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Decade in review: 2010-2019

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Minority Rules

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@hhsepitaph The Epitaph The Epitaph Vol.57 Issue 3 Homestead High School 21370 Homestead Rd, Cupertino, CA 95014

https://hhsepitaph.com/

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

@epitaphHHS

By Karen Li, Shruti Magesh, Katelynn Ngo, Kacey Rebstock and Saanvi Thakur

W

hen junior Sara Smith* attended a HHS house party, she never expected to end the night watching one of her classmates getting carted away by EMTs. The injured party-goer, Smith said, had allegedly been going in and out of consciousness after consuming alcohol, smoking marijuana and taking Xanax. He passed out just as he was reassuring everyone he was fine. “My friend, who was sober, walked up to the EMT dude trying to explain what happened, and they didn’t even care,” Smith said. “I don’t really know what happened [after that]. I don’t even know if the dude’s okay.” Accidents like the one Smith witnessed are fairly common at parties. Junior Lucas Persyn said he has also been a witness to the consequences of mixing peer pressure with substance abuse at a high school party. “[I saw] one person literally jumping off from a roof onto a table and breaking their wrist on that,” Persyn said. “That was all peer pressure. He said he didn’t even want to do it. He ended up breaking himself and the table ... and it wasn’t even his house.” According to a survey of 125 HHS students, 47.6 percent reported that they attend parties, and 45.2 percent said they consume alcohol and engage in other illegal activities at these parties. Senior John Anderson* said he attends parties around once a week. These parties range from kickbacks — which are exclusive small scale parties with around 20 people — to large scale-parties anyone can attend. Typically, HHS parties tend to be kickbacks, which are invite-only parties, Anderson said. “[Going to parties is] part of the mob mentality,” Anderson said. “People will do it, not because people are pressuring them to, but because they feel an internal pressure to be a part of something bigger than themselves in the sense of a party.” Ten miles away, at Los Altos High School and just around the corner at FHS, Ander-

son said, parties can grow to around 100 people and may take one to two weeks to plan. HHS parties, by contrast, are usually planned spontaneously and are more laidback, he said. “[The type of parties you go to] depends on where you exist in the social atmosphere at HHS … depending on what kind of person you are and who you’re friends with,” Anderson said. While parties primarily include socializing with friends, there are also often students engaging in illegal activities, including using drugs and alcohol. Anderson said it’s relatively common to find people smoking marijuana or drinking one of the many alcoholic substances present at parties such as beer, inexpensive vodka or other hard liquors. Teens who abuse substances at parties may do so because of the instant reward, HHS school psychologist Ellen Lain said. “There’s an immediate effect. You do something [and] immediately you get some kind of response,” Lain said. “Versus [in] classrooms, you sit there and then you’re learning these equations. What is the immediate [response]? Nothing really comes back from that as quickly.” According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, people ages 12 through 20 drink 11 percent of all alcohol consumed in the United States. In addition, young people consume more than 90 percent of their alcohol by binge drinking. Smith said that with the abundance of alcohol and drugs at every party, it’s hard not to use them, especially when it seems as if all the participants are having fun. Drug usage at parties is typically limited to marijuana, Anderson said, but other, harder drugs are sometimes present, too. About half of high school students reported using marijuana in a 2013 study. This use of marijuana can negatively affect brain development, cause risky behaviors and develop into serious health problems, ac-

cording to the CDC. Some other ramifications of drug and alcohol use at high school house parties include alcohol poisoning and other trips to the hospital, similar to those described by Smith and Persyn. “I’ve had a few friends get alcohol poisoning,” Anderson said. “I’ve had a few friends not necessarily overdose, but smoke too much weed. I’ve had a few friends go to the hospital.” In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2013, there were 119,000 emergency rooms visits by people ages 12 to 21 for injuries and other conditions linked to alcohol. In addition, by senior year, twothirds of students have tried alcohol, according to the CDC. Sophomore Adithi Sumitran said she thinks teens engage in these behaviors to fit an image rather than for genuine enjoyment. “I don’t think people personally enjoy going out of their comfort zone and doing drugs or smoking,” she said. “I feel like a lot of it has to do with trying to fit in with that media-constructed image of teens.” Similarly, media is often dominated by depictions of high school parties as places where a lot of hooking up and sex occurs, but this doesn’t really happen at HHS, Baker said. “You see high school movies and there’s always people hooking up in the mom’s bedroom. There’s none of that,” Baker said. “Usually, all the doors are closed off and the only people hooking up are people who are already dating.” Back at Homestead, while the administration typically does not get involved in the party scene, since these events take place off campus, usually on nights and weekends, there have been times when adults have had to step in, principal Greg Giglio said. “If someone’s partying on a Tuesday night and they show up Wednesday and they’re still under the influence or unable to function, that becomes our issue because we have to check into

their safety and their well being,” Giglio said. “If they are advertising [parties] here at school, telling everyone here in school [and] we become aware of it … [or if] a fight breaks out or a student gets assaulted or abused [at a party], that’s going to affect their ability to be safe on campus, and that is something that could become our jurisdiction.” The same is true for law enforcement. Even with a clear amount of illegal activity occurring at parties, the main reason parties are shut down by the police is because of noise complaints, Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety officer Elisa Barrios said. “[We may break up a party] if a neighbor calls in a noise complaint during certain hours of the day, [since] we have municipal codes where you can’t be making a certain level of noise,” Barrios said. From there, officers follow specific municipal codes in regard to alcohol and the number partygoers present. “You can’t have more than 10 juveniles in the house [if alcohol is present], so if that’s the case, then we could potentially cite if they’re in violation of that,” Barrios said. When the police do show up, there are usually no consequences for partygoers or the host, Lee said. “If they recognize that it’s like a larger party, they’ll just tell everyone that they have to leave,” Lee said. “Normally, [no one] gets in trouble.” While there are certain dangers and negative consequences that can emerge from a Homestead party, ultimately, Anderson said, parties simply serve as a way for students to unwind and focus on something other than school. “There’s a release. In a party, there’s no boundaries on the ways you can act,” Anderson said. “You can be around all these people without being in the context of school. You can be more yourself. You can be loud or say what’s on your mind. You can be funny. There’s an ease to social interaction there.”

*Names have been changed to protect students’ anonymity.

PAGE DESIGN BY ELAINE HUANG, LEILA SALAM, AND SAANVI THAKUR


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Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Code Red drill procedures, enforcement adjusted as a result of new evidence

News

Secondary locking systems, barricades deemed unnecessary

By Miya Liu

NEWS IN A MINUTE By Shruti Magesh

LOCAL: Bay Area Storm Heavy rains have plagued the Bay Area, and another cyclone is expected to arrive in Northern California. Nicknamed the “Bomb Cyclone,” this storm is expected to bring heavier rains and increased flooding concerns, according to ABC News.

NATIONAL: Kamala Harris Senator Kamala Harris dropped out of the presidential race due to a lack of financial resources and low poll numbers. Yet despite withdrawing from the race, Harris will continue to defend her ideals and is likely to be a vice presidential candidate, according to the New York Times.

Education in the US According to the Program for International Student Assessment, the performance of American teenagers on reading and math tests has remained the same since 2000. Compared to students across the world, American teens scored significantly lower on math. The results have led to the questioning of the education system, with respect to technology, funding and teacher pay, according to the New York Times.

Rising Sea Levels Florida officials said increasing costs will make it impossible to protect all parts of the islands from the increasing sea levels, according to the New York Times.

INTERNATIONAL:

The implementation of the Run, Hide, Defend drill has changed drastically over the years to accommodate the various changes to the drill, according to Forbes. According to the Interagency Security Committee, the Run, Hide, Defend drill, originally referred to as “Run, Hide, Fight,” was formulated by the city of Houston and endorsed by the Department of Homeland Security to be the most effective procedure in the event of an active shooter. The first thing to keep in mind in the event of a nearby active shooter is to run, an officer with the Santa Clara County sheriff’s office, Christopher Scott said. “Find a barricade between you and the suspect or the bad guy,” Scott said. If the situation escalates to where it is unsafe to run, then hide, dean Maria Trejo said. “[Stay] away from a line of sight,” she said. “You definitely want to not be seen. So, hide behind chairs or tables, away from any type of entrance or window.” In the event that the situation demands a need to fight, it’s time

Illustration by Miya Liu to defend, Scott said. “For self-defense, pick up any object that might distract the shooter or cause injury to them,” he said. The sheriff department and HHS school safety plan coordinators, deans Trejo and Steve Puccinelli said they have worked together to create the best drill for our school, one that has evolved since the Columbine shooting in 1999. “Each of the schools that are in our jurisdiction, we have an obligation to provide training and also service these schools in the event of an emergency,” Scott said. Originally, the drill focused on the procedure to build blockades.

Seismic patterns suggest future earthquakes Experts recommend preparing for potential natural distaster By Allen Zhang A 2.8-magnitude earthquake centered less than 1.5 miles away from campus struck the Bay Area just two days after the 30th anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The earthquake was too weak to do any damage to buildings and residents, however, every moderate earthquake increases the risk of larger earthquakes, according to the LA Times. There is a 72 percent chance at least one earthquake with a magnitude of 6.7 or larger will hit the Bay Area by 2043. Since

the Bay Area is on the active boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, there are seven distinct fault lines running through the region, leaving many people at risk, according to USGS. According to Richard Allen, head of the U.C. Berkeley Seismological Lab, although killing 63 people, the Loma Prieta quake was not as damaging as previous earthquakes. The last time the full force of a fault was released was the Great San Francisco Quake of 1906, which killed an estimated 3000 people and left 225,000 homeless, POTENTIAL EARTHQUAKE FEARS: A large earthquake hitting California could have disasterous results, including a large number of deaths, people displaced and entire cities destroyed.

