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PG&E leaves Bay Area in the dark

The Sibling Squabble

Breaking the bounds of culture

Ultimate festival survival guide

Fighting through the limits

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Pg.4

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News

Opinion

Lifestyles

Entertainment

Sports

The Epitaph Vol.57 Issue 2 Homestead High School 21370 Homestead Rd, Cupertino, CA 95014

By Shruti Magesh, Andrea Sun and Renee Wang

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uicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, according to the San Francisco County Suicide Death Statistics. A continued succession of suicides are leading Bay Area schools as the government works to increase resources to battle the seemingly undetermined causes of teen suicides. According to a report by the CDC, Palo Alto leads Santa Clara County in youth suicide rates. In what experts have called a “critical public health issue,” suicide clusters were established at Gunn High School starting in 2009 with a loss of three students in nine months — including recent graduates. In 2014, the high school underwent a second suicide cluster, spurring additional mental health resources on campus. Yet in 2017, another Gunn student took their life three years after the second suicide cluster, and this year, on Oct. 1, a Mountain View High School student committed suicide as well. This epidemic is not limited

@hhsepitaph The Epitaph The Epitaph https://hhsepitaph.com/ @epitaphHHS

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

FADING AWAY: Academic pressures, family issues among reasons cited for teen suicides as community and youth-led efforts seek to change such an epidemic.

to neighboring schools. A sophomore at HHS committed suicide in late 2015, a former graduate, who asked not to be named to protect the privacy of the family, said. Dr. Oliver Lin, a psychologist and Operations Director of Counseling and Psychological Services at Stanford University, said in a phone interview that he believes thoughts like “I don’t have anyone” or “I don’t have any sense of purpose” are the most problematic issues when it comes to suicide, although it is difficult to pinpoint a specific reason. “I think they’re realizing that it’s a pronounced issue, and I think people are trying,” Lin said. “But I don’t think we’re necessarily where we need to be by any stretch now in light of how problematic [suicide] is today.” At HHS, the problems leading to with suicide often stem from academic pressures, such as high test scores and grades, school psychologist Emily Bersaglia said. Students have taken a Wellness Survey in past years, Bersaglia said, and results have shown that academics are one factor of students’ mental health struggles. “Students seem like they have lots of friends, but may not be having face-to-face contact ... which is actually more isolating because not all interactions are positive,” Bersaglia said. Experiencing life through social media can increase mental health issues, Bersaglia said, a factor that parents and adults do not consider. Senior Hannah Suh was a sophomore at Gunn High School when the 2017 suicide occurred. She said she remembers being shocked about the event and took the initiative to spread awareness about mental health, as a result. “There’s definitly more resources on campus and for me personally, after the suicide, I was pretty shocked about what happened,” Suh said. “Students, like me and my friends, have been trying to raise awareness about mental health and I think that’s something that’s pretty common at Gunn.” Even in the government, legislators at both local to federal levels have made creating mentally safe environments for teens a priority. At the federal level, Congressman Ro Khanna, said in a statement that his efforts will be dedicated to increasing funding for m e nt a l

health services in schools and expanding the conversation. “Far too many young adults struggle silently with their mental health,” Khanna said. “While it can often be less visible than other health issues, we all need to take the time to ensure our … community members, and most importantly ourselves, are all doing OK. Things move fast, but this has to be a priority.” Meanwhile, Governor Gavin Newsom signed three new bills in September and October that are aimed to promote interventions to teen suicide, including Assembly Bill 1767 that expands suicide prevention material to kindgergarten through sixth grade students, as compared to the previous distributions to students from seventh to 12th grades, according to Fox 11. In local government, Cupertino Mayor Steven Scharf said the city has been working to incorporate more mental health awareness events, such as Bobatino. Bobatino was an event spurred by Cupertino’s Teen Commission consisting of nine teen members who serve to inform the City Council on important teen-related issues. Despite an increase in discussion about mental health, stigma still dominates, especially in regard to a lack of understanding the seriousness surrounding mental health, senior and co-founder of Mental Health and Awareness Club (MHAC) Abby Shamelashvilli said. MHAC officer and senior Flora Kang said the pressures of the Bay Area have contributed greatly to students not prioritizing their mental health. “I feel that students here, around this area especially, are pressured not only by schools, but by the environment and people they are around: their families, especially, and their parents,” Kang said. As a result of this pressure, a suicide prevention presentation for all students, headed by Dr. Glenn Teeter, a mental health specialist at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, was held last school year in the auditorium, principal Greg Giglio said. Mental Health awareness has not been limited to the HHS campus. Student activists all over the Bay Area have been making this awareness a priority. Nadia Ghaffari, a student at UC Berkeley, created TeenzTalk her sophomore year of high school, an organization that aims to support youth mental health through open conversation with an emphasis on peer connections. The stigma surrounding mental health also creates an environment where students feel like they cannot reach out for help, Ghaffari said. Her personal experiences with mental health are what prompted her to create TeenzTalk. “My friends was living with depression and I saw it was a very isolating experience,” Ghaffari said.

“Youth need to be able to talk to somebody, and know these conversations are warranted.” - Ana Lilia Soto

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Page Design by Elaine Huang and Leila Salam


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News

Wednesday, October 30, 2019 GONE TOO SOON

NEWS IN A MINUTE

By Shruti Magesh

Local:

Overdose Deaths An influx of deaths in Santa Clara county associated with fentanyl and opioid overdose, resulted in a warning issued by the county. Teenagers are amongst the most affected. Those affected suffer seizures, rashes and overdoses, as a result of the toxic chemicals contained in those drugs, according to Kron 4.

STATE: Socal Fire The Saddleride fire burned through southern California, leaving the Los Angeles and Riverside communities in a state of emergency. The fire encompassed 7,500 acres of land and resulted in the mandatory evacuations for many citizens. The cause of the devastating fire is under scrutiny, yet it was found that the fire originated underneath a transmission tower. Currently, the fire is 97 percent contained, according to the New York Times.

Later Start Time Governer Gavin Newsom signed over 70 bills surrounding student rights. These bills now prevent school cafeterias from denying a student meals if they have unpaid balances in their accounts, and expand teacher training resources. The most significant of these bills, SB 328, alters school start times. California has become the first state to prevent high schools from starting classes before 8:30 a.m., according to CNN.

INTERNATIONAL: Nobel prizes The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Ethiopian Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed. Various other Nobel Prizes are being presented to recipients for economics, medicine, physics and literature. Notable research includes one on economic causes underlying poverty, according to the New York Times.

