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volume 64/ # 3

Fall

20 17 DEPARTMENTS

2 MESSAGE FROM THE NATIONAL HBPA

7 INDUSTRY NEWS

12 HBPA NEWS 16

RESEARCH & MEDICATION UPDATE

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47 AFFILIATE NEWS

REMEMBERING ONE OF OUR OWN: HORSEMAN KENT STIRLING PASSES AWAY

One of racing’s most passionate and vocal advocates for commonsense medication policies will be sorely missed

FEATURES

26

32

38

MISSING THE POINT

MEDICATION MIGRATION

HORSE OF THE CENTURY

Some reactions to the Murray Rojas verdict and the The Charles Town naproxen experience and why it NHBPA’s legal support are off-base matters to all racing jurisdictions

Celebrating the greatest of them all: Man o' War

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hj IN EVERY ISSUE

NATIONAL HBPA 870 Corporate Drive Suite 300 Lexington, KY 40503 P(859) 259-0451 F(859) 259-0452 racing@hbpa.org www.hbpa.org

PRESIDENT/ CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD Leroy Gessmann SECRETARY/ TREASURER Lynne Schuller CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Eric J. Hamelback VICE PRESIDENT EASTERN REGION Robin Richards VICE PRESIDENT SOUTHERN REGION Rick Hiles VICE PRESIDENT CENTRAL REGION Joe Davis VICE PRESIDENT WESTERN REGION J. Lloyd Yother

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MESSAGE FROM

THE CEO

THE THOROUGHBRED RACING AND BREEDING INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED STATES HAS BEEN A MAJOR SOURCE OF JOBS, REVENUE AND OPEN SPACE FOR STATES AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY. THE INDUSTRY IS TIGHTLY REGULATED BY STATE AGENCIES CHARGED WITH OVERSEEING THE BUSINESS OF RACING FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE HEALTH, WELFARE AND SAFETY OF THE HORSE AND THE INTEGRITY OF THE SPORT AND THE BETTING PUBLIC. The National Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association, along with the Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, Thoroughbred Owners of California and California Thoroughbred Trainers, represents horse owners, trainers and breeders within all 34 of the pari-mutuel horse racing jurisdictions in the United States. All of these organizations and their constituent members have worked collectively for decades to create and implement uniform policies to safeguard against doping and protect both the public and the horse. Recently, the National HBPA, Association of Racing Commissioners International, American Association of Equine Practitioners, North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians, Harness Horsemen’s International, American Quarter Horse Association and numerous other racing and breeding organizations came together to stand in strong and unified opposition to the proposed Horseracing Integrity Act of 2017 (H.R. 2651). The NHBPA believes this bill is not in the best interests of the racing industry. It is an ill-conceived effort by special interests to impose their minority views on regulating the industry. All of us should have deep reservations about the provisions contained in the bill and the adverse economic impacts and animal welfare challenges it would create. H.R. 2651 implies it will create a system for the uniform regulation of medication in the racing industry. However, such a system already exists and works well. Performance-enhancing drugs are not allowed or tolerated in horse racing. There is total uniformity on this issue in every racing jurisdiction. Thoroughbred racing has rules, policies and laboratory testing that are the envy of any sport or business in the world. The true purpose of H.R. 2651 is an end-run around the racing industry. It will impose by federal intervention the wishes of a minority on an entire industry that collectively is, and has been, uniformly opposed to their views. H.R. 2651 as a stand-alone piece of legislation is deficient on many fronts: · It fails to recognize the health and well-being of our equine athletes as being of paramount importance. · It fails to acknowledge the well-being of our human athletes as being of paramount importance. · It fails to appreciate that current medication policies for equine athletes are far more stringent than we see for human athletes. · It fails to accord states the appropriate regulatory role they have exercised for decades. · It fails to disclose or analyze the economic burden of the proposed changes. · It fails to appreciate the difference between breeds of horses. Additionally, the proposed bill seeks to replace the current state regulatory system with one controlled by the federal government. It would create a massive and completely unnecessary level of federal bureaucracy on top of existing state regulatory structures that have

been in place, in some cases, for more than 100 years. Oversight would be placed in the hands of hand-picked individuals who may know little or nothing about the racing industry or the care of horses. H.R. 2651 is stated to be an attempt at getting nationwide uniformity on the use and regulation of therapeutic medication in racing. However, in my view, it is nothing more than a smokescreen for the elimination of a safe, effective, necessary and highly regulated medication (Lasix/Salix/furosemide) that is administered on race day to protect horses from bleeding in the respiratory tract. For 30 years, an equine welfare policy has been in place to mitigate or prevent the effects of exerciseinduced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), the severity of which is recognized by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Lasix/Salix has been well studied and debated in the racing industry and was the subject of an International Summit on RaceDay Medication in 2011. Current industry policy endorses use of this medication because it is in the best interest of the health and welfare of the horses, jockeys and betting public. Until an alternate or more effective therapy is developed, Lasix/Salix should continue to have broad industry and scientific support. The NHBPA is an active participant in the existing mechanism by which policies are formulated and embodied in the Model Rules of Racing as established by the Association of Racing Commissioners International. These policies form the basis of our regulatory system that is currently in place. These policies were implemented after thoughtful deliberation with input from an array of knowledgeable organizations, including the American Association of Equine Practitioners, the Association of Racing Commissioners International Scientific Advisory Committee and the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium. It is my belief, as well as the belief of many others, that H.R. 2651 is most likely unconstitutional (based on the previous version being deemed so by the independent Congressional Research Service) and will swamp our industry with years of litigation. Along with containing an unfunded mandate, it deprives horsemen of current due process protections and threatens the economic well-being of the industry and the best interests of the horse. We should all be particularly alarmed by the provisions in the bill that would allow this newly created federal bureaucracy to impose unlimited new taxes on our industry, particularly on horse owners, without any checks or balances. H.R. 2651 was publicized at The Jockey Club Round Table Conference on August 13 as being a piece of legislation that anyone in the industry who cares about horses must support. This could not be further from reality. For those who are true to this industry, the message is the opposite. We should oppose H.R. 2651 because we know that the care for both human and equine athletes, as well as the economic viability of the horse racing industry in this country, is essential.

SINCERELY,

Eric J. Hamelback


CONTRIBUTORS Rick Capone Dr. Clara Fenger Rich Halvey Dr. Thomas Tobin

THE

NATIONAL HBPA

WOULD LIKE TO THANK ITS CORPORATE

sponsors AFFILIATES Board of Directors - Affiliates Dr. David Harrington, Alabama Robert Hutton, Arizona Linda Gaston, Arkansas David Milburn, Canada Randy Funkhouser, Charles Town Kent Bamford, Colorado Dave Brown, Finger Lakes William White, Florida Marta Loveland, Idaho Eddie Essenprice, Illinois Joe Davis, Indiana David McShane, Iowa Rick Hiles, Kentucky Benard Chatters, Louisiana George Kutlenios, Michigan Jack Walsh, Minnesota R.C. Forster, Montana Jami Poole, Mountaineer Park Barry Lake, Nebraska Anthony Spadea, New England Joe Poole, Ohio David Faulkner, Oklahoma Sue Leslie, Ontario Ron Sutton, Oregon Sandee Martin, Pennsylvania Robert Jeffries, Tampa Bay Downs David Ross, Virginia Pat LePley, Washington Glade VanTassel, Wyoming

The opinions, representations and viewpoints expressed by the authors in the articles contained in The Horsemen’s Journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions, representations and viewpoints or the official policies or positions of The Horsemen’s Journal, National Horsemen’s Administration Corporation or National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association Inc. and its affiliates (collectively “HJ”). HJ is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to or reliance on any information contained within this issue. Information in this issue may become outdated due to the rapidly changing nature of the horse industry. The publication of any advertisements or articles should not be construed as an endorsement of any product, service or position unless specifically stated. The Horsemen’s Journal, Volume 64 #3. Postal Information: The Horsemen’s Journal (ISSN 0018-5256) is published quarterly by the National Horsemen’s Administration Corporation, with publishing offices at P.O. Box 8645, Round Rock, TX 78683. Copyright 2017 all rights reserved. The Horsemen’s Journal is the official publication for members of the Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association, a representative association of Thoroughbred owners and trainers. HBPA is

PHOTOGRAPHERS ®iQoncept/Adobe Stock ®jentz5262/Adobe Stock Denis Blake Rick Capone Coady Photography Coglianese Photos/Gulfstream Park iStock.com/BCFC iStock.com/cmannphoto iStock.com/dlewis33 iStock.com/RASimon Keeneland Library/Cook Collection Chris Rahayel/NYRA Photo Jennie Rees Heather Sacha University of Kentucky STAFF Denis Blake Editor 512-695-4541 E-mail: hj@hbpa.org Jennifer Vanier Allen Advertising Director 716-650-4011 509-272-1640 fax E-mail: advertising@hbpa.org Limb Design www.limbdesign.com Graphic Design THE HORSEMEN’S JOURNAL 870 Corporate Drive, Suite 300 Lexington, KY 40503-5419 Phone: 512-695-4541 Fax: 859-259-0452 E-mail: hj@hbpa.org HBPA Website: www.hbpa.org Cover Photo: Horsephotos.com

a non-profit 501(c)6 Kentucky corporation. Members receive The Horsemen’s Journal as a benefit of membership paid by the national office from affiliate dues. Annual non-member subscriptions are $14. Single-copy back issues, if available, are $7. Canadian subscribers add $6. All other subscriptions outside the U.S. add $20 payable in U.S. funds. To order reprints or subscriptions, call (866) 245-1711. The HBPA National Board of Directors has determined that the publication of this periodical is necessary in the transaction of the public business required of the association. Views and opinions expressed are those of the authors and/or advertisers and do not necessarily represent the opinion or policy of the publisher or HBPA board or staff. Query the editor prior to sending any manuscripts. Periodicals Postage Paid at Round Rock, Texas and additional mailing offices. CANADA POST: Publications mail agreement no. 41530527. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: P. O. Box 503, RPO West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4R6. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Horsemen’s Journal, P.O. Box 911188, Lexington, KY 40591-1188.

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OFFICIALSPONSOR SPONSOR OFFICIAL of the the National NationalHBPA HBPA of


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YOUR CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

Dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing

October 22, 2016 | No. 43

®

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

Dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing

October 22, 2016 | No. 43

®

TIME... AND AGAIN

Time and Motion, center, delivers sixth QE II win for Galbreath/Phillips family

TIME... AND AGAIN

PARTY ON THE HILL

A day in the life of the Far Hills Time and Motion, center, delivers sixth QE II steeplechase win for Galbreath/Phillips family

LANE’S END FARM

Will Farish’s Woodford County masterpiece

PARTY ON THE HILL A day in the life of the Far Hills steeplechase

LANE’S END FARM Will Farish’s Woodford County masterpiece

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INDUSTRY NEWS

hj NEWS

Coglianese Photos/Gulfstream Park

TOBA HONORS OWNERS AND BREEDERS WITH NATIONAL AWARDS AT CALUMET FARM

The 32nd annual Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association’s national awards dinner was held September 9 at Calumet Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. The event was emceed by Jill Byrne, who was recently named senior director of industry relations at Breeders’ Cup Ltd. Previously, she worked for nine years as the director of broadcast and programming at Churchill Royal Posse earned the Claiming Crown Downs, where she spent time Horse of the Year Award. between production and on air as the senior racing analyst and host of the “Churchill Downs Today” show. “It’s an honor to host the TOBA awards dinner and to recognize those for their outstanding accomplishments, continued support and passion for Thoroughbred racing and breeding,” she said. “To have this event take place this year at beautiful Calumet Farm, with all its history and prestige, is a testament to the honorees, patrons and all members of the Thoroughbred industry.” The national awards dinner honored owners and breeders from 22 states and Canada as well as an owner, breeder and small breeder of the year. Other TOBA award winners included Leslie’s Lady, dam of Beholder, who was named as the National Broodmare of the Year, and Royal Posse, who was honored as the Claiming Crown Horse of the Year, presented by the National HBPA. The Rood & Riddle Sport Horse of the Year went to Zine Dine, owned by Hailey Rogge, and the Heubeck Family received the Robert N. Clay Award, which recognizes a member of the Thoroughbred community who has made an outstanding contribution to preserving land for equine use.

National Owner of the Year Klaravich Stables and William H. Lawrence National Breeder of the Year WinStar Farm National Small Breeder of the Year Robert Manfuso Regional Owners of the Year East Region: Juddmonte Farms Midwest Region: John Oxley South Region: Klaravich Stables & William H. Lawrence West Region: Spendthrift Farm State Breeders of the Year Arkansas: Bill McDowell California: Heinz Steinmann Canadian: Adrian and David Munro Florida: Gilbert C. Campbell Illinois: Barney and Anne Gallagher Indiana: Michael E. and Penny S. Lauer Iowa: Allen Poindexter Kansas: Lance and Valerie Gabriel Kentucky: Kenny Troutt Louisiana: Irwin Olian Maryland: Robert Manfuso Massachusetts: Ken Posco

Michigan: Lisa Campbell Minnesota: Rick Bremer and Cheryl Sprick New Jersey: Daniel Lopez New York: Chester and Mary Broman North Carolina: Nancy Shuford Ohio: Tim Hamm Oregon: Neil Knapp South Carolina: Franklin Smith Sr. Texas: Craig Upham Virginia: William M. Backer Washington: Jean and Jeff Harris

Courtesy OwnerView

JEFF FAGER OF CBS NEWS TO DELIVER THOROUGHBRED OWNER CONFERENCE KEYNOTE ADDRESS Jeff Fager, the awardwinning executive producer of “60 Minutes” and a Thoroughbred owner, will deliver the keynote address when OwnerView and BloodHorse host the fourth Thoroughbred Owner Conference in Del Mar, California, this fall. The event will be held at the Hilton San Diego/Del Mar from October 30 to November 1, the Jeff Fager week leading up to the Breeders’ Cup World Championships. Breeders’ Cup Ltd. is the presenting sponsor for the conference. As in years past, the Thoroughbred Owner Conference is designed to

educate, inform and entertain new, prospective and current Thoroughbred owners through a series of panels and social events. With Fager at the helm over the past 14 years, “60 Minutes” has maintained its status as the most-watched news program in America. Fager also served as CBS News’ first chair from 2011 to 2014, when he reorganized the news division’s platforms on television, radio and the Internet. In 2012 he received the Paul White Award, which recognizes an individual’s lifetime contributions to electronic journalism, from the Radio Television Digital News Association. This fall, Simon and Schuster will publish his book, Fifty Years of 60 Minutes: The Inside Story of Television’s Most Influential News Broadcast, and conference attendees will receive an autographed copy of it. Fager became interested in horse racing through his father, Dr. Charles Fager, a Boston-based neurosurgeon. In 1965 Charles Fager was credited with saving the life of trainer John Nerud, who then honored the doctor by bestowing his name upon a racehorse. Dr. Fager the Thoroughbred went on to become the only horse to ever win WWW.HBPA.ORG

7


NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

four different championship awards in the same year, earning Horse of the Year, champion older horse, champion turf horse and champion sprinter in 1968. That year, he set a world record for a mile in the Washington Park Handicap, covering the distance in 1:32.20. Dr. Charles Fager passed away at the age of 90 on April 8, 2014, and John Nerud died at the age of 102 on August 13, 2015. Currently, Fager owns or co-owns Thoroughbred racehorses in New York and

Ireland. He has campaigned the stakes runners Miss Melinda and Final Chapter. Conference attendees will enjoy three days of presentations, a dinner, multiple opportunities to network with panelists and industry personnel and the option to attend the Breeders’ Cup World Championships on Friday and Saturday. Conference details, including the complete schedule of events, registration forms, host hotel information and other tourism tips are available at ownerview.com.

THE JOCKEY CLUB PROJECTS 2018 FOAL CROP OF 21,500 The Jockey Club is projecting a 2018 North American-registered Thoroughbred foal crop of 21,500. The foal crop estimation is a 4.4 percent decrease from the 2017 projection of 22,500 announced in August 2016. “As always, this projection is based on reports of mares bred received to date, and we estimate that approximately 85 percent of those reports have been received,” said Matt Iuliano, The Jockey Club’s executive vice president and executive director.

The foal crop projection, traditionally announced in mid-August, is computed by using Reports of Mares Bred (RMBs) received to date for the 2017 breeding season. RMBs are to be filed by August 1 of each breeding season. Additional foal crop information is available in The Jockey Club’s online fact book at jockeyclub.com/factbook.asp and in the online state fact books. Stallion owners who have not returned their RMBs for the 2017 breeding season are encouraged to do so as soon as possible. Interactive Registration, which enables registered users to perform virtually all registration-related activities over the Internet, is the most efficient means of submitting RMBs and is available at registry.jockeyclub.com.

THOROUGHBRED CHARITIES OF AMERICA AWARDS 71 GRANTS Thoroughbred Charities of America (TCA) announced that grants totaling $462,139 have been awarded to 71 Thoroughbred industryrelated nonprofits that work to uphold TCA’s mission. Additionally, nearly $24,000 was spent from the Horses First Fund within the organization’s last fiscal year to aid with the rescue of 43 horses abandoned in Mercer County, Kentucky, bringing total support provided to nearly $486,140. Grant recipients from the last three years can be found on tca.org. TCA distributes grants to several categories of Thoroughbred-related nonprofits, including retirement, rehabilitation and rehoming organizations; backstretch and farm employee programs; equine-assisted therapy programs; and research organizations. Grants are provided to organizations that successfully meet the criteria set forth in TCA’s annual grant application. Grant applications for the 2018 grant cycle will be available in early January. The Horses First Fund was established by LNJ Foxwoods in June 2016 to support the immediate need created by the abandoned Mercer County horses. To date, the Horses First Fund has raised $38,000. The horses involved in the Mercer County rescue were successfully rehabilitated and rehomed. “Our grants and aid would not be possible without the generous support of our donors,” TCA President Mike McMahon said. “We are especially proud to be the title sponsor of the Thoroughbred Makeover for the fifth time, as well as supporters of the Thoroughbred Incentive Program and the TAKE2 Second Career Program. We truly believe that retraining and repurposing is the way forward. We congratulate all of our 2017 grant recipients on successfully meeting our grant criteria and deeply appreciate their efforts in Thoroughbred aftercare and in providing health and human services to backstretch and farm employees.” TCA’s mission is to provide a better life for Thoroughbreds, both during and 8

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after their racing careers, by supporting qualified repurposing and retirement organizations and by helping the people who care for them. Since its inception in 1990, TCA has granted over $22 million to more than 200 charities. From

2000 to 2016, more than 95 percent of TCA’s expenditures were allocated to program services including direct grants. TCA is the charitable arm of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association.

THOROUGHBRED MAKEOVER CLASS INCLUDES MORE THAN 500 HORSES The final numbers are in for the $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover and National Symposium, presented by Thoroughbred Charities of America, and organizers are pleased to announce that 509 horses are currently registered to compete at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington on October 5-8. Organized by the Retired Racehorse Project, the event includes seminars, a sponsor fair, horse sale and the Thoroughbred Makeover finale, featuring the top five horses in each discipline competing for $100,000 and the fan-favorite title of America’s Most Wanted Thoroughbred. Competition is offered in barrel racing, competitive trail, dressage, eventing, field hunters, freestyle, polo, show hunter, show jumper and working ranch. To participate, trainers acquire a recently retired racehorse and prepare it over a period not to exceed 10 months to compete in one or two of the Thoroughbred Makeover’s 10 riding sports. Formats for competition are designed to test the quality and progress of each horse’s training. The Makeover offers a unique opportunity to look at a large group of offtrack Thoroughbreds selected specifically for their potential to succeed in second careers. An analysis of the 2017 Makeover field yielded some interesting results: • More than twice as many geldings are entered as mares (355 compared to 148). • Six stallions are entered. • Two-thirds of entrants stand between 16.0 hands and 17.0 hands. The smallest entrant is actually a pony at 14.2 hands; the largest is 17.3 hands. • About two-thirds of the entered horses are either bay or dark bay. • About half of the entrants were foaled in 2012, 2013 or 2014, making them 5 or younger. The 6- to 8-year-old group (foaled in 2009, 2010 or 2011) comprises another 40 percent. The remaining 10 percent of “elder” Thoroughbreds includes four entrants foaled in 2005, meaning they’re embarking on their second career at 12 years of age. It should also be noted that not all ex-racehorses are “failed” racehorses. As one might expect since many of the entrants ended their racing careers early, the number of racing starts skews pretty heavily toward the less-experienced end of the spectrum. Thirty entrants never raced at all, although to be Makeovereligible they must have had at least one published work. About 30 percent of entrants raced 10 times or fewer—presumably many of those trainers realized their horses just weren’t interested in or suited for racing and quickly sent them off to start new careers, for which they’ll hopefully be better suited.

