase transparency and accountability. “As CEO of the National HBPA, I—along with all HBPA members—have always been focused on the health and safety of the horse, the safety of the jockey and the safety of all individuals coming into contact with the horse. I firmly believe in being open, honest and transparent and insisting on the highest standards of horsemanship, and the HBPA continually seeks ways to improve the care, health and safety of Thoroughbred racehorses. We owe it to our industry’s athletes to ensure each horse is given the protection and attention it deserves—because two lives depend on us doing so. “Certainly it was made clear from their announcement that the founding members are open to other important organizations providing input and direction toward the coalition efforts. We look forward to working with the coalition members to ensure the safety and integrity of our industry.” THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

The founding members of the coalition are Churchill Downs Inc., Keeneland Association Inc., New York Racing Association Inc., Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, The Stronach Group and Breeders’ Cup Ltd. Following are excerpts from a news release announcing the coalition: “Thoroughbred racing is steeped in tradition, and we want the sport to live on for generations to come, and that is only possible with all of us working together to ensure that the safety and well-being of our athletes is our top priority,” Breeders’ Cup president and CEO Drew Fleming said. “Protecting the health and welfare of our athletes is a complicated question that requires a multifaceted approach,” said Bill Thomason, president and CEO of Keeneland. “That’s why we are implementing significant measures across the sport—from the quality of our track surfaces to ensuring horses are fit to run each and every time through medication reforms and enhanced veterinary examinations. There is no single solution, and we are committed to finding the right answers, wherever that may lead us.” “The Thoroughbred Safety Coalition presents an opportunity for the sport to adopt a set of best practices with a unified approach to equine safety,” NYRA president and CEO David O’Rourke said. “We look forward to advancing these efforts, communicating directly with the public and broadening the coalition in the coming weeks and months.” For more information, go to thoroughbredsafetycoalition.com. HJ 15


OFFICIAL SPONSOR OFFICIAL SPONSOR of the the National of NationalHBPA HBPA

“I look at the DRF breeding news site every morning ... I’m also a fan of the new DRF sire performance standings.” Kent Barnes Stallion Manager, Shadwell Farm

“I’m on the DRF website all the time!”

Carrie Brogden Machmer Hall, Select Sales

“At WinStar, we rely on the DRF for useful racing data, and as a marketing tool that reaches a wide audience.” Elliott Walden President/CEO & Racing Manager, WinStar Farm


DRF BREEDING Where pedigree meets performance

“Daily Racing Form has all the data that I need to make decisions on buying, selling, breeding and every other decision I make on a daily basis.” David Ingordo Ingordo Bloodstock, LLC

“Daily Racing Form is very pertinent to our day-to-day business at Calumet.” Jak Knelman Director of Stallions, Calumet Farms

“We find the Daily Racing Form to be indispensable to our business.” Ned Toffey General Manager, Spendthrift Farm


NEWS

RESEARCH AND MEDICATION UPDATE

Standing Equine PET Scanner Now Ready for Clinical Use on Racehorses in Training the fetlock joint as this is the area most commonly injured in racehorses, but the researchers were also able to obtain high-quality images of the foot and carpus (equine knee). The MILE-PET is now ready to image racehorses in training. This clinical trial was to have begun at UC Davis before the scanner was scheduled to be moved to Santa Anita Park in mid-December. The Stronach Group, which owns Santa Anita Park, and the Southern California Equine Foundation, which operates the veterinary hospital at Santa Anita, have been key partners in the project by supporting the scanner development costs. Although this project has been in the works for more than a year, the recent media coverage of horse fatalities in Southern California has highlighted the need for improved safety in horse racing. Availability of imaging techniques that are able to detect bone changes that might predispose to catastrophic breakdowns is one of the measures that has been proposed to reduce the track fatalities. “PET has a very interesting role to play in racehorses as it detects changes at the molecular level before structural changes occur,” Spriet explained. “In other words, PET provides warning signs that injuries might happen. There is still a lot of work ahead of us as we need to learn to distinguish the PET changes that reflect normal adaptation to speed work from changes that are indicative of high risk for major injuries.” The plan is to image as many horses as possible at Santa Anita over the coming year. Once the researchers have established a large database representing the different patterns of PET findings in racehorses, patterns at risk for breakdown will be identified. PET will ultimately become an additional tool to help in the management of racehorses with gait abnormalities in order to prevent breakdown. HJ

COURTESY UC DAVIS CENTER FOR EQUINE HEALTH

The UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, in collaboration with LONGMILE Veterinary PET Imaging, has completed the first phase of the validation of the MILE-PET, the first positron emission tomography (PET) scanner specifically designed to image the limbs of standing horses using light sedation, eliminating the need for anesthesia. The first phase of this study, funded by the Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation and conducted under the supervision of Dr. Mathieu Spriet, associate professor of veterinary radiology at UC Davis, consisted of validating the safety of the system and establishing scanning protocols using research horses from the UC Davis Center for Equine Health. Six horses were imaged twice with the standing scanner and once under general anesthesia. This allowed the researchers to confirm the repeatability of findings and to compare results obtained with the technique previously developed on anesthetized horses. The horses tolerated all of the procedures well. All imaging sessions were successful, and no complications were reported. The quality of images obtained on the standing horses was similar to that of scans performed under general anesthesia. “I am very excited to report that everything worked according to plan, if not better,” Spriet said. “I am very impressed with the quality of images we were able to obtain.” Scan lengths ranging from one to 10 minutes were compared, and the team of experts concluded that a four-minute scan is long enough to obtain images of high diagnostic quality. The rapidity of acquisition is a great advantage for clinical patients as multiple areas can be imaged with just a short sedation time. The focus of this initial validation study has been on

A RESEARCH HORSE FROM THE UC DAVIS CENTER FOR EQUINE HEALTH BEING IMAGED WITH THE MILE-PET SCANNER AT THE UC DAVIS VETERINARY HOSPITAL.

18

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


Those who know best, choose...

EQUINE EQUIPMENT

SAVE UP TO 26% OFF MSRP

And Introducing Our Newest Partner... TWO WAYS TO SAVE ON:

Industry’s

BEST

Benefits

Call 1 (877) 905-0004 www.EquineEquipment.com Proudly Serving the USA and Canada.

MANUFACTURERS DISCOUNTS FOR THE HORSE WORLD Not ready to shop yet? Please tell your friends with Horses about us!

OFFICIAL SPONSOR OFFICIAL SPONSOR of the the National of NationalHBPA HBPA


From ClaimTo Fame

FEATURE

ANOTHER ALL-TIME HIGH

Horse must have started ONCE at the claiming level or less since January 1, 2013 to be eligible.

Gulfstream Park • Saturday, December 6, 2014

$1,000,000 in Purses THE 21ST CLAIMING CROWN SETS NEW HANDLE RECORD AT GULFSTREAM PARK

For qualification criteria and nomination deadlines, call the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA) at (888) 606-TOBA. Visit claimingcrown.com or email claimingcrown@toba.org for more information. The Claiming Crown is a partnership between the National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association and the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association.

Compiled from Gulfstream Park news releases | Photos by Coglianese Photos/Andie Biancone, Lauren King and Ryan Thompson

T

he Claiming Crown continues to break its own record. Total handle on the nine-race event featuring more than $1 million in purses has grown every year since 2012, when Gulfstream Park first became host, and this year was no different. The 21st running of the Claiming Crown, held December 7 at the South Florida track, set a new all-time handle record of $13.846 million, up from $13.612 million the previous year. The Claiming Crown, which began in 1999 at Canterbury Park, is set to remain at Gulfstream Park through at least 2021 as part of an extension announced last year by the event’s partners, the National HBPA, Florida HBPA, Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association and Gulfstream. The response from bettors and fans, as well as the horsemen who fill the fields, continues to prove that a day that honors horse racing’s “blue-collar” runners presents a popular and anticipated feature on the racing calendar. “This event has seen tremendous growth over the years thanks to the strong support of the owners and trainers of these great horses and all the fans who enjoy wagering on the competitive fields, plus of course the cooperation of Gulfstream Park, the Florida HBPA, TOBA and the National HBPA,” said Eric Hamelback, CEO of the National HBPA.

“It’s also important that we remember the contributions of the late Tom Metzen Sr. and Kent Stirling, both of whom had races named in their honor,” Hamelback added. “Without their hard work and dedication in building up the Claiming Crown it wouldn’t be the showcase that it is today.” The Claiming Crown races are run under starter allowance conditions with the races classified based on horses having started at least once for a specified claiming price since January 1, 2018, with the Claiming Crown Express and Claiming Crown Iron Horse having the condition of a horse starting at any time during its career for an $8,000 tag. Proving the talent level of horses eligible for the Claiming Crown, among the nominees for the event were two-time graded stakes winner Tax, who could have been haltered for $30,000 early in his career, and former $16,000 claimer Maximum Security, who crossed the finish line first in the Kentucky Derby (G1) before being disqualified for interference and on the same day of the Claiming Crown captured the Grade 1, $750,000 Cigar Mile Handicap at Aqueduct in New York. The weekend also included a seminar presented by TOBA and sponsored by the National HBPA titled “Claiming Your Way to Ownership.” Following are recaps of all of the Claiming Crown races.

LEITONE (CHI) AND JOCKEY JOSE LEZCANO CAPTURED THE $200,000 CLAIMING CROWN JEWEL TO CAP ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL RUNNING OF THE 21-YEAR-OLD EVENT.

20

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


RYAN THOMPSON

EXPRESS BROTHER CHUB

T

he $110,000 Express kicked off the nine-race card celebrating racing’s bread-and-butter runners with a rather dramatic finish, as Brother Chub and Fast Pass both closed from behind to catch Take Charge Dude in the final sixteenth. Brother Chub, who initially raced well back in the nine-horse field, came fivewide into the stretch but rallied gamely to overtake Take Charge Dude. He then drifted out in the stretch but managed to hold off a steadily closing Fast Pass to hit the wire a nose in front. Brother Chub and Fast Pass both improved their positions over last year’s Express, when Brother Chub was in the runner-up position and Fast Pass was third. Racing for Kasey K Racing Stable LLC and Michael Day and trained by Michael Moore, Brother Chub completed the six-furlong Express, for horses that have started for a claiming price of $8,000 or lower, in 1:10.09. Jorge Vargas Jr. was aboard for the win. It was the second victory in a row for the 7-year-old gelding bred in New Jersey by Joe-Dan Farm. He captured a $50,000 optional claimer at Laurel Park on November 3 going 6 ½ furlongs and won in allowance company three times at Parx Racing earlier in the year. Brother Chub’s career record now stands at 16 wins in 52 starts and earnings of $538,036. Fast Pass, owned by Paradise Farms Corp. and Walder Racing and trained by Peter Walder, was also slow to get going but rallied late to just miss at the

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

wire. But his finish showed he did not suffer any ill effects from a journey to South Korea in September for the Group 1 Keeneland Korea Sprint, where he finished 14th over a muddy surface. Prior to that, he had won the Opening Lead Stakes in May, finished third in the Grade 3 Smile Sprint Stakes and won a starter optional claiming race in July, all at Gulfstream. Take Charge Dude held on for third in the Express, 2 ½ lengths back. Owned by Bassett Stables and trained by Saffie Joseph Jr., the 4-year-old gelding came into the race off victories in a $10,000 turf claimer and a starter optional claimer on the main track at Gulfstream Park West. Bordini was a neck back in fourth, followed by Whyruawesome, favored Travy Boy who set the early pace, Nick the Cardshark, Northern and Tale of Fire.

21


LAUREN KING

FEATURE

GLASS SLIPPER

LIZA STAR

T

rainer Peter Walder may have fallen short of victory in the Express with Fast Pass’s near miss, but it didn’t take long for one of his runners to find the winner’s circle. It came in the second Claiming Crown race, to be exact, with a brilliant wire-to-wire run by Liza Star in the $110,000 Glass Slipper for 3-year-old and up fillies and mares who have started for a claiming price of $12,500 or lower. Ridden by Ricardo Santana Jr., Liza Star dueled throughout with 8-5 favorite Cuddle Kitten before pulling away from her around the eighth pole. Liza Star went on to win by a length over Potra Liza, who was covered up in the early going and came running late but couldn’t get there in time. She finished 1 ¾ lengths ahead of Cuddle Kitten who held on for third. Liza Star, who races for Ron Paolucci Racing LLC, completed the one mile in 1:36.92 after setting fractions of :24.30, :46.84, 1:10.91 and 1:23.35. “A lot of people doubted that she could get a mile, but when Ricardo got the first quarter in :24, it was all over,” Walder said. He and Paolucci claimed Liza Star for $6,250 at Gulfstream on May 18. She won that contest and went on to win her next four races for them before finishing third in the Millions Distaff Stakes at Gulfstream Park West on November 9 in her final start before the Glass Slipper. Bred in Florida by Pedro Maestre, the 5-yearold mare now holds a record of seven wins in 14 starts and earnings of $181,845 for the year and nine wins in 25 starts with $219,605 in earnings overall. “I can’t take any credit for claiming her,” Walder said. “Ron picked her out. I asked him if he was drinking his bathwater, but obviously he knew what

22

he was doing.” About Liza Star’s win streak, Walder added: “We clicked. I can’t say I did anything special. I just give her time between races and treat her like a rock star.” Potra Liza, owned by Joseph E. Besecker and trained by Jorge Navarro, was claimed by her connections for $6,250 at Gulfstream in February, winning that race and four others before finishing third in the Parx Hall of Fame Filly and Mare Starter Handicap prior to the Glass Slipper. Potra Liza’s stablemate Cuddle Kitten, who runs for Flying P Stable, won the Parx Hall of Fame Filly and Mare Starter Handicap by five lengths, as well as three consecutive allowances under Navarro’s care. Lucy’s Town was another 1 ¾ lengths back in fourth in the nine-horse Glass Slipper field, followed by All Good Times, Expect Indy, Final Flurry, Picasso Moon and She’s Right Again.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


RYAN THOMPSON

DISTAFF DASH

THINKIN COWTOWN

R

ich Averill had two runners in the $110,000 Distaff Dash, but only bet on one of them—the one who didn’t win. He wasn’t complaining, though. His filly Thinkin Cowtown, who does her best running from off the pace, seized command in the stretch after sitting pretty in midpack in the early stages to win the five-furlong turf stakes by a half-length as the favorite. Averill’s other runner, the 14-1 R Next Roll, finished seventh. “That’s all right,” Averill said of his losing wager. He had decided to bet on R Next Roll, who races near the pace, because Gulfstream’s turf course had been favoring speed during the first few days of the meet and he thought the mare would benefit. Regardless, the winner’s purse of $60,500 more than made up for Averill’s wager. Thinkin Cowtown, with jockey Tyler Gaffalione aboard, wouldn’t be denied, however, as she held off Unaquoi in the final strides for her first victory of the year. Averill and his partners, Matties Racing Stable LLC and ATM Racing, claimed the 6-year-old mare just two starts prior for $25,000 at Gulfstream on July 13 with the express intent of racing her in the Distaff Dash, which is for fillies and mares who have started for $25,000 or less. She is conditioned by Georgina Baxter. “I had watched the horse and she beat me in one of her races,” Averill said of why he chose her. Bred in Florida by Bob Leininger, Thinkin Cowtown has won six of 20 career starts for earnings of $216,880.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

Unaquoi, a 5-year-old homebred for Mrs. Ray M. Pennington III and trained by Ollie Figgins III, was second in last year’s Distaff Dash as well. And this year she added two optional claiming wins to her name, both at 5 ½ furlongs on the turf. Third-place finisher Blue Magic, who was a length behind Unaquoi as a 29-1 longshot, gained momentum late after being bumped at the start. The 4-year-old filly races for Pinnacle Racing Stable LLC and trainer Luis Ramirez, who claimed her two starts prior for $10,000 at Gulfstream on September 25. She won her last start prior to the Distaff Dash, an optional claimer on November 7 at Gulfstream Park West. Stetson Gold finished 1 ¼ lengths back in fourth in the nine-horse field, followed by Same Kinda Crazy, Glory Roll, R Next Roll, Band of Angels and Dance Till Dawn. 23


LAUREN KING

FEATURE

RAPID TRANSIT ROYAL SQUEEZE

J

ockey Paco Lopez ended the day with four Claiming Crown victories, and he got the ball rolling with Royal Squeeze in the $110,000 Rapid Transit for horses that have raced for a claiming price of $16,000 or less. Royal Squeeze, who was the second choice at nearly 3-1, and Lopez vied for the lead with Rol Again Question early on before finally edging away to win by 1 ¾ lengths over 27-1 shot Empire Power. Owned by Imaginary Stables and Glenn Ellis and trained by Elizabeth Dobles, Royal Squeeze finished the seven-furlong race in 1:23.63 while apparently never changing leads in the stretch. “I was fortunate to have some great horses today,” Lopez said. “Whether it’s the Claiming Crown or a $5,000 race, it’s no different for me. I always try for a win.” The Rapid Transit was the fourth career stakes win for 7-year-old Royal Squeeze and his second this year after the Big Drama Stakes at Gulfstream in May. In addition to his stakes wins, Royal Squeeze has won three optional claiming races for his connections, who claimed him in February at Gulfstream in a $25,000 optional claimer, where he finished third at five furlongs on the grass. Bred in Florida by Gary Aiken, Royal Squeeze has won 11 of 40 career starts and earned $556,627. Empire Power rallied late in the Rapid Transit to get up for second by a head over D T Goodie, who was just a nose in front of fourth-place finisher Benefactor. Empire Power races for Secure Investments and is trained by

24

Antonio Sano, who claimed him for $12,500 at Gulfstream in May. The 4-yearold colt subsequently won twice at a mile in a $20,000 claiming race and $25,000 optional claimer. Six-year-old D T Goodie came into the Rapid Transit off of two runner-up finishes at Parx Racing, one in allowance company at 6 ½ furlongs and the other in an optional claimer at a mile. The gelding is owned by Long Ball Stable LLC and trained by Joseph Taylor. Following Benefactor in the eight-horse field was Rol Again Question, who finished a half-length back in fifth, then Who’s Out, First Deal and favored Yodel E. A. Who.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


LAUREN KING

CANTERBURY

SHEKKY SHEBAZ

S

hekky Shebaz gave jockey Paco Lopez his second Claiming Crown win on the day as the odds-on favorite in the $110,000 Canterbury for horses that have started for $25,000 or less. And the 4-year-old gelding won like it by staying close throughout and then driving to win by three-quarters of a length, covering the five furlongs on the turf in :54.25. The Canterbury victory came on the heels of Shekky Shebaz’s close third in the Grade 1 Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint at Santa Anita, where he missed the place by only a nose. As recently as July, he raced in and won a $25,000 5 ½-furlong claiming race on the turf by nearly two lengths. In fact, that was the race where he caught the eye of his current owners, Michael Dubb, Madaket Stables LLC and Bethlehem Stables LLC, essentially the same ownership group that sent British Idiom out to win the Grade 1 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies this year. “I was second in that race with my horse,” recalled Dubb about Shekky Shebaz’s claiming win, “and I saw a lot [in Shekky Shebaz] … That was his first time on the turf, and I said, ‘Oh my God, if that’s his first time on the turf, what happens when he gets the feel of it?’” Dubb and partners purchased Shekky Shebaz privately that summer and sent him to trainer Jason Servis. The gelding quickly got the feel of the turf in winning his first start for his new connections, the Lucky Coin Stakes at Saratoga on August 30. He then finished second in the Belmont Turf Sprint

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

Invitational prior to the Breeders’ Cup. Shekky Shebaz’s record currently stands at six wins out of 18 career starts and $366,875 in earnings. “I just get a thrill seeing horses like Shekky, somebody who came from humble beginnings and watch him develop,” Dubb said. Runner-up in the Canterbury was last year’s winner, Rocket Heat, who races for Flying P Stable and is trained by Michael Tannuzzo. Rocket Heat came into the race off a 1 ½-length allowance victory at Parx Racing in October. Faction Cat, owned by Asterace Group LLC and trained by Georgina Baxter, was a length back in third. Tiger Blood finished fourth in the eight-horse field, followed by New York’s Finest, Cryogenic, Diamond Majesty and Pemaquid Pete.