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“I saw it in other peers: the struggle with mental health, stress [and] not knowing where to access resources [or] afraid to access resources because it’s a stigma. A real lack of a constructive youth-led resource made TeenzTalk to be that youth-led resource that can empower youth voice.” The organization’s largest event, the Teen Wellness Conference, is well into its third year. “To fight the stigma, [we need to] normalize mental health and talk about it,” Ghaffari said. “Hearing stories at conferences and having a safe space for young people to share what they have been through shows everyone listening that they are not alone with what they are facing. Recovery is real.” Crystal Springs Upland High School student Reza Mafi was one of the youth speakers at the conference. Mafi belongs to SafeSpace, an organization that empowers youth to work with local schools and communities in developing solutions. Ghaffari and Mafi said they believe the conversation with mental health should include not just teens, but younger kids and teachers, as well. Ghaffari, for example, created a children’s book called “Growing the Brain,” which introduces concepts of unhealthy versus healthy emotions and ways to ex-

press them at an early age. As for teachers, Mafi said that during professional development days, staff should focus on dealing with mental health issues for students, and campus resources should also be extended to staff. “Teachers may be adults, but still go through mental illnesses,” Mafi said. “Teachers carry a big burden and could use resources like we do.” Allcove, another mental health organization affiliated with Stanford, also targets a wide spectrum of youth and provides support for youth ages 12 to 25. Like many mental health organizations, Allcove is youth-centric with its Youth Advisory Board, comprised of a group of young adults who contribute to the development of care sites. “One of the revolutionary aspects of having this program here is everyone will still get treated, [even if they] don’t have insurance. That’s the goal,” Ana Lilia Soto, Youth Outreach Specialist, said. Soto said schools need to ensure information is available for youth, by providing suicide crisis lines on the website, for example. HHS is working on tackling this problem. During the suicide prevention presentations last year, organizers passed out cards with crisis hotlines for students to reference.

District expands behavioral resources Program targets drug, substance abuse By Shruti Magesh and Katelynn Ngo A new protection and prevention resource targeted toward offering different options for students struggling with substance and drug abuse, was introduced in the district, director of educational options Alison Coy said. These options range from one-time classes to classes occurring over the course of several weeks for students struggling with behavioral or decision-making issues. Students requiring longterm support are placed in outpatient drug programs or are recommended t o take Saturday School, an intervention service geared to initiate discussions, Coy said. “All of these courses are designed . . . to give [students] more information, more chance to reflect, so that they can make healthier, better decisions,” Coy said. Joyce Jeon, senior and copresident of Fwd:Love, a club that focuses on the mental health of students, explains how drug and alcohol usage affects mental health and decision-making. “[Drug and alcohol use] is one of the main contributors, because you make decisions using your brain. A lot of mental health problems are . . . brain related,” Jeon said. “If you have a nega-

tive mentality, you’re probably making negative decisions. If you have a positive mentality, then you’re going to make positive decisions.” However, these p r o y grams b ion ng t also a a str Hu work Illu ine to imEla part life skills to students, and are not limited to drug and substance abuse counseling. “If you’re a student whose behavior is getting you in trouble at school, then it’s probably something that we need to provide support [for]. So, learning skills about how to make better decisions and how to control your responses — that can be really helpful,” Coy said. Student advocate Sarah Loyd said these resources have a considerable effect on families who choose to use them. “I don’t know the exact numbers . . . but I can tell you my own personal results. I’ve witnessed these programs help people, [and] I’ve witnessed students and families increase their communication by attending these programs,” Loyd said. Loyd said she believes these programs hold great importance in meeting the needs of the community.

“In terms of the mental health resources we have on campus, we have a variety of them,” Bersaglia said, “which provides [help for] students who might be having challenges.” In addition, the mental health team is working with a student to create a wellness room for students and staff on campus (see page 3). Despite the available resources on campus, students still of-

ten struggle to get the help they need, Soto said. To bridge the gap between youth and mental health, it is imperative that students reach out, she said. “Youth feel their issues are their issues and don’t want to bother anyone, which adds to the worry,” Soto said. “Youth need to be able to talk to somebody, and know these conversations are warranted.”

Infographic by Renee Wang

HHS Robotics wins first award of the year Innovation leads to victory By Nitya Kashyap The Innovation Moonshot Award for design was presented to the robotics team during CalGames held at Woodside High School on Oct. 6. The award highlights the extent of the team’s preparation and hard work, and showcases the uniqueness of the robot’s overall design, lead mechanical designer and junior Nicholas Ng said. The competition was comprised of two parts. The qualification rounds were targeted to compare the robot against robots from other schools, determining the ranking order of all the competitors. The top eight robots were then selected to further participate in rigorous tests, one of the drivers of the robot and sophomore Anna Zhou said. To prepare for this event, the robotics team made repairs to a previously built robot to

adhere to the set of specific standards, as well as train new drivers to direct the robot. “We have two new drivers this year, so they have to get familiar with the robot,” Zhou said. “They have to learn how to maneuver it, so we had a lot of driving practice.” The team incorporated new aspects to the robot that they did not include in previous years. These new additions provided a stable foundation for the robot and a rotating claw, lead code designer and junior Claire Chen said. “A lot of [the competing] teams had an elevator to place stuff or they had an intake that would flip down, but we had both an intake that would flip over and an arm with a claw. We haven’t seen any other robots that could do that, so I think it was a unique design.” Chen said.

REDESIGNING THE ROBOT:

A rotating claw and flexible intake were among the modifications that led to the presentation of the award to HHS Robotics. The robot took little over a month to repair and prepare for the competition.

Photo courtesy of the Robotics Team PAGE DESIGN BY SAHIL VENKATESAN


News

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Lights out: PG&E leaves Bay Area in the dark

Senior project spurs creation of wellness center on campus

Power cuts to prevent fires

Katherine Bright inspired by lived experience

By Melody Chen and Shruti Magesh

By Andrea Sun and Renee Wang As part of her senior project, senior Katherine Bright is working with FUHSD and the Mental Health and Wellness Club (MHAC) to create a wellness center. “The proposed idea is to create a space on campus that could be used to help students who need a quiet space or break from stress,” principal Greg Giglio said. Bright said she didn’t anticipate the wellness room being her senior project. Originally, she had the sentiment that there was a lack of psychiatric help on campus. Stemming from her personal experiences, Bright said her own mental struggles required serious intervention. “I had a bad event where …

I ended up in the hospital and I saw a psychiatrist,” Bright said. “I was actually in a hospital intensive outpatient program … that’s where I’m getting the idea of a wellness room because that was comfortable for me.” In her plan, Bright said she wants to include stations such as coloring booths, sensory stimulants like kinetic sand and a writing corner. The wellness center remains independent from providing mental health services. If a student needs more assistance, they would be referred to the student advocates, school psychologists or guidance counselors, Giglio said “We have a lot of resources and staff that are dedicated to helping support students with mental

health issues but not that many students or parents are aware,” Giglio said. “So [I’m] hoping that this brings those two groups together to help us help students.” Co-founder of MHAC Eefay Wang was approached by student advocate Sarah Loyd, to give thoughts on the wellness room. Wang said that for people who have panic disorders or migraines, it’s good to have a place to relax and find yourself. “It’s less about getting rid of stress altogether and more about making sure students have healthy ways to cope with what they’re dealing with,” Wang said. Bright said that a trial room is under way in the A building and if the room is well-received, a permanent room could be added into the new GSS building.