By no means are lightly raced horses the vast majority. Horses that raced between 11 and 30 times comprise 37 percent of the Makeover field, and another 26 percent raced more than 30 times. Forty entrants are bona fide “war horses” with 50 or more starts, including four horses with more than 100 races under their belts and two topping the list with 141 starts apiece. The data shows that not all of these ex-racehorses were “slow,” either. About 34 percent earned $10,000 or less during their racing careers. But about half of the Makeover field earned between $10,000 and $100,000, meaning they were fair-to-decent racehorses and probably earned their keep during their time on the track. The top earner in the Makeover field won almost $1.2 million, and 16 percent of the entrants won $100,000 or more, proving that even horses that were successful in their first careers can move on to a second one. No Thoroughbred-related data dump would be complete without doing some examination of pedigrees and sales results. The 509 Makeover entrants were bred to be successful racehorses; some were more successful in this endeavor than others, but the field certainly includes many with racing promise in their pedigrees. Fourteen of 2016’s top 20 sires are represented with Makeover entries. Thirty-one entrants sold for $100,000 or more at auction; the top auction-sold horse went for $475,000. It likely comes as no surprise that a whopping 30 percent of Makeover entries were bred in the state of Kentucky. But the typical Thoroughbred powerhouse states don’t have a monopoly as 29 different states are represented, along with two Canadian provinces. There’s also one entry bred in France, one bred in Mexico and five bred in Ireland. For tickets to the event and more information, go to retiredracehorseproject.org.

OAKLAWN TO HOST TRACK SUPERINTENDENTS CONFERENCE Oaklawn, with sponsorship support from various companies, will host the 17th annual Track Superintendents Conference on March 25-27, 2018. This event allows track superintendents to share their vast knowledge and expertise with each other while also exploring new and proven methods to protect all industry stakeholders. The conference includes presentations, displays and networking opportunities that annually benefit participating tracks in terms of maintaining safe surfaces while maximizing racing and training dates. “We are honored to host these dedicated professionals,” Oaklawn General Manager Wayne Smith said. “This is a great opportunity to bring together

decades of experience for the purpose of sharing and learning from each other. We look forward to extending our usual outstanding southern hospitality, which Oaklawn has long been known for.” Further event details and speakers will be announced soon. The first Track Superintendents Meeting was hosted by event founder Roy Smith at Philadelphia Park in 2001 with 20 participants. Last year’s conference attracted more than 100 registrants from around the world, including from Dubai, Puerto Rico, Canada and England.

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ALL-TIME WINNING TRAINER GOES FROM SKEPTIC TO ENTHUSIAST Scott Lake SeeS dramatic improvement in hiS thoroughbredS // by mark hanSen

W

hen you’re one of the top all-time winning thoroughbred trainers, you’re not about to jeopardize the health of your horses, your winnings, or your reputation by giving them a new performance supplement without doing your research first. That is why Scott Lake, a thoroughbred trainer with more than 5,000 alltime career wins, was - at first - hesitant to try a supplement that his colleague insisted would dramatically increase his horses’ performance. Scott said, “I was skeptical about trying anything promising to boost EPO levels because I have heard too many horror stories about horses being harmed by doping. But a friend of mine in the industry kept giving me information on this new, all-natural supplement. Then I did my own research, and I realized this isn’t the synthetic EPO that damages horses. This is a 100% all-natural supplement, with data to

back up its claims.” So Scott chose 6 horses that he felt were under performing to try EPO-Equine®. “The horses had coats that weren’t where I thought they should be. They were dull, dry and wiry. Plus, their blood levels were a little messed up, and they were training just ‘OK’. I thought, let’s try it. Let’s see if this supplement will help them.” After feeding his horses EPO-Equine® for a month, Scott noticed a huge improvement. “All of my horses looked better and their coats were shinier. Then 4 of the horses on the supplement won the first time I ran them. Coincidence? I don’t think so. They looked better and performed better. They really turned it around. I liked seeing that.” Scott’s quite certain that EPO-Equine®, the natural supplement he tried, is making a huge difference in his horses’ performance. And because of the results, he plans on putting more

of his horses on this natural “blood builder”. But why is it important to “build blood,” and how does this supplement work as a blood builder? Just like in people, a horse’s muscles require oxygen. Red blood cells are the oxygen-carrying cells that deliver oxygen to muscles. A higher red blood cell count = more oxygen = more muscle energy. Elevated muscle energy helps the horse perform harder, faster and longer during endurance events. EPO-Equine® contains a natural “bloodbuilder.” Bioengineers at U.S.-based Biomedical Research Laboratories (BRL) discovered a proprietary strain of Echinacea angustifolia that’s promotes red blood cell production. Veterinarians at the Equine Research Centre in Canada ran a double-blind trial investigating the blood building properties of the active ingredient in EPO-Equine® in healthy horses. For 42 days, one group of horses was supplemented with the active ingredient in EPO-Equine® and another group of horses was given a placebo. The supplement delivered significant blood building results, increasing red blood cell count and hemoglobin levels. Optimized blood levels leads to elevated exercise physiology…for remarkable speed, strength and stamina right out of the gate. Trainers not only trust and rely on EPOEquine® because it’s effective, but also because of its strict quality control, extensive product testing and adherence to banned substance regulations that guarantee safety. EPO-Equine® does not contain any banned or harmful substances. Every batch of EPOEquine® is tested by an independent laboratory to guarantee that it’s clean for use in competition. EPO-Equine® is easy to use. Just add just 1-4 scoops (3.2 grams) of EPO-Equine® to the horse’s daily feeding routine. Within 3-4 weeks of daily use, you can expect to see increased red blood cell levels with no undesirable side effects. According to Scott Lake, “I absolutely recommend EPO-Equine® if your horse isn’t performing or competing to its potential. Give it a shot. It definitely turned my horses around.” Trainers also find that EPO-Equine® is very affordable at the low price of just $59.95 per jar. Or even more affordable by saving $180 when purchasing a 12-jar case for just $539.55 and getting FREE shipping. EPO-Equine® can be ordered at www.EPOEquine.com or 1-800-557-9055, and comes with a 100% money-back satisfaction guarantee.


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CLAIMING CROWN SET FOR DECEMBER 2, NEW WEBSITE LAUNCHED

Coglianese Photos/Gulfstream Park

The 19th running of the Claiming Crown has been set for December 2 at Gulfstream Park, marking the sixth consecutive year that the Florida track will host the nation’s premier day of racing for blue-collar horses. The event is presented by the National HBPA, Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association and Gulfstream Park, together with the Florida HBPA. The lineup of races will mirror last year’s record-breaking event that generated more than $11 million in handle. A total of nine races with purses of more than $1.1 million will be run under starter allowance conditions based on claiming levels from $8,000 to $35,000 with races going short and long and on dirt and turf. Six races will offer purses of $110,000 apiece, while the Tiara and Emerald on the turf for horses from the $25,000 claiming level will offer purses of $125,000 apiece. As always, the richest race will be the $200,000 Jewel at 1 1/8 miles on the dirt for horses from the $35,000 level. “Last year’s running of the Claiming Crown was one of the best ever, and we hope to build upon that success yet again this year,” said Eric Hamelback, CEO of the National HBPA. “I want to thank the horsemen who have supported the growth of the Claiming Crown over the years, and I encourage all

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owners and trainers to consider nominating this year and taking part in this tremendous event for the horses and horsemen who are such an important part of our industry.” To be eligible to compete in the Claiming Crown, a horse must have started for the specified claiming price (or less) at least once since January 1, 2016. For the Iron Horse and Express races only, there is no date requirement, so a horse can be eligible for those races if it starts for $8,000 or less at any time during its career. Horsemen are reminded that the nomination deadline is November 5 with the supplemental fee deadline set for entry day on November 29. The nomination fee for any of the Claiming Crown races is $100, while the supplemental fee jumps to $2,500 for the six races with purses of $110,000. For the Tiara and Emerald, the supplemental fee is $3,000, and for the Jewel, it is $5,000. Nomination forms and complete conditions are available on the newly launched Claiming Crown website at claimingcrown.com. The website also offers photos, videos and a look at the event’s history.


NATIONAL HBPA MISSION STATEMENT Founded in 1940, the National Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association (NHBPA) and its affiliates operate on behalf of Thoroughbred racehorse owners, trainers and backstretch personnel throughout the United States and Canada. Our mission is to improve and preserve Thoroughbred horse racing by: 1. Providing a representative voice for all Thoroughbred horsemen on matters integral to the advancement of Thoroughbred racing in the United States, Canada and at the state level. 2. Encouraging the highest standards of horsemanship to continuously improve the care, health and safety of the horse. 3. Facilitating guidelines to ensure the safety of the jockeys, trainers, grooms, exercise riders, hot walkers, farriers, veterinarians and all others who regularly come in contact with the racehorse.

4.

5. 6.

7.

8.

Supporting the development, adoption, implementation and enforcement of nationwide uniform rules which promote safety and integrity in racing. Disseminating information on critical issues facing our industry to HBPA affiliates and to the general public as appropriate. Supporting and promoting programs and entities which provide general benevolence and other beneficial programs for affiliates and members. Assisting in the development of programs at affiliated tracks providing for the aftercare of our horses when their racing careers are over. Promoting the sport of Thoroughbred horse racing.

NATIONAL HBPA’S POSITION REGARDING THE REGULATION OF RACING MEDICATION 1.

2.

4.

5. 6.

International on behalf of state racing commissions, and following an evaluation based on science and medical research with all industry stakeholders being heard, the rules should be adopted or rejected by a majority vote. The National HBPA contends that uniform medication rules must be based solely on published scientifically determined regulatory thresholds, with published scientifically determined withdrawal time guidelines, all based on and supported by data published in the scientific literature. The National HBPA believes that RMTC and ISO-17025 accredited laboratories should perform all medication testing. The National HBPA does not tolerate cheating in this sport. The NHBPA supports rules wherein repeat offenders of medication rules, after due process, should be severely penalized, including permanent expulsion from the industry.

Denis Blake

3.

The National HBPA’s focus has always been, and remains, the health and safety of the horse, the safety of the jockey, and the safety of all individuals coming into contact with the horse including grooms, hot walkers, trainers and veterinarians. The National HBPA believes a truly independent and transparent Racing Medication and Testing Consortium (RMTC) composed of industry stakeholders (including the NHBPA, The Jockey Club, the United States Trotting Association and Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association, among others) not dominated by any individual organization, with input from appropriate medical and veterinary professional bodies such as the American Association of Equine Practitioners, must be the final evaluator of medical and veterinary science. The National HBPA believes that RMTC approved medication rules should be reviewed by the Association of Racing Commissioners

WWW.HBPA.ORG

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TECHNOLOGY

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+ RESEARCH MEDICATION UPDATE

GLUCK EQUINE RESEARCH CENTER CELEBRATES 30 YEARS OF IMPROVING HORSE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

The University of Kentucky Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center is celebrating 30 years of legacy service to the equine community worldwide.

A 30th-anniversary research seminar, open house and celebration dinner will be held October 12. The seminar will begin at 8 a.m. at the Gluck Center and will feature the inaugural Teri Lear Memorial Lecture followed by an open house. The dinner will begin at 6 p.m. in the Woodford Reserve Room at Kroger Field. Dr. Stuart Brown, chair of the Gluck Equine Research Foundation and a Hagyard Equine Medical Institute veterinarian, will host the program honoring Gluck Center professor Peter Timoney for his lifelong contributions to equine infectious disease research. The center opened its doors June 5, 1987, with a promise to fulfill Thoroughbred breeder and entrepreneur Maxwell Gluck’s legacy and to continue the research and distinguished service to the equine industry of the Department of Veterinary Science, established in 1915. Professors in the department were already world-renowned for their important contributions to equine reproduction and infectious disease research. “From its beginning, the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center has represented a partnership between the University of Kentucky and the equine industry,” said Dr. David Horohov, center director and department chair. “This collaborative spirit continues to this day as the mission of the Gluck Center is the scientific discovery, education and dissemination of knowledge for the benefit of the health and well-being of horses.” Maxwell Gluck and his wife, Muriel, pledged a $3-million challenge grant to the university to build a $9-million equine research facility on the condition the state and those in the equine industry matched the funds. Governor John Y. Brown Jr. matched the challenge grant with $3 million in state economic development

bonds. Other equine industry leaders quickly embraced Gluck’s idea by rallying together to make his vision a reality. UK President Otis Singletary organized a special advisory committee of influential equine industry representatives led by William S. Farish III, owner of Lane’s End Farm, to meet the challenge through a “Support the Foundation” campaign. Farish, along with John Gaines, owner of Gainesway Farm; James E. “Ted” Bassett III, president of Keeneland; Albert G. Clay, owner of Fairway Farm; and Frederick L. Van Lennep, owner of Castleton Farm, quickly raised more than $4.2 million within a month. “This accomplishment could not have been possible without the vision of many leaders from the equine industry and the University of Kentucky who partnered in this venture 30 years ago and assembled such a distinguished faculty to execute on the strategy of this equine-focused research center,” Brown said. “Today, we recognize the benefit of this investment across the many areas of cutting-edge research performed by our team of faculty members, under the leadership of Dr. Horohov, as we celebrate the legacy of this commitment for decades to follow in support of the mission to improve horse health and well-being.” Today, the Gluck Center is part of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and has 20 faculty members conducting equine research in the areas of genetics and genomics, immunology, infectious diseases, parasitology, pharmacology and toxicology, musculoskeletal science and reproductive health. Full details about the 30th-anniversary events, along with the opportunity to reserve tickets, are available at ukalumni.net/gluck.

IO

EQUINE VETERINARIANS INVITED TO SADDLE UP FOR AAEP CONVENTION IN SAN ANTON

Equine practitioners will convene in San Antonio, Texas, this fall to acquire practical knowledge and enhance their skills at the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ (AAEP) 63rd annual convention, to be held November 17-21 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. wellness and quality of life. Attendees can maintain a “healthy The annual AAEP convention is the world’s largest event practice” mindset at the convention by participating in the AAEP dedicated to equine veterinary practice, anchored by more than River City 5K Fun Run on Sunday, November 19, or by attending 130 hours of continuing education, 300-plus exhibitors and attendance comprising thousands of industry leaders, researchers, exercise classes offered Sunday and Monday mornings. A comprehensive menu of student programming designed academicians, private practitioners and students. to facilitate the transition from veterinary school to practice will This year’s educational program will feature a variety of opportunities to gain clinical knowledge in several areas, including include interactive dry labs, professional development sessions laminitis, ophthalmology, infectious disease, internal medicine and and the traditional Avenues Career Night, during which students can explore internship and externship opportunities with dozens of lameness. Dr. Padraic Dixon, the renowned equine dental/sinus leading equine practices throughout North America. The majority and upper respiratory surgeon, will be featured as the Frank J. of student programming will be held Friday, November 17, and Milne State-of-the-Art Lecturer. Saturday, November 18. New to the 2017 program are 90-minute Meet the Expert Attendees can also make connections and form meaningful sessions, a series of interactive small-group discussions with relationships with colleagues at daily networking and social convention presenters distinguished in their respective fields. events, while a robust trade show will showcase the newest These forum-styled sessions will allow practitioners to source the products and services for practice. expertise of some of the leading minds in equine medicine. Visit convention.aaep.org to register, view the complete Complementing the scientific sessions will be daily business educational program or book a hotel room. of practice discussions on the rising topics of ethics, personal 16 HJFALL 17


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n the early years, the sport of horse racing seemed simple. There was no simulcasting, discussion of appropriate marketing strategies, super testing or betting via direct computer links. There was no NTRA, THA, TOC, TOBA, UTTA, AQHA or other organizations representing horsemen’s interests.

Horsemen have a habit of taking care of their own. If someone was sick or down on his luck, they “passed the hat,” taking up collections, which is a time-honored tradition among racetrackers. It was in 1940 in New England that a group of committed horsemen brought into existence what is now known as the National Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association. From this meager beginning the National HBPA has developed into an organization representing the horsemen’s interests on a myriad of issues. Today, there are approximately 30,000 owner and trainer members throughout the United States and Canada focused on a common goal—the betterment of racing on all levels. With this purpose in mind, we welcome and encourage all horsemen to join the National HBPA, and we urge our members to take an active role in the direction and policies of our organization. It is our members who make a difference. We horsemen are the National HBPA.

We are Leading into the Future and we are…… Horsemen Helping Horsemen

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HJFALL 17


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Courtesy Florida Thoroughbred Breeders' & Owners' Association

FEATURE

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HJFALL 17


It is with great sadness that the National HBPA informs its members of the passing of Kent Stirling, who left us on September 6 after a courageous battle with cancer. He was 72. Denis Blake

Stirling had long been known as a passionate and tireless advocate for the rights of horsemen throughout the racing industry. During the past three decades, the most arduous debates and challenges facing horsemen have been over the use of therapeutic medication, and no one carried the water more for thoughtful discussion and reasonable policy in the best interests of the horse than our own Kent Stirling. The racing industry has lost not only one of its biggest fans but also one of its most vocal advocates. A trainer for 20 years in a career highlighted by multiple Grade 1 winner Nijinsky’s Secret, Stirling was a former president of the Florida Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association when he became the FHBPA’s first executive director in 1995, a post he held for some 20 years. Along with Dr. Thomas Tobin of the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center, perhaps no one has invested more sweat equity over the decades into understanding and championing the causes of horsemen and horses involved in the complicated issues of equine medication than Stirling did. Tobin stated, “In the area of medication regulation, Kent expertly navigated through the enormous increases in drug testing sensitivity in the last 25 years to aid in developing new protocol standards. His leadership helped guide the introduction of regulatory thresholds for therapeutic medications, now used worldwide.” Representing the National HBPA and horsemen everywhere, Stirling worked tirelessly toward regulatory uniformity in the best interests of horses and the industry. In what was no small feat in a state such as Florida, which does not have a racing commission, he helped direct that state’s passage of uniform medication standards, years in the making, when signed by Governor Rick Scott in 2015. For decades, Stirling worked selflessly for horsemen. “Kent was a mentor to me and many others, and to know him was to know his heart,” said Eric Hamelback, CEO of the NHBPA. “He was driven by the racing industry and by efforts to put horses and horsemen first. Kent’s tireless efforts promoting racing and advocating for horsemen will likely never be matched and will forever be missed.” National HBPA President Leroy Gessmann added, “Kent has been a fixture for this organization for decades, and he will be missed by so many. His hard work for horses and horsemen may never be matched, but for certain, Kent’s

legacy through his accomplishments will be felt by all, for many years to come.” Following his passing, tributes came in from all segments of the industry. “The passing of Kent Stirling is a great loss on both an industry and personal level,” said Lonny Powell, CEO and executive vice president of the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association, in a statement. “From a professional basis, he has been sorely missed terribly by so many in the Florida Thoroughbred industry. His passing is a very sad thing. “He was a great communicator with a sincere desire to build the Florida Thoroughbred industry and work with others— including the breeders and owners—with respect and a big heart. We, including the FTBOA, have been missing him badly, and now his death brings even more significant loss. His numerous contributions will be his legacy. “On a personal note, Kent and I have been very close industry friends—and he had many admiring close friends in the business—for 17 years. We didn’t always agree on certain industry issues but never disrespected where each other was coming from. I was blessed to spend one of his final days with him. He was brave and still had his patented sense of humor and industry wisdom. He was a great human being and will be impossible to replace as a Florida Thoroughbred executive.” Alex Waldrop, president and CEO of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, tweeted, “Kent was a forceful and effective advocate for tough but fair regulation. He represented the National HBPA well. He will be missed.” The Racing Medication and Testing Consortium tweeted, “We are saddened to hear of the passing of longtime RMTC board member Kent Stirling. His passion for the sport and dedication to its continual improvement will be greatly missed by many.” Stirling is survived by his devoted wife Sheri; his daughter Ginger Allen and husband Michael; his daughter Lori Schneider and husband Marc; his grandchildren Stirling, Connor and Rylie Allen and Regan and Calin Schneider; step-children Juland (Paul) and Jarrod Holmes; sister Jill Thomas and family; first wife Lynne Stirling Reynolds; mother-in-law Marion King; and, of course, his beloved four-legged furry children. Stirling is predeceased by his mother Jean Hansen Stirling, father William Stirling Jr. and brother-in-law Charles (Chuck). A Celebration of Life for Stirling was held at Gulfstream Park. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to FLTRAC (Thoroughbred Aftercare), His Place Ministries (Pembroke Pines) or the Broward Ostomy Association. WWW.HBPA.ORG

21


Royal Posse Luis Saez Trainer | Rudy Rodriguez Owners | Michael Dubb, Bethlehem Stables LLC & Gary Aisquith

CLAIMING CROWN DECEMBER 2, 2017 ENTRY DAY

CLAIMING RACE

CONDITIONS

DIST/TURF

PURSE

Jewel

3yo & up

1 1/8 M

$200K

Tiara

3yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M (T)

$125K

REGULAR NOMINATIONS

Emerald

3yo & up

1 1/16 M (T)

$125K

NOVEMBER 5

Iron Horse

3yo & up

1 1/16 M

$110K

SUPPLEMENTAL NOMINATIONS

Express

3yo & up

6F

$110K

NOVEMBER 29

Glass Slipper

3yo & up (F&M)

1M

$110K

Rapid Transit

3yo & up

7F

$110K

Canterbury

3yo & up

5 F (T)

$110K

Distaff Dash

3yo & up (F&M)

5 F (T)

$110K

NOVEMBER 29

For qualification criteria and nomination deadlines, call Michael Costanzo at 954-457-6260, www.gulfstreampark.com or the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA) at 888-606-8622. Visit our website at claimingcrown.com or e-mail claimingcrown@toba.org. The Claiming Crown is a partnership between the National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association & Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association.