25


FEATURE RYAN THOMPSON

IRON HORSE

YES I SEE

P

eter Walder and Ron Paolucci combined for their second Claiming Crown win of the day with Yes I See in the $110,000 Iron Horse, after capturing the Glass Slipper with Liza Star earlier on the card. This is the second time, that Walder and Paolucci have won both of these races on the same card. In 2015 they won the Glass Slipper with Moonshine Promise and the Iron Horse with Runs With Bulls. Asked what the victories meant to him, Paolucci responded: “Considering I’ve modeled myself after Ken Ramsey, this means everything. Winning two Claiming Crown races is so special. You know, I can’t really afford to play at the highest level and spend millions of dollars on hoses. But guys … like Imaginary Stable [who won the Rapid Transit with Royal Squeeze], I’m happy to see those kinds of guys win, because they’re in the claiming box every day. So it’s nice when you put the work in and see it pay off in the end.” Paolucci and Walder actually had two runners in the Iron Horse, and Yes I See was the much longer shot at 66-1. With Rajiv Maragh up, Yes I See came from behind to best his stablemate, Sensational Ride, by a neck. The latter, ridden by Jose Bracho, had tried to go wire to wire. Yes I See finished the 1 1/16 miles in 1:42.80. “They worked together the other day and [Yes I See] beat [Sensational Ride],” Walder said. “I put the blinkers on for the work and I told Rajiv to never mind the recent form. I liked them both for the race. Ron gave me enough time to work with them.” Yes I See came into the Iron Horse, which is for horses that have started for

26

$8,000 or lower, off of four off-the-board finishes, with his most recent win coming in June at Churchill Downs in a starter optional claiming race. Paolucci and Walder claimed Yes I See out of his next race for $25,000 at Saratoga, in which he finished fifth at 1 1/16 miles on the turf. Bred in West Virginia by Ellen H. Walters, the 8-year-old gelding has 14 wins in 48 career starts and earnings of $307,316. Sensational Ride has been the picture of consistency this year, winning eight of nine starts prior to the Iron Horse. The 6-year-old gelding has a lifetime record of 19 wins in 44 starts and earnings of $227,156. The third-place finisher was last year’s Iron Horse winner Salsa’s Return, who races for Joseph E. Besecker and is trained by Jorge Navarro. To Dare was three-quarters of a length back in fourth in the 12-horse field, followed by Bobby G, French Quarter, Donji, Dizzy Gillespie, Peppi the Hunter, Ruler of the Nile, Twocubanbrothersu and Spin Cycle.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


RYAN THOMPSON

TIARA LUCKY LONG

L

ucky Long has been a horse for a course this year with all six of her starts coming at Gulfstream Park, including her most recent, a victory in the $125,000 Tiara for fillies and mares who have started for $25,000 or less. That course affinity no doubt played into her being made the favorite at nearly 4-1 in the 12-horse field. And she was ridden by jockey Paco Lopez, who collected his third Claiming Crown victory on the day in the Tiara. The 5-year-old mare settled mid-pack in the 1 1/16-mile turf race and moved up well through traffic. Lopez shifted her out turning for home and then they dug in to forge ahead in deep stretch. Lucky Long and Lopez won by three-quarters of a length in 1:40.39. Owned by Robert J. Slack and trained by Rohan Crichton, Lucky Long began the year finishing off the board in an optional claiming allowance in midJanuary, then followed up about two weeks later with a win in starter optional claiming company. In February she earned her first stakes win in the Mary Todd Stakes at 1 1/16 miles on the turf. After running second in a March starter optional claiming race, she was given the summer off and returned to the races at Gulfstream on September 28. Lucky Long ran fourth in the 1 1/16-mile Monroe Stakes on the turf. With her Tiara score, Lucky Long now has six victories—all on turf—in 21 career starts and $288,817 in earnings. Runner-up Una Luna lost some ground entering the stretch but rallied to get back into striking range near the wire, finishing a head in front of Bareeqa.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

Una Luna races for Robert J. Amendola and is trained by Jose Gallegos. The 4-year-old filly came into the Tiara off a second in the Millions Filly and Mare Turf Preview Stakes at 7 ½ furlongs on the turf at Gulfstream Park West. She also had two other stakes placings during the year, in the mile Treasure Coast Stakes and 1 1/16-mile In the Breeze Stakes, both on the grass at Gulfstream. Bareeqa, a 6-year-old mare owned by Midwest Thoroughbreds Inc. and trained by Danny Gargan, won three times on the turf at Belmont Park this fall, including in allowance company at seven furlongs and at the $25,000 and $32,000 claiming levels. Arabella Bella finished a length back in fourth in the 12-horse field, followed by Amazing Audrey, Diamond Play, Raki, Lady Alida, Codrington, Bienville Street, Vip Nation and Drinks On Me. 27


FEATURE RYAN THOMPSON

EMERALD

MUGGSAMATIC

M

uggsamatic’s victory in the $125,000 Emerald provided several important distinctions for his connections at this year’s Claiming Crown. It was the second victory on the day for owners Michael Dubb and Bethlehem Stables LLC, the third for trainer Jason Servis and the fourth for jockey Paco Lopez. Dubb and Bethlehem Stables are part of the ownership group of Canterbury winner Shekky Shebaz, whom Servis trains along with Leitone, who captured the Jewel just prior to the Emerald. And Lopez had already won aboard Royal Squeeze (Rapid Transit), Shekky Shebaz and Lucky Long (Tiara). Muggsamatic played musical barns over the summer, being claimed out of three consecutive starts, the last time at Monmouth Park going to Dubb and Servis for $25,000. The 5-year-old-gelding won that race, running 1 1/16 miles on the turf, the Emerald distance. “They wanted to run the horse back in October for a higher claiming price,” Dubb said. “I didn’t want to take any chances. I wanted this horse for the Claiming Crown. In this game, you’ve got to plan in advance.” In the Emerald, which is for 3-year-olds and up that have started for $25,000 or less, Muggsamatic tracked the leader through the early going before taking command and pulling away in the stretch to win by 1 ¼ lengths as the favorite in a time of 1:41.02. Bred in Florida by Gilbert G. Campbell, Muggsamatic has won nine of 24 career starts for earnings of $291,590, including a victory in the 2017 14 Hands Winery Sophomore Turf Stakes at Tampa Bay Downs.

28

Emerald runner-up Apreciado, who races for Justice Racing Stable LLC and is trained by Mike Maker, was claimed by his connections in February, winning for a $16,000 tag at Gulfstream. He added three more wins during the year including an allowance score going 1 1/8 miles on the turf at Keeneland in October. Tusk, who finished three-quarters of a length back in third, races for Jordan V. Wycoff and is trained by Saffie Joseph Jr., who claimed the 6-year-old gelding for $32,000 out of his last start, a mile turf race at Belmont Park. It was the third straight victory for Tusk, who had won two optional claiming races at Delaware Park in September. Patriot Drive was 1 ¼ lengths back in fourth in the 11-horse Emerald field, followed by Hieroglyphics, And Won, King of Spades, Fifth Title, Spring Up, Driven by Thunder and Max K. O.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


RYAN THOMPSON

JEWEL

LEITONE (CHI)

S

aturday, December 7, was a very good day for the Jason Servis barn. In New York at Aqueduct, Maximum Security rolled to victory in the Grade 1 Cigar Mile. Then, shortly after, Leitone (Chi) dominated a field of eight to win the headliner on the Claiming Crown card, the $200,000 Jewel. Servis had already won the Canterbury with Shekky Shebaz and closed out the card with Muggsamatic’s victory in the Emerald. Leitone, who races for Ara Aprahamian, stalked the pace in the early going before taking control of the race after three-quarters. Guided by Jose Lezcano, the 5-year-old Chilean-bred pulled away for a commanding 2 ½-length score as the 4-5 favorite. Leitone ran the 1 1/8-mile distance in 1:49.54. “This is the kind of horse that you keep asking and he’ll keep running. He’s got a long stride and doesn’t stop; he’s a very nice horse,” Lezcano said. “The other horses in the race were sent early on, and I gave him at least a half mile before asking him to go and when I did, he went on to win easy. I had so much horse the whole way and still had some left in the tank.” Leitone was claimed for $12,500 at Belmont Park on June 16, winning the 1 1/16-mile race on the main track by 13 ¾ lengths. He finished third on the turf in his first start for Servis and then won a $50,000 claiming race at Saratoga. After an off-the-board finish on the grass in an optional claiming allowance, Leitone prepped for the Jewel with a 7 ½-length win in a $50,000 claiming race at Belmont on October 25. Imported from Chile in 2018, the son of Dunkirk has a career record of seven wins and seven placings in 20 starts and earnings of $469,355.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

Noble Thought, who finished second by a half-length for owner Three Diamonds Farm and trainer Mike Maker, trailed the entire field of nine for six furlongs before strongly rallying to get up for the place. The 6-year-old Harlan’s Holiday gelding came into the Jewel off a victory in a 1 1/8-mile optional claiming race at Churchill Downs on November 24. Holiday Bonus, a 35-1 longshot owned by Woodland Farms and trained by Jorge Navarro, finished third after also closing well in the stretch but couldn’t get by Noble Thought in the final strides. Third Day was three-quarters of a length back in fourth, followed by early pacesetter Create Again, Degrom, Ekhtibaar, Forest Fire and Aequor. HJ

29


FEATURE

$4 MILLION REASONS

BREED RACE $

$

WIN

Over $4 Million will be paid to Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders in Oklahoma this year

THOROUGHBRED RACING ASSOCIATION OF OKLAHOMA ONE REMINGTON PLACE 405.427.8753

OKLAHOMA CITY 73111

WWW.TRAORACING.COM

30

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


MRAK – STOCK.ADOBE.COM

FEATURE

INTRODUCING DIGITAL TATTOOS A NEW THOROUGHBRED IDENTIFICATION PROCESS WILL ROLL OUT IN 2020 By Judy L. Marchman

T

he traditional lip tattoo is being phased out. Next year, the digital tattoo will take its place as the form of horse identification at racetracks across the country. The transition to digital tattoos follows on the heels of The Jockey Club’s requirement that horses be microchipped as part of the registration process as well as the breed registry’s implementation of digital foal registration certificates.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

31


COURTESY TRPB

SCANNING THE MICROCHIP BRINGS UP EACH HORSE’S VERIFIED REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE AND UPDATED PHOTOS ON A TABLET FOR THE IDENTIFIER TO CHECK AGAINST.

The Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau (TRPB), which verifies the identity of every Thoroughbred that races in the United States and Canada, has scheduled implementation of digital tattoos to start on January 1, 2020, in accordance with the Association of Racing Commissioners International’s model rule. Issued in 2018, the rule states that, effective on that date, the racing secretary shall ensure that the registration certificates for all Thoroughbred horses that were foaled in 2018 or thereafter have a digital tattoo prior to entry to a race. The TRPB is taking this one step further and requiring any Thoroughbred that has not been previously tattooed and is making its first lifetime start on or after that date to receive a digital tattoo to be correctly identified in the paddock and permitted to race.

WHAT IS A DIGITAL TATTOO?

A digital tattoo is a verification applied to a Thoroughbred’s electronic record indicating that a trained TRPB technician has validated the horse’s identity. This validation must take place before a horse makes its first start in a recognized pari-mutuel race. To apply a digital tattoo, the technician does the following: • Conducts an in-person inspection of the horse and scans its microchip to access its digital Jockey Club registration certificate and foal photos. (The horse’s 15-digit microchip number, which can be found on the certificate just above the “issued to” line, pulls up the electronic registration.) • Compares the horse and its markings against the foal photos in the electronic record to confirm its identity. If the identity is not

32

confirmed, the technician contacts The Jockey Club to resolve any issues. • Takes updated digital photos of the horse (side views and head on) and any markings, scars and chestnuts, and uploads them to the horse’s record on the breed registry database. • Places an electronic embossment on the horse’s headshot photo and a digital stamp on the digital registration certificate. When track identifiers or other racing officials access the horse’s electronic record via its microchip, they will then check to see that the horse has been verified by the TRPB and confirm the animal according to the updated photos. The TRPB has more than 50 technicians across the United States and Canada whose jobs will be to apply the digital tattoos. To get the technicians up to speed before the full digital roll-out on January 1, the TRPB brought in a full-time trainer to instruct the techs in how to operate the scanners and tablets, how to log into the database, how to take photos and so on. Lip tattoos are still being applied through the end of 2019 to allow time for the TRPB techs to be trained but also for the racetracks to get their staffs trained and the necessary technology in place. “The goal is to provide a more effective form of identification,” said Emma Smith, an agent for TRPB who is managing the transition to digital tattoos. “We’ll have the two forms of identification—the updated photos, accessible through scanning the microchip, and the markings themselves—and every time the horse’s papers are viewed, the day, time and person who viewed it are logged in the system.”

HOW WILL DIGITAL TATTOOS AFFECT OWNERS AND INDUSTRY PROS?

As Smith explained, the process for digital tattoos will be essentially the same as for lip tattoos. Owners must ensure that all of their horses have been microchipped and registered with The Jockey Club, which provides the microchips as part of its registration kit. Then, prior to a horse’s first start, the owner must arrange for a TRPB technician to inspect the horse and apply the digital tattoo. There is no change to the standard tattoo fee of US$80/CAN$100, which the technician will still collect prior to the digital tattoo application. The identification process also will be similar prior to a race. Instead of checking each horse’s lip, track identifiers will now scan each horse’s microchip using a Bluetooth scanner connected to a digital identifier app. For horses that were lip tattooed in the past, the tattoo number is listed next to their name on the digital identifier screen. The app will show data for only the tracks at which track identifiers are employed. They can select a particular track and date to bring up the day’s race card and then select a specific race and horse. Scanning the microchip brings up each horse’s verified registration certificate and updated photos on a tablet for the identifier to check against. Racing secretaries, stewards and other regulatory officials may have credentialed access to the database via The Jockey Club’s InCompass racetrack software. Smith and other TRPB staff have been meeting with horse identifiers, racetrack officials and regulators throughout the year and will continue

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


COURTESY TRPB

sales companies and other industry entities that need to access microchips will need to supply their own equipment. In a collaborative effort, The Jockey Club Technology Services (TJCTS) has worked closely with the TRPB in designing and developing the software to facilitate the digital tattoo and identification services using mobile devices and desktop computers, said Shannon Luce, director of communications for The Jockey Club. TJCTS is hosting the systems and providing technical support to the TRPB. Another benefit of the digital tattoo is that it doesn’t fade or become unreadable over time like traditional inked lip tattoos can, which makes identifying horses more difficult, particularly after they retire from racing. “And you don’t have to flip a lip in the paddock anymore,” Smith said. “It’s safer for horses and humans.” The Jockey Club’s tattoo identification service will not be phased out, however, so owners of horses with lip tattoos can still investigate their identities.

CONNECTION WITH DIGITAL REGISTRATION CERTIFICATES

ONE OF THE BENEFITS OF THE DIGITAL TATTOO IS THAT IT DOESN’T FADE OR BECOME UNREADABLE OVER TIME LIKE TRADITIONAL INKED LIP TATTOOS CAN, WHICH MAKES IDENTIFYING HORSES MORE DIFFICULT, PARTICULARLY AFTER THEY RETIRE FROM RACING.

to do so into next year to familiarize them with the digital tattoo system and to help troubleshoot any technical issues that crop up. “We’ve tried to think through various technical issues, such as no internet service at a track or farm,” Smith said. For example, technicians can take identification photos and then upload them later if there are connectivity issues at a farm or training facility. And, each race day, racing offices can download the day’s entries to the horse identifier app, which allows the identifier to access the card throughout the day without needing internet access.

WHY USE DIGITAL TATTOOS?