PTSA introduces Job Shadow Day

Students get work experience, information By Jackson Faria

HHS held its first Job Shadow Day on Oct. 14th. The event was created by the PTSA for students to gain experience in the workplace and learn skills from industry professionals, according to a statement by the PTSA. Hundreds of students throughout different grades participated in this program and spent two to five hours at a workplace they demonstrated interest in. Students were able to choose from a variety of workplaces across an expanse of professions. Senior Caroline Lee said she spent the day at an elementary school where she had the opportunity to shadow teachers.

“I participated in the job shadow day because it was like an internship, which I have always been interested in doing,” Lee said. Lee was offered advice regarding the path to becoming a teacher, as well as different career options in education. “We got to meet a lot of other teachers and [they] gave me advice about how to become a teacher,” Lee said. “It opened my eyes to see what teachers really do and other jobs I could go into around academia.” Other students opted to shadow industry workers at large scale companies. Junior Ayush Satyavarpu said he headed to

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Linkedin’s headquarters for his job shadow opportunity, where he experienced the typical workday of an employee. “We got to tour the campus and we got to see things like the massage room [and] game room and we also got to see how the employees work,” Satyavarpu said. Satyavarpu added that participating in Job Shadow Day exposed him to what it would be like to work at a company like Linkedin. “I really liked the campus and the way the company worked” Satyavarpu said. “It is definitely a company I would like to work at in the future.”

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) left 800,000 people in 34 counties across Northern and Central California without power as they cut electricity to prevent potential wildfires. The risk arose due to severe wind conditions, according to a statement issued by PG&E. The power outages spanned several stages with each wave leaving multiple counties in the dark. According to NBC news, the first wave of outages shut down power in Northern and Central California early on Oct. 9, followed by a second outage that affected about 250,000 customers on Oct. 10. HHS remained open despite the power outages, leaving some students without power. Sophomore Ethan Mahimainathan was affected by the outage for about three hours, losing Wi-Fi and most electricity at home. “PG&E … texted us that we are going to get free data for like, a couple days [to make up for the lost power],” Mahimainathan said. “But it didn’t actually cover the day that we lost power.” Senior Mimi White was among those affected by the power outage. The outage prevented her from

participating in day-to-day activities, she said. Her house lost power for 13 hours. “All the technology went out. I think it was just hard to navigate myself around the house,” White said. Residents voiced their concern regarding the limited publicization of the outage. According to New York Times, the company’s communications and computer systems crashed the day before the outage from high usership. “I think the only reason I knew [the power outage] was coming was because it affected other people,” Mahimainathan said. “I didn’t hear anything from PG&E.” As many as 850,000 customers could lose power in California, following the recent fire in Sonoma County, according to San Francisco Chronicle. A broken PG&E jumper wire was found near the transmission tower that may have caused the fire on Oct. 23 “I just wish that PG&E didn’t have such a monopoly,” Mahimainathan said. “I think [that what] PG&E is doing right now is completely unacceptable. But because they’re the only energy provider, nobody has [the] chance to challenge their energy.” IN THE DARK:

Photo courtesy of The Mercury News

PG&E power cuts left residents in multiple counties across Northern and Central California powerless.

Illustration by

Infographic by Dexter Tatsukawa

Editors Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief Senior News Senior News Senior Opinion Junior Opinion Senior Lifestyles Junior Lifestyles

Adviser

Renee Wang Andrea Sun Shruti Magesh Dexter Tatsukawa Melody Chen Sahil Venkatesan Katelynn Ngo Nika Bondar

Reporters

Natalie Owsley Senior Entertainment Junior Entertainment Senior Sports Senior Sports Design and Multimedia Junior Design Junior Multimedia Business Manager

Saanvi Thakur Shreya Partha Jackson Faria Jane Park Jacqueline Beaufore Kacey Rebstock Miya Liu Yukari E. Zapata

Naomi Baron Elaine Huang Anika Karody Nitya Kashyap Karen Li Leila Salam Sara Shohoud Jack Xu Allen Zhang

Mission Statement The Epitaph is a non-profit publication at Homestead High School, 21370 Homestead Rd, Cupertino, CA 95014. The Epitaph is a forum for student expression and not subject to prior review, in accordance to Education Code 48907. The staff is comprised of HHs Journalsim students. Views Expressed do not necessarily represent views of the school, its staff, or the district. Editorials are opinions of the editorial board. The Epitaph welcomes all letters to the editor but reserves the right to edit all submissions. Letters

should be limited to 300 words. Include contact information. Unsigned letterrs cannot be published, but names will be withheld upon request. Send via homestead.epitaph@gmail.com, or drop letters in the newsroom or the office mailbox. If the Epitaph has made an error, please send corrections to homestead.epitaph@gmail.com. The corrections will be published in the corrections box for the next issue. To reach the Epitaph staff in C102 call (408) 522-2572 or fax (408) 738-8631

Advertising One email and you can reach over 2,300 students and teachers from Northern Sunnyvale to Southern Los Altos. If your target market is between the ages 14 and 18, contact The Epitaph at epitaph.ads@gmail.com and we can make it happen.

PAGE DESIGN BY MELODY CHEN


Opinion

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Illustration by Elaine Huang

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The Sibling Squabble Reporters discuss the trials, tribulations of being a sibling

Oldest Child

and immature. I was constantly embarrassed by my sister and it took a toll on our relationship. However, our dynamic changed when my sister entered middle school. I found that I could sympathize and relate with her more. She is in cross country, so we often run together and talk about our lives, friend drama and feminism. Running has created a bond between us that cannot be reproduced elsewhere. I also enjoy having a connection with her friends. They are very entertaining and funny. We always go on vacations and trips with them. Despite the age difference, we all have a good relationship and I find that we can joke around even though we are in completely different stages of our lives. Because I am the older sibling,

By Jane Park

Jane Park, 16, is an older sister to

Celine, 12.