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China has detained a million Uighur Muslims in detention camps without trial. These detention camps are run with high security, and institute practices of strict discipline and punishment. Furthermore, numerous human rights have been violated at the camps, according to BBC News.

“These blockades are important because not only do they protect against possible stray bullets, but they will obstruct the active shooter’s view of the students and staff within the room,” Puccinelli said. “The shooter will be less likely to attack a room when they are not certain of the number of occupants.” The drill also previously included other features, such as secondary locking systems, which are barricades or blocks of wood used to further reinforce doors. However, Puccinelli said, these secondary locking systems were deemed unnecessary because there has been no evidence of a shooter ever getting through a locked door.

This feature was identified as potentially dangerous, as well. “[The fire marshall was] concerned about being able to get into a room to save somebody who needs to be saved,” Puccinelli said. “The law enforcement was always in conflict with that emerging in an active shooter situation.” In accordance with this new evidence, school safety plan coordinators made the decision to do away with the use of secondary locking devices, Puccinelli said. “The idea is [focused on] strategic thinking, [considering] what’s best for your situation,” Puccinelli said. Trejo said another new focus is the impact on mental health following a drill. “The main goal is to lessen the level of anxiety amongst kids when actually going through the process, but at the same time, [we want to] make them aware of what steps they need to take,” Trejo said. Scott said these drills will prepare students in the event that a real situation occurs. “You have to take things seriously so you’ll remember when you’re in that heightened state,” Scott said.

according to ABC News. David Schwartz, USGS scientist emeritus, called the Bay Area “a tectonic time bomb.” However, there are multiple ways to remain prepared for earthquakes. Kits, such as the Ready America 70280 Emergency Kit, can be purchased for as low as $30. Alternatively, each component of a kit can be bought separately and placed collectively in a makeshift box, according to the CDC. In homes, emergency kits should be kept in a cool, dry locations that are easily accessible and known to each family member, according to the US Department of Homeland Security. Kits should include at minimum three gallons of water per person, a first aid kit, nonperishable food, flashlights, batteries, medications and cash, Lieutenant Liz DiGiovanna of Sunnyvale’s Department of Public Safety said. According to a survey conducted by YouGov in 2018, a staggering 41 percent of Americans say they are not prepared for a natural disaster. DiGiovanna said that finding a secure location during an earthquake is important to remain safe. “The recommendation used to be to find a doorway [during an earthquake] and stand there because it was [thought to be the] sturdiest part of the building,”

DiGiovanna said. “Now, the recommendation is to find something to hide underneath, such as a table or a large desk, hold it over your body and wait for the earthquake to pass.” Dean Steven Puccinelli said that at HHS, students should follow the same basic duck, cover and hold procedures. “If there were to be an earthquake on campus,” Puccinelli said, “you want to duck and cover get under something that can cover your head … If you’re outside of a classroom, you want to get away from tall objects that could fall on you.” Puccinelli said the best place to go during an earthquake is the middle of the baseball or football fields. Furthermore, Puccinelli said that students should try to stay away from large windows as they pose significant danger in the event of an earthquake, as glass pieces can break off and cause significant injuries. To keep pace with the advances in earthquake prevention structures in buildings, HHS plans to continue construction projects to renovate buildings with the appropriate earthquake deterrents, Puccinelli said. “The next construction phase is going to be that each of the existing buildings is going to get earthquake retrofitting to increase the safety of the actual structure of the buildings,” Puccinelli said. PAGE DESIGN BY JACK XU


News

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

New committee created to spread unity

Bill to extend school release times

Family Friendly Act geared to help parents By Naomi Baron California Senator Kamala Harris proposed a bill on Nov. 6 to extend school hours to 6 p.m. across the U.S., to accommodate the working schedules of parents and to better align the days off that parents and kids have, according to CBS SF. According to CBS News, the bill, dubbed the Family Friendly Schools Act, offers $5 million to the 500 schools participating in pilot programs. The money will fund athletic, academic and enrichment opportunities for schools throughout the year with the exception of federal holidays, weekends and emergencies. In addition, teachers are not required to lengthen their school day unless they volunteer to devote extra hours for additional pay, according to CBS News. If the bill passes, the Department of Education (DOE) will publish a report on the effectiveness of the pilot program after five years. Based on the report, the DOE will decide if it should apply this program to more schools. The bill has produced mixed opinions from staff, students and parents. History teacher Andrea Yee expressed the advantages and disadvantages she sees with this bill.

“First of all, it’s a lot of resources that you would need to continue funding that and to have school extended three hours everyday, that’s a lot of money,” Yee said. “I’m unsure of where that money is coming from and if it will be taken from other resources.” Yee said she also recognizes the opportunity cost of the bill. “What if kids have other things to do?” Yee said. “Like you have something outside of school that you need to go to … I know some students [who] work after school. That doesn’t seem fair. Not everyone needs to be at school till six.” However, as a mother, Yee said she also sees the perspective that would convince families to approve of this bill. “My kids have activities outside of school,” she said. “Like, my daughter does g y m nastics. I have

to put them in extended care. So, I pay for childcare after school and that gets expensive.” The bill’s intent is to assist busy parents; however, students are also impacted by the repercussions of the bill, sophomore Ariel Raveh said. “In my opinion, I do not think that staying at school until six is a reasonable idea, neither is it beneficial,” Raveh said. “It’s only an extra three hours of school, but it gives you less time to work on homework once home [and] will probably require you to stay up later and get less sleep.” Sophomore Jack Ohman said the bill has other effects on people on campus, such as other school employees. “Besides the fact that staying at school isn’t exactly ideal for most students it’s also not ideal for janitors and other workers that clean up the school after we leave,” Ohman said. “If students have to stay until 6 p.m., that also requires janitors and custodians to work later hours.”

Photo Illustration by Naomi Baron

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Positivity from clothespins By Katelynn Ngo The Student Life Committee is a brand-new group created by leadership with the intent of spreading positive vibes on campus, decreasing stress and bringing students together. Their first event is handing out clothespins to students with feel-good memos on them from Dec. 4 to Dec. 6, senior Avneesh Muralitharan said. Even though spreading positivity to others is a common theme within other clubs, like CSF and fwd:love, Muralitharan said that being a part of that effort and continuing to propel that idea forward is just as important. “There’s a lot of clubs on campus that do the same thing that we do, but [we’re] just building on that and [on] the fact that we’re [a] part of a greater effort to kind of push for positivity on campus,” Muralitharan said. The main goal behind the clothespin event is to reassure students during finals week, Muralitharan said. “What we want to do is bring positivity to campus … Finals week is pretty stressful, and the whole clothespin

event can cheer [students] up before it kicks into high gear,” Muralitharan said. What sets this event apart from other events is that students themselves choose who they pass the clothespins on to, junior Subhokrity Banerjee said. “You’re giving the student body the whole power of how they want to give away the clothespin,” Banerjee said. “They can give it to their friends, to their classmates or to their teachers.” Junior Aakriti Adhikari said she hopes this event will make leadership seem less isolated from the students. “Another long term goal is to create a transparency between the leadership and the [students],” said Adhikari. The committee aims to use the results they get from this event to better events in the future, Banerjee said. “This is an experiment,” Banerjee said. “Depending on how the event goes … we can develop other plans or events which will fulfill our long term goal, which is bringing the student body together and spreading positivity.”

Photo by Katelynn Ngo SPREADING THE LOVE: The Student Life Committee gave stu-

dents clothespins with uplifting messages to hand out to friends.

Infographic by Dexter Tatsukawa

Editors Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief Senior News Senior News Senior Opinion Junior Opinion Senior Lifestyles Junior Lifestyles

Adviser

Andrea Sun Renee Wang Shruti Magesh Dexter Tatsukawa Melody Chen Sahil Venkatesan Katelynn Ngo Nika Bondar

Reporters

Natalie Owsley Senior Entertainment Junior Entertainment Senior Sports Senior Sports Design and Multimedia Junior Design Junior Multimedia Business Manager

Saanvi Thakur Shreya Partha Jackson Faria Jane Park Jacqueline Beaufore Kacey Rebstock Miya Liu Yukari E. Zapata

Naomi Baron Elaine Huang Anika Karody Nitya Kashyap Karen Li Leila Salam Sara Shohoud Jack Xu Allen Zhang

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Mission Statement The Epitaph is a non-profit publication at Homestead High School, 21370 Homestead Rd, Cupertino, CA 95014. The Epitaph is a forum for student expression and not subject to prior review, in accordance to Education Code 48907. The staff is comprised of HHs Journalsim students. Views Expressed do not necessarily represent views of the school, its staff, or the district. Editorials are opinions of the editorial board. The Epitaph welcomes all letters to the editor but reserves the right to edit all submissions. Letters

should be limited to 300 words. Include contact information. Unsigned letterrs cannot be published, but names will be withheld upon request. Send via homestead.epitaph@gmail.com, or drop letters in the newsroom or the office mailbox. If the Epitaph has made an error, please send corrections to homestead.epitaph@gmail.com. The corrections will be published in the corrections box for the next issue. To reach the Epitaph staff in C102 call (408) 522-2572 or fax (408) 738-8631

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PAGE DESIGN BY NAOMI BARON AND ELAINE HUANG


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Wednesday, December 11, 2019

What will it take to turn words into action?