The TRPB, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations of North America based in Fair Hill, Maryland, has served as the national investigative agency for the industry since 1946 with the goal of protecting the integrity of the sport. The move to digital tattoos is in keeping with that mission. “With modern technology—specifically the use of microchips, scanners, wireless technology and tablets—a digital tattoo will clearly provide a superior and more robust form of identification,” said J. Curtis Linnell, executive vice president of the TRPB, in introducing the digital tattoo system in December 2018. TRPB technicians are using wireless Bluetooth scanners to access horses’ microchips and tablets to upload the updated photos and apply the digital tattoo stamp. The technology primarily being used (and recommended by the TRPB) includes a Datamars Omni Bluetooth scanner and a Samsung Galaxy tablet. While the TRPB supplies its technicians with these tools, racetracks,

Once a TRPB technician applies the digital tattoo, it becomes part of the horse’s permanent electronic record. Among the concerns about implementing this new process is how a horse’s papers—and the digital tattoo—will actually be transitioned along with the horse as it moves from owner to owner or track to track. “For foals of 2018 and on, all will have electronic papers going forward,” Smith said during the TRPB’s presentation on digital tattoos at the National HBPA annual convention in March. Those papers take the form of a horse’s digital registration certificate from The Jockey Club and the attached updated photos. Digital foal certificates were first issued in 2018 and include a horse’s microchip number, so horses foaled prior to that year may still have paper records. For the next few years, tracks will likely have to handle both paper and electronic records. The Jockey Club began requiring microchips for foals of 2017 and later, but owners can still microchip older horses to get the digital tattoo (microchips are available for purchase through The Jockey Club or a veterinarian). “The TRPB’s digital tattoos are an ideal complement to The Jockey Club’s microchip and digital certificate initiatives,” said Rick Bailey, The Jockey Club registrar. Some racetracks also will be arranging to have older horses microchipped. Owners must report a horse’s microchip number to The Jockey Club via their interactive registration account; this is normally done as part of the registration process but will need to be done separately for horses that are microchipped at a later time. Owners and breeders also can log into their Jockey Club interactive registration account to view their current certificates. An owner or their designated agent, such as a trainer, serves as the certificate manager and can assign the certificate to another party, such as a new owner, racing secretary, etc., to allow that person to interact with and transfer the certificate as needed. Again, all of these transactions are logged so there will be a history of who has accessed the horse’s certificate. The Jockey Club has produced a three-minute instructional video outlining the microchipping process involved with registering a foal. The video is available at registry.jockeyclub.com. For more information about digital tattoos, visit the TRPB website at trpb.com or email tattoo@trpb.com. HJ

Judy L. Marchman is an Austin-based freelance writer and editor and serves as copy editor for American Racehorse and The Horsemen’s Journal. She worked for BloodHorse in Lexington, Kentucky, for 15 years before returning to Texas. You can follow her on Twitter @judy_writes. THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

33


Great Deals & Low Prices, Every Day! EPO Equine #2097

Source Code: HBPA

Expires 1/31/20

FREE

OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of

$20 Big Dee's Gift Card with purchase of

360 serving size

Stock Up DEALS Double End Snaps 100+ #8560 ONLY $1.30 99¢ea

Vetrap #127 $1.69 ea

Duramectin

200+ ONLY

1.87% Ivermectin Dewormer

#628D Reg. $2.59 ONLY

$1.99ea

1.44ea

$

Furacin #298 $8.95 ea 144+

ONLY

$7.75ea

Succeed Paste 30 pack syringes for optimal digestive health.

#30G $117.95 3+ $114.95 ea

Sentinel Stable Blanket Country Pride 420 denier nylon with warm channel quilting.

#9010 $54.95 3+ $49.95 ea

More Deals at www.bigdweb.com

• 800-321-2142 • Ask about HWT Shipping Discounts

Pedigree Binder • Ideal way to MANAGE, STORE, VIEW, SHARE equineline pedigrees online • Complimentary with our pedigrees

MY HORSES’ PEDIGREE

• Unique

YOUR PEDIGREE SOURCE

OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of

Learn more at: Equineline.com/PedigreeBinder 34

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


THIS IS THE

1 FOR SNOW CUSTOM WALL PADDING SUPERIOR FLOORING OPTIONS for Barns, Exam and Surgery, Recovery Rooms Pavesafe • Trac-Roll • Vet-Trac

YOUR PADDING & FLOORING SPECIALIST

DANDY PRODUCTS, INC 3314 St. Rt. 131, Goshen, OH 45122 513-625-3000 • 888-883-8386 • F 513-625-2600 www.dandyproducts.net

THE 1025R. THE 1 WITH THE OPTIONAL, FACTORY-INSTALLED, HEATED CAB This unparalleled, 25 HP, Sub-Compact Utility Tractor cab is designed to be comfortable for long hours of “get-that-snow-off-this-sidewalk” in cold, cold, cold conditions. You’ll get front work lights to show the way and let traffic know you’re there, removable, full glass doors for when it’s cold and not so cold and a sun visor to fight glare. Plus, the windshield wipers, dual outside mirrors, internal domed lights, and optional stereo will always keep you in tune with the environment. Add a loader, snow blower, blade and a spreader, and clearing snow from sidewalks, park paths, side roads and long driveways is easy.

THIS IS THE 1 FOR YOU. To learn more on how NTRA members can save up to 28% on a wide array of John Deere equipment, visit www.JohnDeere.com/Equine or call the John Deere Equine Support Center at 866-678-4289. OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of

John Deere is proud to be the Exclusive Equipment Supplier of Agricultural, Turf and Construction Equipment to the NTRA! *Shown with optional features. John Deere, the leaping deer symbol and John Deere’s green and yellow trade dress are the trademarks of Deere and Company.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

• SAFE • CERTAIN • EFFECTIVE WOUND PROTECTION

BIOZIDE GEL ®

WOUND DRESSING Antibacterial • Antifungal

It is the BEST!

Use for Wounds • Incisions • Lacerations • Barb Wire Cuts • Topical Infections • Nail Wounds • Trauma • Rope Burns

PUT IT ON…IT STAYS PUT!

Does Not Melt or Run Off 1% Available IODINE Special Gel Formula Lets The Wound Breathe FOR FASTER HEALING Available In 6 oz. and 20 oz. Jars Biozide Gel is a registered Trademark of

PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS INC.

St. Louis, MO 63166 • USA • 314-421-0300 • Fax 314-421-3332

Toll Free 888-890-0659 Distributors Wanted

ORDER AT www.biozidegel.com or Through Your Tack Shop

35


BIG INDIANA, FEATURE

things are happening

in

and this is just the

tart!

Mares purchased* at a public sale between

November 1, 2019 and March 1, 2020 are eligible for

UP TO $2,000 in INCENTIVES.

Bring the mare into Indiana and register her with the program to be eligible for the irst $1,000 in incentives.

Breed back to a registered Indiana stallion and return the mare to the state for foaling in 2021 for the second $1,000 in incentives.

*Learn more about this new incentive by visiting: http://in.gov/hrc/tb/ • 317-234-2542 IndianaThoroughbredBreedDevelopment

@INThoroughbred

@INhorseracing PHOTO BY MATHEA KELLEY


KELLYVANDELLEN – STOCK.ADOBE.COM

FEATURE

The Push to Administer Lasix at 24 Hours A LOOK AT WHAT TODAY’S SCIENCE SAYS By Kimberly Brewer, DVM, MSc; Clara Fenger, DVM, PhD, DACVIM; Jake Machin; and Thomas Tobin, MRCVS, PhD, DABT

B

leeding from the nose in exercising horses has been identified in historical texts dating back to the 1500s, and racehorses have experienced this condition dating back to the foundation sires of the Thoroughbred breed. Horsemen of the time understood that this bleeding affected the health and performance of their racing stock. More recently, horsemen and their veterinarians have turned to the use of race-day Lasix to mitigate this bleeding. Lasix has become an industry standard in the treatment of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) and is approved for use in American racing at a dose of 250 mg to 500 mg intravenously at four hours prior to post with water withheld until after the race.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

37


Science took a few years to catch up with the observations of horsemen, who began using Lasix more than 35 years before its effectiveness was unequivocally proven. It is now established science, however, that all racehorses bleed into their lungs while running and that Lasix administered at four hours prior to post with water restriction reduces the incidence of EIPH, including its most severe form, obvious bleeding from the nose, or epistaxis, postrace. Long story short, Lasix minimizes racing-related pulmonary damage and protects the lungs of the horse and the lives of both horse and rider. These benefits were seen clearly when Lasix was approved in New Figure Effect of Epistaxis Cases/Year New York Racing York,1 where itsFurosemide introductiononwas associated with aninimmediate reduction of approximately 80 percent in the incidence of postrace epistaxis, as presented in Figure 1.

The first scientist to report on the effect of 24-hour Lasix on EIPH was Dr. Heather Knych of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and her team. Knych evaluated 15 horses with 250 mg of Lasix using a simulated five-furlong race. The horses were evaluated with the standard endoscopic scoring system of 0 to 4. These horses were young and had a low baseline EIPH score (0 to 10); the control group of untreated horses showed a total endoscopic EIPH score of 5 with one horse scoring 2 and three horses scoring 1, a low baseline EIPH value, as shown in Figure 2. Weighted Grade Totals by Treatment 10

9

8

70

50

57

Summed EIPH Score

Number of Epistaxis Cases

60

7

59

58

WITHOUT LASIX

40

6

Grade 3

5

Grade 2 Grade 1

4

3

WITH LASIX

(approved Sept. 1, 1995)

30

2

25 Sept. 1

1

20 13

16

10

0

12

9

Saline

12

4

0 1992

1994

1995

24h Fur

FIGURE 2

(4 months)

1993

4h Fur

8

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

DATA REPLOTTED FROM KNYCH ET AL 2019, VIDEOSCOPE SCORING OF EIPH. THE LEFT COLUMN REPRESENTS THE TOTAL EIPH SCORE, 5, IN SALINE-TREATED HORSES. THE CENTER COLUMN REPRESENTS THE FIGURE being used in1 the prevention of epistaxis. 2002 publication of this book. Reviewing TOTAL EIPH SCORE, 1, AT FOUR HOURS POST 250 MG OF FUROSEMIDE, This initial use of furosemide was based on this book as part of an overall review of WITH WATER WITHHOLDING. THE RIGHT COLUMN REPRESENTS THE TOTAL At this time, theuntil science and there horsemen the are literature clear thatonintravenously clinical experience and, recently, furosemide in the horse, EIPH SCORE, 9, AT 24 HOURS POST 250 MG OF FUROSEMIDE, WITH WATER noted, on restriction pages 112 and 113, a table administered Lasix at four hours prior to postwewith water significantly WITHHOLDING, AND STATISTICALLY DIFFERENT THAN THE FOUR-HOUR entitled “New York By The Numbers, Cases reduces the incidence of EIPH. In addition, by four hours post-administration, the POST-ADMINISTRATION RESULTS. Year

On the other hand, most American racing of Epistaxis,” dated 1992 to 2001. Inspecdiuretic effect of Lasix is over. states have long since approved the Despite use of the clear benefits to the horse and rider, furosemide on race day for the prevention/ dramatic reduction in the factions incidence of EIPH Next, Knych treated the horses with 250 mg of Lasix while withholding water the race-day administration of Lasix has drawn criticism from some alleviation of epistaxis, now known to be in New York racing following the 1995 in the industry that argue that no medications should be permitted on the day for four hours. The result was the expected protective effect of the Lasix and a component of Exercise-Induced Pulmoapproval of furosemide. We now present of a race. The question has therefore arisen: Can we administer Lasix 24 hours nary Hemorrhage [EIPH]. Very recently, this data in standard graphical format (Figwater withholding: The total EIPH score dropped to 1, demonstrating a clear-cut however, questions beenitsraised about effect against EIPH? And obviously, if the prerace and stillhave obtain protective effect as shown in Figure 2, although the effect was not statistically significant. whether or not the routine pre-race treatment of furosemide in reducing the incidence of fluid volume decrease contributes to the Lasix effect, would water also have to be The surprise, however, was the response in these horses to 24-hour Lasix of racing horses with furosemide for the preepistaxis in horses racing in New York in the significantly restricted during the post-Lasix administration 24-hour with vention of epistaxis/EIPH passes “the smell 6 years and 4 months immediately following water restriction. As Figure 2 shows, the 24-hour treatment was associated 2 test,” approval of furosemide in New York racing. whichperiod? has led to renewed examination prerace with an actual increase in the total EIPH score, which checked in at a 9, four In analyzing these data we note the above the baseline group. Even more interesting was that while the changes furosemide in North American racing. from the baseline EIPH score of 5 were not statistically significant, the difference We now draw attention to some clinical evidence establishing, in large numbers ing (“dripping of blood”) from the nose, between the four-hour score of 1 and the 24-hour score of 9 was statistically

“PUSH LASIX TO 24 HOURS PRE-RACE?

in reducing the incidence of epistaxis.

Mr. Bill Heller in his monograph on Lasix, “Run, Baby, Run,”3 where these data have remained hidden in plain sight since the

significant. This finding is not completely unexpected because in humans the

Epistaxis is, however, only one manifestatherapeutic effect of Lasix of decreasing blood pressure is complete, which tion of what is now known as Exercise4 means there is a rebound effect in which blood pressure goes up. This effect Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage (EIPH). It is also the only manifestation of EIPH has not been demonstrated for pulmonary blood pressure in horses, but caution observable without special equipment, and

Epistaxis and Related Considerations

Intern J Appl Res Vet Med • Vol. 10, No. 2, 2012.

STUDY SAYS, ‘HOLD YOUR HORSES.’” 38

should be exercised if 24-hour Lasix is considered, as it clearly places horses at greater risk than the current four-hour model. 177 Summarizing her study, Knych noted that the “four-hour administration of Lasix appeared most effective in reducing severity” of EIPH and that a limitation on her study was the small number of horses. The second study in this area was conducted by Dr. Warwick Bayly and coworkers; it was presented with the Knych study at the 2017 American Association of Equine Practitioners meeting but not published in the scientific literature until 2019. The Bayly study was carried out in two phases; the first involved treadmill studies using red blood cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. This study suggested that a low dose—i.e., 250 mg of Lasix combined with water

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


CHERYL ANN QUIGLEY – STOCK.ADOBE.COM

restriction—was the optimal 24-hour protocol to evaluate in a racetrack study. Water was offered at a rate of about three quarts every four hours until eight hours prior to the simulated race, at which time water was withheld. The racetrack study involved six apparently mature racehorses with higher baseline EIPH scores than those in the Knych study. The horses were treated with 250 mg of Lasix via IV or with saline, and the 24-hour water restriction/ rationing protocol was followed. The saline control horses had free access to water until four hours prerace. Then, 24 hours post-saline/Lasix administration, the horses were run in simulated 1,100-meter races, or 0.68 miles, and the severity of the resulting EIPH was evaluated by both endoscopic examination and bronchoalveolar lavage. There was no EIPH difference between the groups when EIPH was monitored by bronchoalveolar lavage, but on endoscopic examination, the 24-hour Lasix plus water restriction group showed a statistically significant reduction in EIPH scores. So where does this leave the industry with respect to Lasix at 24 hours prior to post? At this point, we note the analysis of racing journalist Natalie Voss, who reported on the AAEP meeting at which the Knych and Bayly papers were presented and interviewed the presenting scientists. Her take-home message is the headline of her report: “Push Lasix to 24 hours pre-race? Study says, ‘Hold your horses.’” In other words, the studies to date, when taken together, do not support a 24-hour Lasix protocol.

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

We believe this to be a correct interpretation of these studies. The Knych study showed an increase in EIPH scores above the baseline EIPH score, and the four-hour Lasix with water withdrawal showed the expected trend toward reducing EIPH scores. However, the increase in the total EIPH score following the 24-hour Lasix plus water withdrawal treatment was statistically different than the four-hour Lasix result. As such, the overall message that she drew from her study was that the results were most consistent with and supported administration of Lasix at four hours prior to post. Bayly was similarly conservative in his conclusions, consistent with the mixed results in his simulated racetrack experiment, with the bronchoalveolar lavage portion showing no effect of 24-hour furosemide and the endoscopic results showing a statistically significant effect. A scientific report is considered confirmed when the results of a scientific study are replicated by a completely independent investigator. At this point, the 24-hour Lasix question remains an open scientific question, and as Bayly himself has stated, “A larger study is indicated to further evaluate whether this protocol significantly mitigates EIPH severity.” In our opinion, the correct conclusion is to “hold our horses” on administering Lasix 24 hours prerace with water restriction until a larger and more scientifically complete study confirms or denies its efficacy in mitigating EIPH. HJ 39


Race into the future with the

Ohio Thoroughbred Race Fund!

www.racingohio.net The Ohio Thoroughbred Race Fund offers more than $5.7 million in stakes & overnight purses for state-bred runners and includes a lucrative stallion & broodmare incentive program.

For more information on our outstanding program, contact Greg Veit, OTRF Administrator 77 S. High Street, 18th Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215 greg.veit@racing.ohio.gov 614-779-0268


FEATURE

SHINING A LIGHT ON

Scopolamine and Environmental Contamination A commonsense examination of the circumstances is in order given the recent news about Justify

BENOIT PHOTO

By Kimberly Brewer, DVM, MSc; Clara Fenger, DVM, PhD, DACVIM; Eric Hamelback; and Peter Sacopulos, JD

O

n September 11 of this year, news broke that 2018 Triple Crown winner Justify, trained by Bob Baffert, had tested positive for a little-known substance called scopolamine in a post-race drug test from the Santa Anita Derby. Worth 100 Kentucky Derby points, the Santa Anita Derby amounts to a “win and you’re in” event for America’s most famous horse race. Once the news hit, social media blew up with wild accusations of cover-up and corruption, despite very few facts being available. Horse racing media, from traditional outlets to all sorts of online blogs, and even mainstream media weighed in before any facts had come to light. The dust still has not yet settled in the case. However, some of the details are now known, and with the benefit of time, reflection and actual facts, the circumstances can now be laid out and conclusions drawn. There is a message for the entire racing industry hidden in the details that extend far beyond the particulars of any one case.

JUSTIFY MADE THE HEADLINES AS A TRIPLE CROWN WINNER IN 2018, AND NOW HE’S IN THE NEWS AGAIN AFTER A POSITIVE TEST FROM THE SANTA ANITA DERBY WAS REVEALED EVEN THOUGH SOME DETAILS REMAIN UNKNOWN.

42

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


WHAT IS SCOPOLAMINE? Scopolamine is a plant alkaloid and prescription medication used for nausea in humans. A closely related synthetic compound, N-butylscopolamine (Buscopan), is approved for use for spasmodic colic in horses. Scopolamine slows intestinal motility by blocking a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, but such anticholinergic drugs also may be used for bronchodilation, or relaxing the smooth muscles of the airways and improving air flow in the lungs. It is this latter action that puts this class of drug among the banned substances in horse racing. Theoretically, such drugs could improve performance by improving air flow. Of course, there is actually no evidence that such an effect is achieved in racehorses, but most banned drugs are classified by their theoretical mechanism of action and not their actual effect on the animal.

WHERE DOES SCOPOLAMINE COME FROM? Alkaloids are substances produced by plants that are typically highly toxic and bitter-tasting, which generally deters consumption by grazing animals. Scopolamine is produced by jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), a weed with a worldwide distribution and a common invader of hay, straw and cereal grain. While horses rarely seek out such plants as forage, when jimsonweed is dried as a component of hay or straw or if the seeds are mixed with grain, they can readily consume it. Scopolamine is also a component of an old-time treatment called “Bell Drops” or “Bells,” which was a tincture of belladonna. This remedy is still available on the internet but is not an approved formulation. Other plant alkaloids that can be consumed by horses in the same fashion are morphine, barbarin (the precursor of aminorex) from the plant yellow rocket and glaucine from poplar shavings.