Middle Child By Yukari E. Zapata Middle child syndrome was discovered by psychologist Alfred Adler. It is the feeling of being left out when you are the middle child of your family. Although parents always say they try to give all their children the same amount of attention, middle children often feel neglected and unimportant, according to Psychology Today. For the most part, what stereotypes say are true. We lack many things our sibilings get. From my experience, parents

My younger sister Celine and I have a good relationship, but it wasn’t always that way. A couple years ago, our relationship was completely different. In fact, I didn’t even want a younger sibling. Growing up, I was always behind on trends and what was deemed “cool” by my peers. I wished I had an older sibling so I could learn from them. Because my sister and I have a four-year age gap, it was hard to relate to each other’s problems. People also told me that having a younger sibling is the worst, because they are seen as annoying

tend to give the most attention to older siblings. After all, what they do first sets the precedent for the other siblings. The same goes for the youngest: anything they do will be the last time their parents will ever experience any of their children doing it. The middle child tends to be the “odd one out” because they are a repetition of what the oldest has already done, but will never be the last to do it. However, being the middle child isn’t all bad. As a middle child, I can pretty much get away with everything because none of the focus is on me. In fact, being the middle child

Youngest Child By Sara Shohoud

has many positives, despite the lack of attention from parents. One of those positives is that I have my older sister to look up to, and a younger sibling that I can influence. And, at this point in my life, as a teenager, not having my parents on my back all the time is pretty awesome. While other kids get in trouble for staying out past curfew or getting a bad grade, my parents tend to overlook that aspect of my life, whether they mean to or not. Although being the oldest or youngest sibling has its perks, being the middle child means that I get to have the best of both worlds.

My parents like to tell me that they don’t have a favorite child, but I know they’re lying. Being the youngest sibling is one of the best things that has happened to me. Not only do I get all the attention, I also get all the sympathy and love. As soon as I came out, everyone’s eyes were on me. I was the 6-pound life of the party. Typically, a child is given only so much love until their younger sibling is born. Luckily, I never had to split my parent’s affection because I got all of it. It made my two older brothers furious, and Sara Shahoud, 18, is the youngest child with two older brothers Amro, 24, and Omar, 19.

Photo illustrations by Melody Chen

made it easier for me to blame my wrongdoings on them. As a toddler, I would often draw on the walls, eat all the sweets and break everything in sight. All I did was point my finger at my brothers: I didn’t even need to say anything, and they would get in trouble. Being the youngest child made me a master at manipulating others. My mom said that she often saw me practicing how to cry in the mirror when I was 3 years old. We younger siblings know how to manipulate others. It’s not a very ethical practice, but we get what we want and still look angelic doing so. Even though my parents knew of my manipulation tactics,

my sister can learn from my mistakes. My parents help her with homework, but I am the one who tells her what classes to take, what clubs she should join and what kind of people she should avoid. My parents, who were born and raised in South Korea, are only so much help in an unfamiliar environment, and constantlychanging education system. It’s nice that my sister can rely on me for advice. Most of all, my sister is my best friend. She is the only one who will completely understand me. We have seen each other laugh and cry and we have finished races together, holding hands side by side. I’ve seen her come so far and know we are going to achieve great things together.

Yukari E. Zapata, 15, is a middle child, with an older sister Yoselin, 19, and a younger sister, Yohanny, 7.

they rarely called me out on it. By the time my parents had me, they were completely burnt out. They are less strict with me and let many things slide. I could do the exact same things as my brothers and simply get a scary mom look, while my brothers would get a 5-year sentence. Besides the overwhelming love I get for being born last, I gain so many life lessons from my brothers, as the youngest child. They are kind to me and always ready to help, even though I was the “devil child” to them. Not only do I learn from what they tell me, but I also learn from observing them. When I see my brothers do something applaudable, I want to follow in their path.

PAGE DESIGN BY JACKSON FARIA


Opinion

More than one path on the street to success

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

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STAFF EDITORIAL The pathway to success in Silicon Valley is becoming more of a race — the average student is often shoved aside by the A-rated frontrunners. Yet, “success” may not be what one makes it out to be. Competition heightens as the frontrunners try to overtake their counterparts, hoping to gain an extra foot when crossing the finish line to their dream college. According to Dr. Sanno Zack, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Stanford Children’s Health, “the amount of workload that teens are carrying is unbelievable and they really get locked into a story about success — I need to get certain grades, I need to get into a certain school that gets me into a certain job.” As it continues to become more difficult to get into college, every added advantage is important in increasing one’s chance of admission. For example, students are taking challenging course loads and participating in prestigious internships on top of a laundry-list of extracurricular activities.

However, when one’s motivation is mainly an entryway into a “good” college, what they lose from such a linear pathway is an intrinsic motivation to do things that bring them genuine happiness. When students focus on amping up their college resume over their personal growth, they lose an essential aspect of high school: trying new, unconventional things and discovering their true passions. According to the Institute for Student Achievement, academic success relies on active engagement and personal incentive, rather than simply

engaging in activities and classes that “look good” on a transcript. Furthermore, when students overload themselves with too many responsibilities, the pressure to balance it all while maintaining their grades can lead to students turning to methods such as cheating to remain afloat. The string of cheating that occurred in several AP classes last year is an example. What it need to realize is the consequences that may occur. Students have a false impression of success that has caused them to neglect the many other pathways that ex-

ist in life. This neglect only leaves students with a dormant reserve of unfulfilled goals. When students realize that a perfect transcript, for example, does not necessarily grant them entry into their dream school, they have already wasted four years of opportunities when the could have been pursuing what they truly want. There is no formula for success. Every student has potential to further their ambition. But once students choose to follow the formulaic path to “success” at the expense of their true interest, there is no going back.

Illustration by Fiona Oh

Spooky season: fun or just dangerous? U.S. schools set limitations for costumes after recent violence By Naomi Baron October is a m o n t h many look forward to for one r e a s o n : Halloween, the day kids get excited to dress up, go trick or treating and indulge in the spooky atmosphere. But recent costume requirements expose a more dangerous side to the holiday. Halloween’s dangerous reputation began in 2016 when reports of masked clowns who lured kids into the woods began to surface around Halloween. The clowns began chasing kids down the streets, robbing public restaurants and stabbing people, according to ABC news. T h e s e clowns were no Ronald Mcdonalds, instead, these clowns are ter-

rifying and do not represent the kid-friendly atmosphere of Halloween. Halloween used to be a night where the only thing to be worried about was beating your friends in collecting candy. Now, it has a dangerous and violent connotation, which has prompted schools to take action. Because Halloween is now seen as a setting that might inspire dangerous behavior, schools have taken action to combat these dangers by imposing costume restrictions. While it’s necessary, the restrictions come with a cost: they place limitations on imagination and creativity. At HHS, students cannot wear masks or face paint that conceals their entire face to the point that they are unrecognizable. This is to ensure there are no strangers on campus, Dean of Students Steven Puccinelli said. “Two years ago around Halloween somebody posted pictures of clowns on Instagram with threatening messages that freaked people out. Because of that and because of the clown problems at the time, we said no more clown costumes.” The Los Ange-