Opinion

STAFF EDITORIAL

THE IMPATIENT PATIENT By Renee Wang

I’ll do it later. How many times have we uttered this? Procrastination is a pervasive habit for many, yet we cannot expect this habit to dissipate once we grow older and more “mature.” 20 percent of adults are chronic procrastinators, according to Joseph Ferrari, a professor at DePaul University. Procrastination affects many facets of our lives — from putting off plans to completeing homework last minute, and letting someone down for a favor. According to a study by the University of Sheffield, we procrastinate as a way to cope with negative emotions, especially self-doubt. That college essay we need to write: we put it off because we think what if we are not good enough? It is followed by this: I’ll do it later. When we look at procrastination not as a manifestation of laziness, but as a form of self-harm, we become more attuned to our deeper concerns and stressors. The fact that we procrastinate, yet are aware of its consequences, is an indication that it is an evasive action. With college deadlines approaching, a sense of urgency towards our future increases. But, it is hard to reconcile with a competitive admissions process that makes us evaluate our self worth. Aside from college deadlines, nearing the end of high school forces us to wonder: am I good enough? Did I do enough? Throwing these doubts away may provide short-term relief, but ultimately sets an unhealthy precedent for the future. Deciding to evaluate your mental wellness right away, over allowing it to accumulate, staves off the need to procrastinate before it becomes a chronic habit later in life. The goal is not to get all your tasks done, but also take care of your internal tasks as well.

Just one semester into the year, students at HHS have experienced two events that could have led to dire consequences. Despite promises to help students feel safer on campus, little has changed. On Nov. 21, a student was reported to be in possession of a “dangerous object,” later identified as a BB gun, according to an email by principal Greg Giglio. In the 200-word email, there was no mention of the consequences of bringing a dangerous object on campus. In early September, a student reported a violent threat on social media by a San Jose State University student and HHS alumni, which implied possible harm to the student as well as the school, according to an email from FUHSD coordinator of communications, Rachel Zlotziver. Upon arrest, the suspect was found in possession of a loaded semi-automatic handgun and ammunition, according to the SJSU Media Advisory. There was little communication following both incidents. The student was arrested, the campus was deemed “safe,” and therefore, we no longer need to worry about it. Moving on without out discussing its consequences after its “resolution” is not enough.

Despite the dangers of these incidents, no permanent solution to keep our campus safe has been implemented. Superintendent Polly Bove said in a panel interview in August that the district is working on bringing security cameras to campus and the Sandy Hook Promise app to the district, which will allow students to anonymously report peers who show signs of suspicious activity. However, the cameras and app are nowhere to be seen. When will a “work-inprogress” turn into reality? While the district and administration spoke of new ways to help keep our campuses safe, little progress is being made. In the email addressing the BB gun incident, Giglio closed the email with: “We want to reassure you that our campus is a safe place for students ... there is no concern for student safety at this time.” How can we assure these new measures are being put in place? Unfulfilled promises for safety opens a wider gash in the issue. When administrators fail to report new involvements, students may assume that administration is not making the safety of its students a priority. School shootings from 2009 to 2010 were nearly double the number of shoot-

ings between 2000 and 2009, according to the Center for Homeland Defense Security. Reassurances of our campus’ safety, without action to actually make the campus safer, feed into a student’s belief that these occurrences are part of the normal high school experience. There are so many ways to manuever around the harsh reality, but it is impossible to downplay the truth: action must be taken. Imagine what could have happened if that SJSU student had gotten into his car with his loaded semi-automatic handgun and driven to HHS.

We would be dealing with a much different scenario. Parents and students alike would be advocating for more enhanced security. Would we have implemented the Sandy Hook Promise app then? Would we finally get security cameras? Probably. Just because we have not experienced a school shooting does not mean we are safe. We cannot wait for a shooting to jolt us into action. We must advocate for more communication, more security and more resources now, to truly keep our student body safe.

Illustration by Ashleigh Dong

Huck Finn does not deserve a spot in classrooms America cannot be defined by one story By Karen Li This year, the American Studies classes are no longer reading Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” as they have in previous years, opting to ditch the American classic in favor of literary works honoring a more authentic black voice. This decision sparks the ageold debate, which American Studies students previously wrote an argumentative essay about after reading the book: should “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” be taught in schools? Set in antebellum America and narrated by the rebellious teenager Huckleberry Finn, this controversial novel details his journey with the runaway slave Jim as his companion. While it is considered a staple of American literature and not unrightfully so, Huck Finn shouldn’t claim a spot as required school reading, but not for the reasons many may think. The main — and obvious — controversy surrounding the book stems from the use of the “n-word.” According to CBS News, the word appears a total of 219 times throughout the course of the story. In 2015, a Philadelphia school removed the book from its curriculum due to the use of the “n-word,” according to the Guardian. On the surface, the argument seems to be over the excessive use of this racial slur, but the fact that the controversy has continued to this day hints at a larger

problem regarding race relations today. When Mark Twain wrote “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” in 1884, it was meant for a largely white male population at the time. However, today’s America is vastly different from America in 1884. Today’s America is multicultural, and a novel written for white males fails to acknowledge that. Furthermore, even though the novel follows the black experience, it is written by a white author and narrated by a white boy. How can an authentic black story be told through a white perspective? In the story, Jim acts as a device to aid Huck’s character development and realization about racism rather than as a standalone individual with a story worth telling. For black students in particular, the demeaning portrayal of blacks in Huck Finn is detrimental to their literary experience. Representing black voices in literature and history is essential to foster an inclusive, insightful learning experience. Book characters mirror reality and act as role models, so to consistently see one’s own race portrayed as inferior from the eyes of others is in no way constructive. Considered as an honest portrayal of slavery and racism from someone who lived during that time period, Huck Finn is often cited as an important book for demonstrating race relations. While there is no denying that

Illustration by Melody Chen THE OTHER SIDE: Huck’s white perspective overshadows Jim’s truth and the black experience in America.

Twain was in the position to write accurately, he is limited to the truth of the white perspective. History is shaped by many stories: the context, people and places are important to achieving a complete understanding of both sides of the race. Using Huck Finn as a depiction of America’s racial past runs the risk of shaping history with a single story. Alternatives exist that give a much more authentic tribute to the black experience, such as Langston Hughes’ “Mulatto: A Play of the Deep South,” the first black play performed on Broad-

way, or “Black Boy” by Richard Wright, a memoir about growing up black in the South. With so many better alternatives out there, why are schools still choosing Huck Finn? It’s only out of a sense of obligation to teach a work renowned as an “American classic,” which isn’t very representative of America at all. In no way am I denying Huck Finn as an accomplished novel in its own right, but it definitely should not be the one used in the classroom to define the black experience in today’s America. PAGE DESIGN BY SHREYA PARTHA


Opinion

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Mental illness is not a trend

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The glorification of mental illness is going too far By Shreya Partha When we glorify mental illnesses, such as anxiety, depression, OCD and bipolar disorder, we diminish the difficulties of such illnesses for those who actually have them and are afraid to step forward for help. Yet, our current culture has developed a habit of viewing mental illness as “trendy” or a justified excuse for harmful behavior. Advancements in our understanding of mental illnesses have recently gained more scientific validity, marking a step toward social progress, according to Edelweiss Behavioral Health. Partly due to more media awareness, society has shifted its lens from viewing mental health as something that should be subdued to something that can be discussed without stigma. Although this is a step in the right direction, the fact that mental illnesses are becoming more widely recognized has set a precedent of it being used as a justification for damaging behavior and attitudes, according to the Collegiate Times.

Views of mental illnesses have shifted from stigma to glorification, which can often have similar qualities, according to Edelweiss Behavioral Health. This ideology causes people to lash out against loved ones or take risks, convincing themselves that their actions are supported by their “mental illness.” By allowing this kind of behavior to slide, we unintentionally foster an environment where people believe that anything they do will be forgiven. One example is of mental illnesses being used as a justification for the actions of a school shooter. There is a belief among many that there is a link between mental illness and school shootings. For instance, President Donald Trump states, “Mental illness and hatred pull the trigger. Not the gun,” according to the Washington Post. However, the link may not be as strong as most believe. According to the New York Times, out of 235 mass murderers, only about 22 percent can be considered

THE MELODIC LINE By Melody Chen

Illustration by Zoe Li mentally ill. Because such shooters are said to be disturbed, there is a lack of accountability for their actions, according to the Collegiate Times. As such, mental illnesses should not be used as an excuse for something as cruel and rash as mass murder. The fact that society is moving

Real or fantasy: impostor syndrome

away from stigmatizing mental illnesses shows growth and allows people who are experiencing mental illnesses to feel more validated about their emotions. Nevertheless, this destigmatization has slowly transformed into a glorification and undermines the value of the illness for people who actually struggle with it on a daily basis.

Redefining success against an epidemic that downplays it By Sara Shohoud I got a C in AP U.S. History. Going into the AP test, I expected to fail. Although I wanted to get at least a 3, that score didn’t seem possible given my performance throughout the year. When I got my score back, I was in complete shock. How did someone who barely passed the class receive a 5? I was worried that my mom pulled a Lori Loughlin and bribed College Board to change my score. Although I studied really hard for the test, I did not expect to get the highest score. What I just described is a case of impostor syndrome. According to Time magazine, impostor syndrome is the idea that your success is not credited to your hard work or talent, but rather luck. Impostor syndrome is not something you are born with. According to Medical News Today, there are three basic factors that could trigger impostorism: new challenges, growing up with a shining sibling and being labeled as “smart.” Impostor syndrome doesn’t fester among those with low self-esteem. It is actually most common among those who are high performers in their field. According to Harvard Business Law, common impostorism thoughts include “I must not fail,” “I feel like a fake,” and “success is not a big deal.” “I must not fail” comes from the fear of being “found out” as an impostor. “I feel like a fake” comes from the feeling that others believe that a person is more competent than they actually are. “Success is not a big deal” comes from a person downplaying their success, attributing it to an external factor rather than their own work.