SCOPOLAMINE TOXICITY Scopolamine toxicity in humans has been reported throughout the world in the medical literature. Typically, it results from the ingestion of Datura spp. plants that are consumed by accident, such as their inclusion in prepared meals in which plants are harvested from a garden. In other cases, toxicity has resulted from the ingestion of herbal or homeopathic medicines in India and China. There are even reports of severe toxicity and death from their intentional exposure as recreational substances. Scopolamine at high doses causes hallucinations, restlessness and aggression, and even convulsions, coma and death. Toxicity also has been reported in horses from either contamination of hay or grain with Datura seeds or the whole plants. Clinical signs include dilated pupils, colic, muscle cramps and abnormal locomotion.

SCOPOLAMINE IN RACING Scopolamine has not been a significant source of positive tests in many years. A review of Association of Racing Commissioners International (RCI) records shows that only 28 scopolamine identifications and rulings occurred between 1982 and 2011. The positives have tended to cluster over time, a not uncommon phenomenon for plant substances. A number of these clusters have been identified in South Africa, and racing authorities use clusters to aid them in determining if penalties should be called. When hay is in short supply due to drought conditions, trainers have fewer choices for providing forage to their horses, and with jimsonweed being drought-resistant, it is more likely to contaminate the hay. Like in South Africa, California appears to have a jimsonweed problem. Of the 28 positive scopolamine tests over the 30 years that RCI tracked positive tests, 22 of them were in California. The California Horse Racing Board (CHRB) THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

43


RUCKSZIO - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

SCOPOLAMINE IS PRODUCED BY JIMSONWEED (DATURA STRAMONIUM), A WEED WITH A WORLDWIDE DISTRIBUTION AND A COMMON INVADER OF HAY, STRAW AND CEREAL GRAIN.

clearly recognizes this fact, as Dr. Rick Arthur, the CHRB equine medical director, released a statement on November 14, 2016, to horsemen at Del Mar warning of the presence of jimsonweed in straw. Despite the intermittent positive reports from 1982 to 2011, after that period there seemed to be an abrupt stop to the RCI-reported positive tests for scopolamine in horse racing. As most of the positives had been in California, the assumption can readily be made that an in-house cutoff or screening level was identified and put in place. Such screening levels are in place already, such as the International Federation of Horseracing Authority level of 60 ng/ml (nanograms per milliliter) in urine and the Louisiana screening limit of 75 ng/ ml. The levels associated with the identifications in South Africa have not been reported.

THE “LEVEL” Justify’s post-race urine level has been reported to be approximately 300 ng/ml of scopolamine. While jurisdictional standards place a threshold between 60 ng/ml and 75 ng/ml as a cutoff point, it has been suggested that, because of its unique climate leading to a larger jimsonweed problem, California’s unpublished cutoff is much higher than this level. However, as with many substances in California racing, the CHRB does not report or publish what it considers a positive for scopolamine. On its face, the 300 ng/ml of scopolamine in urine seems high—four times higher than the highest accepted urinary threshold for the substance. There are several critical points that need to be understood before any conclusion can be drawn about whether Justify is undeserving of his place in history as a result of this urine test. First, urinary concentrations of drugs are drugs in the urine. They may lend a clue as to the amount in the horse, but drugs in urine are already out of the horse’s bloodstream. It is the job of the kidneys to eliminate drugs, and the amount in the urine is typically at least an order of magnitude higher than the level in the blood. It is the level in the blood that determines whether or not the substance has any effect on the horse. 44

Second, the urine levels change depending on the acidity and specific gravity of the urine, as well as recent exercise. None of these details regarding Justify’s case have been disclosed to the general public. Finally, where cutoffs have been set either internationally or in local jurisdictions, those levels are well below the level at which an effect can be expected, usually from 1/100th to 1/500th the effective concentration. This huge “safety factor” is adopted by regulators on the off chance that there may be some unidentified effect at lower concentrations. To date, no such effect has been identified for any substance, but it is a philosophical position and not a scientific one.

SCOPOLAMINE IN CALIFORNIA Six horses at Santa Anita tested positive for scopolamine in the days surrounding the 2018 Santa Anita Derby. This brings us back to the cluster discussion, as clusters of positives often serve as a hallmark signal of environmental contamination. Jimsonweed, the presumed environmental contaminant in this case, can occur sporadically in bales of hay and straw. It is not in every bale, nor is it spread uniformly through a flake of hay or straw. All horses identified with scopolamine in this recent cluster also contained the substance atropine. This is significant because jimsonweed contains not only scopolamine but also another anticholinergic alkaloid—atropine, at a much lower concentration. Intentional administration of a pharmacological preparation of scopolamine would lead to a positive test for scopolamine without the co-identification of atropine. While not all jimsonweed positives lead to both scopolamine and atropine identification, no pharmacological preparation administrations would result in the identification of atropine. This simple forensic fact makes any intentional administration to six horses highly unlikely. For these horses to be subjected to “doping,” they all would have had to receive both atropine and scopolamine.

LEGAL RAMIFICATIONS The CHRB has been criticized and questioned for failing to file complaints and for deliberating and making decisions in private sessions regarding THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


CONCLUSIONS The final chapter has not yet been written in the Justify scopolamine case. The scientific evidence pointing to environmental contaminants in the form of weeds in forage or actual drug contamination from the urine of humans or horses is overwhelming. The regulatory response to the ever-increasing sensitivity of drug testing technology has failed to keep pace with the reality of environmental contamination. Many in racing continue to ignore the need for regulatory screening limits accounting for the presence of naturally occurring substances and environmental contaminants in racehorses. Clear protections for horsemen need to be sought, investigated and implemented for horse racing. Many substances, such as scopolamine, may THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

CODY - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Justify’s scopolamine positive, as well as for the other horses that tested positive. Further criticism has been leveled at the CHRB for its actions of amending and modifying its rules regarding scopolamine after the substance was detected in Justify’s samples and those of three of the other horses that tested positive. While that criticism and questioning may well be warranted, the regulator’s actions and inactions have far-reaching ramifications on the future of those participating in the sport both in California and beyond. How will the CHRB respond when the next scopolamine positive is detected, either above or below the 300 ng/ml level? Will an administrative complaint be filed or penalty imposed, or is the “Justify scopolamine rule” to be followed? Similarly, what action, if any, is taken when a nonperformance-enhancing substance, which is prohibited but not assigned a threshold, is detected in the equine athlete and subject to an argument of environmental contamination? If no action is taken, why? If action is taken, the licensee will have a strong argument based on the arbitrary and capricious nature of the enforcement. State agencies must uniformly and fairly enforce the rules and regulations—to do otherwise is arbitrary and capricious. A licensee facing an administrative complaint or seeking judicial review of an administrative ruling now has precedent to argue that any penalty imposed against them is arbitrary and capricious compared to and based on the Justify case. As such, there is now precedent that, even absent a published threshold, 300 ng/ml of scopolamine is not an actionable level for pursuing an administrative complaint or penalty against a licensee. Licensees faced with positive test results for therapeutic substances with unpublished thresholds such as scopolamine are often presented with a difficult choice—take the deal offered by the regulators or face a lengthy and expensive defense that is often fought in an uneven playing field. However, the action/inaction and decisions of the CHRB may well have leveled that playing field for licensees—perhaps not in the controlled environment of administrative proceedings before the state agency but certainly in a courtroom on appeal before a state judge. Licensees seeking review or judicial review of the state agency’s actions/ inactions must establish that they were prejudiced for the reason that the agency’s actions were arbitrary and capricious, an abuse of discretion or otherwise not in accordance with the law. Additional prejudice may be established by proving that the agency’s actions were in excess of its statutory jurisdiction, authority or limitation, or without observance of procedure required by law. Finally, a licensee may prove prejudice by showing that the agency’s actions are contrary to the licensee’s constitutionally protected rights. Fair, uniform and consistent enforcement of defined rules is the legislative intent and directive in establishing and empowering state regulators. Failure to do so and operating without transparency will, at best, result in future suspicion, distrust and decline of our industry. The absence of thresholds, the modification of rules during an ongoing meet and the lack or refusal to provide the basis for the decision of no action—whether that be environmental contamination, cluster effect or otherwise—are damaging to the agency as well as to those in the industry. OF THE 28 POSITIVE SCOPOLAMINE TESTS OVER THE 30 YEARS THAT RCI TRACKED POSITIVE TESTS, 22 OF THEM WERE IN CALIFORNIA.

require regulation on a local level, because some jurisdictions are at greater risk than others. Other substances, such as common human prescriptions, need universal cut-off levels. Common sense must prevail in the penalty structure for all substances that may contaminate a racehorse. Finally, thresholds should be published and the procedure by which they are determined should be clearly in place in the regulations. If thresholds are to be identified after the race in which the substance is identified, the process needs to be clearly laid out in the rules. HJ 45


FEATURE

PUTTING OUR HORSES FIRST. Funds raised by the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance support 74 accredited organizations and thousands of off-track Thoroughbreds. Since 2012, the TAA has granted more than $17.2 million to organizations accredited through a rigorous process and on-site inspections.

Your support makes a difference in the lives of thousands of horses.

www.thoroughbredaftercare.org | (859) 224-2756 Photos by (from left to right): Square Peg, Erin Shea and New Stride Thoroughbred Adoption.

46

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


One. Helping Many.

“TCA’s support of the Thoroughbred Makeover has helped thousands of horses get a solid foundation of retraining after racing.”

“TCA’s grants provide financial assistance to our food pantry that serves all the backstretch workers.”

“TCA’s grants have allowed us to rehome thousands of Thoroughbreds throughout the years.”

Jen Roytz, Retired Racehorse Project

Chaplain Humberto Chavez, New York Racetrack Chaplaincy of America

Bev Strauss, Mid-Atlantic Horse Rescue

Thoroughbred Charities of America provides grants to approved organizations working to help Thoroughbreds, backstretch, and farm workers. Please consider a donation today. P.O. Box 910668, Lexington, Kentucky 40591 | TCA.org | (859) 276-4989 THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

47


NEWS

ALABAMA HBPA Reminder About New Stallions in Alabama In case you missed the news, two new stallions have recently come to Alabama. Chamois, a multiple graded-placed stakes winner of $355,994, is standing at Flying P Ranch near Hope Hull. A son of two-time leading sire Smart Strike, Chamois stands for $2,000, with special consideration to approved mares. For more information, contact Flying P co-owner Bobby Pruitt at mabgpruitt@ bellsouth.net. Also calling Alabama home is Mosquito, a son of multiple graded stakes winner Yes It’s True out of Fleuron, by Distant View. Mosquito stands at H and H Thoroughbreds in Andalusia. Mosquito has already been represented by his first starter, Foolish Steve, who broke his maiden in November 2018 at Delta Downs for owner-breeder Jerry Hughes. The 3-year-old Alabama-bred colt has added two more wins this year, and his earnings have eclipsed $50,000. For more information about Mosquito, contact Rhett Harrelson at (205) 563-5473.

Magic City Classic Horsemen are reminded that the $40,000-guaranteed Magic City Classic will be run December 13 at Fair Grounds in New Orleans. The race is for Alabama-bred 3-year-olds and up at one mile. The nomination deadline will have passed by the time this issue is received. Look for a recap in the next issue. The Alabama HBPA will reimburse up to $500 in travel expenses for horses that finish fourth and out. Please contact Executive Director Nancy Delony for more information at (205) 969-7048 or nancy.m.delony@ms.com.

ARIZONA HBPA Turf Paradise Has Big Opening Day They’re off and running at Turf Paradise! The track opened its 2019–2020 meet on October 12. Opening day was packed with racing fans as the first 3,000 guests received a Turf Paradise T-shirt. The first day of racing was capped by the running of the Bienvenidos Stakes for older colts and geldings going 6 ½ furlongs. The winner was Silver Ride with Denny Velazquez in the irons for trainer Robertino Diodoro and owners R 6 Stable, Randy Marriott and Lana Smith. That was followed up by the October 19 running of the Princess of Palms Stakes, won by Dreamy Gal with Daniel Vergara in the saddle for trainer Molly Pearson and owner John Pendergast. Congratulations to the winning connections of both races. Your Arizona HBPA board has been extremely busy this past summer and fall going through an arbitration process with Turf Paradise, which turned into a mediation that resulted in a three-year contract between the AZHBPA and the track. This was a very lengthy and exhausting process for all. Be sure and thank your AZHBPA board members, staff and attorney Mike Napier for all of their hard work! Turf Paradise and the AZHBPA hosted a welcome back party with a barbecue and karaoke with Shawn Swartz singing the night away. Everyone had a great time, and the party was well attended. Twenty-five barns participated in our first annual “Track or Treat” at Turf Paradise this Halloween. Chaplain John 48

served pizza and then escorted 30 kids around to the participating barns to collect their treats. Thanks to all who helped out and to the participating barns. On November 27, after the submission deadline for this issue, our annual Thanksgiving dinner was held in the clubhouse with turkey and all the fixings sponsored by the AZHBPA and Turf Paradise. Watch for the announcement in December for details about our kids’ Christmas party hosted by the AZHBPA, Arizona Quarter Racing Association and Chaplain John. The party will include food served by Turf Paradise, Santa with gifts for the kids and a fun time to be had by all. Kids attending need to register on Santa’s list at the AZHBPA office.

Arizona Downs Recap September 1 was the close of Arizona Downs’ inaugural meet. Although the meet had some first-year challenges, it went off fairly well and was well supported by the community. Below are the season-ending winners. Congratulations to all! Thoroughbred Leading Owner—Alfredo Asprino Leading Trainer—Cody Axmaker Leading Jockey —Kassie Guglielmino Quarter Horse Leading Owner—Valerie Velazquez Leading Trainer—Armando Castellanos Leading Jockey—Martin Osuna

Arizona HBPA Board Election This is an election year for the Arizona HBPA board of directors. We are in the process of selecting a nomination committee and an election committee. The nomination committee will be looking for qualified candidates to run. A general membership meeting will be held January 11 in the track kitchen at 11 a.m. The nomination committee will be accepting nominations from the floor with those nominations requiring two seconds. Nominees have until January 27 to accept or deny their nomination, and accepting nominees must have their packets returned by that date. Ballots will be mailed by February 21 and must be returned to the AZHBPA office by 4 p.m. on April 7. Ballots will be counted that evening by the election committee. The AZHBPA board is comprised of volunteers and with that comes a lot of responsibility. We need candidates who are eligible to run and fill these spots. If you have an interest or questions, please contact the AZHBPA office and talk with Leroy Gessmann or Wendy Hobson for details. The AZHBPA office is trying to get as many member emails as possible so we can send updates to keep you informed about what’s going on. If you would like to be added to our email list, send an email to azhbpa@outlook.com. Happy holidays to everyone from the AZHBPA!

ARKANSAS HBPA Oaklawn Remains Steadfast in Commitment to Racing Following the news that Southland Racing and Gaming in West Memphis, Arkansas, plans to phase out greyhound racing over the next few years, Louis THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


AFFILIATE NEWS Cella, president of Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort in Hot Springs, made it clear there are no such plans at his facility. “Racing has been in Oaklawn’s DNA for 115 years, and I plan to continue the legacy my family began in 1904,” Cella said. “As the fourth generation of my family to be at the helm of Oaklawn, I can unequivocally state we are completely dedicated to the great sport of Thoroughbred racing.” Although Oaklawn is in the midst of a $100-million expansion project that will include a hotel and multi-events center, Cella points out Oaklawn is simultaneously spending millions on racing. “Since 2015, we have built 14 new barns and have plans to build several more next year,” Cella said. “We’ve also built a new track kitchen and stable gate this year for the benefit of our horsemen. Plus, we have implemented a rigorous maintenance program for our track to make it one of the best in the country.” Oaklawn also is adding 1,000 tons of air conditioning to the grandstand. That project will be completed by the end of 2019. Cella noted Oaklawn has increased purses for 12 consecutive years and expects a purse distribution of more than $35 million in 2020. In another first for Oaklawn, that distribution will feature four $1 million stakes races starting in 2020. “Our goal is for Oaklawn to become a destination casino and resort that ensures our status as the number one tourism attraction in Arkansas,” Cella said. “And at the very center of the entire enterprise will be one of the premier racing programs in all of North America.” Oaklawn’s 57-day live meet begins Friday, January 24 and continues through Saturday, May 2.

COADY PHOTOGRAPHY

CHARLES TOWN HBPA

the distance. I didn’t even know he won. I was watching another horse.” Gustavo Larrosa rode the 6-year-old Windsor Castle gelding to victory. The other West Virginia Breeders’ Classics winners were: West Virginia Vincent Moscarelli Memorial Breeders’ Classic—Hypothesis Jockey: Gerald Almodovar • Trainer: Crystal G. Pickett • Owner: Jill Daniel Breeder: Francis W. Daniel III West Virginia Lottery Breeders’ Classic—Loving Touch • Jockey: Carlos J. Delgado • Trainer: Timothy C. Grams • Owner: Grams Racing Stable LLC Breeder: Leslie G. Cromer West Virginia Triple Crown Nutrition Breeders’ Classic—Boundtobebad Jockey: Christian Hiraldo • Trainer: James W. Casey • Owner/Breeder: Taylor Mountain Farm LLC West Virginia Tourism Office Breeders’ Classic—Parisian Diva • Jockey: J.D. Acosta • Trainer: Stacey R. Viands • Owner/Breeder: Melinda B. Golden West Virginia Thoroughbred Breeders Association Onion Juice Breeders’ Classic—Penguin Power • Jockey: Arnaldo Bocachica • Trainer: Jeff C. Runco Owner: David M. Raim • Breeder: John D. McKee West Virginia Dash for Cash Breeders’ Classic—Dr. Feelgood Jockey: Darius Thorpe • Trainer: Crystal G. Pickett • Owner: Jill Daniel Breeder: Francis W. Daniel III West Virginia Cavada Breeders’ Classic—Anna’s Bandit • Jockey: Xavier Perez Trainer/Breeder: John J. Robb • Owner: No Guts No Glory Farm West Virginia Roger Ramey Breeders’ Classic Distaff—B’s Wild Cork Jockey: Antonio Lopez • Trainer: James W. Casey • Owner/Breeder: Taylor Mountain Farm LLC

Thoroughbred Makeover The Thoroughbred Makeover, presented by the Retired Racehorse Project, took place during the first week of October with 12 horses eligible to compete for the Wild and Wonderful award presented by the Charles Town HBPA. This award gave $1,000 to any category winner and $500 to any second- or third-place category winner. To be eligible for an award, a horse needed to have at least six career starts at Charles Town or be a West Virginia-bred with at least one start at Charles Town.