22

HJFALL 17


WWW.HBPA.ORG

23


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HJFALL 17


12.2.17

Jewel (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

1 1/8 M

$200K

Tiara (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M (T)

$125K

Emerald (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

1 1/16 M (T)

$125K

Iron Horse (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

1 1/16 M

$110K

Express (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

6F

$110K

Glass Slipper (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up (F&M)

1M

$110K

Rapid Transit (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

7F

$110K

Canterbury (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

5 F (T)

$110K

Distaff Dash (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up (F&M)

5 F (T)

$110K

Buffalo Man

2yo

6F

$75K

House Party

2yo F

6F

$75K

Smooth Air

2yo

1M

$75K

Hut Hut

2yo F

1M

$75K

Pulpit

2yo

1 M (T)

$75K

Wait a While

2yo F

1 M (T)

$75K

Caribbean Classic

3yo

1 1/8 M

$300K

Confraternity Caribbean Cup

3yo & up

1 1/4 M

$100K

Invitational Cup For Imported

3yo & up

1 1/4 M

$60K

Lady Caribbean Cup

3yo F

1 1/16 M

$25K

Caribbean Cup Speed

3yo & up

6F

$25K

Rampart (G3)

3yo & up (F&M)

1M

$100K

Harlan’s Holiday (G3)

3yo & up

1 1/16 M

$100K

Sugar Swirl (G3)

3yo & up (F&M)

6F

$100K

Tropical Turf (G3)

3yo & up

1 M (T)

$100K

My Charmer (G3)

3yo & up (F&M)

1 M (T)

$100K

12.23.17

Mr Prospector (G3)

3yo & up

7F

$100K

12.30.17

H Allen Jerkens

3yo & up

2 M (T)

$100K

Via Borghese

3yo & up (F&M)

1 3/16 M (T)

$75K

Tropical Park Derby

3yo

1 1/16 M (T)

$75K

Tropical Park Oaks

3yo F

1 1/16 M (T)

$75K

12.9.17

12.16.17

All other overnight Race Purse will be $100,000 *Non-Winners of Sweepstakes

WWW.HBPA.ORG

25


FEATURE

iStock.com/BCFC

g n i s s i M the point

SOME REACTIONS TO THE MURRAY ROJAS VERDICT AND THE NHBPA’S LEGAL SUPPORT ARE OFF-BASE By Rich Halvey 26

HJFALL 17


g

BY NOW, EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE READ ABOUT THE CASE OF PENNSYLVANIA TRAINER MURRAY ROJAS, WHO WAS CONVICTED OF 14 COUNTS OF MISBRANDING ANIMAL DRUGS IN VIOLATION OF FEDERAL LAW BUT FOUND NOT GUILTY OF SEVEN COUNTS OF WIRE FRAUD. THE OUTCOME WAS CERTAINLY A MIXED BAG. PROSECUTORS DIDN’T GET A CONVICTION ON THE MOST SERIOUS CHARGES, AND ROJAS STILL FACES PUNISHMENT FOR THE MISBRANDING CONVICTIONS. BUT THIS OPINION ARTICLE IS NOT ABOUT WHETHER ROJAS DID IT OR DESERVED IT OR WAS SINGLED OUT IN SOME WAY. FRANKLY, GIVEN ALL THE TESTIMONY, SOMETHING STUNK OVER AT THE ROJAS BARN, AND SHE PERHAPS COULD HAVE DONE A LOT WORSE THAN A CONVICTION FOR MISBRANDING.

Let me be clear— THIS IS NOT ABOUT DEFENDING ROJAS OR ANYTHING SHE DID THAT GOT HER IN THIS MESS IN THE FIRST PLACE.

Rather, I want to talk about two things: a federal overreach in terms of the prosecution of wire fraud and some shots taken at the National HBPA by racing writer Ray Paulick of the Paulick Report. Let’s start with the wire fraud. According to the website legaldictionary.net, wire fraud “may be committed using interstate wires, television or radio communications, or the Internet” in order to defraud someone. In Rojas’ case, purse money in the races her horses contested was paid by an interstate electronic transfer of funds, and the interstate aspect was enough to trigger federal jurisdiction. But make no mistake—if the feds wanted jurisdiction, they had to find a violation of a federal crime, and overages in racehorses of veterinary medications haven’t made it into the United States code. So, they had to get creative and decided on wire fraud. When the first mail fraud act was passed in the late 19th century, there was a proliferation of get-rich-quick schemes and shady land deals, usually promoted by city slickers to separate rural rubes from their money. Fleecing someone was a crime, but the federal government cleverly made fleecing someone through the mail a whole other crime. The obvious extension of the mail fraud law was to make wire fraud equally illegal. This originally covered the telegraph and the telephone but eventually included communication through landlines and “wireless” communication, including cell phones and the Internet. These federal laws are pretty handy when authorities are targeting substantial crimes like racketeering and money laundering but certainly more of a stretch for something like paying the winner’s share of a purse with a check from an out-of-state bank, especially when the “fraud” was ostensibly gaining an advantage by illegally dosing medications. I suppose you can argue somebody got defrauded—perhaps the connections of the second-place finisher and the people who bet on that horse to win—even if it was only indirectly. Of course, it would seem that by the letter of the federal law, if Rojas had committed the same offense at Parx Racing, she wouldn’t have been charged with wire fraud because the bank used to pay the purses at Parx is located in Pennsylvania. That raises the question, if an act at one track can be considered federal wire fraud and the exact same act at another track wouldn’t be considered federal wire fraud, were the feds overreaching when they charged Rojas with wire fraud? And it further makes one wonder whether the federal fraud statute was appropriate as the primary law enforcement tool for dealing with

therapeutic medication overages at racetracks primarily governed by the state they are in. Often the breadth of how the law should apply becomes a function of the creativity of the prosecutor. Even so, do we really believe the Congress of the United States actually anticipated the wire fraud law to apply in cases like that of Murray Rojas? After reading an editorial from Ray Paulick in which he speculated on the motivations of the NHBPA in this matter, I spoke with Eric Hamelback, the CEO of the NHBPA, about why the horsemen’s association contributed to Rojas’ legal defense. Hamelback was very clear that the NHBPA’s financial support was not about “enabling,” as Paulick suggested, the kind of violations of which Rojas was accused. It was because the NHBPA was legitimately concerned that if the wire fraud charges stuck based on getting a purse distribution check from an out-of-state bank, then there was no violation that couldn’t be considered wire fraud, at least at tracks where purse checks were drawn on an out-of-state account. In a sense, the feds were looking to make a new law with regard to violations of drug/medication thresholds. Overage of ranitidine? Overage of phenylbutazone? Both could be considered wire fraud based on the thinking of the feds with regard to Rojas. Whether or not everyone in the industry agrees with the NHBPA’s position, it seems clear that the association had a legitimate concern, not “preposterous scaremongering,” as Paulick suggested. It takes very little imagination to stretch the decision the feds made on wire fraud to include any violation that results in a purse being fraudulently paid. Hamelback was direct in saying that the NHBPA has always been in favor and supportive of penalizing those within the racing industry who break or abuse racing’s regulatory rules, and while there are some who won’t see any difference between defending Rojas from an overreaching federal government and defending Rojas’ actions to try to gain an edge, the NHBPA’s position was not an attempt to find ways of having trainers like Rojas wiggle out from underneath punishment for the misuse of therapeutic medications. Even if you believe that some states have done a less-than-sterling job of cleaning up racing, you have to ask yourself if the answer is federal prosecution for wire fraud. There will certainly be an element that agrees with Paulick when he says: “I understand why enablers like [Todd] Mostoller [of the Pennsylvania HBPA] and Hamelback rejoiced when the jury found Rojas not guilty on seven counts of wire fraud and conspiracy. They are hoping the FBI will turn tail and let horse racing return to policing itself. They must believe the status quo was WWW.HBPA.ORG

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FEATURE

®jentz5262/Adobe Stock

working just fine before the feds showed up. And maybe it was, for the cheaters and crooks, but not for honest horsemen, and certainly not for the betting public. This is a shameful chapter in the history of the HBPA.” Those who do agree with that statement miss the point just as Paulick did. Even if the NHBPA was pleased that the decision on wire fraud went its way, to imply there was some sort of sticking-it-to-the-fans rejoicing at the NHBPA office over the decision was ridiculous. The characterization that this was somehow part of an NHBPA effort to enable scofflaws to get off the hook is plainly off-base. The NHBPA believed the feds had overreached when they applied the wire fraud statute, and it turns out that based on a jury composed of regular people they were right. The message was not that the FBI should turn tail but that you charge trainers with the appropriate crime and adjudicate it in the appropriate jurisdiction, and if they are found guilty, you give them the appropriate punishment. Paulick made the classic mistake of conflating a stance on a point of law with carte blanche support for the alleged lawbreaker. To use the word shameful is not even close to the NHBPA’s position on Rojas. Paulick could have done his due diligence and talked with Hamelback (as I did) about the Rojas decision, and he would have found out what I did.

He also could have stayed to the end of the trial instead of leaving after the prosecution was finished presenting its case, and perhaps that would have given him a complete perspective on why Rojas chose to fight the wire fraud charge. Instead, he chose to attribute to the NHBPA feelings (rejoicing) and motivations (covering for violators) that were off the mark. If the NHBPA was satisfied with the verdict, it was because no other trainer will have to worry about a federal felony for any overage of a legal therapeutic medication. If Paulick and others believe the states have proven themselves incapable of standing up to the horsemen, there are plenty of steps they can take before settling on creative federal prosecution. For one thing, they could get people on racing commissions who know what they are doing, spend a lot more time on proactive enforcement of the rules and don’t have close personal relationships with the people they are supposed to regulate. But you can be assured the Murray Rojas situation could never have proliferated if the stewards and the racing commission had been more vigilant. Pennsylvania regulators are as much to blame for the involvement of the feds as the problem trainers are. There are some in the industry who would advocate in favor of putting the feds in charge of racing—this regulatory overreach notwithstanding—but a much better answer would be to try to make the current system work the way it is supposed to.

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Rich Halvey is a professional turf writer and handicapper living in Denver, Colorado. He has been a horse racing fan for more than 45 years. You can read his opinion pieces and handicapping articles on his website at halveyonhorseracing.com.


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iStock.com/cmannphoto

FEATURE

MEDICATION MIGRATION MIGRATION MEDICATION MEDICATION MIGRATION By Clara Fenger, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, and Thomas Tobin, MRCVS, PhD, DABT

THE CHARLES TOWN NAPROXEN EXPERIENCE AND WHY IT MATTERS TO ALL RACINGÂ JURISDICTIONS Therapeutic medications are critical to the health of humans and animals alike, and racehorses are no exception. To expect horses to perform at high levels without the benefit of modern therapeutic medication is both unrealistic and inhumane. All industry stakeholders agree that medication that impacts performance or masks lameness at the time of competition needs to be restricted, but turning back the clock to the time before we understood the benefits of anti-inflammatory medication in counteracting the rigors of high32

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intensity performance is wrong for the industry as well as for the health and welfare of the horse. Collateral damage from the aggressive push of industry regulators to limit the use of therapeutic medications has included the loss of any number of medications previously in common use. Among those medications with valuable applications in racehorses that have been unrealistically restricted are isoxsuprine, methocarbamol and naproxen.


®iQoncept/Adobe Stock

GETTING TO KNOW NAPROXEN For many years, Equiproxen ATTENDANT WITH [THE CHANGE IN CONTRACT LABORATORY] WAS A SUDDEN was available as an FDA-approved, safe and effective nonsteroidal antiSPORADIC PATTERN OF IDENTIFICATION OF LOW-CONCENTRATION NAPROXEN inflammatory (NSAID) for horses. POSITIVES [AT CHARLES TOWN]. … WHERE WERE THESE LOW-CONCENTRATION Like humans, not all horses respond similarly to all NSAIDs, and the PLASMA NAPROXEN IDENTIFICATIONS COMING FROM? availability of different FDA-approved formulations allowed access of appropriate anti-inflammatories for horses in need of alternatives to cannot impact a horse’s physiology in any way, these trace blood levels can be phenylbutazone or flunixin. For that matter, detected and may be called a positive in some jurisdictions. Common sense and while it has not been available to the market in a number of years, Equiproxen logic occasionally seem absent from the regulation of horse racing. remains an FDA-approved medication for horses. Despite Equiproxen’s lack of availability, veterinarians and horsemen alike have continued to use naproxen, the FDA-approved human formulation, for those horses in need of this alternative NSAID. In some jurisdictions, such The likelihood of environmental contamination from naproxen causing as Kentucky, warnings have been issued to avoid such use because traces of a positive test has not been lost on the National Horsemen’s Benevolent and naproxen can be detected for weeks after a relatively short course of treatment. Protective Association, and the following alert was published in its book, World Naproxen is usually recommended for back pain and relief of muscle Rules for Equine Drug Testing and Therapeutic Medication Regulation: 2012 cramping in cases in which typical treatments like methocarbamol are Policy of the National Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association, by Dr. ineffective alone.1 Additionally, naproxen is prescribed to horses with sore Thomas Tobin, Dr. Kimberley Brewer and Kent Stirling: feet to avoid injections of the coffin joints and navicular bursae, procedures Naproxen is an oral medication. The dose is large, and naproxen seems to that concern practitioners when required repeatedly.2 To provide the best be chemically stable in the environment. Testing can be highly sensitive, and possible care for the high-level athletes under their care, veterinarians traces of naproxen have been detected for long periods after the last nominal reach for naproxen in these specific instances in which other NSAIDs are not administration, most likely associated with its environmental presence and therapeutically effective. resulting in inadvertent re-exposure. In April 2006, Kentucky recommended “horsemen, veterinarians and owners to discontinue use of naproxen AT LEAST 120 hours before the race in which the horse is entered.” Naproxen is a classic stall/environmental substance in the horse. It is a high-dose oral NSAID used in both humans and horses. The dose to a horse is Naproxen can be identified in horses for up to 47 days after the last 5-10 mg/kg or more administered orally once or twice a day, so the total daily administration if the horse remains stabled in the same stall in which it was dose can be as high as 10 grams/day. By modern analytical standards, this is administered the medication (Wennerlund et al., 2000). More important, the an amount that a chemist will trip over, making naproxen readily detectable amount of naproxen identified in a horse that was never given naproxen but in post-race plasma and urine samples. Additionally, naproxen is unusual in stabled in the stall of a horse given naproxen can be indistinguishable from a that it is a relatively small molecule; one gram of naproxen actually contains horse actually given the drug. Although logic would dictate that the amount of 33 percent more naproxen molecules for the chemist to detect than one gram medication that can be recycled in a horse from urine contamination of phenylbutazone.

HORSEMEN’S ALERT ABOUT NAPROXEN

LOGIC OF IDENTIFYING NAPROXEN AT LOW LEVELS

1 2

Nick Metinnis, DVM, personal communication Mark Cheney, DVM, personal communication WWW.HBPA.ORG

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FEATURE

INADVERTENT ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE

The importance of inadvertent stall/environmental exposure as a source of trace-level identifications was abruptly brought to the attention of the racing world in Cambridge, England, in 2000, and naproxen was a charter member of this first group of identified stall-contaminating medications. At the International Conference of Racing Analysts and Veterinarians (ICRAV) that year, no fewer than four papers were presented showing that the therapeutic medications flunixin, naproxen, meclofenamic acid and isoxsuprine were all significant stall contaminants, to the extent that a clean horse put into a post-treatment stall immediately went “positive” just from exposure to the post-treatment stall environment. In a paper from Hong Kong, it was shown that cobwebs in a treatment stall contained the medication, immediately explaining a number of unexpected isoxsuprine identifications. Since that time, myriad papers in different journals have come to the same conclusion: Horses can trigger readily identifiable positive tests in post-race samples from urine contamination of their hay and bedding, even if the tested horse was never administered the medication. In fact, looking back with the wisdom of hindsight, our Canadian colleagues had much earlier—around 1985 or so—seen the unusually long time required for horses to “clear” naproxen after the nominal last administration, showing that by 120 hours post-dosing plasma naproxen concentrations had bottomed out at about 200 ng/ml or so and then leveled out, not declining further. What was actually happening, of course, was that the naproxen in the stall was re-contaminating the horses, and what our Canadian colleagues were most likely measuring was evidence of the presence of naproxen in the stalls of these horses, as pointed out by our Swedish colleagues some 15 years later in their Cambridge 2000 ICRAV paper.

NAPROXEN ISSUES AT CHARLES TOWN

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Fast-forward another 15 years to Charles Town Races in West Virginia in 2015, when Industrial Laboratories took over the state’s testing. When the Association of Racing Commissioners International’s Controlled Therapeutic Medication Schedule was introduced, the threshold for all substances not on

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the schedule went to zero tolerance, and the contract laboratory was changed from Truesdail to Industrial Laboratories. Attendant with this change was a sudden sporadic pattern of identification of low-concentration naproxen positives. They were being reported at a rate of about one a month in plasma, with concentrations ranging from 6 ng/ml to 160 ng/ml. The first question that springs to mind is this: Where were these low-concentration plasma naproxen identifications coming from? Preliminary review of the data showed that one early plasma positive was at 4,000 ng/ml, fully consistent with a recent full dose naproxen administration. There were no further high-concentration naproxen identifications, suggesting a lesson learned. All of the other naproxen identifications, however, were much lower concentrations, the highest at 161 ng/ml and the balance below 100 ng/ml, with most below 50 ng/ml and one as low as 6.3 ng/ml, a very low plasma concentration of naproxen. An initial look at the low-concentration plasma identifications suggested that they were associated with “ship-ins,” so the first theory was that the shipin stalls at Charles Town were contaminated with naproxen. Responding to this possible explanation, the West Virginia Racing Commission reportedly sampled the ship-in stalls and had the samples analyzed, but to our knowledge the results of this testing have never been released. We must also note that sampling a stall is one approach to this question but that a more relevant, definitive and defendable approach is to simply put a clean horse in the stall for a day or two and then take a blood and urine sample from the horse. As suggested by the considerable scientific literature on the subject, if the stall is actually significantly contaminated, the horse will test positive for the medication in question, and a horse sniffing around the stall in question for 24 to 48 hours is a much more definitive and defensible test than simply “spot sampling” the stall with samples that may or may not pick up what the horse will pick up and immediately transfer to his blood and urine. Our next step was to review all of the individually claimed naproxen identification information with the able assistance of Maria Catignani, executive director of the Charles Town HBPA. When working on the data files, we first looked at the jurisdictions from which the affected horse had shipped in to Charles Town. It soon became apparent that a preponderance of these


horse had shipped in from the Mid-Atlantic states, which, it also soon became apparent, had very different regulatory policies regarding naproxen compared to West Virginia’s. Based on discussions with veterinarians, chemists and other colleagues and a review of testimony in those Mid-Atlantic cases, it was found that many if not all of the Mid-Atlantic states have had a long-standing regulatory threshold for naproxen of 1,000 ng/ml in plasma, a threshold that is apparently still in place in these states.3 This finding immediately pointed to an additional possible source for these low-concentration plasma identifications of naproxen, namely that they were irrelevant trace-level residues of therapeutic administrations that “hung over” in horses racing in the Mid-Atlantic when they shipped in to Charles Town. None of these 161 ng/ml or less plasma residues identified in the Charles Town positives would have raised an eyebrow in the Mid-Atlantic states. Additionally, the range of values in these Charles Town ship-in identifications was sufficiently low enough that their origins could reasonably be attributed to trace residues of naproxen associated with inadvertent or unknowing stall exposure to traces of the medication. In lay terms, horses in the Mid-Atlantic states are racing with pharmacologically insignificant traces of naproxen in their plasmas. The concentrations are well below where the Mid-Atlantic drug testing radar is set for naproxen, but those concentrations have the potential to trigger a trace-level identification positive in the now zero tolerance for naproxen at Charles Town. So, with regard to naproxen, it appears that Charles Town is a border jurisdiction with horses from the Mid-Atlantic shipping in that are clean by Mid-Atlantic levels but testing positive for traces of naproxen by Charles Town’s new regulatory standards. Given this circumstance, the most practical approach to this matter is to set a screening limit of detection for naproxen in Charles Town that recognizes that horses from the Mid-Atlantic states will occasionally tend to test above 6 ng/ml in plasma and to set an upper limit on this screening limit of detection that accommodates the needs of these Charles Town ship-in horses. 3

SETTING A SCREENING LIMIT FOR NAPROXEN

Taking this approach, we therefore reviewed the statistical spread of the trace-level Charles Town plasma identifications and calculated the concentrations at which “soft” and “hard” outliers of the trace-level naproxen identification population occurred. This analysis placed the “hard” outlier concentration at close to 250 ng/ml, which we selected as our recommended screening limit of detection for the Charles Town authorities in this naproxen matter. We also reviewed how this proposed screening limit of detection compared with the current list of regulatory thresholds for the RCI-controlled therapeutic medication thresholds. Our analysis showed that this proposed screening limit of detection for naproxen fell within the broad range of the RCI-controlled therapeutic medication thresholds, confirming its suitability for use in circumstances such as the Charles Town situation. A detailed copy of this analysis, with extensive supporting documentation and the proposed screening limit of detection solution, was presented to the West Virginia Racing Commission as it reviewed these naproxen identifications. The outcome was that a significant number of these identifications were rescinded, although it is unclear at this time precisely what the new screening limit of detection for naproxen in West Virginia is or will be. That brings us to one final matter raised by these Charles Town events, which is the status—or more correctly at this time the non-status—of naproxen as an RCI-controlled therapeutic medication. Naproxen has a long international history and an excellent safety record as a controlled therapeutic medication as evidenced by the 1985 Canadian research and the 2000 Swedish research, as well as its 30-year history as a controlled therapeutic medication in the Mid-Atlantic states and its status as an FDA-approved medication in horses. Given these circumstances, it may well be appropriate to recommend to regulatory authorities outside of the Mid-Atlantic region that the decadeslong historical threshold for naproxen of 1 ug/ml be included in the RCI list of controlled therapeutic medications based on its long-established worldwide history of use as a safe and effective equine therapeutic medication.