Now that the causes and symptoms of impostor syndrome have been defined, we can work towards mitigating its negative effects. Harvard Business Law has given seven ways to battle impostor syndrome. A few of these methods include recognizing impostor feelings when they emerge, reframing failure as a learning opportunity, and, my personal favorite, being kind to yourself. By recognizing impostor feelings, you have taken the first step toward change. Awareness allows you to track these thoughts and understand why they emerge. Reframing failure into learning opportunities allows these Illustration by Zoe Li failures to be used to grow and better yourself. In the wise words OUT OF PLACE: Recognizing impostor syndrome as it emerges allows us of Bob Ross, “we don’t make mis- to self-evaluate our needs and understand the hard work that we have put takes, only happy accidents.” in. With the amount of work students handle, it is important to recognize that My favorite way to battle im- hard work deserves self-praise. postor syndrome is by being kind to yourself. Self love is a very important practice, and, acAD cording to Medical News Today, is the key to stable mental health and well-being. Being kind to ourselves allows us to recognize when our successes are credited to our hard work. With the amount of work students put into academics and other passions, we deserve to relish in the successes that are a result of our hard work.

In the age of avocado toasts and kale smoothies, millennials are often characterized as the generation of fads. The aesthetics of reflecting yoga rooms and almond milk hand creams consume the general impression that millennials are chasing the perfect image. Yet, there is more to self-care than it seems. Self-care practices in the mainstream media reveal the movement’s narrow scope of being driven by the elite. The appeal of the self-care brand has grown over the years, but it doesn’t have to mean a $130 hot stone massage to rid your anxieties. According to Tufts Observer, such misconceptions only reinforce the idea that selfcare is reserved for the wealthy by neglecting the fact that self care simply means taking good care of yourself. More millennials have reported prioritizing self care than any other generation before them, according to Pew Research Center. In fact, millennials outspend boomers two folds on personal care essentials, including diet plans, life coaching and gym subscriptions, according to Field Agent. Instead of latching on to the self-care facade, millennials and Generation Z must recognize that self care doesn’t have to be costly and glamorous. For example, journaling and hiking are free alternatives to self care that provide the same benefits as any luxury self-care items. Self care is not defined by the privileged anymore; in fact, it is easier and more accessible than it sounds. There is a difference between self-indulgence and self-care, and all it takes to fulfill the latter is to take better care of yourself in ways you know best. PAGE DESIGN BY ALLEN ZHANG


6 .

Opinion

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

To hell and back: a fight for democracy Hong Kong protests show no signs of stopping

By Leila Salam

THE PARTISAN PARTY

By Sahil Venkatesan Where did the right go wrong? When did they transform from a party with actual policies to a group of Americans supporting sexism? There are only 13 Republican congresswomen in the House out of all 199 Republican Congress members, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. It is clear that the Republican party is overlooking gender diversity. By backing President Donald Trump, the Republican party has identified themselves as against women’s rights. Republicans backed a candidate who said: “I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss. I don’t even wait. And when you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything...” When dozens of women came out alleging that Trump had sexually assaulted them, Trump simply called all the women liars, according to ABC News. These prejudices don’t seem to end. In December 2017, Roy Moore, a Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, was accused of sexual misconduct with minors. The Washington Post reported that nine women stepped forward to detail that Moore had pursued them sexually and romantically when most of them were minors. According to CNN, after these allegations surfaced, the Republican National Committee still gave money to the Moore campaign. They still supported Moore after Mitt Romney, the Republican 2012 presidential nominee, stated “No vote, no majority is worth losing our honor, our integrity.” The culmination of all these events has portrayed many Republican officials as against women.

Hong Kong is in a crisis. Bodies have been buried. College students have been rounded up by police. Protesters have been set on fire. No matter what comes next, Hong Kong will never be the same. Protesters gather in the streets daily to fight for their basic human rights — rights that are being threatened by the Chinese government. Hong Kong must be allowed to keep its democracy even if it is at the expense of the Chinese economy. According to the Washington Post, the Hong Kong police fired over 1,800 rounds of tear gas, 150 sponge grenades and arrested 420 protesters in the first two months of protests alone. The dispute started over an extradition bill proposed by the Hong Kong government. According to The New York Times, the bill would allow Hong Kong police to arrest Hong Kong citizens who committed crimes in other countries. However, it quickly became clear that China would use the bill as an opportunity to encroach on Hong Kong. China and Hong Kong are two very different places. According to Vox, Hong Kong remained under British rule for 99 years, but gained its freedom back in 1997 after the lease

expired. According to The Washington Post, China is eager to get its hands on Hong Kong completely this time — a feat that was not predicted to happen until 2047, per an agreement between China and the British. The British gave Hong Kong back to China under the circumstance that there would be one country and two systems. Chinese control over Hong Kong would strip away the democracy and the freedoms that they currently have, forcing the people to live under authoritarian rule. According to the 2019 Index of Economic Freedom, Hong Kong is the freest economy in the entire world, making it a target for China to engulf. However, the Chinese government is asking for too much. If the extradition bill passes, citizens in Hong Kong would not only be handing over their resources, but their freedoms as well. Despite the increasing violence, the Hong Kong government remains tenacious, holding strongly negative views of the protesters. According to Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, “If there is still any wishful thinking that by escalating violence,

Illustration by Leila Salam IN A CRISIS: Protesters arm themselves with umbrellas and masks to protect

themselves from tear gas fired by the police.

the Hong Kong government will yield to pressure, I am making this statement clear and loud, that will not happen.” Carrie Lam opposes the protesters because she, as well as the rest of the Hong Kong government, is a puppet of the mainland Chinese government. They were elected and are supported by government officials in Beijing. Even with their own government working against them, protesters still find ways to make political change. For example, at the recent Hong Kong local elections, out of

the 452 seats in the territory’s 18 district councils, pro-democracy candidates won 391, according to The New York Times. This is a huge win for democracy in Hong Kong. However, the fight must continue. The people of Hong Kong will never be able to fully recover from the trauma and pain that these protests have caused. The people of Hong Kong have made it clear that they are willing to die for their freedom. They will never give up this fight. They will never give up on their freedom.

A silent battle in the classroom

Class participation favors extroverted students By Shruti Magesh

Infographic by Melody Chen and Sahil Venkatesan

Throughout high school, I always dreaded looking down at the syllabus on the first day of school, realizing that a good portion of my grade is comprised of class participation. According to the Center for Teaching and Learning Development, class participation is defined as actively listening, being prepared for class and completing assignments — in addition to asking questions and presenting opinions during discussions. Yet, participation is commonly graded as the number of times a student speaks during class, without taking into account the various factors that come into play. These factors include opportunities to speak up in the classroom and listen attentively. Participation grades are often subjective, and can be deemed unfair to those who have trouble speaking up in class. According to the Atlantic, about one-third to half of the people in society are introverts. Introverts are usually more reflective in nature, and feel more comfortable alone versus in large groups, according to Our Lady of the Lake University. Yet, forcing introverts to participate and grading their participation unfairly favors extroverts in the classroom. It can also lead to feelings of

anxiety in students, which can pose significant threats to mental health. According to Psych Central, 40 million people experience anxiety and three-fourths of that amount experience it before the age of 22. In addition, for students who have learning disabilities or anxiety issues, forced participation can make school unbearable. According to the Child Mind Institute, class participation can lead to increased anxiety among students with learning disabilities and a loss of connection with the teacher. Pushing students past their boundaries to speak up in class

only adds to the risk factor, according to Psych Central. In addition, class participation may be difficult for non-native English speakers. The cultural and language barriers will inadvertently result in drawbacks and a loss of opportunities for the respective students, according to a research paper on the role of language and culture on class participation by Stephanie Vandrick. A better understanding of the material, a specific teaching style and an inclusive environment are all components that contribute to success in the classroom in lieu of participation.

Illustration by Melody Chen RECOGNIZING MULTIPLE VOICES: Teachers must redefine the standards of

grading class participation by including opportunities for introverts to discuss their ideas.