CASTLE BOUND

West Virginia Breeders’ Classics On an October 12 evening full of surprises at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, longshot Castle Bound scored a 68-1 upset in the $300,000 West Virginia Breeders’ Classic Stakes at 1 1/8 miles. “You never know in this business,” said winning trainer James W. Casey, who bred and owns Castle Bound as Taylor Mountain Farm LLC. “We were hoping for fifth probably. I had one a year ago pay around $100, but those are the two longest [odds] I ever had. We had two or three we were going to put in there. We weren’t sure we would get in, but we thought that this one would like THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

FURAHA

49


NEWS Furaha, with trainer Susan Deal, won the Show Hunter category. This West Virginia-bred had 11 starts at Charles Town before beginning his second career.

Flu Shots The Charles Town HBPA helped horsemen prepare for cold and flu season by offering a flu shot clinic on October 18. The event offers free flu shots to backstretch workers each year, and participation in 2019 doubled compared to last year.

Track or Treat Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races held a “Track or Treat” event on October 22 for children of Penn National Gaming Inc. employees and horsemen. The event drew nearly 200 kids who played games, made crafts and trick-or-treated at booths set up by PNGI departments and the Charles Town HBPA.

Gulfstream Horsemen’s Purchasing Association Continues to Grow The Gulfstream Horsemen’s Purchasing Association has launched operations and is now fully serving horsemen at Palm Meadows Training Center with expansion to Gulfstream Park ongoing. The FHBPA-owned company started selling bagged wood shavings to south Florida horsemen in August and experienced strong demand for its product. The horsemen asked for an expanded offerings menu, and the GHPA has answered those calls, now selling timothy and alfalfa hay, various feed choices and also commonly used products like electrolytes, poultices and furacin at discounted FHBPA member prices. Contact Charles Simon at csimon@floridahbpa.com for details.

INDIANA HBPA Indiana Grand Honors Meet Leaders

FLORIDA HBPA Billy Badgett Tabbed as Executive Director of Florida HBPA The Florida HBPA has named veteran trainer and racing executive William “Billy” Badgett to fill the group’s vacant position of executive director. Badgett, 67, recently left his position as vice president of racing at Gulfstream Park after a five-year stint on the frontside following a long and distinguished career as a trainer. His most well-known trainee was two-time Eclipse Award winner and Hall of Famer Go for Wand. Badgett trained the winners of 583 races and more than $21 million in purses. “With horse racing facing such an uncertain future, I figured that my talents would be best served by helping the horsemen and backside community,” Badgett said. “I have the unique experience of having worked on both sides of the fence, and going back to my roots as a horseman really appealed to me.” FHBPA President Steve Screnci stated, “We are really excited to have Billy on board with the FHBPA. He is uniquely qualified to represent horsemen as in addition to his vast experience as a top trainer, he also has seen racing’s issues firsthand from the point of view of track management. Billy will be a huge asset for our organization.” The FHBPA represents the interests of more than 5,000 Thoroughbred horse owners and trainers who race in south Florida. The FHBPA works to foster and promote their relationships with racetracks, government and community while creating a better economic climate in which our members can do business. 50

COADY PHOTOGRAPHY

MORE THAN 200 KIDS ENJOYED CHARLES TOWN’S HALLOWEEN EVENT.

Trainer Genaro Garcia had another exceptional season at Indiana Grand, earning his third straight title. Under his Southwest Racing Stables banner, Garcia also teamed up with owner Bruce Murphy to earn their second straight leading owner title. Horses from Garcia’s barn won 59 races, 21 more than LEADING TRAINER AND CO-LEADING OWNER the second-place GENARO GARCIA barn on the list. In all, his runners earned $1.1 million, and he maintained a top-three average of 52 percent throughout the 120-day meet that ended November 6. Garcia, who was born in Mexico, now moves into sixth place on the list of all-time leading trainers at Indiana Grand with 269 career wins at the track. “It was a great year, not just because I won my third title, but because I completed my 500th career win too, and that was very good,” Garcia said. “I would like to say thank you to all my owners that have become a part of this. And I must thank my barn crew. They work very hard and are also a part of this.” Garcia, who has a farm in Greenwood, Indiana, is also working hard on a new project. He just purchased a farm off I-465 on the southeast side of Indianapolis, so his operation in Indiana continues to grow. “I also want to thank Indiana Grand, because it is like my home,” Garcia added. “I feel so proud to compete with a lot of people that I admire. I think Indiana Grand is a great racetrack with good horses and good trainers.” THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


AFFILIATE NEWS COADY PHOTOGRAPHY

One of the good individuals who surrounds Garcia is Murphy, who has become a major part of Garcia’s operation over the past three seasons. Murphy, who owns and operates Murphy Trailer Sales in Crawfordsville and Backstretch Supplies with Garcia at Indiana Grand, teamed up with Garcia once again this season CO-LEADING OWNER BRUCE MURPHY for another leading owner title. Horses owned by Murphy and Southwest Racing Stables won 28 of 120 starts and earned in excess of $500,000. They have now won the majority of their 70 races over the past three years of competition at Indiana Grand with 97 career wins and more than $1.8 million in earnings since forming their partnership in 2012. “I feel very blessed,” Murphy said. “We have great horses and a great barn with Genaro and his staff. All the horsemen did a great job this year, and we are just very blessed to be in this position again.” The Garcia-Murphy combination had great success with Will Knows, who won five races during the meet to be named the Indiana HBPA’s Winningest Horse of the Year at Indiana Grand. Will Knows caught the eye of Garcia and Murphy in the early stages of the 2019 racing season at Indiana Grand. They claimed him for $10,000 out of his first start for 2019, which was a win for his previous connections. From there, the 4-year-old gelded son of Wilko reeled off three more consecutive wins. Will Knows completed the season with five wins, two seconds and one third in nine starts, only missing the top three one time all year. “We got him after the first race of the year, and what a fantastic horse he turned out to be,” said Murphy, who co-owns the horse with Garcia’s Southwest Racing Stables. “He’s a pleasure to have in the barn. He’s not a beautiful horse to look at, but he’s so good-natured, and we are very blessed to have him.” The Indiana-bred also completed the season with more than $71,000 in earnings. He even tried his luck in the $100,000 Brickyard Stakes, which was the only time he wasn’t among the top three finishers. Will Knows was presented with a blanket courtesy of the Indiana HBPA, which honors the horse with the most wins each season. O’Prado Perk from the Tony Granitz Stable also completed the year with five wins, scoring a streak of four victories to end the season. However, the 3-year-old Paddy O’Prado gelding had fewer second-place finishes and earnings, which gave the nod to Will Knows for the award. Among the jockeys, what a year it was for rider Marcelino Pedroza Jr. After a slow start to the meet in April, Pedroza climbed his way to the top of the standings by mid-June and never looked back, soaring out to a commanding lead and earning his second title in the past three years at Indiana Grand. A native of Panama, Pedroza had several major highlights during the meet, including equaling the track record for most wins in one night by a jockey with six wins on the September 5 racing program to tie the previous record set by Rodney Prescott in 2013. Pedroza followed that up with his 1,000th career win in early October, and he surpassed the record set by Fernando De La Cruz in 2016 for most purse earnings recorded by a jockey in one season. De La Cruz

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

accumulated more than $3 million, and Pedroza concluded the meet with more than $3.4 million in purses. “I am extremely blessed,” Pedroza said. “I want to thank all the owners and trainers who supported me and a special thanks to my agent, John Herbstreit. He did a really good job for me, and he worked very hard.” Pedroza concluded the 2019 season with three wins on the final program. In all, he won 152 races with 111 seconds in 649 starts. He finished 59 wins ahead of second-place finisher Rodney Prescott, who won 93 races. Pedroza also earned the leading jockey title at Indiana Grand in 2018. He adds this second title to those earned at Turfway Park and Kentucky Downs. Pedroza now has 495 career wins at Indiana Grand and moves into the top five jockeys of all time at the track. Each year, Indiana Grand honors the top apprentice of the season with the Juan Saez Leading Apprentice Award. This year, the track honored two recipients as Kendal Sterritt and Joe Ramos Jr. tied atop the standings with 25 wins apiece. Sterritt began her riding career just a month before arriving in Indiana last spring. The native of Mesa, Arizona, grew up loving horses and found a way to get involved through an unconventional manner. “I begged and begged my mom for a pony,” Sterritt said. “She finally bought me one, and I started riding lessons. Then I started competing on the jumping circuit, which took me all across the country. When I graduated from high school, I went to college for one year and decided that wasn’t for me, so I got a job galloping at Hidden Springs Ranch in Yarnell, Arizona, under trainer Duane Grissom.” From that first experience with Thoroughbreds, Sterritt was hooked and later went to Turf Paradise, where she galloped for a year and a half before she took out her jockey’s license. She rode the first three weeks of her career at Turf Paradise, winning two, before ending up in Indiana in May. “I had several people telling me I should go to this track or to this track, but it just didn’t feel right,” she continued. “Then someone suggested Indiana, and it just felt right. Coming from Turf Paradise just riding three weeks, I didn’t expect to do this well, so this is a nice surprise.” Sterritt accomplished several goals during the meet. In addition to winning 25 races, the 23-year-old apprentice also scored her first stakes win aboard Rooster in the $75,000 ITOBA Stallion Season Stakes this fall. She ended the season among the top 10 jockeys at Indiana Grand with accumulated purse earnings of more than $626,000. “I thank everyone who gave me a shot and believed in me and let me ride their horses this year,” she said. “This is a true honor to win this award.” Joining Sterritt for the award was Joe Ramos Jr., who also started his professional career earlier this year. A native of Puerto Rico, Ramos graduated from jockey school there on January 1. He rode in 17 races, winning three, before venturing to the continental United States and forming a partnership with agent Julio Rijos in mid-March with a plan to ride at both Belterra Park and Indiana Grand during the summer, a goal that turned out well at both facilities. “I always say thanks to God first, then family, then the hard work we’ve put into it,” said Ramos through his agent Rijos. “A special thanks to all the owners and trainers for their support this year, and I hope to be back in the spring.” Ramos adds the apprentice award at Indiana Grand to his leading apprentice honors at Belterra Park earlier in the fall. There, he finished fifth in the overall standings with 45 wins. He completed the 2019 meet at Indiana Grand with 25 wins and more than $561,000 in purse earnings. To date, Ramos has 78 career wins in only eight months of riding in the United States, and his purse earnings have surpassed $1.2 million. Ramos becomes the first member of his family to be involved in horse racing. His grandfather had an affinity for the horses as a child and passed that love on to Ramos. 51


NEWS “He [Ramos] is the only jockey in his family,” Rijos said. “He has been very passionate about horses and racing since he was a little kid. He went home to visit his family in Puerto Rico and will come back for the meet at Turfway this winter, and then we plan to be back in Indiana next spring.” “Juan Saez was a bright, young jockey that always had a smile on his face and had such a bright future,” said Jon Schuster, Indiana Grand vice president and general manager of racing, of the award’s namesake. “Unfortunately, his life tragically ended in a racing incident at Indiana Grand in 2014. By naming this award in his honor, it is a small thing we can do to keep his name alive, and we want to congratulate both Kendal and Joe for being part of an exclusive group to win this award.”

IOWA HBPA As One Meet Ends, Iowa HBPA Prepares for Another As Prairie Meadows works on upgrades and improvements to the backside area, the Iowa HBPA is preparing for the 2020 season. Some things to look forward to are the joint IAHBPA/ITBOA annual awards, a Groom Elite 101 course and discounted Adventureland tickets for our horsemen. This year, the IAHBPA has been meeting with Prairie Meadows, the Iowa Racing and Gaming Commission and Iowa Quarter Horse Racing Association to negotiate a new contract beginning in 2020 as the current contract is up at the end of 2019. After many meetings, there is now a tentative five-year agreement in place. With the new contract, there will be a couple of noticeable changes to the 2020 race meet, with the biggest one being the schedule. The racing season will begin on May 1 and finish on September 26 with only Thoroughbreds running for the first month and a half, followed by Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses racing at the same time. It’s been a long time since there was a mixed meet at Prairie Meadows, and hopefully the return of this type of format with 616 Thoroughbred racing opportunities over the course of 84 Thoroughbred racing days will incentivize the rebuilding of the Iowa program. We look forward to offering our horsemen this new racing schedule, and we will be monitoring the effects this change has on every aspect of racing. In conjunction with Prairie Meadows, we’ll be reviewing that information so we may improve the racing product to be the best it can be. With this new program, we have put forward goals to increase overall field size and the Iowa foal population. It’s only with the support of our horsemen here in Iowa and elsewhere contributing to the Iowa program that we will be successful. Aside from national meetings, conventions and major holidays, our office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. You can reach Executive Director Jon Moss or Secretary-Treasurer Michelle McShane in the office at (515) 967-4804.

KENTUCKY HBPA President’s Message It’s about the horse. At a recent meeting of the Kentucky Equine Drug and Research Council (EDRC), a majority of the members voted against a proposal to prohibit using furosemide (Lasix) in 2-year-old horses on race day. However, a subsequent vote by the EDRC reversed that proposal and now supports the Lasix ban. 52

Banning Lasix in 2-year-olds would begin in 2020 and would include stakes races in 2021. The EDRC is an advisory committee of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission (KHRC). It is customary for the commission to agree with the advice forwarded to them by the EDRC, although as of press time the KHRC had not yet had its meeting to discuss the issue. The EDRC is comprised of mainly veterinarians, a scientist, a racetrack representative and a political appointee, which for the past several years has been Senator Damon Thayer. I was the KHBPA representative on the EDRC through the terms of three governors. However, when Matt Bevin was elected, he would not accept my appointment to the council. We later found out that a certain senator lobbied to have me removed. The KHBPA recommended appointing Dr. Mark Cheney in my place, and he has done a great job of representing the interests of the horse, but I feel it is beneficial to have someone on the EDRC to provide a horsemen’s perspective. When the topic of eliminating Lasix was originally presented by Mike Ziegler of Churchill Downs, Dr. Cheney and Dr. Andy Roberts, who is also on the committee, strongly opposed the suggestion. Senator Thayer was in favor of eliminating Lasix on race day. At that first meeting, I was entitled to speak and explain the importance of the medication. I outlined the various studies that have proved the importance of Lasix while there are no credible studies to the contrary. Afterward, the EDRC members voted against eliminating Lasix. Senator Thayer was irate and insulted the council members who voted in favor of keeping Lasix. Later, after the first meeting, several of us were talking in the parking lot. Senator Thayer accosted me regarding what had transpired. I explained to Senator Thayer that it is and always should be about the horse. It is difficult for me to understand what drives this incessant effort to eliminate the use of Lasix on race day. I recall a few years ago that a member of the racing commission suggested at a meeting that Lasix affects bone density, leading to breakdowns. The equine medical director at the time explained to him that there is no science to support that claim. A couple weeks later, this same member had written an op-ed in a newspaper espousing the same theory that Lasix causes issues with the bone. Yet his horses all run with Lasix. I question, if someone really believes this, how can they in good conscience use the medication? Another often-repeated complaint is that foreign buyers express the view that they will not purchase horses bred by sires and out of mares who raced in the United States because they are somehow tainted since they were successful while running with Lasix on race day. Yet when foreign horses race in the Breeders’ Cup in the United States, invariably they run on Lasix. I wonder if these foreign horses who are successful in the Breeder’s Cup would suffer the same fate when they return to their country of origin and enter the breeding shed. In closing, Pete Salmen Jr. passed away a few weeks ago. He was a true friend to many of us in the racing industry and was elected as president of the KHBPA during some very tumultuous times. He also served on several committees, including the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund and the Kentucky Racing Health and Welfare Fund along with his good friend Don Ball. We will miss him. Rick Hiles, KHBPA President

Immigration Update Kentucky HBPA Backstretch Services Coordinator and Hispanic Liaison Julio Rubio and attorney Will Velie of Horseman Labor Solutions have provided the following update on immigration issues for horsemen. The National HBPA and Kentucky HBPA have been taking a leading role in helping advocate for our industry’s needs regarding important immigration issues. The first development is that the H-2B visa cap for the winter season was THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


reached as of November 7. This means that any applications for H-2B visas will not be granted again until April 2020. Last year, the April cap received more than 100,000 applications for 33,000 available spots. The fact that the cap was reached sooner than last year means that almost certainly there will be even more applications submitted for April 1 than were submitted last year. To try to react to this chronic shortage of available spots under the H-2B program, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) and staff have been meeting with members of Congress to try to build support for a new interpretation under the H-2A agricultural visa that expands the definition of “agricultural labor” to include “activities related to the care and feeding of horses.” As livestock, horses require care and feeding no matter where they are located. The H-2A program should therefore apply to agriculture jobs in the equine sector including grooms, stable hands, exercise riders and general caretakers. The inclusion of equine workers into the H-2A program would immediately eliminate the cap pressure on horsemen as the H-2A does not have a statutory limit or quota, so all horsemen who need temporary workers to meet labor shortages would be able to successfully petition for them. The second development is related to PERMS, which is permanent residence status for employees through a U.S. employer, and so far, many grooms have been approved and more are in the process. For the past two years, there has been no wait with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services when submitting petitions; it used to take more than five years. The trainers who have been applying for their workers’ permanent residence status are really grateful that their long-time visa workers are finally able to live the American dream. Workers who have been approved are allowed to bring their families as permanent residents and are very happy and grateful. We will be keeping you updated as new developments arise.