Illustrations by Elaine Huang

les Times reported that Target stopped selling clown masks altogether in 2016 amid the clown panic. Stores taking action to discourage clown costumes showhow these dangerous acts have ruined the lighthearted holiday. Another issue is costume weapons that can be mistaken for the real thing. Halloween featureds kids dressed up as police officers and cowboys with accessories like toy guns. Many schools have banned particular costume accessories to avoid such confusion. Imposing these restrictions curbs costume creativity. However, recent cases show it’s a price worth paying to prevent cases of mistaken weapon threats. ABC news reportd that in 2016, a 13-year-old boy was shot dead by a police officer who mistakenly thought he was holding a real gun instead of a BB gun. In 2018, a 14-year-old boy in Arizona was shot and killed by a police officer after the officer mistakenly assumed his airsoft gun was real, according to CBS News. These are simply a few of the many instances where kids have been injured or killed due to carrying fake

weapons. To prevent these atrocities from happening at HHS, Puccinelli said he adopted a rule where HHS does not allow any fake or real weapons of any kind. Recent cases show that costume restrictions are necessary to ensure safety. But while the school should be commended for looking out for its students’ safety, we must acknowledge the sad reality we live in, where recent violence has forced schools to place a limit on childrens’ creativity and the imagination of their costumes. Because of the recent violence, some of the fun and creativity Halloween is meant to bring is overshadowed by the dangers it presents, and the fun spooky holiday has turned into a worrisome dangerous one.

THE MELODIC LINE By Melody Chen The housing crisis continues to grow as more families fall below the low income limits line in San Francisco. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development defined the “Low Income Limits” as $117,400 for a family of four in 2018, well over four times the federal poverty line in 2018. As more people are struggling to afford homes in the city, San Francisco is now facing another problem: homelessness. Civic leaders are pushing forth to implement navigation centers in the city for the homeless despite protests from nearby residents. A recent proposal for Embarcadero has caused a stir in the neighboring blocks. The debate introduces a tug-a-war between those who strive to preserve their house value and the city’s goals to wipe out the homeless crisis. However, navigation centers only act as temporary refuges for the homeless community. Civic leaders and volunteers must also take the opportunity to help the homeless navigate permanent housing. Yet, on the other side, some residents are growing distrustful of the new navigation center on the Embarcadero. According to the SF Chronicle, a few opponents filed a lawsuit against the proposed building, fearing that the navigation center would pose a safety risk for those living nearby. However, the crisis has padded the “not in my backyard” mentality. Crimes would only increase if the sectors do not have a support system to look up to. After all, the goal is to build a place for the homeless to be more proactive and conscious of their actions. While navigation centers may only serve as a temporary retreat, such changes may be the next step to something more permanent and effective.

PAGE DESIGN BY YUKARI E. ZAPATA


6

Opinion

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Private counselors are not a necessity

Misconceptions fuel the growth of private counselors By Shruti Magesh

Can Trump be impeached? That is the question House Democrats are trying to answer with their impeachment inquiry into what really happened between Donald Trump and Ukranian President Volodymyr Zelensky. House Democrats are looking to prove that there was a “quid pro quo” between the Trump administration and the Ukranian government. The New York Times defines quid pro quo as refusing to give someone something unless they give you what you want in return. To impeach Trump, House Democrats must prove that Trump would not give Javelin missiles to Ukraine unless Ukrainian officials investigated Joe Biden. Trump called Zelensky on July 25, and according to Politico, the two talked about Ukraine purchasing Javelins from the U.S. During the call, Trump asked President Zelensky to do him a favor and investigate Joe Biden and his son. According to Politico, texts and emails between Ukrainian officials after this call stated that the most important factor in the negotiations was that “Zelensky [said] that he [would] help investigation,” and that Zelensky convinced Trump that Biden would be investigated. The most recent and damning evidence stems from William Taylor’s testimony to the House. According to The Washington Post, Taylor, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, testified that Trump demanded that President Zelensky publicly announce that he would investigae Joe Biden and the 2016 election. Taylor also testified that the U.S. ambassador to the E.U. stated that “Everything’ was dependent on such an announcement, including security assistance.” This is quid pro quo, and without a doubt, Trump can and should be impeached by the House.

ly, they can book a scheduled appointment with their counselor. In addition, students can choose to utilize the College and Career Center as a resource. Despite this, students continue to flock to private counselors, often times paying large amounts of money. For example, Ivywise — a private counselling company — charges anywhere from $300 to $600 an hour. A part of this reason lies in the stigmatism surrounding the idea that private endeavors will result in a chance at

a better outcome. Yet this ideal cannot be proven true, as there is only a certain extent to what these counselors can do. The abilities of private counselors, similar to school counselors, are restricted to the student’s actions, with private counselors costing outrageous amounts for comparable services to that of school counselors.

Illustration by Melody Chen

By Sahil Venkatesan

selors that are made available to them. Moreover, school counselors also undergo rigorous training to gain expertise in topics from college guidance to academic help. According to the American Counselor Association, counselors must hold a masters degree in counseling and be state-certified. The vast qualifications of school counselors make them a favorable alternative to private counselors. Yet, constraints on the time available for school counselors to provide personalized attention for each student is not applicable to most private counselors. According to the American Counselor Association, the optimal ratio of counselors to students is 1 to 250. However, schools in larger states, such as California, tend to have larger amount of students assigned to guidance counselors. This limits the capabilities of counselors during busy seasons, such as college application season. In fact, HHS’s counselor to student ratio is 1 to 608, which is well above the recommended ratio, according to the September Guidance Newsletter. However, students always have the opportunity to get the help they need from school counselors, if they head to their offices earlier on in the year. Alternative-

WASTE OF MONEY: Students flock to private counselors in hopes of

gaining an extra step over other students while disregarding the high cost.

The conversation no one is having

Weakness stigma against boys poses mental and emotional trauma in the future

By Shreya Partha

Infographic by Melody Chen and Sahil Venkatesan

“Be a man. Don’t be weak. Don’t cry.” Everyday phrases like these are said to boys and often overlooked. From a young age, boys are trained to believe that they aren’t allowed to have feelings and that their emotions don’t matter. With the world becoming more progressive, why has society failed to take notice of such an ongoing problem right in front of us? Our definition of a man is so twisted that it is hard for men conform outside of the way deemed “correct.” Masculinity. A simple Google search will reveal that the idea itself embodies being tough and aggressive. The idea of masculinity is defined by the endurance of suffering, independence, and self-reliance. While this is considered the norm today, it doesn’t prevent the apparent consequences that arise in men emotionally and mentally. Famous actors, influencers and musicians have spoken out about their personal experiences with toxic masculinity. In an interview with Britain’s Lorraine talk show, Dwayne Johnson opens up about the stigma of depression and its toxic effects. . “There’s just a DNA, there’s a wiring in us and a constitution that oftentimes doesn’t let us talk about if we’re scared or vulnerable or things like that,” Johnson said.