PAGE DESIGN BY KATELYNN NGO


Lifestyles

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Get RePsyched about fashion

7

Business class produces fashion company By Elaine Huang

Infographic by Karen Li

“I oversee the day-to-day Students in the Virtual En- syched said. “We ended up decidterprise (VE) class are kicking ing upcycled clothing would best business of the class. At the beoff their entrepreneurship represent what we wanted to sell ginning of every class, I go and tell everyone what we’re doing with RePsyched. this year.” VE is a student-led class On Nov. 22, RePsyched held and I make sure everyone knows supervised by Graeme Logie their official grand opening, what they’re doing,” Adil said. where students are required to where they gained the support “Throughout the class, I check be self-motivated and respon- of parents, students and teachers in with the different departments with our CEO Gabe, our CFO sible to produce a functioning through donations. company. “We hope to try to practice our Neeti and our VP marketing sales Using recycled clothing, sales skills so that the salespeople Brandon.” Outside of business, students RePsyched creates and sells have a chance to practice what upcycled garments. they have to do to deliver dollars are able to learn life-long skills “We’re selling upcycled into the coffers of the company,” through the class that will benefit them regardless of their career. denim or cotton products, and Logie said. “In the executive team, everyour goal was to eliminate the The Virtual Enterprise class amount of waste that the fash- is able to teach students about one’s building their leadership ion industry produces,” Gabe the operating system of a real skills and I feel like it’s a really Rosado, senior and CEO of company. Zibaa Adil, senior and valuable experience,” Adil said. RePsyched said. “We are reus- CEO of Repsyched, has a clear “Other general soft skills like writing and communication [have ing textiles and fabrics to cre- understanding of her role. also been] exate patchwork panded so far.” style jeans, Virtual Enjackets, hoodterprise classes ies and hats.” have their own The virtual competitions company Reacross the counPsyched is an try. The amount original idea of success of a generated by business is very students in similar to a real the class. To company. decide on a “How sucmain product, cessful your the class held business is can pitches at the be compared to beginning of that of the sales the year. from other na“To choose tionwide virtual a product, we enterprise classthrew a bunch es,” Rosado said. of ideas on “There are real the table and competitions we just slowly in Oakland, Bawent through kersfield, and if all of them as a class,” Andrew Photos courtesy of Gabe Rosado we do really well there, we can Chang, senior perhaps make it and sales asso- CLOTHES WITH PURPOSE: Senior and RePsyched CEO Gabe Rosado to New York.” ciate of Rep- proudly models the company’s patchwork style, upcycled jeans.

From weapons contract negotiator to high school teacher History, Spanish teacher Eileen Kim explains how she fell in love with teaching By Katelynn Ngo Eileen Kim’s journey to HHS was not a straightforward one. In fact, she never wanted to be a teacher, much less a history and Spanish one. Her first experience as a teacher was during college, where Kim helped out in a seventh grade ESL class in her college town, Charlottesville, which she later realized was also a sanctuary city for refugees. “There were students from all over the world, from almost every single continent,” Kim said. “Working with those kids and realizing what obstacles they faced — on top of the trauma that they experienced fleeing from their homes and resettling in a new country — made me look at our education system more deeply.” However, that mentoring experience didn’t lead Kim into teaching just yet. Kim’s first job after attending the University of Virginia was as a weapons contract negotiator in Washington D.C., a career path that deviates greatly from the one she has today as a high school teacher. But, she soon realized that job wasn’t for her.

Although negotiating and crunching numbers was fun and intellectually stimulating, Kim said most days she was working from a desk. “I took it because I thought I wanted to work in the State Department. I thought if I worked for the DOD, I could start establishing my career in D.C. and then transition to state,” Kim said. “But, I quickly realized that working for the government is not really for me. While the job sounds really cool, in reality, for me, it was really boring. Most days, I [was] in a cubicle just pushing paper, so that really wasn’t for me.” After Kim realized that she didn’t want a government job,

she made the decision to quit her job and move to Korea to teach English. It was there that her desire to teach cemented. Just being in Korea and interacting with the students meant a lot to Kim, she said. “That was the first time I actually stood up in front of a classroom as a teacher. That’s when I realized that I wanted to do this job — it just felt really natural,” Kim said. “I loved being with the students and being in Korea where my family is originally from. It was really meaningful for me personally just to connect back to my roots.” Language, especially, is important because of the way it has

“People who speak different languages have a different sense of the world. It really shapes your thoughts and how you think.” - Eileen Kim

the ability to reach across cultural barriers, said Kim. “People who speak different languages have a different sense of the world. It really shapes your thoughts and really shapes how you think. You are literally learning how other people think and how other people view the world,” Kim said. Besides her love of language, Kim enjoys writing and traveling. “It’s a dream of mine one day to write either a book or a TV show, just because there’s a lot of funny things that happen in this job. I [also] think [travel is] really, really important,” Kim said. “When you travel and you do it in a way … [where] you actually get to know the people, culture, language, food and history … then when you come home, you just have a different perspective and a deeper appreciation.” Kim believes that students can have a greater impact on the world than they might believe, and advises them to remember this and be kind to themselves.

“Be kind to yourself. We often hear you have to be kind to others, but I think I think it’s really important to remember to be kind to yourself,” Kim said. “I also want to say this: young people, even though the world does not take you seriously, you guys are more powerful than you think you are. If you can collectively harness your power, you will literally change the world.”

Photo by Katelynn Ngo

CONNECTING WITH OTHERS: “The most rewarding part of this job is that human

connection that I can make with my students,” Kim said.

PAGE DESIGN BY KAREN LI


8

9

Spread Royal Wedding #1 (April 29) Prince William and Kate Middleton are married in London.

BP Oil Spill (April 20) Considered the biggest oil spill in U.S. history, the April 20 explosion killed 11 people (Smithsonian Ocean).

U.S. Supreme Court rules samesex marriage a fundamental right in Obergefell v. Hodges (Georgetown Law Library).

One Direction breaks up “I really liked them because I went to their concert, so it was very traumatizing [when the broke up].” -Katelyn Ma (11)

Club and Grub is canceled

The event allowed clubs to sell food on campus to fundraise. (The Epitaph Archive)

“Me Too” movement begins

“I love how this showed unity within the whole world and even though we are in different places, we are united.” - Graciela Rivera (12)

Campus goes on lockdown

A case of domestic violence with an armed and dangerous suspect behind the nearby 7-11 sent campus into a temporary lockdown.

California legalizes marijuana Shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas

19-year-old Nikolas Cruz opens fire at his former high school in Florida, killing 17, and making it the deadliest high school shooting in history (NBC News).

New bell schedule implemented School start time is pushed back, allowing schedules to be aligned at HHS, FHS and CHS.

College moves AP test registration

Trump impeachment hearings begin

I-Hub opens “I’m taking AP art in the I-Hub right now and I’m really liking the new building. The new art room has better lighting, a place to take pictures of art and a place to hang out.” Suodaba Adel (12)

2019

The construction starts around spring break and three food trucks are used as substites for the cafeteria (The Epitaph Archives).

Same-sex marriage is legalized (June 26)

Marching band not considered a sport

2018

Photos by Andrea Sun; photo illustrations by Andrea Sun and Allen Zhang; illustrations by Elaine Huang and Anika Karody

Common Core Standards place heavy emphasis on critical thinking and applications to the real world (The Epitaph Archives).

Construction of new cafeteria

“While the first movie was acceptable, the ones following were quite terrible.” - Nicholas DeAnda (11)

“Fortnite [became] common mainstream, solidifying the virtual playground as the breeding place for the next generation.” - Benjamin Sun (10)

2017

HHS celebrates 50th anniversary

Common Core introduces new standards

Star Wars is back

“Trump’s election was insanely stressful. I had no idea where his rhetoric would leave us as a country.” - Aidan Lin (12)

2016

Barak Obama is Re-elected (Nov. 6)

Linsanity begins and ends

Quad gets a new statue

Donald Trump is elected

2015

The new stadium begins the tradition of graduation at the football field (The Epitaph Archives).

The hurricane is responsible for at least 147 deaths and affects almost half the states.

A terrorist attack at the annual Boston Marathon kills three spectators and more than 260 others (History.com).

“I remember this song! It used to be so popular! It played at my 5th grade science camp dance party.”-Karuna Chandran (9)

Rise of Fortnite

2014

The new stadium lights are constructed for use during sports and band practices, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. (The Epitaph Archives).

New football stadium arrives

Hurricane Sandy (Oct. 22- Nov. 2)

Bombing at Boston marathon (April 15)

“Uptown Funk“becomes #1 song of the decade (Nov. 10)

2013

HHS gets new stadiums

Greg Giglio becomes principal (Jan. 7)

“I felt very upset about how the 49ers kept on going for it on fourth down. Very terrible play calling by the Niners.” - Zachary Merlesena (11)

2012

“[The] parades were amazing, especially the first one. [It] was crazy and crowded. I … received a replica ring, which I still have.” - Mimi White (12)

“Steve Jobs’ death marked the end of an era in the Silicon Valley surrounding information systems and the accessibility of the internet.” -Naysha Kola (12)

49ers lose to Ravens in Super Bowl XLVI (Feb. 3)

2011

2010

Giants begin winning streak

Steve Jobs dies (Oct. 3)

By Nika Bondar, Anika Karody, Nitya Kashyap and Andrea Sun

PAGE DESIGN BY NIKA BONDAR, ELAINE HUANG, NITYA KASHYAP AND ANDREA SUN


8

9

Spread Royal Wedding #1 (April 29) Prince William and Kate Middleton are married in London.

BP Oil Spill (April 20) Considered the biggest oil spill in U.S. history, the April 20 explosion killed 11 people (Smithsonian Ocean).

U.S. Supreme Court rules samesex marriage a fundamental right in Obergefell v. Hodges (Georgetown Law Library).

One Direction breaks up “I really liked them because I went to their concert, so it was very traumatizing [when the broke up].” -Katelyn Ma (11)

Club and Grub is canceled

The event allowed clubs to sell food on campus to fundraise. (The Epitaph Archive)

“Me Too” movement begins

“I love how this showed unity within the whole world and even though we are in different places, we are united.” - Graciela Rivera (12)

Campus goes on lockdown

A case of domestic violence with an armed and dangerous suspect behind the nearby 7-11 sent campus into a temporary lockdown.