Kentucky Horsemen Find Success at the Breeders’ Cup

BREEDERS’ CUP/ECLIPSE SPORTSWIRE

Kentucky horsemen and horses were well represented in the November 1-2 Breeders’ Cup World Championships at Santa Anita, producing four of the 14

BREEDERS’ CUP/ECLIPSE SPORTSWIRE

AFFILIATE NEWS

MITOLE

today was awesome. There’s no words. Thank you to that mare. She’s been so great to us.” An earner of $2.69 million, Blue Prize had more to give, being sold three days later for $5 million to Larry Best’s OXO Equine at Fasig-Tipton’s November sale. Mitole, who joins Spendthrift Farm as a stallion for the 2020 breeding season, virtually assured himself of being voted champion male sprinter and put himself in serious discussion for both older male and Horse of the Year as he reeled in favored Shancelot for a 1 ¼-length triumph in the $2 million Sprint (G1). Making the race even more special for trainer Steve Asmussen is that Mitole gave longtime owners Bill and Corinne Heiligbrodt their first Breeders’ Cup victory. In stamping himself “the fastest horse in the world,” Mitole won six of seven starts in 2019 after his 3-year-old season was shortened by a minor leg ailment. His championship 4-year-old season included the Churchill Downs Stakes (G1) on Kentucky Derby Day and New York’s stallion-making Metropolitan Mile (G1) that featured a mix of the best sprinters and dirt route horses in the world. “Going back as a 3-year-old, he proved his brilliance,” Asmussen said after earning his seventh career Breeders’ Cup win. “The horsemen that Corinne and Bill are understood [after] something as simple as a splint that he incurred that his elite ability only comes along very rarely and gave him more than enough time to be sure that he would be healthy enough to do what he does. Because a body that moves as fast as his is simple physics. “We laid out a map highlighted by the Met Mile,” Asmussen continued. “Then for a horse to have the mind as well as the physical ability to regroup and then to prove you’re the fastest horse in the world at the end of the year is truly special.” Brad Cox, a year after earning his first Breeders’ Cup victory with Distaff heroine Monomoy Girl, earned his second and third, making him the only trainer to win more

winners: Blue Prize (Distaff), Mitole (Sprint), Covfefe (Filly & Mare Sprint) and British Idiom (Juvenile Fillies). Merriebelle Stable’s Blue Prize, a two-time winner of Keeneland’s Grade 1 Juddmonte Spinster as well as three graded stakes at Churchill Downs, gave Keeneland-based trainer Ignacio Correas his first Breeders’ Cup victory as the 6-year-old Argentine-bred mare beat heavy favorite Midnight Bisou by 1 ½ lengths in the $2 million Longines Distaff (G1). “I don’t think it can get any better,” Correas said afterward. “A lot of credit goes to the mare. Good trainers with bad horses, you need horses like this to show what you can do, where they can take you because they take you on a great ride. Joe [Bravo] rode her great when she won her second Spinster, and THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

BREEDERS’ CUP/ECLIPSE SPORTSWIRE

BLUE PRIZE

COVFEFE (PICTURED) TEAMED WITH BRITISH IDIOM TO DELIVER TWO BREEDERS’ CUP VICTORIES TO THE BRAD COX BARN.

53


NEWS

54

second-most all-time Churchill Downs victories at 715 on November 8. His prolific stable would seem poised to have a good shot in 2020 to surpass Dale Romans’ record 735 victories under the Twin Spires. Mott held the record for 31 years before Romans, a vice president of the Kentucky HBPA, passed his longtime racetrack idol two years ago with his 703rd Churchill Downs victory.

Frank Jones Honored with Warner L. Jones Jr. Horseman of the Year Award An otherwise forgettable horse race at long-shuttered Miles Park in western Louisville launched Louisville entrepreneur and Kentucky HBPA vice president Frank L. Jones Jr. into a half-century of horse ownership and contributions to the sport and industry. The Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners at its November 14 awards dinner honored Jones with its 2019 Warner L. Jones Jr. Horseman of the Year Award for his depth of contributions as a horse owner, breeder and horseplayer who has FRANK JONES volunteered immeasurable time helping the Thoroughbred industry through his work on behalf of horsemen and as a regulator. The Warner L. Jones Jr. Horseman of the Year Award recognizes individuals for outstanding contributions to Kentucky racing and sharing the passion exemplified by Jones, who spent 50 years on the Churchill Downs board, including eight as chairman during the iconic track’s resurgence. Warner Jones was the inaugural award winner in 1988, six years before his death. Frank Jones, no relation to Warner, has had only two trainers: the late Jerry Romans and his son Dale. “Our Man of the Year is the man of my life,” Romans said in his poignant comments introducing Frank Jones at the event at the Kentucky Derby Museum. “When my career was trying to get started … no matter where I went, Frank made sure I had a horse that fit, that could win a race. “Go back 50 years ago or thereabouts, when Frank got out of the Air Force and was fortunate enough that his high school buddy and his brothers owned a bar and restaurant here in Louisville. He called Frank and said, ‘Would you stop by the bar? I’ve got a hot tip tonight on a race in a little racetrack in west Louisville, Miles Park. Can you go over and make a bet for me?’ So Frank goes by the bar, picks up some money and makes his first $2 bet on a horse that happened to win. “Out of that $2 wager, it might have been the greatest race ever run for the state of Kentucky and the horse racing industry. Because out of that $2 bet came 30 years of service as vice president of the HBPA, came part of almost every negotiation of every contract with every racetrack. I think [Churchill Downs president] Kevin Flanery would say there’s not been a tougher negotiator in history.” Romans said he was in the room when Jones worked out with former Turfway Park owner Jerry Carroll the formula by which horsemen would get a cut of bets placed out of state on Kentucky races. “A lot of people don’t realize [back then] that racetracks only got the revenue from the money [bet] from people who walked in off the street and bet,” he said. “They worked out the formula for interstate wagering, which led to intertrack wagering and international wagering and grew Kentucky racing to the COADY PHOTOGRAPHY

than one 2019 Breeders’ Cup race besides Chad Brown and his trio. Cox started it off with Keeneland’s Grade 1 Darley Alcibiades winner British Idiom wearing down favored Donna Veloce by a neck in the $2 million Juvenile Fillies (G1). Covfefe followed the next day, holding off Santa Anita standout Bellafina by three-quarters of a length in the $1 million Filly & Mare Sprint (G1) with Joel Rosario in the saddle. It was the first Breeders’ Cup victory for Larry, Nanci and Jaime Roth’s LNJ Foxwoods stable. British Idiom has pretty much the same ownership as Monomoy Girl, who in Keeneland’s 2018 Ashland Stakes gave Cox his first Grade 1 victory. Those owners are Michael Dubb, Stuart Grant, Sol Kumin and Bethlehem Stables. Both fillies were purchased by bloodstock agent Liz Crow. Also like Monomoy Girl, British Idiom spent much of the summer training at Ellis Park in preparation for her debut elsewhere. Cox’s first full year of training was 2005, but his career has skyrocketed the past five years. From his first Eclipse Award champion in Monomoy Girl last year, he has wasted no time in getting more, with British Idiom a lock to be 2-yearold filly champion and the 3-year-old Covfefe the female sprint champion. Cox grew up two blocks from Churchill Downs, the son of forklift operator and $2 bettor Jerry Cox, who in a 2014 interview recalled his son at age 10 or 12 telling him one day, “Old man, you’re looking at the next D. Wayne Lukas.” If Brad Cox told a slightly different version, where he simply said he “wanted to be the next D. Wayne Lukas,” there is agreement that the younger Cox began sneaking into the grandstand at age 10 and fibbed about his age to get his first job walking horses at age 13. The trainer admits he doesn’t spend much time reflecting on how far he’s come and accomplished, which includes training titles at Churchill Downs (three), Ellis Park (two) and Keeneland (one) along with being the three-time defending meet leader at the Fair Grounds in New Orleans. “I don’t, I really don’t,” Cox said the morning after British Idiom won and hours before Covfefe’s victory. “It’s what’s the next hurdle in front of us. Horses to enter, looking for the next champion. We’re a very driven stable, and we’re looking to have quality horses. And doing that, you can’t rest. We were up at one o’clock this morning, loading horses to ship them home, [including] British Idiom. You’ve got to continue to work. We’ve got a great crew in place. These are rewarding days, like yesterday. But back at it today.” After Covfefe’s win, he said, “Someone told me a couple of weeks ago, ‘You’re not in the horse business. The horse business is in you.’ That’s very true.” Four Wheel Drive, the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf Sprint (G1) winner, is part of trainer Wesley Ward’s Keeneland-based stable but did not race in Kentucky, winning his three races at Colonial Downs, Belmont Park and Santa Anita. The Juvenile Turf Sprint marked the third time that the Mike Makertrained Chimney Rock had finished a good second in a stakes behind three different Ward-trained horses. Also, while Brown’s stable is firmly aligned with New York, his $4 million Longines Turf (G1) winner Bricks and Mortar won Churchill Downs’ Grade 1 Old Forester Turf Classic, and Uni (GB) prepped for her victory in the $2 million TVG Mile (G1) by taking Keeneland’s Grade 1 First Lady. Kentucky’s four wins match New York for producing the most at the 2019 Breeders’ Cup, with California and the Mid-Atlantic each having two and Europe one, with road warrior Four Wheel Drive defying classification. The Kentucky HBPA again teamed with Kentucky Downs and Ellis Park to underwrite written and video coverage produced by communications specialist Jennie Rees of Kentucky horses and horsemen in the Breeders’ Cup as a service to resource-strapped media outlets. The content was used extensively by racing websites but also was a staple of Breeders’ Cup coverage for mainstream media outlets such as Louisville’s WHAS Radio and the 94-station Kentucky News Network and WLKY-32, Louisville’s top-rated television station. Speaking of Asmussen, he tied fellow Hall of Famer Bill Mott for the

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


AFFILIATE NEWS place it is today. Everyone in this game who races in Kentucky owes a debt of gratitude to Frank Jones for what he’s done for the industry. “Let’s all thank God that horse at Miles Park 50 years ago didn’t stumble coming out of the gate and run dead last. I don’t know where I’d be or this industry would be.” When he came to the podium, Jones said, “The horse paid $96, in case you were wondering. … This award is one of the greatest things that has ever happened to me. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate it. … The first horse I ever bought was in 1968. I paid $1,500 for this horse. He immediately had a shin and didn’t run for four or five months. But he did win. The first horse I ever had that won was at Latonia. I’m standing on the chair—I used to get a lot more emotional about winning races than I do now—hollering. I said to the guy standing next to me, ‘That’s my horse!’ He said, ‘He didn’t beat much.’” From that humble beginning, Jones went on to be the leading owner at Churchill Downs’ 1989, 1990, 1992 and 1995 spring meets. Along with Dale Romans, he has transformed his stable from mainly claimers to top-quality racehorses.  Jones bred and raced $1.5 million-earner Tapitsfly, the inaugural Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf winner in 2009 and winner of Belmont’s Grade 1 Just a Game and Keeneland’s Grade 1 First Lady. He bred and raced 2016 Preakness Stakes (G1) runner-up Cherry Wine and Churchill Downs’ Grade 3 Regret winner Sweeping Paddy in partnership with William Pacella and Frank Shoop. Jones owns multiple graded stakes-placed Tiz Mischief and campaigns stakescaliber Rare Form with the Churchill Downs Racing Club and the 3-year-old filly Shacklette with Nancy Delony Jones, whom he married in August. Wins and horses aside, Jones’ most important contributions to racing are his unpaid work on behalf of horsemen and those working in the industry. Typical of Jones, he and Nancy requested donations to the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund instead of wedding gifts. Jones, who built Recreonics into the industry leader for aquatic and swimming pool equipment, is a former member and vice chair of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, on which he served as an important voice for horsemen and horseplayers while also understanding the business world. He continues to serve on the board of the Kentucky Racing Health & Welfare Fund, which provides health resources and financial assistance to the commonwealth’s backstretch workers. Jones recently was appointed by newly elected Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear to be on the transition team for the Public Protection cabinet, which oversees the KHRC.  “Frank L. Jones Jr. has a lot in common with Warner L. Jones Jr., well beyond the similarity in name,” said outgoing KTO president Chris Murphy. “Like Warner Jones, Frank has had an extraordinary reach of benefaction to the industry. … What great shape our wonderful sport would be in if we had more people who could keep up with these Joneses.”

Thirty-Two Equine Workers Document the Churchill Downs Backside in Groundbreaking New Book As the home of the Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs is the epicenter of Kentucky’s equine heritage and the most storied racetrack in the world. More than a thousand people come to work on the backside of the track on any given day during a racing meet. Most of the hotwalkers, grooms, exercise riders, jockeys and other equine workers who dedicate their lives and careers to horse racing will never stand in the winner’s circle, but each of them is a member of a rich community with a long and storied tradition, one that many outside the industry are not aware of. Better Lucky Than Good: Tall Tales and Straight Talk from the Backside of the Track changes that. Over three years, Louisville Story Program engaged backside workers and residents of South Louisville in conversations and a THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

collaboration that has led to a caring, in-depth look into the lives and stories of equine workers. Authored by thirty-two people who live and work on the Churchill backside, Better Lucky Than Good represents the first time in the history of American Thoroughbred racing that equine workers have documented their own lives and experiences for the public. “Every person I know who has ever ‘written a horse book,’ or worked extensively as a journalist covering the world of the track, has at some point had a version of this thought: If somebody would just do a good oral history, interviewing the people who actually work with the horses—the grooms and riders and farriers and assistant trainers, the folks on the ‘backside’—it would be worth 10,000 pages of even the best literary description of the sport. Now the Louisville Story Program has done this, and done it beautifully. It’s no exaggeration to say that this book has needed to exist for 200 years,” said John Jeremiah Sullivan, author of Pulphead and Blood Horses. The 320-page book retails for $25 and is available at louisvillestoryprogram.org.

The HBPA Is You The HBPA, established in 1940, is an organization of owners and trainers numbering approximately 30,000 nationally in 23 states and Canada and more than 6,000 in Kentucky. The association is governed by a board of directors consisting of owners and trainers volunteering their time and elected by the membership every three years. The HBPA is committed to working for the betterment of racing on all levels. The HBPA represents owners and trainers on several fronts: · The HBPA is present in negotiating sessions with each racetrack regarding purse structure, equitable share of simulcast revenues, overall track safety, sanitation and security. · The HBPA provides benevolence to horsemen in need, education and recreation programs to the backstretch, and various insurance packages that include—free of charge to members—fire and disaster insurance and claiming coverage. Visit one of the fully staffed HBPA offices at the currently running racetrack in Kentucky for details. · The HBPA works in conjunction with the chaplaincy program and the Kentucky Racing Health and Welfare Fund to provide support and benefits for horsemen. · The HBPA supports scientific research and marketing initiatives on a regional and national level to help promote interest in Thoroughbred racing. · The HBPA is at the forefront in litigation and legislation on issues involving horsemen’s rights in regard to interstate simulcasting, proprietary rights, casino gambling, therapeutic medication, sports betting and many other areas of concern to horsemen. How can I join? You are invited to drop by the HBPA office to meet the staff and learn more about current projects and how you can get involved in helping to improve the industry. There are no membership fees. Remember, this is your organization. Become an active participant and one of the horsemen helping horsemen. To join, all you need to do is fill out our membership card and fax, mail or email it back to us. For more information, please visit our website at kyhbpa.org and click on “How to Join.” 55


NEWS

Evangeline Downs Racetrack & Casino 2020 Race Meet

Fair Grounds Race Course 2019-2020 Race Meets

2235 Creswell Lane Extension, Opelousas, LA 70570 Toll Free: 866-4-Racing * www.evangelinedowns.com

1751 Gentilly Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70119 Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

November 2019

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

February 2020

Mon

Tue

Wed Thu

16 17

20 21 22

01

05 06 07 01

05 06 07

08

12 13 14 08

11 12 13 14

15

18 19 20 21 15

18 19 20 21

22

26 27 28 22

25 26 27 28

29

29

09 10 11

12

16 17 18

19 20

23 24 25

26

30 31

Fri

Sat

08 09 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30 31 November 2019 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 26 27 29 December 2019 04 05 06 11 12 13 18 19 20 27

12 19 26

02 09 16 23 30

Fri

Sat

15 16 17 18

15 16 17 18

22 23 24 25

22 23 24 25 29 30 31 August 2020

01 02

01

06 07 08 09

05 06 07 08

13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23

12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22

27 28 29 30

26 27 28 29 84 Thoroughbred Days

10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27

Harrah’s Louisiana Downs 2020 Race Meet 8000 Hwy 80 East, PO Box 5519, Bossier City, LA 71171 318-742-5555 * www.ladowns.com

2717 Delta Downs Dr., Vinton, LA 70668 * 337-589-7441 www.deltadowns.com

October 2019

Thu

03 04 05 06

Delta Downs Racetrack & Casino 2019-2020 Race Meets

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

Wed

08 09 10 11

June 2020

01 02 03 04 05

Tue

July 2020

29 30 May 2020

80 Thoroughbred Days

January 2020

Mon

08 09 10 11

24 25 27 28 29 March 2020

28 29 30 December 2019

Sun

01 02 03 04

05 06 07 08 13 14 15

Sat

April 2020

01 09

Fri

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

Fri

January 2020 01 02 03 08 09 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31 February 2020

Sat

04 11 18 25

01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29 84 Thoroughbred Days

07 14 21 28

56

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

January 2020

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

March 2020 04 01 02 03

07 14

05

06 07

11 08 09 10 11

12

13 14

18 15 16 17 18

19

20 21

25

26

27 28 February 2020

46 Quarter Horse Days 01

02

03 04

08

09

10 11

15

16

17 18

22

23

24 25

29

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


AFFILIATE NEWS LOUISIANA HBPA

MOUNTAINEER PARK HBPA

Louisiana HBPA Lifetime Achievement Award

WV Racing Commission Establishes Initiatives on Equine Health and Welfare

The Louisiana HBPA presented Arthur Morrell with a lifetime achievement award on December 8 at the Fair Grounds. Arthur served on the LAHBPA board from 1992 to 2017. His wife of more than 50 years, Cynthia Hedge-Morrell, is a Thoroughbred trainer. Morrell has been a horse owner and champion of the Louisiana horsemen for more than 30 years and has our thanks for everything he has done on behalf of the Louisiana horse racing industry and our members.

Delta Downs The 2019–2020 Thoroughbred meet at Delta Downs ends on March 9. Louisiana Premier Night is February 20 and features approximately $1 million in purses for Louisiana-breds. For additional information, contact the racing office at (888) 589-7223.

Evangeline Downs

The West Virginia Racing Commission announced at its November 12 meeting that it will establish a medical review board, hire an equine medical director and implement the necropsy program at Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort and Charles Town Races. The racing commission, Mountaineer Park HBPA and Charles Town HBPA are participating in the Mid-Atlantic Strategic Plan to Reduce Equine Fatalities along with their counterparts in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia. These initiatives will follow the best practices being developed through this plan. The medical review board will include the equine medical director, a steward, a safety official, the track investigator, a horsemen’s representative and the track superintendent. Joe Moore, the racing commission’s executive director, said he plans to have the board in place in January 2020 at Charles Town Races and at the beginning of the 2020 meet at Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort.

The Evangeline Downs Thoroughbred meet is scheduled to begin April 8. Stall applications are due by late February. For additional information, contact the racing office at (337) 594-3022.