When it comes to talking about our feelings, society welcomes people to openly express how they’re feeling, or so we think. The minute a man cries or shows any type of emotion, we become quick to jump in and criticize him for being human. According to the Good Men Project, although women are more likely to attempt suicide, men are more likely to go through with it, without any second chances or previous cries for help, leaving close families and friends shocked. In addition, men have also been less likely to seek therapy because of the belief that talking about their emotions is negative and non-masculine. They reach a point where they can’t keep up with the veneer of being a “man” and being strong and holding it all together all the time. Societal norms have conditioned men to believe that withholding their feelings and taking care of themselves without asking for help when they need it is healthy and normal. According to Harvard Business Review, men who are more sympathetic or agreeable make 18 percent less income and are presumed as less likely to have management potential compared to the stereotypical masculine embodiment. This adds fuel to the fire in saying that if men want to make mon-

ey in this world, they have to show their “masculinity” or their toughness. To move forward, we should change the self-imposed definition of masculinity as something that can be tailored depending on the person. In fact, by detaching f r o m t h e connotations of masculinity, we, as a society, can and should do better.

Illustration by Shreya Partha

THE PARTISAN PARTY

In the Bay Area, students opt to receive private counseling to supplement the counseling services offered in schools. However, the glamor of private counselors is exaggerated as private counselors have the same skill set many school counselors do. In fact, San Francisco is reported to have a higher ratio of private counseling services than most other cities. According to Independent Educational Educational Consultants Association, around 26 percent of students hire private counselors, and that number is constantly rising. Contrary to popular misconceptions, school counselors are not solely reserved for advice on college applications. They are also certified in a myriad of other factors that are beneficial for academic success. According to the American School Counselor Association, school counselors work to create individualized plans for each student, collaborate with family and teachers, advocate for underrepresented students and provide short-term and long-term plans for counseling. School counselors provide a multitude of services that overlap with that of private counselors. Students often choose the route to private counselors, ignoring the effectiveness of school coun-

PAGE DESIGN BY ANIKA KARODY


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8

Spread

Teacher & union president

JOHN SHELBY

Custodian

PATRICIO HERNANDEZ

Network support specialist

ANDY NGUYEN

Executive assistant

TRICIA GOULET

Printing technician & receptionist

9

PEGGY TSAI

WHEN YOU COME HERE, IT DOESN’T LOOK LIKE WORK — IT LOOKS LIKE A FAMILY.”

I LIKE TO KNOW HOW THINGS WORK”

- PATRICIO HERNANDEZ

Photo illustration by Miya Liu

ANDY NGUYEN

BEHIND THE SCENES

From cook to custodian

The staff behind the curtain

By Miya Liu

By Katelynn Ngo

WITH HIS WIFE: Hernandez enjoys

going on vacations with his wife.

A hallmark of being a high school student is the continuous cycle of finishing homework, turning in assignments and studying for tests. With all this going on, we often fail to realize that sometimes there is a lot more to school than just academics. One defining feature of a school is its staff, who are often overlooked and go unacknowledged, despite how much they contribute to keep the gears of the school turning. One such staff member is executive assistant Tricia Goulet, who has a variety of responsibilities on campus, such as handling the school’s money. “I end up dealing a lot with the purchases and getting things paid.

Andy Nguyen takes on world with curiosity By Karen Li

I keep track of the budget with Mr. Giglio,” Goulet said. “That’s a big part of what we do: making sure that the money is being spent appropriately.” Her many other duties include managing the office, making sure positions are filled and ensuring that people are being supported and able to do their jobs, Goulet said. “I guess you could say I’m the overall supporter of the entire staff of the whole campus,” Goulet said. “So, a lot of times people will just come to me when they don’t know where else to go. They’ll say, ‘hey, maybe you know the answer to this question,’ and they’ll ask me.” In the same building as Goulet is

Infographics by Katelynn Ngo

Photo courtesy of Patricio Hernandez

16-year-old daughter Isabella and his 23-year-old son Aaron. He met his wife, Caroline, during his 16 years in the restaurant business. Because she had been waiting a while for her food, he worked extra to make it, and he fell for her. A friend introduced them, and soon they were dating. “She’s nice,” Hernandez said. “She is a strong lady.” Even though Hernandez created a family here at Homestead, he said he misses the one he has at home and he holds his favorite memory, when he first met his wife, close. “It’s the one I remember every day when I go home,” Hernandez said.

Got technical difficulties?

The secret duties of our hidden heroes

Hernandez finds family anywhere Patricio Hernandez has been working at HHS for 11 years and spends a lot of time here, more so than students. He works a 12 hour shift starting around 11 a.m., but during events like homecoming, he does not finish until 2 a.m. Hernandez does maintenance for the music building, the A building, K-2 and the I-Hub. He takes care of the bathrooms, fixing lights and doors and locking the office at night. “I always like to do more than the best,” Hernandez said. “You don’t do your work because you need to do the work, but because you like to do the work.” However, this is not the only reason he puts so much effort into taking care of HHS. We are also like his family, he said. Many people treat him well, including the office staff and some of the students he interacts with. “The music and the FBLA students are so good —[they have] so much respect, [and are] so clean,” Hernandez said. But, this is not true with all passersby. Hernandez said he sometimes encounters students and parents who do not show respect. “Some people come here mad that we close at 4 p.m., but they need to understand that people here have a life too, people have their [families], and they need to leave at 4 o’clock to see [them],” Hernandez said. Hernandez’s family includes his

-

Peggy Tsai, who acts as printing technician in the mornings and receptionist in the afternoons. Tsai, too, has a variety of duties that she has to do everyday. “I [oversee] the completion of copy requests from our staff [and manage] the copy machines to assure they are in good condition. [I also arrange] timely repairs when necessary, as well as stocking sufficient inventory of paper for the school,” Tsai said. “In the afternoon, I take care of the front desk and reception desk, which includes receiving incoming calls, greeting visitors, providing immediate help to students, parents and staff, handling the distribution of mail and

packages [and] a variety of other miscellaneous duties.” The best part of her job is seeing the smiles on her fellow staff members’ faces and knowing that people trust her, Tsai said. Similar to Tsai, John Shelby also has to juggle between two different responsibilities: acting as the site president for Fremont Education Association — a teacher’s union supporting teacher’s rights and ensuring that student learning is foremost in the school — and being a teacher for his computer programming classes. He is also the adviser for programming club, which has lunch meetings two times a week in his classroom.