California legalizes marijuana Shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas

19-year-old Nikolas Cruz opens fire at his former high school in Florida, killing 17, and making it the deadliest high school shooting in history (NBC News).

New bell schedule implemented School start time is pushed back, allowing schedules to be aligned at HHS, FHS and CHS.

College moves AP test registration

Trump impeachment hearings begin

I-Hub opens “I’m taking AP art in the I-Hub right now and I’m really liking the new building. The new art room has better lighting, a place to take pictures of art and a place to hang out.” Suodaba Adel (12)

2019

The construction starts around spring break and three food trucks are used as substites for the cafeteria (The Epitaph Archives).

Same-sex marriage is legalized (June 26)

Marching band not considered a sport

2018

Photos by Andrea Sun; photo illustrations by Andrea Sun and Allen Zhang; illustrations by Elaine Huang and Anika Karody

Common Core Standards place heavy emphasis on critical thinking and applications to the real world (The Epitaph Archives).

Construction of new cafeteria

“While the first movie was acceptable, the ones following were quite terrible.” - Nicholas DeAnda (11)

“Fortnite [became] common mainstream, solidifying the virtual playground as the breeding place for the next generation.” - Benjamin Sun (10)

2017

HHS celebrates 50th anniversary

Common Core introduces new standards

Star Wars is back

“Trump’s election was insanely stressful. I had no idea where his rhetoric would leave us as a country.” - Aidan Lin (12)

2016

Barak Obama is Re-elected (Nov. 6)

Linsanity begins and ends

Quad gets a new statue

Donald Trump is elected

2015

The new stadium begins the tradition of graduation at the football field (The Epitaph Archives).

The hurricane is responsible for at least 147 deaths and affects almost half the states.

A terrorist attack at the annual Boston Marathon kills three spectators and more than 260 others (History.com).

“I remember this song! It used to be so popular! It played at my 5th grade science camp dance party.”-Karuna Chandran (9)

Rise of Fortnite

2014

The new stadium lights are constructed for use during sports and band practices, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. (The Epitaph Archives).

New football stadium arrives

Hurricane Sandy (Oct. 22- Nov. 2)

Bombing at Boston marathon (April 15)

“Uptown Funk“becomes #1 song of the decade (Nov. 10)

2013

HHS gets new stadiums

Greg Giglio becomes principal (Jan. 7)

“I felt very upset about how the 49ers kept on going for it on fourth down. Very terrible play calling by the Niners.” - Zachary Merlesena (11)

2012

“[The] parades were amazing, especially the first one. [It] was crazy and crowded. I … received a replica ring, which I still have.” - Mimi White (12)

“Steve Jobs’ death marked the end of an era in the Silicon Valley surrounding information systems and the accessibility of the internet.” -Naysha Kola (12)

49ers lose to Ravens in Super Bowl XLVI (Feb. 3)

2011

2010

Giants begin winning streak

Steve Jobs dies (Oct. 3)

By Nika Bondar, Anika Karody, Nitya Kashyap and Andrea Sun

PAGE DESIGN BY NIKA BONDAR, ELAINE HUANG, NITYA KASHYAP AND ANDREA SUN


Lifestyles Wednesday, December 11, 201911 Resource department a locus of staff diversity Teachers immigrate from all over the globe By Nika Bondar and Katelynn Ngo Every day, dozens of students speed by the resource department on their way to classes, unaware of the fact that in those rooms is an extraordinary group of paraeducators that originate from all over the world. One paraeducator, Iman Saadattalab, recently became a U.S. citizen on Nov. 26. Saadattalab immigrated from Iran in 2013, thanks to a green card lottery. “The hardest part of coming here definitely was saying goodbye to my family and friends,” Saadattalab said. “It still is hard … I miss the interaction with people and speaking my own language on a daily basis.” When he came to America, Saadattalab said he was surprised by the diversity of the nation that he was now part of. “I had a lot of American friends who were conservative Christians. I thought everybody in the U.S. was going to be like them,” Saadattalab said. “When I moved here, I saw that’s completely not true. It was a mixture of different races [and] different religions, which I really liked.” Paraeducator Marichu Agustin, on the other hand, was only 12 when she immigrated from the Philippines to the U.S. in 2001. Her mother had been petitioned by Agustin’s grandmother, who wanted a better future for her grandchildren.

Unfortunately, Agustin’s entire family was not able to come. “It was only me, my sister, my brother and my mom,” Agustin said. “My dad had to stay behind because in terms of [our] visa, my dad was not part of that visa. My dad came in 2009 over eight years later.” Meanwhile, something that another paraeducator, Manjula Shankar — who immigrated from India and got her U.S. citizenship in 1994 — really appreciated about being a citizen was having a U.S. passport. “You don’t need a visa … you can just have an American passport. That’s the power of … becoming a U.S. citizen,” Shankar said. “We traveled to Europe and we didn’t need any visa.” When asked to describe her journey to the U.S., Shankar let out a nostalgic exhale. “My husband came in 1990 [and] in 1993, I came with my twoyear-old son,” Shankar said. “We started our journey in America with just two suitcases and … we built our family life from there.” Paraeducator Dilshad Jahan, similarly, built her life and family in America after immigrating from Bangladesh 20 years ago to complete her bachelor’s degree in engineering, she said. She learned English by taking an ESL class at De Anza Community college and watching movies.

Surprisingly, the hardest thing for Jahan in the beginning is something many of us do regularly, she said. “[In America], it was a long process going to the grocery store because I didn’t have a car,” Jahan said. “[I saw] all [these] new foods and things. I had never seen boxed foods before.” Over the next two decades, Jahan said she gradually grew closer to the American culture. “This is a very welcoming country, but the struggle will always be there. I am an American on paper,” Jahan said. “But, to be [a] true American … I have to give back to the community and know how I can improve myself, like every American.” A common struggle shared by many immigrants coming into the U.S. is not being able to communicate in the national language. Like Jahan, Elvira Savvateeva had no skills to communicate in English after immigrating from Russia 20 years ago, she said. “The little town [where I lived] in Virginia didn’t have ESL programs,” Savvateeva said. “Someone from church decided to volunteer to help me and my friends [learn] English. We started with the alphabet song because her kids were little, so that’s exactly what we did.” To Savvateeva’s delightful sur-

Photo illustration by Elaine Huang ON THE MAP: Staff members in the resource department have come from

Bangladesh, India, Iran, Russia and the Philippines. Paraeducator Iman Saadattalab (above center) recently became a U.S. citizen. Also pictured, from left: Dilshad Jahan, Manjula Shankar, Elvira Savvateeva and Marichu Agustin.

prise, she was greeted by bright lights and a festive environment when she first came to the U.S. “We moved right before Christmas and in Russia, they didn’t decorate outside of the homes,” Savvateeva said. “At that point, I was absolutely shocked by how beautiful everything was.” After coming to the U.S. and seeing the diversity and beauty of

the people, Agustin said that she learned a valuable lesson. “It made me become humble and be respectful to people in terms of who they are … you never know what they come from,” Agustin said. “Just be mindful of what you say when you’re talking about culture and diversity and what people go through, because everybody’s life is different.”

Louise Garces returns from five-week leave Garces suffered dislocated elbow, is ongoing in recovery By Jackson Faria Louise Garces is a well -nown figure for her role on campus as a student liaison. On any given day, she can be seen her riding her bike around campus or interacting amiably with the student body. However, Garces said she had to have surgery to repair an injured elbow, keeping her out of work for five weeks. “I was on a ladder cutting branches on a tree when I fell onto my driveway and broke my elbow in three places, and dislocated it,” Garces said. The fire department came to her residence where they assessed her arm and fixed the dislocation. Garces said she then went to the UC Davis Medical Center to get a cast for her arm. About a week later, Garces had a brief surgical procedure on her elbow to fix the damages from her fall. “The next day I woke up and my hand was black

and blue, completely swollen and in a lot of pain,” Garces said. “So, I went back to the emergency room.” Garces said she had to wait five hours in the waiting room before she was treated. She ended

Photo by Jackson Faria BACK IN BUSINESS: Louise

Garces said she is happily back in her role as student liaison, keeping our campus safe.

up staying another couple nights in the hospital to have tests and x-rays done. After she was cleared, Garces returned home, still in pain, but it gradually went away over the next week, she said. Even with the pain she had to endure from this injury, Garces said she is happy with the amount of time that it took for her to recover. “With this type of surgery, it usually takes eight weeks to come back but I was able to return in only five,” Garces said. Although she is back at school, she is still not 100 percent recovered yet, she said. For now, she can’t ride her trademark bike around campus as she has not yet started the physical therapy process to strengthen her arm. “[However,] I am very happy to be back at HHS ahead of schedule and getting back to work,” Garces said. PAGE DESIGN BY YUKARI E. ZAPATA


12

Entertainment

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Out of musical touch: the connectivity of music Music curated to the teen experience resonates more By Renee Wang