Mountaineer 2020 Racing Meet Dates Announced

Fair Grounds

Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort applied to race 130 days for its 2020 meet beginning April 26 and ending December 2 with the West Virginia Derby on Saturday, August 1, at 1 p.m.

With 2019 nearing an end, Fair Grounds will host a final chance for Louisiana-bred juveniles to earn black type in the male and female divisions of the $100,000 Louisiana Futurity on December 29. Following the turn of the calendar into 2020, graded stakes action returns to New Orleans on January 18 when Kentucky Derby hopefuls will square off in the Grade 3 Lecomte Stakes on a card with five supporting stakes. The Road to the Kentucky Derby then continues February 15 with the Grade 2 Risen Star Stakes presented by Lamarque Motor Company and concludes March 21 with the Grade 2 Twinspires. com Louisiana Derby. Early-bird nominations for the Louisiana Derby, which include nomination fees for the Lecomte and Risen Star, are due December 21. For more information, contact the racing office at (504) 948-1288.

Louisiana Downs

ACKERLEY IMAGES

The Louisiana Downs American Quarter Horse meet for 2020 begins January 4 and ends March 18. For more information, contact the racing office at (318) 741-2511.

Century Casinos Receives Approval for Acquisition of Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort Century Casinos Inc. in September announced that it has received approval from the West Virginia Lottery Commission to acquire the Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort from Eldorado Resorts Inc. “We are very excited to be expanding into West Virginia,” Erwin Haitzmann and Peter Hoetzinger, co-chief executive officers of Century Casinos, remarked. “Mountaineer is a great addition to our portfolio and will be our third racetrack and casino property. We look forward to working with the staff and community to continue the current success at Mountaineer into the future.” Located about one hour from downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the Mountaineer property originally opened in 1951 with the casino opening in 1994. It features a 357-room hotel, 1,486 slot machines, 36 table games, a poker room, a racetrack and five dining venues. In June 2019, Century Casinos entered into a definitive agreement with Eldorado Resorts to acquire the operations of Mountaineer, Isle Casino Cape Girardeau in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, and Lady Luck Casino Caruthersville in Caruthersville, Missouri, for approximately $107 million.

Mountaineer Meet Concludes with Numerous Events The Mountaineer Park HBPA hosted several events throughout November including a turkey giveaway sponsored by Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort, a Thanksgiving dinner at EJ’s Family Restaurant, CANTER listing day in an effort to find second careers for our equine athletes and the end of the meet dinner co-sponsored with Mountaineer on November 22. The Mountaineer Park HBPA wishes everyone a happy, healthy holiday season!

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

57


NEWS

NEBRASKA HBPA Online Stallion Auction Set for January The Nebraska HBPA will hold its first stallion auction January 19-25 through the online auction site thoroughlybred.com. We are looking for stallion owners who would be interested in donating stallion seasons to our auction. Some of the proceeds raised from the auction will go toward a stakes race in 2020—the inaugural Nebraska HBPA Stallion Stakes for 4-year-olds and up that are progeny of the stallions that sell a season in our auction. In addition, in 2024 we will run our first Nebraska Stallion Stakes for 3-year-olds. Again, eligibility will be restricted to progeny of stallions with a season sold in our 2020 auction. The Nebraska HBPA is striving to bring life back to the great sport of horse racing here in the heartland and to generate larger purses for our horsemen. If you have any questions or are interested in donating a stallion season, you may contact Heather Martinez by phone at (402) 473-4104 or (402) 730-6580 or email hbpaheather@gmail.com. You also can go to thoroughlybred.com/site/nebraskahbpa, which will be active once the auction starts.

OHIO HBPA Ohio Track Updates Mahoning Valley kicked off its 38-day fall meeting October 26 with the Best of Ohio program, which features five $150,000 stakes for registered Ohio-breds in various divisions. Large fields were the norm with the five races totaling 61 starters. The Best of Ohio was conducted over a fast track despite a cloudy day in which some light rain fell during the program. In the first stakes, the John W. Galbreath for 2-year-old fillies, 1-5 favorite Moonlit Mission rallied from well off the pace under jockey Ricardo Mejias and drew off in the final sixteenth of a mile for a 2 ¼-length score over Nikki My Angel. Charlie Williams owns and trains Moonlit Mission, who covered the 1 1/16 miles in 1:46.84. The win was Moonlit Mission’s fourth straight, and overall her record stands at four wins from six starts, good for $182,050 in earnings. Liberate scored a gate-to-wire 7 ¾-length victory at even money in the $150,000 Juvenile Stakes under jockey Gerardo Corrales for trainer Tim Hamm. Authentic Cowtown rallied for the place, finishing 1 ¼ lengths in front of Wicked Warrior in third. Liberate ran the 1 1/16 miles in 1:45.27. A 2-year-old gelded son of Gemologist, Liberate won for the fourth time in five career starts for owners WinStar Farm LLC, Blazing Meadows Farm LLC and Michael Lewis. He has earned $206,250 in his freshman season. Reigning Ohio Horse of the Year Altissimo ran down pacesetting Dare Day in the final sixteenth to prevail in the six-furlong Best of Ohio Sprint in a time of 1:09.90. Christian Pilaris rode Altissimo for trainer Rich Zielinski, who conditions the 6-year-old gelded son of Noble Causeway for breeder Nancy Lavrich and co-owner Ronald Zielinski. Altissimo has a record of 4-2-0 from seven starts in 2019, good for more than $300,000 in earnings. Overall, Altissimo has 17 career wins from 40 starts with $781,638 in earnings. After finishing second in last year’s Best of Ohio Distaff, Leona’s Reward improved her placing in 2019 by scoring a gate-to-wire three-length victory over 2-1 favorite Magna Rose in the 1 1/8-mile, $150,000 event, giving the team of Gerardo Corrales and Tim Hamm their second stakes victory on the program. The 6-year-old Parent’s Reward mare is owned by Blazing Meadows Farm LLC and Michael Friedman. She paid $9.80 for the win, her third in seven starts this year and her 17th in 45 career starts through the Distaff, good for $842,556. 58

Forewarned rallied from well off the pace to run down former Ohio Horse of the Year Mo Dont No in the stretch for a 2 ¼-length score in the $150,000 Best of Ohio Endurance at 1 ¼ miles. The 7-5 favorite, Forewarned covered the distance in 2:04.41 under jockey Anthony Salgado. Mo Dont No held second, finishing 1 ¾ lengths in front of Over Icce. The victory was the third in 10 starts in 2019 for Forewarned, a 4-year-old colt by Flat Out who is trained by Uriah St. Lewis and owned by Trin-Brook Stables Inc., and sent his year-to-date earnings to $244,420.

Ohio State Racing Commission Medication Thresholds After a series of meetings of their medication committee, the Ohio State Racing Commission passed Resolution 2019-07, officially adopting various thresholds for many therapeutic medications. The thresholds listed below will be enforced beginning January 1, 2020. Substance Threshold Matrix Acepromazine HEPS 10 ng/ml urine Albuterol 1 ng/ml urine Betamethasone 10 pg/ml blood Butorphanol 10 ng/ml urine Cetirizine 6 ng/ml blood Cimetidine 400 ng/ml blood Clenbuterol 25 pg/ml blood Dantrolene 5-OH dantrolene blood 0.1 ng/ml Detomidine 1 ng/ml blood Dexamethasone 5 pg/ml blood Diclofenac 5 ng/ml blood DMSO 10 ug/ml blood Firocoxib 20 ng/ml blood Flunixin 20 ng/ml blood Furosemide 100 ng/ml blood Glycopyrrolate 3 pg/ml blood Guaifenesin 12 ng/ml blood Isoflupredone 100 pg/ml blood Isoxuprine 1 ug/ml urine Ketoprofen 2 ng/ml blood Lidocaine 20 pg/ml of total blood 3-OH Lidocaine Mepivacaine 10 ng/ml of 3-OH urine Level of Detection blood Methocarbamol 1 ug/ml urine Methylprednisolone 100 pg/ml blood Omeprazole 10 ng/ml blood Omeprazole Sulfide Phenylbutazone 2 ug/ml blood Prednisolone 1 ng/ml blood Procaine Penicillin 25 ng/ml blood Ranitidine 40 ng/ml blood Triamcinolone Acetonide 100 pg/ml blood Xylazine 200 pg/ml blood

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


AFFILIATE NEWS to push his total earnings to $1,508,241. Welder has spent so much time in the winner’s circle at Remington Park that it’s almost a given he will be there every time he competes. However, there was some doubt that his seven-win local streak would end. DUSTIN ORONA PHOTOGRAPHY

The following substances are removed from the commission’s Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances and are now prohibited substances: Substance Threshold Matrix Pentazocine 50 ng/ml urine Promazine 50 ng/ml urine 3-OH promazine Pyrilamine 100 pg/ml blood O-desmethylpyrilamine Stanozolol 1 ng/ml urine 16 B-hydroxystanozolol

THOROUGHBRED RACING ASSOCIATION OF OKLAHOMA (OKLAHOMA HBPA) Shotgun Kowboy, Welder Win Again in the Oklahoma Classics

DUSTIN ORONA PHOTOGRAPHY

Oklahoma Classics Day at Remington Park always includes some rising stars in the Oklahoma-bred ranks, especially in the 2-year-old races, but this year’s edition on October 18 showcased two of the state’s biggest stars as Shotgun Kowboy and Welder both added to their impressive resumes.

WELDER

The 2018 Oklahoma Horse of the Year had everyone gasping at the start of the $130,000 Oklahoma Classics Sprint when the gates opened and the gray reared a bit with a hop to start his journey, spotting his six rivals a head start as he was not in his customary spot near the front. The crowd and connections then gasped again as the 6-year-old gelding turned a disadvantage into his favor, flying like a bullet from his early seventh place to the lead in about a half-mile, taking over at the top of the stretch. Welder went on to win by 4 ¼ lengths with David Cabrera up for trainer Teri Luneack and owner Ra-Max Farms LLC for his second consecutive Classics Sprint victory. Bred by Center Hills Farm, the son of The Visualiser improved his record to 20 wins in 30 starts and is closing in on the millionaire’s club with earnings of nearly $930,000. Other stakes winners on the night included Zapit in the Classics Lassie, Rowdy Yates in the Classics Juvenile, Inagoodway in the Classics Distaff, Alternative Slew in the Classics Distaff Turf, Three Chords in the Classics Distaff Sprint and Cowboy Mischief in the OKC Turf Classic. Complete recaps of all of the Oklahoma Classics races are available at remingtonpark.com.

SHOTGUN KOWBOY

Shotgun Kowboy, the 7-year-old millionaire, won his fourth $175,000 Oklahoma Classics Cup with one of the most impressive efforts of his distinguished career. Bred, owned and trained by C.R. Trout, Shotgun Kowboy easily pulled away with over a quarter-mile left in the 1 1/16-mile race to win by 6 ¾ lengths under jockey David Cabrera. “He ran awful well; he’s sure been good to us,” Trout said. “I want to give this to my wife [Arletta]. She’s in the hospital. She had open-heart surgery. She’s doing better. She loves this old horse; she named him, and this is for her.” The win sets a new mark as no horse has ever won the Classics Cup, the marquee event of the Oklahoma Classics series, four times. Shotgun Kowboy pulled away from a tie he had with Mr. Ross (1999–2001) and Zee Oh Six (2002, 2005–2006), who had each won the race three times. The win is also Shotgun Kowboy’s fifth overall Classics win; he won the Classics Juvenile when he was a 2-year-old (2014) to go with his Cup victories (2015, 2017–2019). The fifth Classics win puts Shotgun Kowboy in a tie with Oklahoma Horse Racing Hall of Famer Highland Ice for most Classics triumphs. The Classics Cup was the 14th career victory from 38 starts for Shotgun Kowboy and his ninth overall win at Remington Park. The winner of the Grade 3 Oklahoma Derby in 2015, Shotgun Kowboy also picked up $105,000 for the win THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

Lady Orchid, D Toz Capture Oklahoma Stallion Stakes Remington Park showcased some of the best Oklahoma-bred and -sired horses in training on September 13 with two divisions of the Oklahoma Stallion Stakes for 3-year-olds at seven furlongs. In the $47,800 fillies division, Lady Orchid gave her owner-breeder, Lori Bravo, and her trainer and Lori’s husband, Francisco, some good flashbacks. The daughter of Oratory out of Burst of Life seems to be picking up where her mother left off as a stakes winner. It was the third win in as many starts for Lady Orchid with her other wins coming at Will Rogers Downs in Claremore earlier this year. “Yes, she sure does remind me of her mother,” Lori Bravo said in the winner’s circle. “She kind of has the same style and is a very good-minded filly.” Burst of Life was a stakes winner and ended her career with nine victories in 14 starts and $140,355 while running for the Bravos, who also own and operate River Oaks Thoroughbreds, where they stand some of the state’s top stallions. She took the $50,000 Flashy Lady Stakes in the final race of her career. 59


NEWS

Carter Sales Co.’s OKC September Sale Posts Big Jump in Average Carter Sales Company’s OKC September Sale saw a record 50 percent increase in average price, which jumped to $10,858 from $7,228 in 2018, while the median nearly doubled from $4,500 in 2018 to $7,500 this year. In addition, the 19 percent buyback rate was the lowest to date. The sale was held September 1 at the OKC State Fairgrounds Sales Arena. The sale’s top seller at $30,000 was Hip 19, a yearling colt by Pollard’s Vision out of Kip Seville, a sister to multiple Oklahoma champion and Horse of the Year Kip Deville ($3.1 million). The colt was consigned by Mighty Acres for Center Hills Farm. Lee Young of Oklahoma City signed the ticket for Young Stables LLC. Hip 17, a yearling filly by Graydar out of the Ghostzapper mare Heavenly Ghost, commanded the second highest price at $27,000. Mark Hixon, agent for John Barger of Grand Prairie, Texas, bought the filly from the consignment of Buena Madera. While the sale posted records in most categories, the number of horses offered was the smallest in the sale’s 13-year history. The 42 yearlings offered represented a 46 percent drop from 78 in 2018. “The number offered and the incredible purses for racing produced the highest median in our sale’s history, but in an industry where sales are contracting across the board, we have reason to be concerned,” said sales manager Terri Carter. “With two equine veterinarians in the family, we see many other types of horse sales with similar declining numbers, but we also see disciplines with recent increases. “Like any business, we have a responsibility to fix our problems and then use our many resources to share our love for horses and the industry,” she added. “It is just too easy to be negative, and that drives people away. I am a big believer that attitude is everything, and the attitude and atmosphere at the sale, along with the record increases, told me we are headed in the right direction.” The mixed session sold four of six mares for an average of $1,825 and a buyback rate of 33 percent. Go to cartersalesco.com for complete results.

Oklahoma Derby Produces Record Handle at Remington Park

process. The export handle, from all outside venues, was $2,851,667, also a new all-time high for that category. Bettors at Thunder Roadhouse played $7,521 on the card. “I want to thank our entire team whose hard work resulted in the biggest single day of wagering in the history of Remington Park,” said Matt Vance, vice president of racing operations. “Congratulations and thanks go to all the horsemen who participated and made Sunday such an incredible day. Many of the top horses in America were here for our biggest day, and we appreciate all of the horseplayers who recognized the Oklahoma Derby program through their wagering.”

OREGON HBPA Greetings from Oregon In our last news update from Oregon, we shared that Portland Meadows was closing after many years of racing. A new group from Grants Pass, TMB Racing, had been granted a commercial race meet license. We have just concluded our first commercial fall race meet in Grants Pass. By almost every measure, it has been a huge success. TMB made a large financial investment in the Grants Pass Downs race facility. A new safety rail was purchased and installed at a significant expense. Much-needed sand was added to the racing surface, and new equipment for working the track also was purchased. Portable stalls were added to accommodate the increase in the number of horses stabled on the grounds. The result has been a very safe race season for horses and riders with the horsemen and horsewomen feeling excited about the future. For the racing fans and betting public, great additions were made as well. A huge state-of-the-art electronic tote and videoboard was installed on the infield, making betting data and race replays awesome. New self-service wagering terminals were brought in, making the wagering experience much improved. The food and beverage choices are very good, making a day at the races an enjoyable experience in Grants Pass. And the weather overall was incredible, rounding out a wonderful fall racing experience. The racing has been excellent. While we are currently limited to eight-horse fields due to the track width, most races had a full starting gate. The majority of races had seven horses, with only a few dropping to six or five. In addition, the average purse payout per day was $60,000, which for Oregon is very good. The one area we need to improve is the betting handle. It appears many ACKERLEY IMAGES

In the $50,000 male division, D Toz became a multiple stakes winner at Remington, following up his Don McNeill Stakes win as a 2-year-old in Oklahoma City last year. D Toz, bred by the Richter Family Trust and co-owned with B.J. Richter, is trained by Danny Pish and went over the $100,000 mark in earnings with the win. “I think he’s better now than when he won the Don McNeill last year,” said jockey Lane Luzzi. D Toz’s sire, Chitoz, stand at the Bravos’ River Oaks Farms in Sulphur.

The Oklahoma Derby Day program on September 29 generated a record pari-mutuel handle day for Remington Park. The 13-race program featured eight stakes events including the Grade 3 Oklahoma Derby and Grade 3 Remington Park Oaks. Total handle was $3,086,572 and included money wagered on-track, export betting and money played at Thunder Roadhouse in Oklahoma City, a Remington Park-authorized off-track site. It was the first time in Remington Park history that a racing card produced total handle of more than $3 million. A crowd of 10,610 witnessed Owendale’s win in the Oklahoma Derby and Lady Apple’s score in the Remington Park Oaks, wagering $227,384 in the 60

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


AFFILIATE NEWS bettors across the country took a wait-and-see approach before wagering on the races at Grants Pass. We believe if we continue to offer races with full fields and a competitive race product, our handle will rise significantly in the future. Next year, there will be three separate meets at Grants Pass. A spring meet will kick off in early May, a summer meet in mid-July and a fall race meet beginning in September. With several exciting projects on the radar including new barns, a wider racetrack accommodating more starters and improvements to the grandstand, the future at Grants Pass looks very bright indeed. A major development will be the possibility of adding historical racing machines, which could really secure future racing in Oregon. Good luck at the races!