Shelby said he often arrives at school early, at 7 a.m., and takes the extra hours before school starts to make coffee and prep for his classes. “I like getting stuff done in the morning when no one’s around,” Shelby said. As union president, Shelby meets with administrators during his prep or other union members after school. But, teaching will always be his main passion, he said. “All the things I do are all well and good,” Shelby said. “But, at the core, I’m a teacher who is trying to give students skills that are important, not just in high school, but onwards in their lives.”

When they’re not running around campus saving teachers from the complications of technology, the tech staff, comprised of Sean O’Hayer and Andy Nguyen, are working in their office tucked away in the corner of the library. Walking into the room, various shelves, boxes and stacks of tech equipment tower precariously. From his desk, Nguyen helps run the school from behind the scenes. As someone who works in IT, Nguyen good naturedly acknowledges the stereotypes around him – and proceeds to refute them. Nguyen said he considers himself athletic, escaping to the mountains to ski and snowboard down black diamond slopes whenever he gets the chance. “Computer guys aren’t necessarily nerds who sit behind the computer all day,” Nguyen said. Working with computers is something that Nguyen does in his own time, and he said he enjoys working a job that aligns with his personal hobbies. In an IT job especially, being interested in the work is essential to long term success, Nguyen said. “There is so much involved that if you don’t like [tech], it gets tiring really fast,” Nguyen said.

His interest in tech stems from began helping out. After a tech support internship an overall curiosity for the world around him, Nguyen said. in college and two consulting jobs, “I’m interested in knowing how Nguyen was offered a job at HHS. things work, which proves to be When he first took the job, Nguyen said it felt surreal. useful in tech,” Nguyen said. “It felt like it wasn’t real and I Working in tech is extremely fitting considering Nguyen’s inter- wasn’t sure if I was up for it,” Nguyests, but it is truly his curiosity that en said. “I looked up to the tech drives him in life. If given a single guy at FHS, and when I got this job, day to do anything he wanted, he I became his colleague. It’s always been my objective to be like him.” would explore the world, he said. Nguyen said he feels absolutely “I’m not just looking for extraterrestrial intelligence,” Nguyen content with his job here and foresaid. “I’m looking for materials that sees himself in it for the long run. “I’ll be here doing this for a long we don’t have on Earth, but maybe exists elsewhere. I’m looking for time because it’s what I’ve always phenomena that are of interest. I’m strived to be,” Nguyen said. interested in the unknown.” Nguyen has actually aspired to work in this position since high school, he said. He attended FHS, where his biology teacher introduced him to the tech Photo courtesy of Andy Nguyen guy, who was doing the same thing Nguyen HITTING THE SLOPES: Nguyen enjoys skiiing or is now, and he snowboarding down mountains in his free time. PAGE DESIGN BY KAREN LI, MIYA LIU AND KATELYNN NGO


8

Spread

Teacher & union president

JOHN SHELBY

Custodian

PATRICIO HERNANDEZ

Network support specialist

ANDY NGUYEN

Executive assistant

TRICIA GOULET

Printing technician & receptionist

9

PEGGY TSAI

WHEN YOU COME HERE, IT DOESN’T LOOK LIKE WORK — IT LOOKS LIKE A FAMILY.”

I LIKE TO KNOW HOW THINGS WORK”

- PATRICIO HERNANDEZ

Photo illustration by Miya Liu

ANDY NGUYEN

BEHIND THE SCENES

From cook to custodian

The staff behind the curtain

By Miya Liu

By Katelynn Ngo

WITH HIS WIFE: Hernandez enjoys

going on vacations with his wife.

A hallmark of being a high school student is the continuous cycle of finishing homework, turning in assignments and studying for tests. With all this going on, we often fail to realize that sometimes there is a lot more to school than just academics. One defining feature of a school is its staff, who are often overlooked and go unacknowledged, despite how much they contribute to keep the gears of the school turning. One such staff member is executive assistant Tricia Goulet, who has a variety of responsibilities on campus, such as handling the school’s money. “I end up dealing a lot with the purchases and getting things paid.

Andy Nguyen takes on world with curiosity By Karen Li

I keep track of the budget with Mr. Giglio,” Goulet said. “That’s a big part of what we do: making sure that the money is being spent appropriately.” Her many other duties include managing the office, making sure positions are filled and ensuring that people are being supported and able to do their jobs, Goulet said. “I guess you could say I’m the overall supporter of the entire staff of the whole campus,” Goulet said. “So, a lot of times people will just come to me when they don’t know where else to go. They’ll say, ‘hey, maybe you know the answer to this question,’ and they’ll ask me.” In the same building as Goulet is

Infographics by Katelynn Ngo

Photo courtesy of Patricio Hernandez

16-year-old daughter Isabella and his 23-year-old son Aaron. He met his wife, Caroline, during his 16 years in the restaurant business. Because she had been waiting a while for her food, he worked extra to make it, and he fell for her. A friend introduced them, and soon they were dating. “She’s nice,” Hernandez said. “She is a strong lady.” Even though Hernandez created a family here at Homestead, he said he misses the one he has at home and he holds his favorite memory, when he first met his wife, close. “It’s the one I remember every day when I go home,” Hernandez said.

Got technical difficulties?

The secret duties of our hidden heroes

Hernandez finds family anywhere Patricio Hernandez has been working at HHS for 11 years and spends a lot of time here, more so than students. He works a 12 hour shift starting around 11 a.m., but during events like homecoming, he does not finish until 2 a.m. Hernandez does maintenance for the music building, the A building, K-2 and the I-Hub. He takes care of the bathrooms, fixing lights and doors and locking the office at night. “I always like to do more than the best,” Hernandez said. “You don’t do your work because you need to do the work, but because you like to do the work.” However, this is not the only reason he puts so much effort into taking care of HHS. We are also like his family, he said. Many people treat him well, including the office staff and some of the students he interacts with. “The music and the FBLA students are so good —[they have] so much respect, [and are] so clean,” Hernandez said. But, this is not true with all passersby. Hernandez said he sometimes encounters students and parents who do not show respect. “Some people come here mad that we close at 4 p.m., but they need to understand that people here have a life too, people have their [families], and they need to leave at 4 o’clock to see [them],” Hernandez said. Hernandez’s family includes his

-

Peggy Tsai, who acts as printing technician in the mornings and receptionist in the afternoons. Tsai, too, has a variety of duties that she has to do everyday. “I [oversee] the completion of copy requests from our staff [and manage] the copy machines to assure they are in good condition. [I also arrange] timely repairs when necessary, as well as stocking sufficient inventory of paper for the school,” Tsai said. “In the afternoon, I take care of the front desk and reception desk, which includes receiving incoming calls, greeting visitors, providing immediate help to students, parents and staff, handling the distribution of mail and

packages [and] a variety of other miscellaneous duties.” The best part of her job is seeing the smiles on her fellow staff members’ faces and knowing that people trust her, Tsai said. Similar to Tsai, John Shelby also has to juggle between two different responsibilities: acting as the site president for Fremont Education Association — a teacher’s union supporting teacher’s rights and ensuring that student learning is foremost in the school — and being a teacher for his computer programming classes. He is also the adviser for programming club, which has lunch meetings two times a week in his classroom.