George Maylin, DVM, personal communication

CONCLUSION

Rational thresholds for therapeutic medications need to be considered in all jurisdictions to allow the reasonable treatment of our precious athletes. The limitation of a practitioner’s armamentarium to an arbitrary 28 or 30 medications, with limited scientific basis for the thresholds, is at the very least unrealistic and at worst endangers the health and welfare of the horse. The West Virginia Racing Commission took the high road in the case of naproxen, choosing a reasonable threshold, and other jurisdictions should take notice. In a recent case in Kentucky, both the absolute insurer rule and the arbitrary threshold for methocarbamol were successfully challenged. Racing commissions across the country need to pay attention and follow the lead of West Virginia. Rational regulation of therapeutic medications avoids costly legal battles and allows our regulators to get back to the business of promoting horse racing and fighting the real threats to the integrity of our sport.

WWW.HBPA.ORG

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FEATURE

University of Kentucky

Man o’ War with his longtime groom Will Harbut

Horse of the Century

Celebrating the Greatest of Them A ll:

MAN O’ WAR By Rick Capone

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The mares were quietly grazing in the fields and keeping an eye on their foals, who were running and playing together before stopping to nurse or take a nap. It was a beautiful spring day at Nursery Stud, August Belmont II’s renowned Thoroughbred breeding farm just north of Lexington, Kentucky. If you looked closely, a young chestnut colt seemed to stand a little taller than the other foals as he gazed into the distance. He had what some called “the look of eagles.” That colt would soon be named Man o’ War, and before long he would become a legend. Man o’ War was foaled at Nursery Stud on March 29, 1917. At the time, Ercel Ellis’ father, Ercel F. Ellis Sr., worked there, and the day after the colt was born, Ellis Sr. put the first halter on him. “The first job he had in the horse business was with August Belmont at Nursery Stud, which is out by the old Georgetown Pike,” said Ellis, a horse racing historian and host of the weekly radio show “Horse Tales with Ercel Ellis” on 105.5 FM in Lexington. “He wasn’t there that night when Mahubah [Man o’ War’s dam] foaled, but he was there the next day. That morning when Man o’ War was walking around and they turned him out later that afternoon, he slipped the little halter on him and let him follow him out.” Man o’ War’s pedigree was strong. He was by Fair Play out of Mahubah, by Rock Sand. His father’s sire, Hastings, had won the 1896 Belmont Stakes.

However, what Hastings was best remembered for was his temperament. He was called a mean horse, known to “bite and ram other horses in races,” according to an article about Man o’ War on the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame website. Belmont loved his horses and horse racing, but he loved his country more, and he went to serve a commission during World War I. Since he knew he wouldn’t be able to give his newest foals the attention they deserved, he sold the entire 1917 crop, including Man o’ War. Into the picture stepped Samuel D. Riddle, a textile manufacturer in Pennsylvania who also enjoyed horse racing. When his trainer, future Hall of Famer Louis Feustel, advised him to purchase Man o’ War at the 1918 Saratoga yearling sale, Riddle bought the colt for $5,000. Once Feustel started training Man o’ War, it seemed the horse might have inherited Hastings’ temperament, as “he would dump exercise riders and make it hard to saddle him,” according to the Hall of Fame article. So, Feustel had to change his training strategy. With patience, Man o’ War became a little more cooperative, but according to Ellis, it might have had more to do with the horse than anything else. “When Man o’ War was in training, once he figured out ‘what they wanted me to do, they wanted me to run,’ he became a bit more cooperative because he just loved to run,” Ellis said. “He just wanted to go.”

Man o’ War’s stride of 28 feet

Keeneland Library/Cook Collection

was the longest ever measured at the time.

WWW.HBPA.ORG

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FEATURE

Beginnings of a Legend

Feustel chose a five-furlong maiden special weight at Belmont Park on June 6, 1919, as Man o’ War’s first race. There, against six other horses, he won by six lengths despite his jockey, Johnny Loftus, who was aboard for all of his races at two, trying to slow him down. Man o’ War went on to win the Keene Memorial at Belmont, the Youthful Stakes at Jamaica Race Course, the Hudson Handicap and Tremont Stakes at Aqueduct and the United States Hotel Stakes at Saratoga, all while carrying more weight than his opponents, including 130 pounds in those last three races. Interestingly, the second-place finisher in the United States Hotel Stakes was a colt named Upset, who would soon be forever linked to Man o’ War for a reason no one expected. With his power, speed and reported 28-foot-long stride, the longest ever measured at the time, Man o’ War won his races easily, and as his wins began to add up, so did his following. Dedicated horse racing fans and casual fans alike began coming to the track to watch him run. But then the unthinkable happened. On August 13, 1919, in the Sanford Memorial at Saratoga, Man o’ War lost for the first time—to Upset, the horse he had just beaten in his previous race. According to news reports, Man o’ War got a bad start in the race because he was turned the wrong way at the start, but Edward L. Bowen, former BloodHorse editor and current Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation president, believes people might have the wrong impression about that start. “It’s often written as if he was turned exactly the wrong way,” Bowen said. “But if you look at the chart, he was within four lengths after a quarter-mile. So, I think when they said ‘the wrong way,’ I’ve always assumed they meant sideways, not really facing the other way.”

Either way, Man o’ War made up ground quickly and was soon within striking distance, but he was boxed in along the rail. “People didn’t believe it at the time [that he lost]. He was giving the horse [Upset] 15 pounds,” Ellis said, explaining that Upset’s rider, Willie Knapp, intentionally kept Man o’ War trapped on the inside while leader Golden Broom was stopping. Knapp, with Upset on the outside, could have gone by the fading frontrunner at any time. Knapp, according to Ellis, waited until Johnny Loftus, who was aboard Man o’ War, realized that he wouldn’t be able to get through and instead would have to take back and go around Golden Broom. At that point, Knapp gunned Upset to the front. The strategy cost Man o’ War a couple of lengths, but once in the clear, he came running to end up second by a half-length. Golden Broom finished three lengths back in third. That’s the way riders raced, and Knapp was happy with the win. However, as Ellis recounted, later in his life Knapp looked back on the race and said he had thought about it a lot. If he had known what Man o’ War was to become, he would have let him out. Knapp believed not only that Man o’ War was the better horse that day but on any other day, as well. Man o’ War and Upset would meet three more times during their careers, with Upset the runner-up each time. While Man o’ War’s connections were disappointed with the Sanford loss, they felt it was a fluke, and they were correct. Man o’ War bounced back and won the Grand Union Hotel Stakes (with Upset second) and Hopeful Stakes at Saratoga and the Futurity Stakes at Belmont to close out his 2-year-old campaign. All told that year, he won nine of 10 races, finished second once and earned $83,325. For his efforts, he was named champion 2-year-old male.

Upset, with Willie Knapp up, wins the 1919 Sanford Memorial Stakes at Saratoga with Man o’ War and Johnny Loftus closing fast to finish second; it turned out to

Keeneland Library/Cook Collection

be the only time Man o’ War lost a race.

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Perfection at Three

time, and he won by a length and a half. It was over that quick.” It was the first time Kummer had to touch Man o’ War with his whip. Man o’ War then went to Saratoga for two races. In the first, the Miller Stakes, with Kummer injured, Earl Sande was in the saddle and guided Man o’ War to a six-length win under 131 pounds. Then, with Kummer still not ready to ride, Andy Schuttinger rode Man o’ War to a 2 1/2-length win in the Travers Stakes. It was an impressive performance as “Big Red,” the nickname he was given long before Secretariat took the moniker, defeated his two major rivals, Upset, who was second, and John P. Grier, who was third. Man o’ War’s next race, the Lawrence Realization, which came on September 4 at Belmont, was possibly his most remarkable. Going 1 5/8 miles, and with Kummer back aboard, as he would be for the rest of the season, Man o’ War defeated Hoodwink by an unbelievable 100 lengths. And, according to the race chart, he was “restrained at the end.” It’s easy to dismiss that margin of victory considering that the overmatched Hoodwink was the only other horse in the “race,” but Man o’ War’s time of 2:40 4/5 was more than four seconds faster than the previous world record. Following that win, Man o’ War went on to win the Jockey Club Stakes by 15 lengths at Belmont and the Potomac Handicap at Havre de Grace, where he carried an incredible 138 pounds.

Keeneland Library/Cook Collection

In 1920 the Triple Crown was not the prestigious title it is today, and in fact that term had not yet been coined for the three racing events that comprised the crown, the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes. Riddle did not like running his young horses too early, so Man o’ War did not compete in the Kentucky Derby and instead opened his season in the Preakness Stakes, then run at 1 1/8 miles, at Pimlico on May 18. There, with a new rider, Clarence Kummer, Man o’ War won the race over a familiar rival, Upset, who was 1 1/2 lengths back in second. Man o’ War and Kummer followed that with two wins at Belmont, the Withers and the Belmont Stakes, the latter by 20 lengths. He next won the Stuyvesant Handicap at Jamaica and then beat John P. Grier, another good horse of that era, in the Dwyer Stakes by 1 1/2 lengths at Aqueduct. Bowen believes that, while all of Man o’ War’s wins were impressive, the Dwyer just might have been his best performance. “John P. Grier was a very good horse and was able to really challenge Man o’ War,” Bowen said. “And the fact that [Man o’ War] took that challenge from a really top-class horse and then drew away, I think that was probably his best race.” While Ellis considers Man o’ War’s Preakness victory as his top victory, he thinks the horse’s win in the Dwyer ranks right up there with his best. “That was the race that … John P. Grier had headed him, I think, in the stretch,” Ellis said. “The rider [Kummer] reached back and hit Man o’ War one

Man o’ War, ridden by Clarence Kummer, defeats John P. Grier and jockey Eddie Ambrose in the 1920 Dwyer Stakes while carrying 18 pounds more than his rival.

The Match Race Next up was a much-anticipated meeting with 1919 Triple Crown winner Sir Barton in the Kenilworth Park Gold Cup at Kenilworth Park in Windsor, Ontario. Many tracks tried to lure two champions together, but a $75,000 purse offered by Kenilworth Park’s owner did the trick. In that race, the 3-year-old Man o’ War carried 120 pounds to 4-year-old Sir Barton’s 126 pounds, marking the only time Big Red carried less weight than his rival. At the break, Man o’ War took the early lead and never looked back, winning the 1 1/4-mile race by seven lengths. Not to make excuses, but some believed that Sir Barton was not 100 percent for the race. With that win, Man o’ War closed out his 3-year-old season undefeated with 11 wins in as many starts and $166,140 in earnings. In fact, he tallied 14 consecutive wins when counting his final three wins as a 2-year-old. He was named 1920 Horse of the Year and champion 3-year-old male. However, what no one knew at the time was that the Kenilworth Park Gold Cup would be the final race of Man o’ War’s career. Riddle cared for his horse’s well-being, and he was becoming increasingly concerned about the weight assignments. During his 2-year-old season, Man o’

War carried 130 pounds six times, while at three, except in his race against Sir Barton, he always carried the most weight under handicap conditions, including 135 pounds in the Stuyvesant and 138 pounds in the Potomac. Because of that, Riddle talked to Walter Vosburgh, the official handicapper for The Jockey Club who assigned weights to horses for races, and asked how much weight he thought Man o’ War would carry if he raced as a 4-year-old. According to Ellis, Vosburgh said that if Man o’ War raced at four, “it would be the most weight I’ve ever put on a horse before.” With that response and with nothing else left for Man o’ War to prove, Riddle chose to retire his horse in good health and sent him to stud. Man o’ War closed out his record-setting career with 20 wins, one second and $249,465 in earnings in 21 career starts. He was inducted into the Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame in 1957. As for the records he set during his career, according to the Hall of Fame article, “When all was said and done, Man o’ War had established three world records, two American records, seven track records and equaled another track standard.” WWW.HBPA.ORG

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“The Mostest Hoss” Man o’ War then headed to Kentucky for retirement. The first stop along the way was at Riddle’s private hunt club, Rose Tree Hunt Club in Media, Pennsylvania. All along the way people lined up to see him as he passed through their towns. In Bowen’s book, Man o’ War, which was the first book in the Thoroughbred Legends series, he cites Page Cooper and Roger Treat’s recording of the trip to Rose Tree Hunt Club from their own book about Man o’ War: “Man o’ War’s immediate destination was Glen Riddle … but it was a slow journey south, for it had no sooner started than it was transformed into a triumphant procession. At every stop along the way, crowds gathered to see the champion, and he obligingly stuck his proud head out of the van door in answer to their cheers. At last, the caravan reached Pennsylvania. Before going to Glen Riddle, [Big] Red and the former show horse, Major Treat, stopped at the Rose Tree Hunt Club in Media, where Mr. Riddle’s neighbors and friends had planned a welcome befitting royalty. As the van drew up to the club track, thousands of people who had been waiting ringed around.” In his book, Bowen wrote about the story of the horse reaching Kentucky: “Some three months after his Kenilworth Park Gold Cup swan song, Man o’ War arrived in Kentucky. On January 27, 1921, the great Kentucky-bred and soon-to-be monarch made his only appearance at a Kentucky racetrack. He was stabled in Col. E.R. Bradley’s barn at the Kentucky Association track in Lexington, on which racing had been conducted for nearly a century. The track by then was shabby and had only another dozen years of existence in front of it, and the strip was sloppy, but Big Red’s old friend Clyde Gordon [his regular exercise rider] galloped him proudly before an appreciative crowd.” Following that, it was off to his stud career, which began at Hinata Farm north of Lexington. He stood there for one year and then moved to Riddle’s newly established Faraway Farm, which was close by, and there he would live the rest of his life. While many people think that Will Harbut was the horse’s groom right away, that is not true. His first groom was John Buckner. Harbut didn’t come into Man o’ War’s life until 10 years later at Faraway Farm.

Together, Man o’ War and Harbut became linked for life, as the groom enjoyed weaving tales of the horse’s career, much to the delight of the estimated three million people who visited him at Faraway between 1922 and 1947. Harbut’s most famous saying was “He was the mostest hoss that ever was.” However, when Man o’ War was lying down in his stall and visitors asked if he could be made to get up so they could see him, according to Bowen’s book, Harbut told them, “Ma’am, that’s Manny Wah. When he wants to git up, he gits up; when he wants to lie down, he lies down.” While Man o’ War’s racing career stood on its own merit, Harbut definitely helped grow the legend even more. “I think Will Harbut was a big part of [growing the legacy],” Bowen said. “The fact that they were featured on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post in the ’40s was an indication of his role in that. … Apparently, I’ve learned that Mr. Harbut was really well educated [and] well spoken. And I’ve come to the tentative conclusion that he just felt it was advantageous to take on this homespun approach and use all these colorful phrases that he’s so renowned for. … But, certainly, he had a big part of keeping the legend alive.” Ellis also has fond memories of Man o’ War, his all-time favorite horse. As a child, he grew up at Dixiana Farm, which was close to Faraway Farm, and he would ride his bike over to visit Harbut and Man o’ War. It was there that Ellis saw just how much the horse loved to run. “I watched Harbut walk him down [to the paddock]; the horse would walk along, very alert,” Ellis recalled. “He’d get him there, unsnap him, and he was gone. The power that horse had, and he was 20 years old at that time … was unbelievable. The power.” Ellis also talked about the beauty of the big horse. “This horse, let me tell you, he didn’t look like other horses,” Ellis said. “People who knew nothing about horses, you can show them a picture of Man o’ War, and they’d say, ‘That’s Man o’ War.’ You couldn’t do that with any other horse, I don’t believe, down through history. He was that unique.”

Keeneland Library/Cook Collection

This conformation shot of Man o’ War was taken in 1936 at Faraway Farm.

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Herbert Haseltine’s iconic statue of Man o’ War now resides at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington.

A Lasting Legacy

As a stallion, Man o’ War’s progeny won numerous stakes races over the years. Arguably, his greatest offspring was War Admiral, who won the 1937 Triple Crown and was awarded that year’s Horse of the Year honors. Sadly, as the saying goes, all good things come to an end. On October 4, 1947, Harbut died after suffering a stroke. Less than a month later, on November 1, Man o’ War died from a heart attack. Three days later, Man o’ War was buried in a casket lined in Riddle’s racing colors at Faraway Farm. More than 2,000 people attended the funeral, which was broadcast nationally on NBC radio. In the crowd that day were Ellis and his dad. “That was the first funeral I ever went to,” Ellis said. “They buried him out at Faraway Farm. A big crowd. It was broadcast nationally on radio. We had to park, gosh, almost a quarter of a mile away, because you know, Huffman Mill Road where Faraway was, it was a narrow country road. We walked over and kind of stayed on the fringe. I didn’t want to see the horse that way, and neither did dad, I know.” Soon after the funeral, a larger-than-life statue of Man o’ War, sculpted by Herbert Haseltine, was placed atop his grave. It remained there until the early 1970s, when the statue and the casket were moved to the Kentucky Horse Park, where the statue is proudly displayed today.

Rick Capone

This year, 100 years since he was born, Man o’ War still captures the imagination of horse racing fans of all ages and is still considered by many to be the greatest Thoroughbred of all time. Still, with his legend so strong after all these years, some people wonder if there could ever be another horse that might be said to be greater than Man o’ War. “I don’t know if there’s ever been a horse that fired the imagination like that horse did,” Ellis said. “He meant a lot of different things to a lot of different people. I doubt seriously if that will ever happen again. It was probably the timing, just coming out of the first World War.” Added Bowen, “I think it would take a lot of factors, and I’m not sure in today’s world that would ever happen. … I think you’d have to have a horse of just incredible ability who was owned and trained by people who were attuned to letting him be tested sufficiently for you to maybe say, ‘Well gosh, even Man o’ War didn’t do that.’ ” With his majestic presence and dominance on the track, Man o’ War has left a lasting legacy for the sport of horse racing, the likes of which will probably never be seen again.

Rick Capone is a freelance writer based in Versailles, Kentucky, just down the road from Keeneland. He is also a volunteer at Old Friends, where he owns a retired Thoroughbred, Miss Hooligan, in partnership with his friends Michael Blowen and Tim Ford. WWW.HBPA.ORG

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t h o r o u g h b r e d r a c i n g a s s o c i at i o n o f o k l a h o m a

breed . race . win

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OK 44

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in 2017, over $4 million will be paid to thoroughbred owners & breeders in oklahoma For further information contact

Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission

2800 N Lincoln, Suite 220 • OKC, OK 73105 • 405.943.6472 • www.OHRC.org

Thoroughbred Racing Association of Oklahoma

One Remington Place • OKC, OK 73111 • 405.427.8753 • www.TRAORACING.com


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NATIONAL HBPA Xpressbet and the XB Family of Brands are committed to the growth of North American racing by increasing handle from domestic and international sources. We support the mission of the HBPA on behalf of owners, trainers and backstretch personnel.

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MAGIC CITY CLASSIC UPDATE Details for the Magic City Classic, a race for Alabama-bred 3-year-olds and up sponsored by the Birmingham Racing Commission, are in the process of being written. The purse this year will be $47,000, and the Alabama HBPA has requested to have the distance shortened from one mile to seven furlongs. Once the details are finalized, we will get the word out. The three-time defending champion of the Magic City Classic is Dennis Murphy’s homebred Buggin Out, who took last year’s edition at Fair Grounds by five lengths. For more information, including a nomination form, contact Leda Dimperio at the Birmingham Racing Commission at leda@mindspring.com or call (205) 837-7477 or (205) 937-2232 for questions.

STALL APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE FOR 2018 OAKLAWN MEET Stall applications for Oaklawn Park’s 2018 season are now available at oaklawn.com or by calling (501) 701-5570. Oaklawn has made several changes in advance of the live season that horsemen will find on the stall application form. Most significant are changes in the eligibility rules. Starting in 2018, horses must have started for more than $5,000 or have finished first through fourth in a $5,000 claiming race to be eligible for a stall or to enter. Oaklawn has also raised the minimum claiming price from $5,000 to $6,250. Maidens must have started for more than $7,500 or finished second through fourth in a $7,500 maiden claiming race to receive consideration for a stall. In addition, 6-year-old maidens and horses 10 or older will not be allowed to start unless approved in advance by the racing secretary and stewards. Oaklawn had previously announced an $8.525 million, 31-race stakes schedule, and purses are projected at $30 million for the 57-day season that runs Friday, January 12, through Saturday, April 14.