By Saanvi Thakur I have listened to more mental health presentations than I can count, but it’s never stuck. I’ve never felt able to just go to the student advocate and talk about how much anxiety sucks. One year ago, while I was procrastinating and scrolling through Instagram, I found Teenager Therapy. This podcast provides teens with an outlet where they can listen to daily conflicts and frustrations, but from a more relatable point of view. Started by five juniors — Gael Fernandez, Kayla Suarez, Isaac Hurtado, Thomas Pham and Mark Hugo — Teenager Therapy talks about topics like sexuality, toxic friends and other personall issues. The idea of being so vulnerable to the internet about my sexuality and other personal problems sounds terrifying and like something I could never do. All the members of Teenager Therapy do exactly this and they do it impeccably. Along with sharing personal information about their lives, the group tries to involve all teen perspectives. Some of the listeners of Teenager Therapy are parents and adults who listen to understand their own teen’s thoughts and emotions. When listening to the podcast, parents get the opportunity to know a side of their teen that is usually not shown. Teenager Therapy offers a different approach, as a parent can talk about the podcast and find common ground between being a parent and wanting to know their teen better. Teenager Therapy may just be another podcast to someone who hasn’t listened before, but for me and hundreds of other teens, this inspiring podcast is an escape from our harsh reality, bringing high spirits. Each episode has something memorable that makes it distinguishable from the rest. The group creates a conversation that is realistic but also inclusive, allowing teens to accept themselves. These components shape the podcast into one of the best I have listened too.

and becoming more attuned to per cool.” newer artists whose songs rang The song is not aspirational, but affirming — it more relatable to the current relays a feeling many teen expestruggle with. “It’s anti-part of me I Meanwhile, Yelrience over more abstract low Hearts by Ant don’t even like really Saunders is reflecideas. … my needing and Hot girl tive of the way we bummer by communicate today. longing to be super In text lingo, difBlackbear escool.” - Blackbear ferent colored heart pecially had a emojis are thought sense of vulto symbolize differnerability in covering a unient kinds of love. versal feeling of not “liking” who Since Saunders believes the tituyou are — it isn’t angsty or nega- lar yellow heart he has been given tive, it is raw and relatable. As the is representative of a platonic and songwriter puts it: “It’s anti-part not romantic love, he realizes that of me I don’t even like really … he has been friendzoned. my needing and longing to be suAfter being out of the mainstream, it was refreshing to hear songs I found easily accessible She put yellow points to, from feelings of selfworth to our new digital language. hearts I was especially impressed by Saunders, a relative unknown around my I thought they whose breakout single landed him in the same charts as artists name were all the like Post Malone. Saunders’ success, I hope, same paves the way for more lesser known artists to dominate the charts and tackle experiences more specific to youth today. After all, such connectivity is the way we can continue to expand our music tastes while remaining connected.

not a pressing concern, music is an integral part of teen culture. According to a study by Stanford University, music’s function goes beyond a listening ear: it also has a social function. Music is a topic of discussion, adds to the slang we use and can alter moods. I realized that by not making an effort to broaden my musical horizons, I was shutting myself off from an entire culture. I decided to listen to a new song every day for a week, using the top 50 hits on Spotify as a reference. Ultimately, my venture into new music signaled me to a shift in music trends. I found myself disconnecting from the likes of Harry Styles and Selena Gomez

Phot

Photo Illustration by Renee Wang

CELEBRITY SPOTLIGHT

There is nothing like discovering a new song — it resonates with you and consumes your conscience. It is the sporadic tap of the foot when you are bored, the song you dance to in front of the mirror. According to studies by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz of the New York times and Deezer, most people have cemented their musical tastes by age 14 and stop seeking out new music by age 30. Personally, I’ve lost all my musical momentum — and I’m only 17. I can’t remember the last time I’ve sought out new music — most of my insight comes from a catchy song I may hear, or a friend’s recommendation. While a passivity to music is

LEFT: Hot Girl Bummer by Blackbear,

and Yellow Hearts by Ant Saunders speak to a specific youth experience.

Satire: the real cost of Disney+

What students risk for the unlimited streaming By Sara Shohoud Disney has officially released their new streaming service, Disney+, as of Nov. 12. For $6.99/ month, or $69.99/year, you have access to every Disney production that has ever been released. Content ranges from Disney’s first-ever feature film, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” to the newest Disney television series, “The Mandalorian.” Not only does Disney+ supply us with classics like “The Suite Life of Zack and Cody” and “That’s So Raven,” it also includes a few deleted scenes from the number one grossing movie “Avengers: End Game.” Upon getting Disney+, I became super overwhelmed with the excess amount of content and couldn’t decide if I wanted to rewatch a classic Disney channel television series or watch something I have not yet seen. With so much content to choose from, it was easy for me to get sucked in. I was excited to start a long marathon of sitting in front of my laptop for hours on end watching mindless entertainment. Even though Disney+ is only $7/month, which is cheaper than Netflix, it comes with a much higher price: our declining GPAs. The increase of distractions that come with this streaming service

will ultimately cause a downfall in the productivity of school work. According to the Washington Post, procrastination comes from fear or dread, so people often play video games or watch television to make those negative feelings go away. As high school students, we can’t risk our grades, especially in Silicon Valley. The area we live in

has a rich culture of overachievers, particularly in the education system. The pressure is on us to not only get A’s in school but also to get into a prestigious college. We already have Netflix, Instagram, Snapchat and sadly, TikTok distracting us. If we add Disney+, we will officially be doomed. However, giving up sleep is one way to binge Disney+ and still

leave time to complete schoolwork. Give up sleep and you can watch as much Disney+ as you want without having your GPA crumble before your eyes. But the question remains: is it worth it? Is Disney+ worth your grades and sleep? Is an extra source of entertainment worth your time and energy? Ultimately, the choice is up to you to decide.

Photo Illustration by Sara Shohoud

PAGE DESIGN BY NIKA BONDAR, SHRUTI MAGESH AND RENEE WANG


Entertainment

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

13

By Jackson Faria and Karen Li

“The Lion King” A remake of the 1994 animated classic, Disney’s live action version of “The Lion King” hit theaters on July 19 and has grossed over $1.6 billion worldwide, according to Forbes. The film followed your favorite characters Simba, Pumbaa and Timon throughout their journey in the jungle.

“Avengers: Endgame”

Photos courtesy of IMDb

“Spider-Man: Far From Home”

“Endgame” was the finale of the “Avengers” series that started back in 2012. “Endgame” was top in the box office, racking up $2.79 billion worldwide, and broke numerous other records, according to Vox.com. It ended up becoming the highest grossing film of all time, with the highest selling opening day and most scheduled show times of all time.

“Far From Home”, the sequel to “Spider-man: Homecoming”, follows Spider-Man as he travels around the world, fighting villains and crime. The film was released on June 26 and brought in $1.3 billion worldwide according to CNBC.

Illustration by Elaine Huang and Leila Salam

Check out the Epitaph’s Best of 2010s playlist on Spotify by scanning the QR Code!

Photo courtesy of Universal Music Group Photo courtesy of NBC Sports “Sunday Night Football” (NBC): Usually promoted as the NFL’s top game for the week, NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” is consistantly a top watched program every week. Even though “SNF” saw a decrease in viewers from last year, it still was the most watched show in 2019 with 22.2 million people tuning in according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Photo courtesy of Def Jam Recordings

Photo courtesy of Hollywood Reporter “NCIS” (CBS): “NCIS” is a TV series that follows a team of special agents who investigate all kinds of crimes. It has been running since it premiered in 2003, and its seventeenth season premiered on Sept. 24, 2019. It is the thirteenth-longest-running scripted TV show, according to CBS News.

Photo courtesy of Metro UK “Big Bang Theory” (CBS): The hit comedy series “Big Bang Theory” produced it’s 12th and final season this past year. The show premiered in 2007 and focuses on the lives of a group of scientists in southern California. An average of 18 million people tuned in to each week during the final season according to Deadline.

Photo courtesy of Atlantic Records

The renowned singer-songwriter, Taylor Swift, has a net worth of $185 million, according to Statista. In April, she released “Me!” featuring Brendon Urie, which was the lead single of her seventh studio album, “Lover”. In June, she released “You Need to Calm Down” and in July, “The Archer” as a promotional single. When the album was released in August, all 18 of its songs made the Billboard Hot 100. Earning $150 million a year, rapper Kanye West is the second highest paid musician in the world, according to statistical data from Statista. This year, he released his Christian hip hop album “Jesus is King” in October, which became the first to ever top the Billboard 200, Top R&B/HipHop Albums, Top Rap Albums, Top Christian Albums and Top Gospel Albums at the same time, according to The Hollywood Reporter. With an annual income of $110 million, Ed Sheeran is the third highest paid musician, according to Statista. His year was characterized by the release of his fourth studio album, “No. 6 Collaboration Project,” in which he collaborated with various artists. His single “I Don’t Care,” featuring Justin Bieber, which broke Spotify’s single day streaming record at nearly 11 million daily global streams. PAGE DESIGN BY KACEY REBSTOCK AND LEILA SALAM


14

Sports

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Total Fitness improves physical education standards

Unconventional P.E. classes make exercise more appealing, effective for students By Jane Park

FARIA FOCUS By Jackson Faria Thursday Night Football on Nov. 14 will be remembered in NFL history. In a matchup between the Steelers and the Browns, the Browns’ defensive end Myles Garrett got ejected for fighting. Garrett deserves to be suspended indefinitely. His malicious actions deserve a strict response from the NFL; stricter than ever before. When comparing the fight that occurred Thursday night to others in NFL history, Garrett’s actions are far more violent than anything seen before. After tackling Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph, the two engaged in a physical altercation where Garrett ripped Rudolph’s helmet off and swung it like a club, hitting Rudolph’s bare head. Teammates of both joined in amid the pushing. Garrett, his team mate Larry Ogunjobi and Steelers lineman Maurkice Pouncey were ejected from the game. Many took to social media to show their reactions to the fight. NFL stars Patrick Mahomes and JJ Watt both showed their disbelief of what they witnessed on Twitter, with Watts commenting that the event was “insanity.” Brown’s quarterback Baker Mayfield and head coach Freddie Kitchens called Garrett’s actions inexcusable. All three players ejected from the game were given suspensions in the following days. Ogunjobi faced a one game suspension, and Pouncey will face a three game suspension. The NFL has decided to suspend Garrett “indefinitely,” so he will miss the remainder of the 2019-20 season. League officials said they are confident that Garrett will be back after he meets with the NFL commissioner’s office this upcoming offseason.