PENNSYLVANIA HBPA New Start Adoption Horses Excel in Second Careers The racing career of Fairly Obvious came to an end before it could get started when in 2018 the then 2-year-old filly was donated to the Pennsylvania HBPA’s New Start program. Trainer Kim Graci abandoned all hopes of a racing career for the Pennsylvania-bred after the daughter of Weigelia suffered a hairline fracture to a pastern. Graci gave the filly time on a farm to heal but thought better of putting more stress on the leg. That turned out to be a good move as Fairly Obvious has blossomed in her new start as a riding horse. In the $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover, held at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington in October, Fairly Obvious finished second in the Freestyle Division and fourth in the Ranch Work Division. The yearly competition is organized by the Retired Racehorse Project (RRP) to showcase all that off-track Thoroughbreds (OTTB) are capable of achieving following a racing career. Lindsey Partridge, a Canadian who counts wins in two previous editions of the Makeover’s Freestyle Division, now trains and rides Fairly Obvious. Partridge is well known in the sport of extreme trail challenges and has trained horses for use in Hollywood movies. She picked up a prize of $2,500 from the RRP for her second-place finish, and the PA HBPA sweetened the pot with $500 from the PA HBPA New Start award. Partridge earned even more money from the Pennsylvania Breeders’ Association and another bonus from the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance since Fairly Obvious was fostered by Bonnie Hutton’s After the Races, a TAA-accredited farm in Elkton, Maryland. The PA HBPA offers monetary awards to horses obtained through New Start or from a Penn National Race Course-based trainer and who finish first, second or third in any of the 10 divisions at the Makeover. Partridge sees a lot of potential in Fairly Obvious and has decided to train her as a hunter/jumper prospect. “I’m so impressed with her mind and athletic ability,” Partridge said. Other New Start alumni to distinguish themselves at the Makeover include Fleet Gizmo, one of three Makeover competitors previously trained by PA HBPA President Sandee Martin. Fleet Gizmo, ridden by Haley Donahue, finished fourth of 140 competitors in the Hunter Division, while Neighmar, a Bernie Houghton retiree, finished seventh in the Jumper Division under Franny Haynes, who was named the top junior rider in that division. Allison Chub rode Missed Him in the Eventing Division, Erica Brown rode Kavarro in the Trail and Ranch Work divisions, and Donahue rode J Edgar in the Hunter Division. New Start has rehomed more than 700 retired racehorses since the PA HBPA board of directors established it in 2013. The success of the Makeover, whose eligibility requires horses to race or post a published work in the 18 months prior to the competition and who cannot have more than 15 rides before January 1 of the year of competition, is a big reason for the rising popularity of OTTBs. THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

That is in addition, of course, to the fact that Thoroughbreds are so intelligent and adaptable to new training. The 2020 RRP Thoroughbred Makeover will take place at the Kentucky Horse Park October 7-10.

WASHINGTON HBPA Anyportinastorm Named 2019 Horse of the Meeting Owner Peter Redekop’s Anyportinastorm was voted the 2019 Emerald Downs Horse of the Meeting following the last day of racing on September 22. Attendance continued to be strong at the Auburn oval, and overall handle was boosted by an increase in demand for the track’s simulcast signal around the country. Trained by Blaine Wright, Anyportinastorm ran meet-fastest times at both 6 and 6 ½ furlongs, winning the Governor’s Stakes by 3 ½ lengths in 1:07.54 and Budweiser Stakes by 6 ½ lengths in 1:14.35. The 5-year-old Florida-bred by City Zip compiled a 2-1-0 record in three starts and earned $88,000 during the meet. In addition to Horse of the Meeting, he also was voted Top Sprinter and Top Older Horse. In his only defeat, Anyportinastorm finished a gallant second to Law Abidin Citizen in the $200,000 Longacres Mile (G3). Carrying the high weight of 124 pounds, Anyportinastorm set fast fractions—:23.05, :45.58, 1:09.37, 1:21.46— and resisted gamely in the final furlong, finally yielding to the California invader in the final strides. Wright, the leading stakes trainer the past three years at Emerald Downs, currently has Anyportinastorm training at Golden Gate Fields. Anyportinastorm is the second Florida-bred to win Horse of the Meeting at Emerald Downs. Flamethrowintexan won the honor in 2006 after victories in the Longacres Mile and Mt. Rainier Breeders’ Cup Handicap. In other awards, One Horse Will Do Corporation and Steve Shimizu’s 5-yearold mare No Talking Back—the only three-time stakes winner at the meet—was honored as Top Older Filly or Mare and Top Washington-Bred. Frank Lucarelli received honors as the meet’s Top Trainer and for Top Training Achievement for his record-tying five-win day and for becoming the first conditioner in track history to win 1,000 races. His 81 victories in 2019 shattered the single-season record as he rolled to his sixth training title. The 62-year-old Seattle-area native has been at Emerald since its inaugural season in 1996. A transport from the opposite corner of the United States, former Tampa Bay Downs jockey Gary Wales rode 99 winners and scored a runaway victory in the jockeys’ standings. Wales was awarded Top Riding Achievement for his season-long dominance atop the standings. Kevin Orozco was the leading rider by stakes wins with six, and Blaine Wright topped the trainers with nine. John and Janene Maryanski and Riverbend Farms’ Baja Sur rolled to dominant victories in the Auburn Stakes and Coca-Cola Stakes to earn honors as Top 3-Year-Old Colt or Gelding. A Washington-bred trained by Wright, Baja Sur also received Top 2-Year-Old honors in 2018. Alittlelesstalk, owned by Warlock Stables, Kelly Dougan and Stephanie Loffredo, was Top 3-Year-Old Filly. A Washington-bred trained by Roddina Barrett, Alittlelesstalk prevailed in the Kent Stakes and Washington Cup Sophomore Filly Stakes and also finished second against colts in the Muckleshoot Derby. Jean and Jeff Harris (racing as Clemans View Farm) and Michelle Beaunaux’s homebred Windy Point was awarded Top 2-Year-Old Filly. The lightly raced Washington-bred trained by Jose Navarro convincingly won her first out against maiden special weight company, was stakes-placed in the Angie C. and 61


EMERALD DOWNS

WINDY POINT

ANYPORTINASTORM

Barbara Shinpoch stakes and then captured the WA Cup Juvenile Filly Stakes. Race Home went from unraced to Top 2-Year-Old Colt or Gelding in two weeks. A son of Race Day owned by Tim Bankers and trained by Manuel Ortiz Sr., Race Home exploded through the lane to capture the $100,000 Gottstein Futurity and finish the season two-for-two. Brahms Forest, who began the season with a victory in a $4,000 claiming race and won every other race over his next eight starts, including three out of six starter allowance contests, was voted Top Claimer of the Meet. Trained by Lucarelli, the 5-year-old California-bred boasted a 9-5-2-0 record at Emerald Downs. The gelding is owned by Two Putts for the Win #4, David Lechmanik and Alliance Stable. The 84th renewal of the Longacres Mile, featuring a driving three-way finish between Law Abidin Citizen, Anyportinastorm and Restrainedvengence, was voted Race of the Meeting. To be eligible for a year-end award, a horse must have raced at least twice during the season. Other awards not mentioned above include: Leading Owner: Chad Christensen (32) Leading Horse by Wins (5): Brahms Forest, Das Bear, General Mach Four, Rosso’s Gatto Leading Quarter Horse Jockey by Wins (3): Javier Matias Leading Quarter Horse Trainer by Wins (3): Nick Lowe Leading Apprentice: Jose Leon (7 wins) Durkan Award: Ken Elison and Sharon Ross Lindy Award: Alex Anaya Leading Sire Wins: Harbor the Gold (21 wins)

Opening day, with a post time of 2 p.m., is the lone racing day for opening weekend, followed by Saturday/Sunday racing April 25-26 and May 2-3. Friday night racing begins May 8 and continues through August. Post times remain similar to last season at 2 p.m. on Sundays and 6:50 p.m. on Fridays. The first eight Saturdays, April 18 through June 6, feature a 2 p.m. post, while the final 15 Saturdays, June 13 through September 19, feature a 5 p.m. start. Championship Sunday, featuring four stakes races including the 85th Longacres Mile (G3), is scheduled for Sunday, August 9. The complete 2020 stakes schedule will be released in January. Stall applications will be available in mid-December. HJ

DENIS BLAKE

EMERALD DOWNS

NEWS

Emerald Downs Announces 2020 Race Dates for 25th Season Emerald Downs Racetrack and Casino has announced a 63-day live racing season in 2020, with opening day Saturday, April 18, and continuing through Sunday, September 20. The race dates were approved at the Washington Horse Racing Commission’s November meeting at Auburn City Hall. During the meeting, Emerald Downs President Phil Ziegler reported the live meet will be similar to the 2019 meet but eliminates one four-day race week and three Friday night race cards in September. Working with the Washington HBPA, track management hopes to make up for the loss of four days by increasing the number of racing opportunities when the horse population is at its peak. Emerald Downs, which is owned by the Muckleshoot Tribe, will be celebrating its 25th season of racing.

62

THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


Statement of Ownership, Management,512-695-4541 and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

Round Rock, TX 78683

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer) 1. National PublicationHorsemen's Title

Administration Corporation 3380Horsemen's Paris Pike, Journal Lexington, KY 40511 The

2. Publication Number

0

0

1

8

_

5

6

4. Full Issue Frequency 5. Number Issues Published 9. Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor of (Do not leave blank)Annually Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

Round Rock, TX 78683

6. Annual Subscription Price

Telephone (Include area code) 3. Filing Date

2. Publication Number

Denis Blake The Horsemen's Journal 0 0 1 8 _ 5 2 5 6 8. P.O. Complete Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer) BoxMailing 8645,Address Round ofRock, TX 78683 4. Issue Frequency 5. Number of Issues Published Annually National Horsemen's Administration Corporation Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

512-695-4541 12-04-2019

6. Annual Subscription Price

3380 ParisinPike, Lexington, KYand 40511 Quarterly March, June, Sep. Dec. 4 $14.00 Denis Blake 7. Full Complete Address Mailing Known Office of of printer) city, county, and ZIP+4 Contact Person 9. Names and Complete Addresses Publisher,(Not Editor, and (Street, Managing Editor (Dostate, not leave blank)ÂŽ) P.O. BoxMailing 8645, Round ofRock, TX 78683Publication Publisher (Name and complete mailing address) Denis Blake P.O. Box 8645 10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followedarea by the Telephone (Include code) National Horsemen's Corporation Round Rock, TX 78683 names and addresses ofAdministration all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a512-695-4541 corporation, give the 3380 Paris Pike, Lexington, KY 40511 names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer) each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Editor (Name and complete mailing address) National Full Name Horsemen's Administration Corporation Complete Mailing Address

DenisParis BlakePike, Lexington, KY 40511 3380 National Administration Corporation P.O. BoxHorsemen's 8645, Round Rock, TX 78683

3380 Paris Pike, Lexington, KY 40511

9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailingmailing address) Managing Editor (Name and complete address)

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run) (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies) b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

National Horsemen's Administration Corporation Denis Blake P.O. Box 8645, Round Rock, TX 78683

3380 Paris Pike, Lexington, KY 40511

Complete Mailing Address

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

National Horsemen's Administration Corporation

3380 Paris Pike, Lexington, KY 40511

11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities. If none, check box X None Full Name Mailing Address  7D[6WDWXV(For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at Complete nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes:

X

PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

11. Publication Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of 14. Total Amount Bonds, Mortgages, or 13. Title Issue Dateoffor Circulation Data Below Other Securities. If none, check box X None

Horsemen's FullThe Name

Journal

Complete Mailing Address

Fall 2018 (mailed 9/12/2018)

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published  7D[6WDWXV(For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one)Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Number Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months X Total a. of Copies (Net press run) 17,750 Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

17,500

PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com. (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid 16,864 16,536 distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

b. Paid Circulation (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid 0 distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies) one) (By Mail  7D[6WDWXV(For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check and The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Outside Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Xthe (3) Mail) Ž 0 Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

0

0

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPSÂŽ

0

0

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class MailÂŽ)

0

16,864

16,536

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail)

0

0

0

0

0

0

650

650

650

650

PS Form 3526, July 2014Paid [Page 1 of 4 (see pageof4)] 7530-01-000-9931 Distribution byinstructions Other Classes MailPSN: Through the USPS (4) (e.g., First-Class MailÂŽ)

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 17,514 17,186 (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

16. Electronic Copy Circulation g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) a. Paid Electronic Copies

0

16,864

16,536

(4)

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

0

0

0

0

0

0

650

650

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

650

650

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

17,514

17,186

g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

236

314

Call us now to make sure you have a legal workforce for the upcoming season.

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g)

17,750

17,500

i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)

96.3%

96.2%

17,500

96.3%

96.2%

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

Paid Electronic Copies I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price.

b. Total Paid Copies 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) 17. Publication of Print Statement of(Line Ownership

xF

Publication not required.

the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed ŕŻ˜If7RWDO3ULQW'LVWULEXWLRQ /LQHI 3DLG(OHFWURQLF&RSLHV /LQHD

Winter 2019 in the ________________________ issue of this publication. d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c ÂŻ 100) 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner x

Date

I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price.

Editor

12-04-2019

17. Publication Statement of Ownership PS Form 3526,ofJuly 2014 (Page 2 of 4) I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who material or is information the form may be statement subject to is criminal sanctions and/or civil sanctions x omits Publication not required. If the publication a general requested publication,onpublication of this required. Will be(including printed fines and imprisonment) (including civil penalties). Winter 2019 in the ________________________ issue of this publication. Date

12-04-2019

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

DON’T WASTE ANOTHER MINUTE!

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail)

No. Copies of Single 314 Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

17,750

* If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17 on page 3. F ŕŻ˜7RWDO3ULQW'LVWULEXWLRQ /LQHI 3DLG(OHFWURQLF&RSLHV /LQHD

16. Electronic Copy Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue During d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c ÂŻ 100) Preceding 12 Months

Editor

0

Average No. Copies Each 236 Issue During Preceding 12 Months

i. Percent Paid by 15f times(Line 100) 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) b. (15c Totaldivided Paid Print Copies

0

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

F 7RWDO3DLG'LVWULEXWLRQ[Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

0

16,536

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

0

xa.

Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

17,500

(2)

(4)

Editor (Name mailing 10. Owner (Doand not complete leave blank. If theaddress) publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the Denis Blake names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of P.O. 8645, Round Rock, TX 78683 each Box individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding Complete Mailing Address 11. Known 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address) Other Securities. If none, check box X None

17,750 16,864

F 7RWDO3DLG'LVWULEXWLRQ[Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

Denis Blake National Horsemen's Administration Corporation P.O. Rock,KY TX40511 78683 3380Box Paris8645, Pike,Round Lexington,

Full Name

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

12-04-2019

Quarterly in March, June, Sep. and Dec. 4 $14.00 National Horsemen's Administration Corporation Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ÂŽ) Contact Person 3380 Paris Pike, Lexington, KY 40511 (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) Denis Blake P.O. Box 8645 Editor (Name and 1. Publication Titlecomplete mailing address)

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

3. Filing Date

5 2

OFFICIAL SPONSOR of the National HBPA

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

* If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17 on page 3.

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 2 of 4)

HORSEMAN L A B O R

S O L U T I O N S

William Velie Attorney at Law

Craig McDougal Attorney at Law

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION Hablamos espaĂąol

1-877-678-RACE (877-678-7223) www.horsemanlabor.com THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019

63


TRUE CENTER GATE

YOUR FARM NAME HERE

You have a lot invested in your horses. Shouldn’t you invest in the right equipment to train your horses to break on top? True Center Gate has been building the most reliable and durable Starting and Training Gates since 1950.

Advertisers’ Index Abbey Road Supplements.....................................................................64 Big Dee’s Tack & Vet Supply.................................................................34 Biozide Gel...........................................................................................35

For more information contact: Diane Fleming (602) 524-8437 moreinfo@truecentergate.com • www.truecentergate.com

Quality Buildings Since 1958

BloodHorse...........................................................................................64 Daily Racing Form..........................................................................16, 17 Dandy Products Inc..............................................................................35 Equine Equipment................................................................................19 equineline.com.....................................................................................34 Equiwinner Patches...............................................................................9 Finish Line Horse Products Inc...........................................................4, 5 Gulfstream Park..................................................................................IFC Horseman Labor Solutions...................................................................63

Suburban . Commercial . Agricultural . Horse Barns & Arenas

Toll Free 800.558.7800 waltersbuildings.com

Indiana Thoroughbred Breed Development Program............................36 Iowa Thoroughbred Breeders and Owners Association.........................13 Lavin Insurance Group LLC..................................................................12

SKIP DICKSTEIN

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2018

FREE BloodHorse Daily PDF & Mobile App

BLOODHORSE.COM/DAILY

Listen on your Alexa Device

PREAKNESS RESULTS

NAIL-BITER

Justify Emerges From the Fog to Win Preakness

NTRA Advantage..................................................................................35 Ohio Thoroughbred Race Fund.............................................................41 Red Brand.......................................................................................... IBC Signal Health.......................................................................................62

See page 4 IN THIS ISSUE

Soft Ride................................................................................................6

10 Ritvo: Preakness Could Become Elite Event at Laurel

12 McCrocklin Tests the Midlantic Juvenile Market

20 Abyssinian First Winner for Cairo Prince BLOODHORSE DAILY

Download the FREE smartphone app

PAGE 1 OF 34

BloodHorse.com/Daily

Texas Thoroughbred Association..........................................................11 Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance..........................................................46 Thoroughbred Charities of America......................................................47

Abbey Road Presents

ALL NATURAL SUPPLEMENTS “Your Road to Success”

Authorized Dealer for the Flexineb Nebulizer

Thoroughbred Racing Association of Oklahoma...................................30 Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau..............................................40

Sales and Service

True Center Gate..................................................................................64

1-248-521-2221

Walters Buildings.................................................................................64

CALL TODAY Now accepting new customers

Xpressbet............................................................................................ BC

www.abbeyroadsupplements.com

advertising deadline

SPRING 2020

64

ADVERTISING SPACE RESERVATIONS: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28 AD MATERIALS DUE: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 For more information or to reserve space, contact The Horsemen’s Journal advertising department at 716-650-4011 or advertising@hbpa.org THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL

WINTER 2019


OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of


global

Proud to Support the National HBPA Xpressbet and the XB Family of Brands are committed to the growth of North American racing by increasing handle from domestic and international sources. We support the mission of the HBPA on behalf of owners, trainers and backstretch personnel.

866.88XPRESS (866.889.7737)

OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of

Must be 18 or older (21 in AL, AZ, IA, IN, KS, NH, ND, WA) to open an account with Xpressbet, LLC and reside in a state where such activity is legal. Void where prohibited. National Gambling Support Line 800.522.4700.

Profile for The Horsemen's Journal

The Horsemen's Journal - Winter 2019  

The official publication of the National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association.

The Horsemen's Journal - Winter 2019  

The official publication of the National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association.