ARIZONA HBPA TURF PARADISE UPDATE It’s hard to believe that summer has come to a close and the backside at Turf Paradise is now open. The backside opened for stall preparation and barn setups on September 5 with horses arriving on September 12, and the main track opened for training two days later. We are looking forward to the return of live racing on October 14. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS Several capital improvement projects are in the works at Turf Paradise, including installing a new in-conduit timing system on the main track and turf course, repainting barns, filling potholes, replacing stables’ electrical outlet boxes, installing a new water system for barns K-9 through K-12, repairing the five-eighths-gap safety rail and the manure bunkers, putting on a new roof for barn A-1 and replacing the Arizona Department of Racing/Turf Paradise office roof, adding new sand and tanbark for the main track, paving the south parking lot with asphalt millings, and completing general barn repairs and dorm room cleanup. ADOR LICENSING AND AZHBPA OFFICE HOURS The Arizona Department of Racing is encouraging members to get licensing done early. The Turf Paradise licensing office opened in early September, and hours are from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day. Licensing applications are available online at racing.az.gov. For more information on licensing, please call (602) 364-1709. The AZHBPA office also opened in early September, and hours are from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. The office will be closed on weekends through October 7. YAVAPAI DOWNS UPDATE A group of Arizona investors are in the due diligence stage of acquiring Yavapai Downs. They have retained Corey Johnsen, managing partner of Kentucky Downs, as an advisor. The group is in the process of acquiring their licenses and obtaining bids for the rebuilding of the facility. Their goal is to be open for the 2018 race meet. We will keep you updated as news comes in.

OAKLAWN BUMPS APPLE BLOSSOM AND ESSEX PURSES FOR 2018 One of the richest and most prestigious Grade 1 races for older fillies and mares will be $100,000 richer in 2018. The Apple Blossom Handicap is one of two stakes receiving a purse increase ahead of Oaklawn’s 2018 live season, along with the Essex Handicap for older male horses, which was bumped $50,000. The $700,000 Apple Blossom will be run Friday, April 13, while the $300,000 Essex will be run Saturday, March 17, as part of Oaklawn’s 31-race stakes schedule worth $8.525 million. “The Apple Blossom is one of our marquee races, and a race of its stature deserves a purse increase,” Oaklawn Vice President Louis Cella said. “The long list of winners is a who’s who of some of the best race mares of all time, from Bayakoa to Paseana to Azeri and, of course, Zenyatta. Stellar Wind, the 2017 winner, is just one of many champions to kick off her year in this great race.” The bump to the Essex is the second straight for the 1 1/16-mile race following a $100,000 increase in 2017 and a move to Rebel Stakes Day, where it now shares the card with the $350,000 Azeri Stakes (G2) for older fillies and mares and the $900,000 Rebel Stakes (G2) for 3-year-olds. For the second consecutive year, Oaklawn will offer a lucrative alternative to horsemen looking for a race in advance of the Dubai World Cup by holding the $500,000 Razorback Handicap (G3) Monday, February 19, where it shares the card with the $500,000 Southwest Stakes (G3) on Presidents’ Day. Gun Runner won the 2017 Razorback before finishing second to Arrogate in the World Cup and going on to an impressive victory in the Grade 1 Stephen Foster Handicap. “We couldn’t have been more thrilled with the results of switching the Razorback and Essex Handicaps on the stakes calendar,” General Manager Wayne Smith said. “Gun Runner was exactly the type of horse we were hoping to attract for the Razorback, and Mor Spirit helped build the reputation of the Essex with his win in the Grade 1 Met Mile. We have the best stakes program for 3-year-olds along the Triple Crown trail. These purse bumps will ensure that our program for older horses of both genders will continue to take positive steps forward.” In addition to the two purse increases, Oaklawn has moved the $125,000 Gazebo Stakes for 3-year-olds sprinting six furlongs from early March to

WWW.HBPA.ORG

47


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February 24 next year to offer more time for horses who may wish to stretch out to 1 1/16 miles in the Rebel Stakes three weeks later. The highlight of the 2018 season will once again be the Racing Festival of the South, which will run April 12-14, the final three days of the season. It will feature the $150,000 Bachelor Stakes Thursday, April 12; the $700,000 Apple Blossom Handicap and $400,000 Fantasy Stakes (G3) Friday, April 13; and conclude with the $150,000 Northern Spur Stakes, $400,000 Count Fleet Sprint Handicap (G3), $750,000 Oaklawn Handicap (G2) and $1 million Arkansas Derby (G1) Saturday, April 14. Overall, Oaklawn will offer $30 million in purses next year. The 2018 live meet runs Friday, January 12, through Saturday, April 14. OAKLAWN RACING CLUB TO DEBUT IN ADVANCE OF 2018 MEET Oaklawn Park will offer fans the chance to experience the thrills of Thoroughbred ownership in a low-risk, low-cost fashion with the debut of the Oaklawn Racing Club just in time for the 2018 live racing season. The Oaklawn Racing Club will offer up to 200 shares at $500 each in a horse that will be purchased privately and trained by multiple stakes-winning Oaklawn trainer and native Arkansan Ron Moquett. The plan is for Moquett to identify and purchase an unraced 2-year-old with the goal of starting one or two times this fall in preparation for its 3-year-old season at Oaklawn. “Oaklawn has one of the greatest fan bases in the country, and we know there will be a lot of interest in our racing club,” General Manager Wayne Smith said. “There’s nothing more exciting than having the opportunity to be involved in Thoroughbred racehorse ownership. We’re looking forward to working with Ron and hopefully offering that thrill to Oaklawn Racing Club members.” “I’m really excited to be part of the Oaklawn Racing Club,” said Moquett, who has trained major contenders in Oaklawn’s 3-year-old stakes program the last three years with Far Right, Whitmore and Petrov. “This is a great way for a racing fan to get the experience without all the risks that can come with owning a Thoroughbred. We look forward to having a lot of fun with the group and their horse.” Benefits of membership include regular email updates on the horse; access to a members-only Facebook page for regular pictures, videos and updates on the horse; exclusive club events during the 2018 Oaklawn live meet; and two free reserved seats every time the Oaklawn Racing Club horse runs (excluding Rebel Stakes and Arkansas Derby days). The Oaklawn Racing Club was formed with the intention of being a 501(c) (7) not-for-profit social club organized for pleasure, recreational and other non-profitable purposes. Members should not join with any profit motive or expectation of profit. Membership shares can only be purchased through the Oaklawn website, oaklawn.com. Only one membership per person will be allowed, and all participants must be at least 18 years old to participate. For more information, visit oaklawn.com or email racingclub@oaklawn.com.

HBPA OF BRITISH COLUMBIA HAROLD BARROBY INDUCTED INTO CANADIAN HORSE RACING HALL OF FAME Longtime HBPA of British Columbia stalwart Harold Barroby was inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame at a gala dinner held August 9 at the Mississauga Convention Centre in Mississauga, Ontario. Harold became one of only 45 Thoroughbred trainers to be inducted into the hall of fame, joining 48

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his brother Frank Barroby, who was inducted in 2010. They have both been members of the British Columbia Horse Racing Hall of Fame for many years, as well. Harold Barroby began his training career in 1964, winning his first race at Lethbridge in Alberta that same year. By 1969 Harold was the leading trainer in Alberta and he repeated in 1970. In 1974 he moved his operation to Vancouver, British Columbia. In Alberta, Harold Barroby, the Prairie boy from Ravenscrag, Saskatchewan, was a presence. On the West Coast of Canada, he became the institution that was known to all as Harold, just plain Harold. Harold is the alltime leading trainer at Hastings Racecourse (known as Exhibition Park for many years). He has led the trainer’s list there 10 times and won 145 stakes. That total increases to 165 when the 20 stakes he won on the Prairies are included. Harold is particularly Harold Barroby proud of having won all the major derbies run on the Prairies. He took the Manitoba Derby in 1974 with Easter’s Memory, and he won the Saskatchewan Derby three times. He won the Canadian Derby at Northlands Park in Edmonton with one of his best horses, Pampas Host. Harold won the Alberta Derby at Stampede Park twice and finished off in the West with a victory in the British Columbia Derby with a horse named Fortinbras for the late Louisiana oilman John Franks. It would be much easier to name the stakes that Harold has not won at Hastings than those he has, including most of them multiple times. In five different seasons, he won 10 or more stakes, including a career-high 17 in 1977. He knew how to give his stars long careers. Pampas Host started 124 times and won or placed in 45 stakes in a career that saw him continue to be effective as a stakes horse for seven years. Harold trained Delta Colleen, also for John Franks. She is still the all-time leader in earnings for a British Columbiabred filly or mare and is second overall. She had a seven-year career as well, winning 19 stakes and placing in 26 others. Delta Colleen earned $810,798 at a time when most Hastings stakes had purses of $30,000. Title Victory started 60 times and won 10 stakes while racing for Canada West Ranches, whose principal, Jimmy Shields, the great Canadian curler, was one of Harold’s strongest backers and a major owner for many years. Jungle Mac had 50 races and won eight stakes, six of them as a 2-year-old. Harold has a long list of horses that have won a lot of races, 1,699 as of this writing, and he will have won number 1,700 before this is published. He has also bred many outstanding British Columbia runners, perhaps most notably Happy Trap, who was named after his son Travis, better known as Trapper. Happy Trap won 13 stakes in a five-year career. But when asked what were the things he was proudest of in his career, he cited the HBPA Backstretch Award that he received for his years spent helping make life better for the men and women who worked on the backstretch at Hastings. For more than 40 years, Harold served the HBPA of BC as president, vice president and director. He has also served on numerous committees that provided benefits to the backstretch community, and that work was recognized in the following commendation that accompanied his HBPA Backstretch Award:


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CHARLES TOWN HBPA OWNERS AND BACKSTRETCH SUMMER BARBECUE An early afternoon thunderstorm on August 7 didn’t stop children and adults from sharing in fun and fellowship as we welcomed our new chaplain, Rafael Arroyave, who is a familiar face at Charles Town. Rafael is a former jockey at our track. The Charles Town Racetrack Chaplaincy, along with the Charles Town HBPA and track management, sponsored a picnic and barbecue for backstretch workers, owners and trainers. The tasty food, face painting, piñatas, moon bounce, horseshoes and auctions, both silent and live, made for a fun-filled event.

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But what really tells you about Harold is his work on HBPA committees. He was on all of them at one time or another, but it was on the benevolence, dental and scholarship committees that Harold really made a difference in people’s lives. In Harold’s first term as a director he served on the Benevolence Committee and that set the tone. Harold never stopped thinking about the welfare of the people that worked, and in many cases lived, on the backstretch. Over five different decades, if someone could not pay their rent, had a dental problem or a physical setback or could use help getting an education, well, everyone knew to go talk to Harold because they were sure they would not hear the word “no,” and they did not. In his acceptance speech for his induction into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame, Harold thanked his owners for their many years of support, and then he expressed his gratitude to Sandra Barroby, his wife and partner in many horses over the decades, by saying, “Who I am most grateful to is my wife, Sandra, who has shared a life in Thoroughbred racing with me. Racing has given us a great life and racing has provided for us to raise our family … but as the people in this room know well, it has its ups and downs. Sandra and I have ridden them out together, and I am thankful every day that we are still together living a life we love in a sport we love.” Harold Barroby continues to train and race at Hastings in Vancouver. The HBPA of British Columbia is grateful to the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame for recognizing the extent of Harold’s accomplishments in Thoroughbred racing. At the same time, we are proud to claim him as one of our own, an HBPA guy through and through and a caring member of the HBPA family whose many contributions to the racing community have made a difference to so many people in so many ways.

RACE FOR THE RIBBON On Saturday, September 23, a stakes-laden race card will be televised by TVG2, which will provide in-studio coverage of the event that can also be heard on the Horse Racing Radio Network. The night of racing includes eight stakes and is headlined by the second graded race on Charles Town’s calendar, the $300,000 Charles Town Oaks (G3) for 3-year-old fillies. Other events that day include a 5K fun run, the ninth annual Race for the Ribbon track walk and a silent auction. WEST VIRGINIA BREEDERS’ CLASSICS The state’s finest Thoroughbreds will be showcased in the 31st running of the West Virginia Breeders’ Classics on Saturday, October 14. Post time is 7 p.m. The WV Breeders’ Classics event has generated more than $25 million in purses for the state’s breeders and horsemen and has become the premier horse racing event on Charles Town’s fall calendar. And it’s more than just racing. The WV Breeders’ Classics include numerous events, as well as charitable donations to local and statewide organizations. The brainchild of National Football League Hall of Famer and West Virginia native Sam Huff, the WV Breeders’ Classics are a one-night event with a year-round impact. Following is the schedule of races for a total of $1 million in purses for West Virginia-breds: WV Dash for Cash 3yo and up 4 1/2 furlongs $65,000 WV Division of Tourism Breeders’ Classic

3yo fillies

7 furlongs

$75,000

WV Vincent Moscarelli Memorial Breeders’ Classic 2yo

6 1/2 furlongs

$75,000

WV Triple Crown Nutrition Breeders’ Classic

2yo fillies

6 1/2 furlongs

$75,000

WV Lottery Breeders’ Classic

3yo

7 furlongs

$75,000

WV Breeders’ Classic Distaff

3yo and up, fillies and mares

1 1/8 miles

$80,000

WV Onion Juice Breeders’ Classic

3yo and up

7 furlongs

$80,000

WV Cavada Breeders’ Classic

3yo and up, fillies and mares

7 furlongs

$125,000

WV Breeders’ Classic

3yo and up

1 1/8 miles

$350,000

GENERAL MEETING DATES FOR 2017 Our most recent general meeting was held September 16, and the next one is scheduled for Saturday, December 16, at noon at the Holiday Inn Express in Ranson. 2018 PROPOSED THOROUGHBRED RULE CHANGES The proposed changes to West Virginia’s Rules of Racing and the public comments regarding those proposed rules are available for review at apps.sos. wv.gov/adlaw/csr/ruleview.aspx?document=16513.

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FLORIDA HBPA COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS The FHBPA Scholarship Committee awarded $33,000 in college scholarships to backstretch workers and children of backstretch workers for the 2017–18 school year. The schools attended by these students range from Broward Community College to Duke University. Although most of the recipients are very good students, the scholarships are need-based, not academic-based. The FHBPA encourages those who work at or grow up around the track to improve their lives through education, and this is a benevolence effort that the FHBPA is very proud of. PURSE INCREASE The FHBPA is also proud of the fact that a purse increase for the remainder of the summer and through the Gulfstream Park West meet was ready to be implemented beginning in mid-August. This came about as a result of the efforts of the FHBPA Board and particularly its Contract Committee working with Gulfstream to bring a previous multimillion-dollar purse overpayment to zero for the start of the 2017 non-Championship Meet, which began in April. Higher purse monies generated, which last year merely lowered the overpayment amount, will now result in a corresponding purse increase, as it should be. We look forward to higher and level overnight purses beginning at Gulfstream Park in April and continuing through the Gulfstream Park West Meet in the fall until the Championship Meet begins in December.

INDIANA HBPA INDIANA GRAND MEET CONTINUES POSITIVE TREND Just past the halfway point of the Indiana Grand Thoroughbred meet, nearly all of the metrics—and a growing number of fans at the track—say the 2017 meet is booming. After several consecutive years of solid increases in overall handle, the 2017 meet is up again by 6 percent compared to the same time last year, after the 75th racing day of the 120-day meet. Live handle is up 2.7 percent. After a late-July week of monsoon rains forced some cancellations, the overall number of races is down by comparison, but there is time to make that up by the time the meet ends on October 27. The four-day-a-week meet added a fifth day each week in July and August, reverting to the four-day schedule after August 25. The July 15 Indiana Derby was indicative of the popularity of this year’s Thoroughbred meet. The race established new track records for handle for a single race and for the highest handle ever in the history of racing at Indiana Grand. A total of $1.150 million was wagered on the Indiana Derby, beating last year’s record total of $1.095 million. Also, wagering for the night reached $3.581 million, setting a new track record. The total handle from the 2016 Indiana Derby Night was $3.157 million. Attendance for the evening was 13,622, also surpassing last year’s record attendance of 12,974. On August 16, Big Kick’s victory in the seventh race on the card carried special significance. The winner automatically earned a bid to participate in the Claiming Crown at Gulfstream Park in December. The race was staged by Indiana Grand in cooperation with the Indiana HBPA.

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Owned by Maggi Moss and trained by Tom Amoss, Big Kick has won 13 of 47 starts. He was claimed at Indiana Grand last year and has won at eight different tracks under nine different jockeys. Now, he may have a date for the $110,000 Claiming Crown Iron Horse at Gulfstream. INDIANA HBPA PROMOTIONS BUILDING AN AUDIENCE AND HELPING HORSEMEN Through multiple promotions and events this year, the Indiana HBPA has worked to build enthusiasm and fan appreciation for Thoroughbred racing at Indiana Grand.

Grand Morning attendees learn about the receiving barn from Stall Superintendent Mike Smith. The Indiana HBPA co-promoted four “Grand Morning” events with our track partners this year, building on the introduction of the event in 2016. Attendees—whose numbers grew by more than three times this year—toured the test barn, receiving barn and jockey quarters; heard from the stewards, the race secretary, various trainers and representatives of the Indiana breed development program; and watched a mock draw. The program met the first Saturday morning of the month, May through August, during training hours. The Indiana HBPA also co-promoted a Back-to-School Night in conjunction with Family Night and the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund activities at Indiana Grand on June 29. A big Saturday night crowd was treated to a gaming bus, face painting, a dunk tank, costumed characters, a jockeys vs. maintenance crew tug-of-war, a jockey race from the gate, backpack and school supply giveaways, plus a drawing for a Galaxy notebook. Ten days later, Chaplain Ailsa Calderon helped distribute school supplies and backpacks to backside horsemen, women and their families from the Indiana HBPA chaplain’s trailer. During the same week, the Indiana HBPA distributed 350 Indiana State Fair daily admission tickets to backside trainers, crews and their families for the 16-day Chaplain Ailsa Calderon with some of the school state fair in Indianapolis. supplies and backpacks. The Indiana HBPA also co-promoted a Boots, Brews and BBQ Night in early September with Indiana Grand Racing & Casino, in addition to two huge horsemen picnics during the meet, plus the Chaplain’s Welcome Back Picnic at the beginning of the meet and multiple fishing days onsite at Indiana Grand. It’s been a good year so far with much more to come.


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IOWA HBPA IOWA HBPA ELECTION RESULTS The following individuals have been elected to the Iowa HBPA Board of Directors: • President: David McShane • Owner-Directors: Allen Poindexter, Richard Cosaert, Maria Pauly, Mike Vanderpool and Jeff Hartz • Trainer-Directors: Kelly Von Hemel, Paul Pearson, Doug Anderson, Brandi Fett and Larry Hunt The newly seated board has elected Jeff Hartz as first vice president and Maria Pauly as second vice president. The election ballots were received by Loren Jacobsen, CPA, and counted by the Election Committee of Jack Peters and Ray Shattuck and Nominating Committee substitute Doug Vail, overseen by Secretary/Treasurer Jamie Thompson with assistance from Executive Director Jon Moss. We thank everyone who ran for a seat on the board and the Election Committee and Nominating Committee members who donated their time and talent to this year’s election. PRAIRIE MEADOWS MEET RECAP The Prairie Meadows meet ended August 12 for a total of 67 days of racing. The meet was highlighted by the running of the Grade 3 Prairie Meadows Cornhusker Handicap on July 8. The Cornhusker was won by Iron Fist, owned by Whispering Oaks Farm LLC and trained by Steve Asmussen. Two other Grade 3 stakes were held during the Festival of Racing, the Iowa Derby and Iowa Oaks. The Derby was won by Hence, owned by Calumet Farm and trained by Steve Asmussen. The Oaks was won by Shane’s Girlfriend, owned by ERJ Racing LLC, W.C. Racing Inc. and Dennis O’Neill and trained by Doug O’Neill. Asmussen had an impressive run during the Festival. On Friday, he won the Distaff and Iowa Derby with renowned jockey Mike Smith, and on Saturday, he won both the Iowa Sprint Handicap and Cornhusker with jockey Ricardo Santana Jr. aboard. The final day of racing was capped off with the Iowa Classic, a race card of seven Iowa-bred stakes featuring the state’s best Thoroughbreds. During the Iowa Classic, we had some exceptional racing. The Iowa Cradle winner was Tin Badge, a horse that is owned by Iowa HBPA Director Mike Vanderpool and his wife, Marylee, along with ITBOA President Steve Renftle, and trained by Greg Zielinski. In the Iowa Breeders’ Oaks, Theperfectvow won for trainer Robertino Diodoro and owner Sandra Rasmussen’s River Ridge Ranch. Itsallaboutyou scored in the Dan Johnson Sprint Stakes for trainer Francisco Villafranco and owner Danny Caldwell. Trainer Tom Wellington had an incredible win in the Iowa Breeders’ Derby with Wonderful Dancer going off as the fourth choice in the field of eight and winning by more than 11 lengths while pulling away under gentle urging. Iowa HBPA Director Kelly Von Hemel had a fabulous last day of racing during the Classic night with three stakes winners. His charge, Msbrooklynbrawler, won the Iowa Sorority by a decisive margin of more than 12 lengths. The filly is owned by the partnership of Brian Hall, Jason Loutsch and Justin Loutsch. In the Donna Reed Stakes, Von Hemel won with Mywomanfromtokyo for owners Crimson King Farm and Christine Rhiner. Finally, in the Governor Terry E. Branstad Stakes, Von Hemel sent out One Fine Dream to win for Umbrella Stables II Inc.