In HHS’ freshman physical education class, P.E. 9, students are typically graded on how fast they can run or how well they can play conventional sports, like soccer and basketball, instead of their overall health. “It’s unfair because some people just aren’t runners. Me and my friends try really hard, but we don’t get [A’s],” freshman Emma Yu said. Running a mile under seven minutes and 30 seconds qualifies for an A, Yu said, and anything over that time is a descending grade. Such quotas encourage students to exercise for the letter grade rather than for the health benefits that P.E. is supposed to encourage. “I think that [its] very detrimental [to students] because if you made a lot of self improvement but were still over the [mile run] time limit, you didn’t get the grade that you deserved,” senior Roma Bedekar said. Sara Frausto, who teaches P.E. Total Fitness, a class available to students above or in 10th grade, says that she incorporates nontraditional exercise and activities that students will continue to use as adults into her class. “My goal is to make sure that students are learning something that they can take with them to

college. That way, when they graduate, they’re able to figure out how they can incorporate fitness into their life,” Fr a u s t o said. A lack of exercise after high school is a growing issue in the U.S. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, less than 5 percent of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity daily, and more than 80 percent of adults do not meet the guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. “Once you’re outside of high school, there’s no class that’s going to mandate that you exercise, and I think that Total Fitness helps develop habits that encourage students to exercise outside of school,” senior Naysha Kola said. Frausto encourages her students to integrate exercise into

their life by teaching low equipment body weight workouts and giving students resources from YouTube, Instagram and blogs that they can use later in their lives. “Every single day I [teach] this class, I am trying to find something new and exciting and different from the year before,” Frausto said. “I also cater curriculum to the students in the class and their interests.” P.E. Total Fitness allows students to make choices about the

Illustration by

Jane Park

exercise they want to apply to their lives. However, traditional P.E. classes can have a similar effect by personalizing exercise to meet every student’s needs. “I think that as P.E. teachers here at HHS, we always want to make sure we’re reaching all of our students and instilling good healthy values in them for lifelong fitness, and sometimes a traditional P.E. class is not the best place to do that,” Frausto said.

Boys varsity water polo goes out with a splash Team’s success based on both key and minor players By Karen Li The boys varsity water polo team finished off an impressive season on Nov. 9, playing at the CCS quarterfinals after placing second in their league. This is the highest HHS water polo has ever placed, and both the players and coach, Sam Hyrne, said they are proud of the team’s accomplishments this season. Senior team captains Archer Sauer and Kyle Wynne have been on the varsity team since their freshman year and can attest to the team’s growth throughout the years. “In freshman year, we set the record for the highest HHS has ever placed in the league, and that was 5th out of 7,” Sauer said. Despite their rocky start to the season, the team more than exceeded expectations. During the first game, one of the starters broke his finger and another fell ill. Then, throughout the season, many players were either sick or injured at any given point. “It’s been a struggle,” Hyrne said. “I don’t think we’ve played one game this season where everyone was healthy and there.” However, the team was able to make a comeback after the first few losses. The captains attribute

the team’s success to the strong line up of senior players. “The class of 2020 for water polo is one of the strongest classes to come through,” Wynne said. “Almost all of our starters have double digit goals.” However, Sauer said that everyone on the team contributed to their success, no matter how much playing time they received. “Some guys haven’t played a single minute this year, but they’re still at practice every day,” Sauer said. “They’re still pushing us and trying their best, and these guys are all going to become so much better for it next year.” The close-knit team environment also propelled them onto their road to CCS, allowing for a successful and exciting season. “It’s been fun, first and foremost,” Hyrne said. “This has been ... the largest group that has played together for a while, so the team dynamic was a lot stronger than in years before.” Even as a junior and first-time varsity player, Hayden Gutierrez said he feels like a part of this family. “We’re always having fun together,” Gutierrez said. “They’re all my friends.” As seniors, this is Sauer’s and

Infographic by Melody Chen and Karen Li Wynne’s last season playing at HHS. Although they are sad to let the sport go, the captains have plans to continue their water polo endeavors beyond this season. Sauer will be playing water polo for UC Irvine in the fall. For the rest of this year, he will be playing with his club team at Stanford. Wynne will also continue playing for his club team, NorCal. He has not committed to playing in college yet, but might, depending on where he gets accepted.

Gutierrez said he will also continue with club water polo. His after season plans include mountain biking, running and dedicating time to school work. Meanwhile, Hyrne said he plans to take a break for a while, but will always come back to water polo. “I can’t stay away from water polo for long,” Hyrne said. “I’m going to start developing practice plans and strategies for how I’m going to coach the team next year.” PAGE DESIGN BY MELODY CHEN


Sports

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

girls Basketball wrestling

football

1-1

Jackie Khuong (11)

current record

5-1

current record

Boys varsity basketball opened their season with a win against George Washington High School. Standout players include senior Alex Harris, scoring 35 points. Although losing against California High School, girls varsity basketball combined for a 5-1 record in tournaments on Dec. 1 and 2.

Cross Country

0) n (1

Boys soccer is starting strong with two recent wins. Girls soccer won their first home game of the season. The annual HHS Christmas Cup, in which teams throughout the Bay Area compete against each other, is set for Dec. 23.

1-1

Cha

current record

Boys Basketball

ah

2-0

current record

Elij

boys SOCCER girls soccer

HHS beat Gunn High School in their last regular season game and ended up winning a share of the league title and qualified for CCS. HHS won their first round matchup against Mills High School but lost to Leland High School. Standouts include Harold Rucker III (12) and Evan Blandini (10). Jared Wade (12)

Come see JV’s upcoming tournament on Dec. 15 at LHS.

2-0

Photo illustrations by Dexter Tatsukawa

15

Girls cross country became the second team ever to win Division I CCS four years in a row. Both the boys and girls teams won cross country titles at the SCVAL championships.

conference record

PAGE DESIGN BY DEXTER TATSUKAWA


16

Last Word

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

“Color blindness” is more dangerous than it first seems. In an attempt to demonstrate respect for all ethnicities, people occasionally fall in the trap of ignoring racial diversity, with phrases like, “I don’t see color” or “there is no color, just people.” Color is ever so prevalent in our community. According to Data.gov, Homestead has had only minorities — defined as a group of people that is less than half of a group — since 2005 and Asians have been the largest minority since 2012. These three graphs show the transformation of the Homestead population compared to the general population of the United States. Homestead was established in 1962, which corresponds to the first graph, for which we used the demographics of Santa Clara County. The earliest school demographic records show that in 1992, Homestead was only slightly different than the U.S. and in 2018, Homestead is now very different. At a school where there is no majority, minorities rule.

“If we want to have a world where people see each other as equals we be accepting of different racial and ethnic groups and see their cultures as equally valuable. The study of history and the way it's “My race is somewhat taught needs to improve to relative to where I am in the show students that people world...I don’t like [that we of color did play an try to fit people in boxes] important role in American because we are so much history [because it] more complicated than one impacts what we think specific box and it kind of about the present and our perpetuates the idea that if views on present policies” you don't, then you're not ... -ANDREA YEE normalized in society Chinese ...those lines are kind of being broken down but they're still there.” -GABRIELLE DARISME (12)

Check out some of their stories here!

“Homestead has been an accepting community for me [as a minority]. People are really nice here regardless of your race.” -JOHN PRICE (11) African-American

Chinese-American

Nigerian, Canadian, Haitian-American

White AfricanAmerican Asian Hispanic

9.7% 2%

18.3% 5.9% 15.6% 29.6% 13.4%

44.8%

Mixed

“Racial diversity is huge...[it’s a lot] like the saying 'never judge a book by it’s cover’ if you are used to seeing people of all different cultures you are less likely to judge someone based off how they look...Homestead is a very diverse place so that really applies to us here” -MAX FERMIN (11) Puerto Rican, Dominican

“If we want to have a world where people see each other as equals we be accepting of different racial and ethnic groups and see their cultures as equally valuable. The study of history and the way it's taught needs to improve to show students that people of color did play an important role in American history [because it] impacts what we think about the present and our views on present policies” -ANDREA YEE

2.9% 7.5%

60.4%

0.8% 4%

1.2%

9%

76.7% 11.5% 27.5% 55.3%

95.1%

98.7%

HHS

demographics

1960

1992

2018

US

demographics

4.9% “It's important for my kids to know their culture so they know about themselves, our family and ancestors. [In our tribe’s present situation,] People living on the reservation are in a poverty cycle. It’s too far from other cities so they’re literally stuck there. There’s little to no support from the government other than the food ration, but nothing is fresh and it’s basically diabetes in a box.” -MILLA CACHOO (10) Skokomish (Native American), Filipino, English, German, Norwegian, Swedish, Irish

PAGE DESIGN BY JACKSON FARIA AND MIYA LIU

Profile for The Epitaph

The Epitaph , Volume 57 - Issue 3  

Volume 57, Issue 3 of Homestead High School's student-run newspaper, The Epitaph.

The Epitaph , Volume 57 - Issue 3  

Volume 57, Issue 3 of Homestead High School's student-run newspaper, The Epitaph.

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