The Iowa HBPA thanks all of the owners, trainers and their employees for helping to make this year a success at Prairie Meadows. We can’t wait for the next year of racing to begin! IOWA HBPA NON-RACING HOURS With racing now complete at Prairie Meadows, the office off-season hours will go into effect. The hours will be Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. You can contact the Iowa HBPA at (515) 967-4804 or via email at info@iowahbpa.org.

KENTUCKY HBPA PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE The Horseracing Integrity Act of 2017, H.R. 2651, has resurfaced. It is similar to past efforts. It is an attempt to have an outside agency govern medication policies throughout the country. Here are some points to ponder about the legislation and what will happen if it passes. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) would govern all aspects of medication and testing in racehorses. Perhaps some feel this is a good idea, but if there is something that is especially onerous to racing by USADA, good luck trying to explain your concerns. Like, for instance, Lasix on race day. It would be prohibited, even though countless research projects have proven it is both therapeutic and beneficial to prevent bleeding in racehorses. Guess who will pay for the testing of racehorses? You guessed it—the owners of racehorses. Currently, that cost is estimated to be in the neighborhood of $400 for each start. So, each owner, on top of all of his or her other expenses, will be required to pay an additional $400 or thereabouts to run. Personally, I am not opposed to having more uniform medication and testing policies throughout the various racing jurisdictions, but I am hesitant to support a program that turns over regulation of the racing industry to a third party with no experience in racing. Approximately a week prior to Ellis Park’s opening day, the track received a letter from Monarch, a betting consortium representing several racetracks in California and Florida, that the rate to receive simulcasts from those tracks would increase dramatically. Ellis Park management faced a dilemma: either agree to pay the exorbitant rate hike or choose not to show simulcast signals from such tracks as Del Mar and Gulfstream. Initially, they decided not to pay the higher fee but relented after a couple of weeks and began to show the popular signals at the increased rate. While we understand that this is a business decision, as horsemen, it is difficult to understand why the simulcast signal from California is worth 6 percent but a Kentucky simulcast signal is only worth 3 percent. Betfair representatives contacted the KHBPA and met with the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission (KHRC) in an effort to promote exchange wagering. This is a form of wagering that allows you to wager on a particular horse but only at certain odds. For instance, say prior to the 2015 Kentucky Derby, you were interested in betting on American Pharoah at 10-1 odds. Betfair sends out a message and if anyone is interested in taking the bet then the wager is completed. Betfair is a broker so to speak. Many people feel that the concept of exchange wagering is innovative and is the wave of the future. While it may be innovative, the percent that is returned to horsemen for purses is inconsequential. The KHRC, due to various concerns, decided not to pursue exchange wagering at this time. WWW.HBPA.ORG

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REMEMBERING EDWARD H. FLINT Ed Flint passed away in July at the age of 87 following a brief illness. A lifelong Louisville resident, he was a successful businessman. Ed especially loved the business of horse racing. He owned several racehorses, and through his many visits to the backstretch, became enamored with the plight of horsemen and backstretch workers. In the late 1970s, Ed was elected by the membership to be the president of the Kentucky HBPA and served for several terms. He was also elected by the National HBPA Board of Directors to be president for one term. During his tenure, he was instrumental in the development of the Backside Improvement Fund and the Kentucky Racing Health and Welfare Fund. Ed also tackled issues involving simulcasting, therapeutic medication and running on Sundays. He became a strong voice for horsemen’s rights in the Kentucky legislature. DHS OPENS UP 15,000 ADDITIONAL H-2B VISAS FOR 2017 Prior to his appointment as White House Chief of Staff, then-Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary John Kelly decided to offer extra H-2B visas for temporary, seasonal workers. These visas are used for temporary, nonagriculture workers at a variety of businesses, including members of the horse industry—principally horse trainers and owners who cannot find American workers to fill semi-skilled jobs at racetracks, horse shows and fairs and in similar non-agricultural activities. The government offers 66,000 such visas a year, with the 2017 cap having been met within the first 30 days of open enrollment. This left many organizations without access to the critical labor pool provided by the H-2B program. Trainers at racetracks around the country have reported difficulties in filling staff positions. The extra visas are available to employers that show they’d be significantly harmed if they aren’t able to temporarily hire foreign workers. On July 19 DHS and the U.S. Department of Labor published a rule increasing the cap by up to 15,000 visas through the end of fiscal year 2017. The filing deadline was September 15. 52

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On July 18-19, Julio Rubio and Will Velie joined the H-2B Workforce Coalition, which organized a fly-in of industry members that rely on the H-2B to Washington, D.C., in telling their story to legislators. It was a powerful way to get the message across that H-2B is a vital program that supports the U.S. economy. Julio and Will met with Senators Rand Paul’s and Mitch McConnell’s staffs, and both senators are in favor of the H-2B program. It appears their effort was a great success. Julio and Will this summer traveled to tracks like Saratoga, where they held pro bono clinics for workers to see if they would qualify for any of the existing immigration programs. ELLIS PARK MEET Ellis Park has been enjoying a terrific meet, and the turnout was excellent for two Kentucky HBPA events staged in conjunction with the racetrack. Our Laptop Day has waned in participation in recent years, but this year’s event on July 23 did really well thanks to heavy promotion in the track program, advertising, social media and fliers delivered to areas with high student traffic. Coady Photography

Changing the claiming rules in Kentucky has been openly discussed between the various racetracks and the KHBPA. Kentucky is in the unique position that our claiming horses are coveted throughout the country. The problem is that many horses are claimed in Kentucky and immediately leave the state. This causes a severe shortage of horses. We have tried to come up with alternatives that make claiming more difficult. For instance, one alternative is requiring a horse owner to run at least once at the specific racetrack prior to claiming and the horse cannot change ownership for at least 60 days unless it gets claimed again. Also, the horse is not eligible to race outside of Kentucky for 30 days after the end of the race meeting in which it was claimed. Finally, owners would only be eligible to claim one horse in each race. Another proposal currently being considered is to require a claimed horse to race only in Kentucky for 60 days after the race meeting in which the horse was claimed has ended. Some of our board members feel this is the only way to curb the exodus of claimed horses from Kentucky. I, along with other members of the KHBPA board, are opposed to this idea because we feel it is unfair to owners to require that a horse race only in Kentucky 60 days after a race meeting is over. What are your thoughts? Good luck in your racing endeavors. Rick Hiles, President, KHBPA

From left, Rick Hiles, John Griffith and Mike Bruder present scholarships and laptops to college students. This year, Laptop Day morphed into College Scholarship and Laptop Day. After each race, we gave away a 15-inch Dell laptop and case to a full-time student and teamed with Ellis Park and Henderson, Kentucky, businesses to give a $1,000 scholarship to another student. Ellis Park Mutuels Director Jeff Hall lined up local businesses to fund $500 scholarships, with Kentucky HBPA President Rick Hiles suggesting the HBPA pay the difference to make the stipends $1,000. We opted to meld that into our laptop giveaway to provide maximum exposure. Those signing up for the drawings said they learned of the giveaway from a variety of sources, including the radio and TV ads Ellis Park commissioned this meet; newspaper ads; promotions on the track’s website and Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts; and the track program. One University of Louisville student from a family that owned a horse running that day heard it announced while at the track. Some were told about the promotion by their parents. Indeed, we saw lots of collegians at the track with their families, all appearing to have a grand time. Hiles, board member Mike Bruder and treasurer John Griffith were on hand for the presentations. Board member John Hancock’s grandson, Matt, made the presentation for the industry scholarship given out with the last race, with John as the sponsor.


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LOUISIANA HBPA DELTA DOWNS The 2017–18 Thoroughbred meet at Delta Downs begins on October 18 and ends on March 10, 2018. Delta originally had scheduled a stakes program with 32 stakes during the meet valued at $4.275 million and highlighted by the $1 million Delta Downs Jackpot (G3). However, due to the regionwide impact of Hurricane Harvey, the stakes schedule was altered to drop the Jackpot and seven other open stakes. For additional information, contact the Delta Downs racing office at (888) 589-7223. A good time was had by all at the annual barbecue. A lively crowd of horsemen, track employees and their families attended our annual barbecue the evening of Wednesday, August 9. The food and company were excellent, and the evening ended with spontaneous dancing by kids of all ages and impromptu karaoke. J & B Barbecue’s smoked chicken again hit a high note. If we can’t say the same for all the would-be singers, we can report that any deficiencies were more than compensated for by the good time had by all.

FAIR GROUNDS The Fair Grounds 2017–18 Thoroughbred meet will begin on November 18 and finish on March 31, 2018. The meet will feature the 105th running of the $1 million Louisiana Derby (G2) on March 24. Twilight racing at 3 p.m. CT is scheduled for opening day, and starlight racing at 5 p.m. is scheduled for the following Fridays: December 29, January 19, February 23 and March 9. Stall applications are due by October 4. For more information, contact the racing office at (504) 948-1288. LOUISIANA DOWNS The 2017 Louisiana Downs Thoroughbred meet concludes on September 27. The 2018 American Quarter Horse Meet is scheduled to begin on January 6 with stall applications due by December 8. For more information, contact the racing office at (318) 741-2511. Denis Blake

THE HBPA IS YOU The HBPA, established in 1940, is an organization of owners and trainers numbering approximately 30,000 nationally in 23 states and Canada and more than 6,000 in Kentucky. The association is governed by a board of directors consisting of owners and trainers volunteering their time and elected by the membership every three years. The HBPA is committed to working for the betterment of racing on all levels. The HBPA represents owners and trainers on several fronts: • The HBPA is present in negotiating sessions with each racetrack regarding purse structure, equitable share of simulcast revenues, overall track safety, sanitation and security. • The HBPA provides benevolence to horsemen in need, education and recreation programs to the backstretch, and various insurance packages that include—free of charge to members—fire and disaster insurance and claiming coverage. Visit one of the fully staffed HBPA offices at the currently running racetrack in Kentucky for details. • The HBPA works in conjunction with the chaplaincy program and the Kentucky Racing Health and Welfare Fund to provide support and benefits for horsemen. • The HBPA supports scientific research and marketing initiatives on a regional and national level to help promote interest in Thoroughbred racing. • The HBPA is at the forefront in litigation and legislation on issues involving horsemen’s rights in regard to interstate simulcasting, proprietary rights, casino gambling, therapeutic medication, sports betting and many other areas of concern to horsemen. How can I join? You are invited to drop by the HBPA office to meet the staff and learn more about current projects and how you can get involved in helping to improve the industry. There are no membership fees. Remember, this is your organization. Become an active participant and one of the horsemen helping horsemen. To join, all you need to do is fill out our membership card and fax, mail or email it back to us. For more information, please visit our website at kyhbpa.org and click on “How to Join.”

EVANGELINE DOWNS The 2017 American Quarter Horse meet at Evangeline Downs begins on October 4 and ends on December 20. On Friday, November 17, the trials for the LQHBA Louisiana Million will be conducted with the final on Saturday, December 16 (Louisiana Million Day). Louisiana Million Day will also include the LQHBA Breeders Derby and additional stakes races with more than $1.7 million in total purses to be awarded. For additional information, contact the Evangeline Downs racing office at (337) 594-3022.

WWW.HBPA.ORG

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THE STATE OF MINNESOTA RACING The curtain is about ready to come down on yet another season of racing at Canterbury Park, so it is a good time to address the state of racing in Minnesota. The meet began with two unknowns: There was advance deposit wagering (ADW) for Minnesota residents for the first time, and there was the threat of state government to be shut down again. With the former, and logically so, there was no sharp downturn in track handle. Realistically, the ADW ship sailed long ago and, with it, whatever whales exist in Minnesota. So the introduction of ADW seems to have been a net plus for all parties, though it is a painful reminder of how the folks who put on the show get but a sliver of its bounty. With the latter, the threatened state government shutdown, we received a mixed bag. On the plus side, there was no shutdown, so racing was allowed to continue. On the negative side, we were unable to get a so-called “Lights On” bill passed. This legislation would have allowed racing to continue even if there were a government shutdown. This only makes sense in that racing self-funds its regulatory system. But making sense and passing laws don’t necessarily go hand in hand. Wait till next year. On a heartening note, the voting began on August 4 in the election of the Minnesota HBPA Board of Directors with a full slate of four highly qualified candidates for the two open positions of owner-director. The four are Claudia Goebel, Joy Gorra, Bob Lindgren and Scott Rake. Meanwhile, Board Vice President Bernell Rhone will win in a walkover, as he is running unopposed for the sole trainer-director open position.

MOUNTAINEER PARK HBPA BOARD OF DIRECTORS UPDATE As the end of the 2017 meet approaches at Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack & Resort, the Mountaineer Park HBPA Board of Directors wanted to provide an update on several important issues. As many of you know, we faced some difficult decisions regarding the stability of our purse account and the number of days we could race during 2017. The decision was made to try to maintain the purse structure by not reducing purses and to race four days a week, aligning our schedule with the trend in the industry. These changes have allowed us to maintain the length of our racing schedule and to avoid a 30-40 percent reduction in purses. The board fought to ensure that trainers no longer would have to walk their horses to the test barn to receive Lasix. This was a dangerous practice, and the administering veterinarian now goes to the individual barns. In this process, we further required those veterinarians to remain on property during the races. During the previous meets, second-place finishers were considered a winner if a test was considered “cloudy” until further testing confirmed the results. The board worked with the commission to end this practice and to ensure that the lab followed their contract and released the purse money within the agreed upon timeframe. This has allowed trainers to race their horses in the proper conditions without penalties and to receive the purse money in a timely fashion. This board believes that horsemen and women need to work with management to promote our racing product. We have worked on several

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promotional projects including advertising, raising awareness for the racing industry at the state legislature, promoting and assisting in Thoroughbred aftercare programs and promoting a more professional racing image with consistent uniforms for pony riders and outriders. We continue to work to improve the services we provide to our members through our medical trust and our chaplaincy. We are happy that longtime fellow horseman Wilson Langley has accepted the position of Chaplain and is working hard every day to meet the spiritual needs of our members. As always, we welcome your input on issues that are important to our members. Please contact the office at (304) 387-9772 or Jami Poole at (724) 718-5864 with any comments or concerns. Sincerely, Mountaineer Park HBPA Board of Directors Jami Poole, President; Jennifer Johnson, VP; J. Michael Baird, VP; John W. Baird, Eddie Clouston, Loren Cox, Louise Poole, Annette McCoy, Jeannette McIntosh, Dennis Behrmann and Brady Howell 2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS ELECTION The Mountaineer Park HBPA Board of Directors election will take place this fall. Any members who do not receive a ballot and wish to vote should contact the HBPA office at (304) 387-9772. Ballots will be mailed on or around September 20, and results will be counted on October 20. If you would like to confirm your address, please contact the office. A LETTER FROM OUR CHAPLAIN Greetings from Mountaineer Park, We have been busy since I began my work here as Chaplain at Mountaineer Park. We recently distributed back-to-school supplies to the children of our backstretch workers. The summer has flown by so fast; like a whirlwind, it came and is gone. The Mountaineer Park Chaplaincy Picnic was a big success. It was held at the Tomlinson Run State Park for horsemen, track employees, jockeys and their families with food, Lots of families came out for the picnic. games, swimming and fellowship. We lost longtime horseman Bob Boris on July 4. He is missed by a host of friends and family including his wife, Missy. Please keep them in your prayers. We ask for your prayers for Bill and Tammy Durbin. They have both been a part of our racing community for many years and are both suffering from extensive health problems. They are out of the hospital but need our prayers for healing and strength. In addition to these activities, I offer a daily devotional at 9 a.m., prayers before the races and Sunday services at 11 a.m. in the chapel. I am happy to see the participation in these moments of prayer and reflection increasing with each week. I ask for your continued prayers for our efforts here at Mountaineer that God will prevail and the lost will be found. We are working each day to strengthen and support the Christian community at Mountaineer. In Christ, Chaplain Wilson Langley

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QUEEN OF THE QUARTER-MILE RACES AT MOUNTAINEER BUILDS A FOLLOWING By Tom LaMarra As seven stakes including the $750,000 West Virginia Derby were being run the afternoon of August 5 at Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack & Resort, the most popular racehorse at the track was on a farm about three miles away resting up for her next battle. There isn’t big money on the line when the 6-year-old mare Huntress Helena competes, and the action usually is over in 22 seconds or less. But her knack for winning, usually against males, has built up a following at the track and around the country via the Mountaineer simulcast signal and Twitter. Local fans will crash winner’s circle photos or take selfies from the fence. Deep-pocketed “bridge-jumpers” seeking to make a quick profit will bet tens of thousands of dollars to show on the mare to get the West Virginia minimum payout of $2.20 rather than the standard $2.10 elsewhere. Owned by Jason Hall and trained by Michael Baird, Huntress Helena has 56

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raced five times so far this year in what the track calls “oddball” claiming races at two furlongs—a quarter of a mile—and she has won them all. Her record at the distance at Mountaineer is astounding: Last year, she won six of nine races, and in 2015, six of seven for an overall count of 17 wins in 21 starts with three seconds and one third. “I was handed a great product,” said Baird, who took over training of Huntress Helena before she made her 2017 debut May 22. “I just try not to mess it up. The other guys did a great job with her.” The “oddball” races assign weight according to claiming price. The higher the price tag, the higher the weight, and Huntress Helena has carried as much as 135 pounds and usually at least 130. Hall claimed her for $25,000 in June 2016, and Bill Beamer took over the training from previous owner-trainer William Hackney. Baird, whose father is trainer John Baird and uncle was the late Dale Baird, the all-time leading Thoroughbred trainer by wins with more than 9,000, said he doesn’t employ different training methods with Huntress Helena even though she regularly goes a Quarter Horse distance. “I train her like every other horse I have,” Baird said. “She comes to the track to gallop once a week and spends the rest of her time on the farm. She’s an absolute professional in everything she does.” Baird, who is third in the trainer standings at Mountaineer this year, credits jockey Rex Stokes III for his handling of Huntress Helena. Stokes, who found success at Mountaineer about a decade ago and is currently second-leading rider at ThistleDown Racino near Cleveland, had won with 11 of 42 mounts at Mountaineer through August 5 of this year, five of the wins having come with Huntress Helena. “Rex deserves a lot more credit than me,” Baird said. “He may be the most phenomenal gate rider I’ve seen in my life. He’s unbelievably good with his hands and very good with how he Huntress Helena uses his cushion whip, which is a humane riding crop. He’s very quick going back and forth, right to left, and is mistake-free on speed horses in my opinion.” Huntress Helena this year has broken the 22-second barrier in four of her five victories, with the quickest time in :21.87. The Mountaineer record for the distance is :21 set by Promised Cruise in 1990. Baird, who also is active in the West Virginia breeding industry and stands the stallion Machen at his Northern Panhandle farm, isn’t concerned about track records. He has toyed with the idea of running Huntress Helena at longer distances—she won a 4 ½-furlong turf race at Mountaineer in 2014 and broke her maiden there going five furlongs on the dirt a month earlier. For now, however, the trainer is awaiting the next round of two-furlong races for the Florida-bred mare by Hear No Evil who has earned $150,230 in her 31-race career. “Every time I lead her over for a race, I’m as excited as I’ve ever been,” Baird said. “She’s a celebrity here. Track announcer Peter Berry had pointed out to me that people were gathering around the winner’s circle taking selfies with their phones, and from then on I started paying attention. So we asked the track photographers to start letting Huntress Helena stand there a little longer. It’s

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COLONELSDARKTEMPER GIVES A.J. FOYT A DERBY VICTORY A.J. Foyt Jr. knows all about winning major auto races, but on August 5 at Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack & Resort, the longtime Thoroughbred owner won his biggest horse race ever. Foyt watched from home as Colonelsdarktemper, a colt he purchased for $35,000 at the 2015 Fasig-Tipton Kentucky October sale, took the lead no one else wanted and kept on going to win the $750,000 West Virginia Derby, the Grade 3 centerpiece of the Mountaineer racing season. The race ended up being a family affair. Trainer William “Jinks” Fires is the father-inlaw of jockey Jon Court. And though not related, Colonelsdarktemper Fires has been training for Foyt—winner of the Indianapolis 500 four times—for about 20 years, and the two are good friends. Ten 3-year-olds broke from the gate in the 1 1/8-mile West Virginia Derby, which drew a bit more attention this year because of the presence of Patch, a colt who had his left eye removed because of an infection at age 2. Patch in his previous start finished third in the Grade 1 Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the Triple Crown, and was sent away as the 2-1 favorite at Mountaineer. The early pace wasn’t fast, and that left Colonelsdarktemper, a son of Colonel John, on the lead before the opening quarter-mile had been completed. Court nursed him along under minimal pressure from longshot Heartwood, and on the final turn, Colonelsdarktemper opened up a lead of several lengths. Loooch Racing Stable’s Game Over, who sat behind the winner most of the way, left the rail entering the stretch and narrowed the gap. But Colonelsdarktemper held on to win by one length and paid $16 to win as the fifth choice in the field. The final time for the distance on a fast track was 1:50.68. Also on the card, First Growth captured the Sen. Robert C. Byrd Memorial Stakes for local trainer and owner Odin J. London Jr. and jockey T.D. Houghton in 1:09.62.


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NEBRASKA HBPA HORSEMEN’S PARK CONCLUDES ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL LIVE MEET Horsemen’s Park concluded its seven-day meet at the end of July, the most days it has ever run. Total attendance was 43,500 (6,214 average), and that number probably would have been higher if stifling heat hadn’t affected the middle racing weekend. “We need to get more creative to get more horses here,” General Manager Mike Newlin said. “We want to make sure the Nebraska-breds still have a place, but we’ve got to do everything we can to fill those fields.” The racing dates also might get tweaked once again next year. The track raced three weekends in July this year, but Newlin said it might go back to racing Preakness Stakes weekend in May and then again later in the summer. “Preakness day was huge for us when we did that [in 2016],” Newlin said. “It’s something else we’ll be considering.” Still, attendance averaged more than 6,200 patrons each day. All patrons received a free program with their paid admission. For the horsemen, the track added another barn and improved the racing surface by purchasing tons of dirt from the now-closed Bluffs Run dog track. For the fans, Horsemen’s Park paved over the crushed rock on the apron near the track to give it a more permanent feel. The track also has tried to hold down prices at the concession stand, where you can still get a large Coke for $2 and a hot dog for $1.50. Newlin would like to eventually get lights for the track in order to do night racing. He has also worked especially hard at trying to cultivate a younger generation of race fans. “I think our demographic is more varied than ever,” he said. “It’s not just a bunch of old guys chomping their cigars.” The fans are still coming out, but there’s no question that luring more horses—and the possible addition of lights—would make the Horsemen’s Park experience even better. Nobody knows that better than Newlin, who already is thinking ahead to next year.

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really neat. That kind of stuff has never happened to me.” Berry, who promotes Huntress Helena on Twitter and through his race calls, said there is a fascination with the mare in part because she has never finished worse than third in her 21 races at two furlongs. “The fact is she has paid off every time in two-furlong races,” Berry said. “I think people like watching to see how big the show pool will get. I don’t understand why there hasn’t been a $1 million show pool given the fact she’s 20-0 with show bets. “It’s certainly a novelty, but she just keeps winning, and I think she has picked up a length or so with Rex riding. She’s popular because she’s so consistent in an unusual type of race.” Baird may train Huntress Helena like he does other members of his stable, but when it comes to watching her races, he has made adjustments—perhaps out of reverence but more than likely because of nerves. In quarter-mile dashes, there’s little or no time for a horse to recover from a poor start. “When she’s in, I don’t watch the race with the people I usually watch races with,” Baird said. “I go upstairs and sit in the box with my wife. It’s edge-ofyour-seat in these two-furlong races, but after the second step out of the gate, the anxiety is gone. And it’s not about the purse—we get about $6,000 for winning. There’s a lot more pressure on that race than you would think.”

“It’s my job to make racing here the best it can be,” he said. “That’s what I’m trying to do. If the opportunity arises to add even more live days, I would love to do that for the horsemen.” LONGTIME RACING COMMISSION EMPLOYEE ANN SHEA UNDERGOING CANCER TREATMENT Ann Shea, who has been a Nebraska Racing Commission employee for more than 30 years, was recently diagnosed with stomach cancer. Shea, 85, has been undergoing cancer treatments between her duties in the racing office, first in Omaha, and continuing in Columbus. She has continued to work while receiving treatment. Ann began her career with the Nebraska Racing Commission after retiring from Mutual of Omaha. She has been a passionate advocate for horsemen and is considered to be a mother to many on the racetrack. If you wish to send a card of well wishes, please mail to Ann’s home at 4419 Eastridge Drive, Omaha, NE 68134.

NEW ENGLAND HBPA NEW ENGLAND HBPA CELEBRATES RECENT SUCCESS By Lynne Snierson While remaining true to the mission of horsemen helping horsemen, the New England HBPA grabbed hold of the reins to ensure live racing and simulcasting in Massachusetts would continue uninterrupted, that additional days would be added to the 2017 live racing calendar at Suffolk Downs and that the beneficial Race Horse Development Fund remained intact. “We will race as often as we can,” NEHBPA President Anthony Spadea said. “It is vitally important that our horsemen are able to make some money. This is so necessary for our people who have had to race away from home and for our Massachusetts breeders.” The 2017 live meet at Suffolk Downs, which was sold to a major Boston real estate development company in May, originally was scheduled for six days in total. The season was structured in a racing festival format, with live action on Saturdays and Sundays on one weekend in the months of July (8-9), August (5-6) and September (2-3). Nonetheless, enthusiastic support from horsemen, who filled the entry box, and from fans, who enjoyed the festivities and packed the stands to energetically cheer the horses and riders for every race, brought the NEHBPA and track management back to the bargaining table in hopes of extending the season. Immediately after the August weekend of racing, a deal was struck to cover the operating costs for two additional days with money from uncashed tickets that was sitting in an account. Once the Massachusetts Gaming Commission approved the allocation of $800,000 from the state’s Race Horse Development Fund for the purses, the weekend of September 30-October 1 was added to the schedule. “We’ve had so much success in running these two days of racing on the weekends in the past three years that we really went to bat and worked hard with [Suffolk Downs chief operating officer] Chip Tuttle to try and run these two additional days because we think that with the way people enjoy these twoday festivals and New England racing, it is very helpful to our horsemen and breeders,” Spadea said. “We are so pleased to see these racing fans so happy, and these extra days are so important for our horsemen.”

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The Ohio HBPA affiliate news was mistakenly left out of the fall issue of The Horsemen’s Journal. Below is the text of that news as it should have appeared in the magazine. We apologize for the mistake.

Ohio HBPA Belterra Park wrapped up a successful 2017 racing season by hosting the Best of Ohio on Saturday, October 7. All sources handle is up significantly at Belterra Park in 2017. The track has also seen strong increases in on-track attendance during the 2017 live racing season. For the second time, Belterra hosted the Best of Ohio series which consists of five stakes races for Ohio-breds each worth $150,000; the 1 1/16 mile John W. Galbreath Memorial Stakes for 2-year-old fillies, the 1 1/16 mile Juvenile Stakes for 2-year-olds, the Best of Ohio Sprint at 6 furlongs, the Best of Ohio Distaff for fillies and mares 3 and up at 1 1/8 miles and the Best of Ohio Endurance at the classic distance of 1 1/4 miles for 3-year-olds and up. The Best of Ohio series is back on a rotating schedule between Ohio’s three Thoroughbred tracks and will be hosted by Thistledown in 2018. Mahoning Valley Race Course’s fourth season of live Thoroughbred racing kicks off on Saturday, October 28. A 10 percent purse increase from the 2017 winter-spring meet will see purses at an all time high at Mahoning Valley for the 2017 fall meeting at approximately $115,000 per day, which does not include approximately $10,000 additional in Ohio Thoroughbred Fund money expected to be paid out each day.


The 35-day fall meeting will conclude on December 30 with racing to be conducted four days each week on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. The fall meeting at Mahoning Valley Race Course will be followed by the 2018 winter-spring meeting at the track which will begin in early January and run through approximately the final week of April with the exact dates expected to be approved by the Ohio State Racing Commission. Thanks to the generosity of a former Ohio HBPA board member, the Ohio HBPA is proud to partner with Ohio University in offering a terrific scholarship opportunity for sons and daughters of Ohio trainers. The scholarship will include full tuition, room and board at Ohio University and is renewable for four years. Eligibility requirements include being the son of daughter of a trainer who has been licensed for at least five years and is currently racing horses in Ohio. The student must also be a resident of the state of Ohio and graduate from an Ohio high school. The student must also apply to and be accepted to the Ohio University Athens Campus. 2018 is the first year the Ohio HBPA Ohio University scholarship will be awarded. Any student who is graduating from high school in 2018 and meets the above requirements must apply to the Ohio University Athens Campus during the fall of 2017 and contact Ohio HBPA executive director Dave Basler at 614-8751269 by December 31, 2017, in order to be eligible for this great scholarship opportunity! Ohio HBPA members are encouraged to visit our website at www.ohiohbpa.com for details on our other benefit programs sponsored by the Ohio HBPA which include the Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Health Fund, the Claiming Insurance Program and the Retirement Assistance Program.


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With no stabling or training available on the grounds at Suffolk Downs, horsemen are required to ship in to race and must do so again for September 30-October 1. But there are terrific incentives. Purses average about $500,000 per day, trainers receive a $400 bonus per starter and owners get a $500 participation bonus for finishing in the first five positions. Those owners whose horses end up sixth to last receive a $1,500 runner’s reward each race. Longtime racing executive Lou Raffetto, the consultant to the NEHBPA, recruits the horses from New York, New Jersey and the Mid-Atlantic tracks. “Lou has done such a really great job bringing in all of these horsemen,” Spadea said. “How difficult a job it is; he deserves so much credit.” For months, the horsemen also worked diligently to ensure the Massachusetts law authorizing and governing live racing and simulcasting in the state was extended, thus avoiding an August 1 shutdown of the entire horse racing industry in the state. On July 26, the State Senate and House of Representatives both gave the go-ahead to House Bill 208 and Governor Charlie Baker subsequently added his signature. The bill is almost identical to the one enacted last year, which was due to sunset on July 31, 2017, but now will be in effect until July 31, 2018. The law not only affects live Thoroughbred racing and simulcasting at Suffolk Downs but also live harness racing and simulcasting at Plainridge Park Casino and the simulcasting-only operation at Raynham Park, which hosted live greyhound racing until it was outlawed in 2010 by the state. The owners of Suffolk Downs submitted a letter to the state legislature on July 20 expressing their full support for the bill. Not only does it allow the current live meet to continue and simulcasting to go on interrupted but it keeps track workers and horsemen employed. With the bill’s passage, Suffolk Downs is allowed to remain a licensee for racing and year-round simulcasting as long as the track hosts from one to 50 days of live racing in a calendar year. Also earlier in the summer, the horsemen achieved a major legislative victory on July 7 when lawmakers reached compromise on the $40 billion 2018 state budget bill that eliminates $400 million in spending yet left intact a significant portion of the money in the Race Horse Development Fund. In the short-term, owners, breeders and industry stakeholders had been in peril of losing $13 million to help balance the budget by redirecting that money from the industry to state parks and conservation efforts. In the long-term, the very existence of the RHDF was at risk. The RHDF was established in the 2011 expanded gaming legislation to help the state’s struggling horse racing industry and is fueled by a percentage of the profits from the state’s burgeoning casino industry. The RHDF had come under attack from legislators and private citizens who believed the money would be better spent elsewhere than divided between the Thoroughbred and Standardbred horsemen, with 80 percent directed to purses, 16 percent allocated to breeders and 4 percent given to backside welfare. “I think we made the economic argument that the [RHDF] money is necessary to either fund the [proposed new Thoroughbred] horse park and all of the promise of employment that it has, or to back up the agricultural community that depends upon that money in parts of the state, and that it is in fact a good investment,” said Brian Hickey, NEHBPA’s lobbyist. The version of the 2018 budget bill passed by the State Senate contained an amendment that would have stripped $13 million from the horsemen. The Senate bill was sent to a six-member conference committee, who ultimately decided to strike the amendment in the final bill and instead maintain the support for horsemen. 58

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“I don’t think the overriding issue [at the Statehouse] was the fact that it kept purses up even though we understand how important that is,” Hickey said. “The question was ‘Is this sport worth saving? Does it create the jobs? Does it have the economic impact? Is it all worth it?’ At the end of the day, they thought what we think and the answer is yes, it is. We are very thankful.” “By preserving the Race Horse Development Fund, the conference committee protected an industry in Massachusetts that has the potential to create up to 1,000 new jobs and $100 million in annual economic activity,” said NEHBPA Executive Director Paul Umbrello. “The choice was between spending and investing, and the legislature chose to invest in the future of this industry and our economy. “The NEHBPA thanks its members and sponsors for their continued help and support to return full time racing to New England.”

THOROUGHBRED RACING ASSOCIATION OF OKLAHOMA (OKLAHOMA HBPA) XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX REMINGTON PARK ANNOUNCES 2017 STAKES SCHEDULE The 2017 Thoroughbred season at Remington Park began on August 25 with a schedule of 31 stakes that includes the Grade 3, $400,000 Oklahoma Derby and the top 2-year-old race of the season, the Springboard Mile. The meet runs through December 17. The Oklahoma Derby will headline a huge afternoon of 10 stakes on Sunday, September 24, with total purses nearing $1.4 million. The 29th edition of the Oklahoma Derby will be the main attraction on a program that also includes the $200,000 Remington Park Oaks, the $175,000 Governor’s Cup, the $150,000 David M. Vance Sprint and the $100,000 Remington Green. The afternoon provides a well-timed opportunity for horsemen looking for prep races prior to the Breeders’ Cup weekend at Del Mar on November 3-4. The Springboard Mile has received a purse increase of $100,000 over its 2016 running. The boost elevates the race to the $400,000-mark, giving it shared status with the Oklahoma Derby as the richest races of the Remington Park season. The Springboard Mile headlines a five-stakes program on the season’s final afternoon of racing on Sunday, December 17, that also includes the $100,000 She’s All In Stakes for older females and the $100,000 Trapeze Stakes for 2-year-old fillies. The Springboard Mile is also the culminating race in Remington Park’s trio of stakes for 2-year-olds. The series gets underway with the $75,000 Kip Deville Stakes on the Oklahoma Derby Day undercard and continues in the $100,000 Clever Trevor Stakes on Friday night, November 3. In addition to a purse increase, the Springboard Mile also received a boost in importance as a Road to the Kentucky Derby points race for the first time. It is one of 10 2-year-old races in which points can be earned toward a berth in the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs. “We’re delighted to welcome the Springboard Mile into the fold,” said Mike Ziegler, executive director of racing for Churchill Downs Inc. “It has been a meaningful race for Midwest 2-year-olds in recent years, including Will Take Charge, the eventual 3-year-old champion of 2013. Remington Park officials have been enthusiastic to have their race included in our series, and their commitment was reaffirmed when they increased the purse by $100,000 to give it shared status as the richest race of Remington Park’s season.” “We are very grateful the Springboard Mile has been recognized in this manner,” said Remington Park President and General Manager Scott Wells. “This truly is one of the most important things that has happened for


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2016 OKLAHOMA-BRED THOROUGHBRED CHAMPIONS

Hyper Drive The TRAO would like to congratulate all of the champions who were honored at Riverwind Casino during our awards banquet: Champion Thoroughbred Male Racing Stock and 3-Year-Old Colt/Gelding — Hyper Drive (Don’t Get Mad—Plenty Sweet) Owner: Henry Thilmony C hampion Thoroughbred Female Racing Stock and 3-Year-Old Filly — Euro K Shotgun (Euroears—Shotgun Jane) Owner: C.R. Trout Champion Thoroughbred 2-Year-Old Filly — Sweet Posse (Caleb’s Pose—Plenty Sweet) Owner: Stuart M. Grant C hampion Thoroughbred 2-Year-Old Colt/Gelding and Male Sprinter — Hallelujah Hit (Mr. Nightlinger—Halo Hit) Owner: C.R. Trout C hampion Thoroughbred Female Sprinter and Aged Thoroughbred Mare — Devious Rumor (Street Boss—Gracinha) Owner: Doyle Williams C hampion Thoroughbred Female Turf Runner and Thoroughbred Claimer — Gianna’s Dream (Twirling Candy—Untamed Beauty) Owner: Jordan V. Wycoff C hampion Thoroughbred Male Turf Runner and Aged Thoroughbred Stallion/ Gelding — Ibaka (Uncle Abbie—Synersis) Owner: Doug Wall  Champion Thoroughbred Horse Mixed Meets — Goodheartedgirl (Ellerton—Leadingwithmyheart) Owner: Robbin Caldwell and Blaine Brown

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Remington Park and its fans since we opened nearly 30 years ago. “Thanks to horsemen from our region and from all around the country, over the past decade the Springboard Mile and the two prep races leading up to it have drawn absolutely top-level horses. Those horses have gone on to success in some of the world’s most important races.” The 2017 stakes schedule at Remington Park also features 16 races for eligible Oklahoma-breds, including the lucrative $1 million Oklahoma Classics night on Friday, October 20, and its eight divisional stakes for state Thoroughbreds. Seven stakes races are also scheduled for the Remington Park turf course, led by the $100,000 Remington Green on September 24. For the complete stakes schedule, go to remingtonpark.com.

Leading Owner of Thoroughbred Racing Stock — C.R. Trout Leading Breeder of Thoroughbred Racing Stock — Center Hills Farm Leading Sire of Thoroughbred Racing Stock — Don’t Get Mad Owner: Robert Zoellner and Clark Brewster Leading Dam of Thoroughbred Racing Stock — Plenty Sweet Owner: Tracy Strachan Horse of The Year — Hyper Drive T horoughbred Charities of America Award of Merit — Horse and Hound Rescue Foundation REMINGTON PARK STAR OKIE RIDE DIES Okie Ride, winner of four Oklahoma Classics Sprints and multiple other stakes at Remington Park, died August 9 just seconds after completing a halfmile breeze. The 10-year-old local champ collapsed at about 8:45 a.m. after finishing his second four-furlong breeze of the Remington Park pre-season. Jockey Luis Quinonez was up for the work and immediately sought to aid the horse. Okie Ride is believed to have suffered a pulmonary event, according to track veterinary staff. Owned and bred by the Richter Family Trust of John and Kris Richter of Perkins, Oklahoma, Okie Ride was trained by Kenny Nolen. “All of us are just devastated,” Nolen said from Canterbury Park in Minnesota, where he was racing this summer. “He was just such a big part of us and part of our family. We are all taking it hard, especially my wife, Sally. When ‘Okie’ first came to us, he was a shy horse. Sally started working with him and caring for him, and it changed his personality. He became her horse. He would hear her voice when she came to the barn and you could immediately see him perk up. He had a great personality and confidence because of her, and I truly believe she brought the best out of him when he raced. “I’m very sad that I wasn’t there this morning, but Sally was, and at least I know she was with him.” The news about Okie Ride caused shockwaves throughout Remington Park. “Our deepest sympathies are extended to the connections of Okie Ride,” said Remington Park President and General Manager Scott Wells. “The Oklahoma horse racing community lost one of its brightest stars this morning. Okie Ride was a constant fixture in our winner’s circle for seven years, which speaks volumes for the way the Richter family and the Nolen family cared for him. He will be missed by thousands of fans.” Okie Ride was preparing for his annual return to Remington Park action, where he has competed exclusively, with great success, since the fall of 2013. The lighter racing schedule, normally four to six races per Remington Park season, was an advantage to the Oklahoma-bred gelding by Candy Ride (Arg) from the Geiger Counter mare Tic Tic who would have attempted to set records in Oklahoma City for career wins this season. “Right after his last race each season at Remington, we would pull his shoes, and he would go home to the Richters’ place, where he would have a good, long vacation for a few months,” Nolen said of Okie Ride’s annual routine. “A few years ago, we decided to give him those breaks and just focus on the races available for him at Remington Park. I think it was a big part of why he was so successful for so long, because he didn’t have to race year-round. The WWW.HBPA.ORG

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schedule and the money at Remington Park were a perfect spot for him. I think it is good for all horses to get a vacation.” Okie Ride won at least one race in each year of his Remington Park career from 2010 through 2016. A sprint specialist, Okie Ride won the $130,000 Oklahoma Classics Sprint four times, the $50,000 Remington Park Turf Sprint three times and the $50,000 Silver Goblin Stakes three times, all versus Oklahoma-breds. The last victory for Okie Ride facing foes in open company took place in a 2012 allowance race at Remington Park. A winner of 16 career races, Okie Ride amassed 14 scores at Remington Park. His career comes to an untimely end just one win away from the mark for most all-time wins at Remington Park. Okie Ride shares the mark for most wins in the Oklahoma Classics Sprint, winning the race in 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2016. The four victories put him alongside Highland Ice, who won the Classics Sprint in four consecutive years, 1996–99. Okie Ride’s four Classics night wins tie him with She’s All In and Notable Okie for the second-most victories in the series for Oklahoma-breds. Overall, Okie Ride started 41 times, winning 16 with 10 second-place runs and six third-place finishes. At Remington Park he tallied 33 starts, 14 wins, seven seconds and six thirds. Okie Ride earned $789,714 in his career with $700,642 made at Remington Park.

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OKLAHOMA-BRED LADY IVANKA WINS GRADE 1 SPINAWAY AT SARATOGA, EARNS BREEDERS’ CUP BERTH Oklahoma-bred Lady Ivanka ran down Maya Malibu in deep stretch and fended off her rival by three-quarters of a length to capture the 126th running of the Grade 1, $350,000 Spinaway Stakes for 2-year-old fillies on September 2 at Saratoga Race Course. Owned by Michael Dubb, Bethlehem Stables, Michael Imperio and Susan Montanye, Lady Ivanka started her career two-for-two and earned an automatic entry to the Grade 1, $2 million 14 Hands Winery Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies on November 4 at Del Mar. Under jockey Irad Ortiz Jr., Lady Ivanka stalked before going four-wide out of the turn to overtake the pacesetters. Hall of Fame rider Javier Castellano piloted Maya Malibu to the lead from the inside and maintained the advantage until Lady Ivanka surged ahead in the final strides, completing the sevenfurlong sprint in 1:24.97. “I got a perfect trip; I broke out of there Lady Ivanka and just sat there and waited,” said Ortiz, who won his second consecutive Spinaway after leading Pretty City Dancer to a dead-heat victory in 2016. “We were clear on the turn and when I asked her she was there for me. She was ready. Rudy [Rodriguez] did a good job with her. Her last race was impressive, and she did it in a good way. Now, here we are in a Grade 1, and she did it.” Lady Ivanka won her debut for trainer Rudy Rodriguez on August 9, posting an eight-length score at 5 ½ furlongs at the Spa. The Tiz Wonderful filly handled the step up in class three weeks later, going off at 5-1 and paying $12.40 on a $2 win wager. She more than tripled her career earnings to $199,800. “It was a tough test, but we got it done,” said Rodriguez, who also won the 2014 Spinaway with Condo Commando. “I was not confident at all [turning for home] because I saw that the other horse was coming on the inside, and Javier is one of the best riders in the country; they opened the rail for him and I was concerned. I was hoping that he would wait a little longer, but I’m not on top here, so I thought if he waited a little longer maybe we could wait for whatever they were going to do, but it worked out. “I think she’s very good; she’s got a very good mind,” he added. “She can see like you see … she’s just sitting there behind horses; she’s been doing that in the morning all the time, so I think she can stretch out.”

Chris Rahayel/NYRA Photo

OKC SUMMER SALE RECORDS BIG INCREASE IN AVERAGE AND TOTAL SALES The Carter Sales Co.’s OKC Summer Sale saw the average yearling price jump by 21 percent and recorded a 16 percent increase in gross sales with a total of $531,400. Yearlings averaged $9,137, a nearly $2,000 increase over 2016. An Oklahoma-bred Flashback filly out of the Tiznow mare Tiz Merry topped the sale. Phil Adams of Gainesville, Texas, purchased the filly for $55,000 from the Buena Madera consignment for Hidden Creek Farm. The next highest seller at $44,000 was an Oklahoma-bred Mister Lucky Cat filly out of Eternal Joy, the dam of multiple stakes winner Heykittykittykitty ($495,161). The Luckily Partnership/D. Dipalo purchased the filly from the Millar Equine consignment. Two horses were knocked down at $43,000 each. The first was an Oklahoma-bred colt by Jimmy Creed out of the De Niro mare Showmethegreencard who was purchased by SBM, agent for Clark Brewster. Mighty Acres consigned the colt for Center Hills Farm. The next at $43,000 was an Oklahoma-bred Flat Out filly out of the Broken Vow mare Broken Blues. The filly went to Jay Lewis of Jones, Oklahoma. She was bred by John James Revocable Trust and presented by Marty Powers. “This was the best catalog in our sale’s history,” Sales Director Terri Carter said. “It was strong across the board, and that made the sale so much fun for everyone. The atmosphere was just so energized. “We’ve always tried to make the sale fun with food and music. I think horse racing is often a family venture, and it’s great to see these families together out selecting their next racing prospect.” Carter credited the $43,075 maiden special weight purses at Remington Park as a driving factor in the strong market. “They are doing a lot of good things at Remington with capital improvements and the new Remington Park Racing Club designed to let people try their hand at racehorse ownership with a small buy-in for a group experience of owning and racing,” Carter added. “We are really lucky to be in a state where racing is doing so well.”

HERITAGE PLACE THOROUGHBRED SALE SET FOR OCTOBER 8 IN OKLAHOMA CITY Heritage Place is excited to announce the sixth annual Thoroughbred Yearling and Mixed Sale will be conducted Sunday, October 8, in Oklahoma City. The sale is open to Thoroughbred yearlings and will also contain a session of mixed age horses. Heritage Place remains committed to providing a regional market and place of commerce for Thoroughbred breeders, buyers, trainers and enthusiasts. Heritage Place provides a reputable, first-class sales company and facility to accommodate buyers and sellers. The entire facility is enclosed, offering 650 stalls, a restaurant and bar, an off-track betting parlor featuring simulcast racing and a theater-style sales auditorium with comfortable seating. For more information and to view the catalog, go to heritageplace.com.


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REMINGTON PARK LAUNCHES FIRST RACING CLUB Remington Park has announced its first racing club partnership set to operate during the 2017 Thoroughbred season. The inaugural RP Racing Club offers a racehorse ownership experience for an extremely reasonable one-time fee. The cost of a single membership into the 2017 RP Racing Club was $250, and membership closed in early September. The 2017 RP Racing Club horse will be purchased and managed by eighttime Remington Park leading owner Danny Caldwell and will be conditioned by Federico Villafranco, who trains Caldwell’s horses. Racing club members will receive owner access to Remington Park, including visiting the track in the mornings to watch the horse during training hours, experiencing pre-race moments in the saddling paddock with the trainer and jockey as they discuss race strategy and hopefully enjoying the thrill of victory and standing in the winner’s circle for a photograph. RP Racing Club members will also be invited to special events, including a reception on days when the club horse competes. There are no hidden expenses. All RP Racing Club members will receive detailed monthly statements regarding costs for the horse and depicting money earned from racing. Club members also will receive regular updates about their horse and the RP Racing Club via email and social media platforms. For more information, visit remingtonpark.com.

OREGON HBPA OREGON RACING UPDATE The Oregon HBPA is delighted to share details with all of you regarding our 2017–18 race meet at Portland Meadows. The backside was available for ship-in only on August 27 with the first day of training on September 1. Our first day of racing is October 2, and our concluding race day is January 30, 2018. Most weeks consist of racing on Monday and Tuesday with a few Sunday race days sprinkled in throughout the meet. Our backside will close on February 4. Once again, the Oregon HBPA will be providing free chips for the hot walkers, some free stall bedding and a $100 participation bonus for each Thoroughbred starter. Similar to last year, we are considering adding funds to the purses. Our summer race meets have all been very successful. For the first time ever, two of our fair meets were simulcast around the country through our advance deposit wagering partners. We concluded our racing this summer at the Tillamook Race Meet and the Harney County Fair Meet. Like last year, the Trainer of the Day at our fair meets has been met with much excitement, and the trainers all wait anxiously to see who gets the $100 award each entry day. Good luck at the races!

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Lady Ivanka was bred by Scott Pierce out of the Officer mare Lady Leftennant. The filly did not meet her reserve at auction as a weanling or as a yearling. She then sold for $80,000 at the Fasig-Tipton Midlantic 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale.

PENNSYLVANIA HBPA PENN NATIONAL HORSES WELL REPRESENTED AT THOROUGHBRED MAKEOVER Penn National Race Course is represented by 50 of the 509 retired Thoroughbreds nominated to the Retired Racehorse Project’s $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover. The Makeover will be presented this year October 5-8 at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. New Start, the retired racehorse rehoming project of the Pennsylvania HBPA, has 12 named to the Makeover. CANTER PA is also well represented. “Looking at where Makeover horses finished their careers definitely gives us some insight into the trajectory these horses take and where rehoming interventions need to happen,” wrote Kristen Green on the RRP’s website. “We compiled the tracks where each horse last raced—the track they retired from—and these 10 tracks supplied over half (52 percent) of our Makeover entries. They are second-tier tracks, where the trainers likely have fewer recourses and less financial cushion. It’s the trainers who have the least who are the ones who are asked to ensure that the racers on their way down don’t end up in dangerous situations.” The 10 tracks referred to are in order of participation: Penn National (50), Mountaineer Park (35), Finger Lakes (27), Mahoning Valley (26), Parx Racing (26), Laurel Park (23), Indiana Grand (22), Belterra Park (20), Charles Town (18) and Turfway Park (18). “Congratulations, PA HBPA’s New Start and CANTER PA,” wrote Clovis Crane, a board member of the PA HBPA who will again participate in the Makeover. “This is a fantastic example of the dedication of our horsemen to repurpose our Thoroughbreds when they are no longer racing.” The Makeover offers $100,000 in prize money for horses competing in 10 disciplines. TAPETA SURFACE MAINTENANCE COMPLETED A substantial maintenance project on the Tapeta surface at Presque Isle Downs was completed in June. The surface was refurbished with four loads of fresh fabricated fibers and 20 drums of proprietary Tapeta oil and wax. The project was spread out over several weeks in an effort not to interrupt the regular training and racing schedule. The total cost of the project, $225,000, was paid by the Pennsylvania HBPA and was an expense the PA HBPA Board of Directors gladly approved to ensure the quality and viability of the racing surface, which has proven to be the safest racing surface in the country since installation in 2007.

WASHINGTON HBPA WHBPA ANNUAL MEETING The annual Washington HBPA membership meeting was held the evening of July 26 at the Washington Thoroughbred Breeders and Owners Association Sales Pavilion at Emerald Downs. The meeting, which included a pre-meeting social hour, was lightly attended. Twenty-four owners, six trainers and two guests signed the attendance roster, which established a quorum. WHBPA President Pat LePley opened the meeting and, in his President’s Address, outlined three reasons why owners and trainers at Emerald Downs should be optimistic for the future of racing in the Pacific Northwest: • Tremendous growth in the Seattle/Tacoma area. It has been reported that

WWW.HBPA.ORG

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NEWS

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WASHINGTON HBPA PRESIDENT IS HONORARY STEWARD FOR LONGACRES MILE Serving as honorary steward for the 2017 Longacres Mile (G3) was current WHBPA President Pat LePley, an individual with a history of being fully committed to local Thoroughbred racing. A Seattle native, LePley bought his first Thoroughbred in 1974 and along with his wife, Carol Hern, has been involved in ownership ever since. Always an involved participant, LePley served on the Washington Horse Racing Commission from 1997 to 2003 and has represented horsemen for the past eight years as a WHBPA Owner/Director and now president. On August 13, LePley, along with more than 6,500 racing fans, 62

HJFALL 17

Courtesy Emerald Downs

population is growing by 1,000 people per week. Washington’s economy is one of the strongest in the nation, construction is booming and jobs are plentiful. • The Seattle area’s historical heritage of quality racing and established fan base. Further, there is legislative history of embracing the industry and a respect for the contribution to the economic health of the state. • The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s commitment to horse racing. This is evidenced by the past and present enhancements to the purse account, the Tribe’s recent capital improvements in the facility—most notably the $5 million investment toward upgrades and addition of a card room in the grandstand area, increased advertising and promotions, plus an unprecedented two-year contribution of almost $1 million in horsemen’s incentives. This money will directly benefit and encourage trainers to race at Emerald Downs. LePley also recognized each of the directors and highlighted the recent accomplishments of the WHBPA board and staff members. He ended his presentation with a brief update on legislative activities and forthcoming worker’s compensation issues. Executive Director MaryAnn O’Connell followed with a presentation about the financial future and challenges of both the Washington HBPA and Emerald Downs’ purse structure. Attendees were shown how purses are derived from a variety of sources, some of which come from state statute, contracts with management and “gifts” from the Tribe. O’Connell also outlined recent Washington Horse Racing Commission rule changes, including the new Voided Claim Rule enacted when a horse suffers a catastrophic injury during the running of race, jurisdictional reciprocity for veterinarian lists and amendments to therapeutic medication thresholds. During her presentation, O’Connell praised the commission, especially Executive Secretary Doug Moore and commissioner Dr. Everett Macomber. Amongst heightened national pressure to conform to model rules, which sometimes are geared toward the elite in horse racing, the commission has exhibited a willingness to work with trainers and veterinarians to establish rules that support and protect Washington horse racing and the health and welfare of all participants including the horse, while also considering the livelihood and economics of racing in the Pacific Northwest. O’Connell also highlighted upcoming proposed rules, including revisions to the trainer responsibility and out-of-competition testing rules. She concluded that it is an ongoing, neverending battle and to reeducate oneself, the commission and stakeholders regarding the science and politics of medication rules, testing protocols and the pro and con consequences to the Washington Thoroughbred industry. The evening ended with an open forum that covered topics such as developing a strategic plan to enhance owner’s viability for profitability, suggestions for improving communication concerning racetrack maintenance, plus a plethora of suggestions geared toward enhancing the owner and trainer experience at Emerald Downs.

Gold Rush Dancer enjoyed a spectacular day of racing and perfect weather at Emerald Downs. Gold Rush Dancer, a California-bred by a Washington sire, struck gold as he raced to a dominant 4 ¾-length victory in the 82nd running of the $200,000 Longacres Mile, returning from California to the track where his career began two years ago. The now 4-year-old colt by Private Gold broke his maiden in his first start at Emerald Downs in 2015. He went on that year to compete in four stakes, winning the $65,000 Gottstein Futurity before shipping to California, where he remained until coming back for this year’s Mile. Ridden by 19-year-old Evin Roman, Gold Rush Dancer ran one mile in 1:33.85 under 120 pounds and returned $8.40, $4.20 and $3.80. Vann Belvoir is the winning trainer for owner/breeder John Parker of Lakebay, Washington. Also of note, Belvoir, son of longtime Washington trainer Howard Belvoir who saddled Barkley, the fourth-place finisher in the race, became the first person to win the Longacres Mile as both a jockey and trainer. Slightly favored by a scant $77 over the winner, Mach One Rules, ridden by Isaias Enriquez at high weight of 123 pounds, rallied from sixth to edge Dedicated to You for second by a head and paid $4.40 and $3.60 and earned $40,000 for owner R.E.V Racing. Point Piper, the defending champion, finished fifth, and 2014–15 Mile winner Stryker Phd closed ground to finish sixth. Seattle Serenade, third choice at 5-1, surprisingly showed no speed and finished seventh, while Papa Frank, Chief of Staff, Bistraya, Togrammashousewego and Black Sona completed the order of finish. Another highlight of Mile Day at Emerald Downs was the first-ever car giveaway. Chet Pennington of Olympia won a brand new 2017 Toyota Camry as Emerald Downs and Doxon Toyota of Auburn teamed up to offer the largest single prize in Emerald Downs’ history. “We were proud to sponsor such an iconic event in the Longacres Mile,” said Craig Willy, Doxon Toyota general manager. Pennington had his name drawn from all the people who correctly selected Gold Rush Dancer to win the Longacres Mile. “It feels pretty darn good,” Pennington said of winning the car. He said his wife actually picked the winning horse. 2017 WASHINGTON HALL OF FAME WINNERS ANNOUNCED The votes are in and the 2017 Washington Thoroughbred industry’s newest inductees to the Hall of Fame are the following: Male Horse: Noosa Beach—22-14-4-2, $524,472. Won 12 stakes including the 2010 Longacres Mile (G3) and was six times stakes-placed. Bred, owned and trained by Jeff and Doris Harwood. Other nominees were 1992 Horse of the Year Staff Rider (18-9-3-1, $364,699), 2003 top 3-year-old Fast Parade


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Also inducted into the Hall of Fame for his lifelong achievements and contributions to the industry was Dr. Mark DeDomenico, a Thoroughbred owner and breeder and the owner of Pegasus Training and Rehabilitation Center in Redmond, Washington. SECOND ANNUAL “RIDE FOR RACEHORSES” BENEFITS PRODIGIOUS FUND On the morning of July 30, in its second consecutive sold-out year, about 100 horses and the equivalent of “wannabe” exercise/race riders converged on Emerald Downs to participate in the second annual Ride for Racehorses. Benefiting the Prodigious Fund, adult riders paid $50 (and $25 for children) for the opportunity to spend one hour on the oval with their equine companions. Participating breeds represented a cross section of the local horse population, with American Quarter Horses being most plentiful followed by Thoroughbreds. Horses and riders were divided into three one-hour groups: Walk/Trot, Walk/ Trot/Canter and Walk/Trot/Canter/Gallop. Surprisingly, there were no “run-offs,” although outriders were available to assist if necessary. There were two minor falls (over-exuberant equines) and no reported injuries to horses or humans. Heather Sacha

(11-6-2-0, $475,013) and 2006 Washington Horse of the Year Pure as Gold (19-7-3-10, $476,444). Trainer: Marion L. Smith— A native of Junction City, Kansas, Marion L. “Million Dollar” Smith accomplished one of the greatest training feats in Washington racing history when he twice won the Longacres Mile with rejuvenated claimers. Pitch Out, claimed for a then state record $16,000 by S.J. Agnew, prevailed in the 1971 Mile, and Snipledo, claimed for a record $60,000 by Robert Resoff, won the 1990 renewal. In fact, Snipledo’s four-length win was the exclamation point to one of the greatest single seasons in state racing history. Under Smith’s training, Snipledo was six-for-six and finished 1990 with a then single-season earnings record of $273,810 and honors as Washington Horse of the Year and Longacres Horse of the Meeting. Nicknamed “Million Dollar” for his penchant for winning big races, Smith tied Jim Penney for No. 4 all time in Longacres stakes wins with 36. He saddled Silk Chiffon to consecutive wins in the 1985–86 Belle Roberts Handicaps, which at the time was the track’s championship event for older fillies and mares. Smith also had victories in the track’s other two signature races—Washington State Champion 2-Year-Old Maharesred romped in the 1988 Gottstein Futurity, and Star Recruit prevailed in the 1992 Longacres Derby. Smith also maintained off-season stables in California, spending successful winters in the Bay Area and at the Los Angeles tracks, but he enjoyed his greatest success in Seattle, where his barn perennially ranked among the leaders in wins, win percentage and earnings. Other multiple stakes winners trained by Smith include Sharper One, Murrtheblurr, Space Patroller, Aunt Iva, Icy Folly and Run Roni Run. Other nominees were Bob McMeans and Craig Roberts. Breeder: Debbie and Rick Pabst, Blue Ribbon Farm, Buckley, Washington — A Washington Thoroughbred Breeders and Owners Association member since 1972, Debbie Pabst was elected to the WTBOA board in 1982 and is a current board member for the WTBOA and the Washington HBPA. Rick Pabst also has served on the WHBPA board. In 2014 Debbie was awarded the prestigious Washington S.J. Agnew Lifetime Achievement Award. Beyond her success as a breeder and a prominent leader in the Washington Thoroughbred industry, Debbie is known for her willingness to be “on call” to those in the industry who need help or advice. Whether it is for information regarding an equine purchase, stallion, orphan, foaling issue or a request for donations to an industry cause, the Pabsts have always exhibited an unselfish generosity to promote and encourage industry participants. The Pabsts are among those who contributed to the building of the WTBOA offices and sale pavilion and were among the original investors in Emerald Downs. Their Thoroughbred breeding accomplishments include being Washington’s leading breeders in 2011 ($368,903), 2012 ($399,436), 2013 ($446,570, a Pabst record) and 2014 ($383,107), and the breeders of champions Find Your Spot (2014 Washington champion 3-year-old filly), Finding More (2012 Washington champion 2-year-old filly), Jebrica (2011 Washington champion 3-year-old), Atta Boy Roy (2009–10 Washington champion sprinter and 2009 Washington champion handicap horse, co-bred with Patricia Murphy), She’s All Silk (2006 Washington champion 3-year-old filly), Dancin’ All the Way (1990 Washington champion 2-year-old colt, co-bred with WAM Stables) and owners of Washington broodmare of the year Peaceful Wings (2011). Other industry positions include serving as managing partner of various Blue Ribbon Racing partnerships and the Washington Broodmare Club, standing Atta Boy Roy and Nationhood at stud (both leading freshman sires of their year), acting as a sales agent, providing boarding and foaling services, and serving as co-coordinator of Washington’s nurse mare service. Other nominees were Mel and Helen Beck and Diane Kem.

Horses of all breeds participated in the Ride for Racehorses event. Thanks to all of the volunteers and participants who helped make the Ride for Racehorses such a fun and successful event. The organization’s board of directors continues to be overwhelmed by the support of the equestrian community for this event and in turn the Prodigious Fund, which supports programs and farms that benefit retired racehorses. The Prodigious Fund’s mission is to recognize and support positive efforts made within the Thoroughbred aftercare community for the rehoming, promotion and care of retired racehorses. The Prodigious Fund is supported through industry contributions, per starter contributions and matching funds from Emerald Downs. The Prodigious Fund financially supports the following: • Thoroughbred retirement and rescue organizations • Rehoming and retraining of the Thoroughbred racehorse • Promotion and publicity in support of the retired racehorse athlete • Sponsorship of Thoroughbred-only horse show classes/October annual horse show • Programs promoting the Thoroughbred athlete.

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NTRA Advantage/John Deere................... 14 Oaklawn.................................................. 10

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The Horsemen's Journal - Fall 2017  

The official publication of the National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association.

The Horsemen's Journal - Fall 2017  

The official publication of the National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association.