Shelby said he often arrives at school early, at 7 a.m., and takes the extra hours before school starts to make coffee and prep for his classes. “I like getting stuff done in the morning when no one’s around,” Shelby said. As union president, Shelby meets with administrators during his prep or other union members after school. But, teaching will always be his main passion, he said. “All the things I do are all well and good,” Shelby said. “But, at the core, I’m a teacher who is trying to give students skills that are important, not just in high school, but onwards in their lives.”

When they’re not running around campus saving teachers from the complications of technology, the tech staff, comprised of Sean O’Hayer and Andy Nguyen, are working in their office tucked away in the corner of the library. Walking into the room, various shelves, boxes and stacks of tech equipment tower precariously. From his desk, Nguyen helps run the school from behind the scenes. As someone who works in IT, Nguyen good naturedly acknowledges the stereotypes around him – and proceeds to refute them. Nguyen said he considers himself athletic, escaping to the mountains to ski and snowboard down black diamond slopes whenever he gets the chance. “Computer guys aren’t necessarily nerds who sit behind the computer all day,” Nguyen said. Working with computers is something that Nguyen does in his own time, and he said he enjoys working a job that aligns with his personal hobbies. In an IT job especially, being interested in the work is essential to long term success, Nguyen said. “There is so much involved that if you don’t like [tech], it gets tiring really fast,” Nguyen said.

His interest in tech stems from began helping out. After a tech support internship an overall curiosity for the world around him, Nguyen said. in college and two consulting jobs, “I’m interested in knowing how Nguyen was offered a job at HHS. things work, which proves to be When he first took the job, Nguyen said it felt surreal. useful in tech,” Nguyen said. “It felt like it wasn’t real and I Working in tech is extremely fitting considering Nguyen’s inter- wasn’t sure if I was up for it,” Nguyests, but it is truly his curiosity that en said. “I looked up to the tech drives him in life. If given a single guy at FHS, and when I got this job, day to do anything he wanted, he I became his colleague. It’s always been my objective to be like him.” would explore the world, he said. Nguyen said he feels absolutely “I’m not just looking for extraterrestrial intelligence,” Nguyen content with his job here and foresaid. “I’m looking for materials that sees himself in it for the long run. “I’ll be here doing this for a long we don’t have on Earth, but maybe exists elsewhere. I’m looking for time because it’s what I’ve always phenomena that are of interest. I’m strived to be,” Nguyen said. interested in the unknown.” Nguyen has actually aspired to work in this position since high school, he said. He attended FHS, where his biology teacher introduced him to the tech Photo courtesy of Andy Nguyen guy, who was doing the same thing Nguyen HITTING THE SLOPES: Nguyen enjoys skiiing or is now, and he snowboarding down mountains in his free time. PAGE DESIGN BY KAREN LI, MIYA LIU AND KATELYNN NGO


10

Lifestyles

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Bayreach’s goal to help students

No techies, no theatre

By Katelynn Ngo

By Sara Shohoud

Club hosts clean-ups around Bay Area Bayreach, an organization founded by students for students, aims to connect students with a range of programs and opportunities. The organization was founded in August last year, and is currently going through approval by ASB to be a club, according to senior and director of Bayreach Volunteer Corps Gabrielle Darisme. Bayreach is relatively new to the Bay Area, but is in the process of expanding to create a greater reach toward students. “Bayreach is a nonprofit organization and we’re [currently] starting chapters in different areas. FHS has a Bayreach club, so I’m a part of overseeing and managing that,” Darisme said. “We’re working on expanding to other schools, [which] is working really well so far.” Already, Bayreach has a presence at HHS, with senior Aidan Lin being the president of the 501c3 nonprofit chapter of Bayreach. It will expand its presence with junior Sarah Oh, who will be the president of the new Bayreach club on campus. “We are trying to become a club at HHS, and it’s going

to be just volunteering, while “I really like helping other for the organization itself, we people and making a positive hire professionals to come impact on the community,” in and talk to students about MacDonald said. mental health,” Oh said. Something that sets BayBayreach has hosted a va- reach apart from other clubs riety of events, and are in the is that it offers students the process of partnering with opportunities they need, but other schools and organiza- does not necessarily force it tions to produce change on on them. their campuses. “I really wanted to “We’ve done a beach help students around me,” clean-up [at Main Beach in Darisme said. “And I felt that Santa Cruz] in the past, and it was super different bewe also served a homeless cause we wanted to provide shelter [called LifeMoves students with the tools to in San Jose],” Lin said. “In help themselves and better the future, we are planning themselves, instead of just to partner up with Garden saying, ‘this is how you be a Gate Elementary School to better student’.” do campus revitalization.” At their most recent event, their beach and city clean-up on Oct. 20, the organization collected around 220 pounds of trash over an eight hour period. In addition, Bayreach has also started academic tutoring at Cupertino Middle School, and are in the process of extending the same services to Sunnyvale Middle School, Lin said. Junior Jenny MacDonald, Photo courtesy of Elaine Huang who will be the vice president of the club, joined Bay- CLEANING THE CITY: Volunteers reach as she enjoyed giving collected 220 pounds of trash over an eight hour period on Oct. back to her community. 20 at Main Beach in Santa Cruz.

Behind the scenes of the play The drama department puts on a fall play and a springtime musical annually. While audiences are dazzled by the performances of fellow students, hidden in the spotlight is the work of the tech crew. The backstage crew is responsible for lighting, sound, stagecraft, wardrobe and makeup. Although these roles all require effort and dedication, the most difficult job is that of the stage manager, senior Jackson Leunberger said. “The quality of tech, and especially the stage, really affects how well the show goes,” Leuenberger said. Junior Tzlil Nahum said he Infographic agrees. “[As an actor,] I think that the techies are one of the people that deserve the most respect because they take the time out of their day to work backstage,” Nahum said. “They don’t get much attention from the crowd and everything.” Leuenberger said students put an immense amount of effort into preparing for and running a production. “Their job is to stay backstage and

Once a musician, always a musician

McMahon reflects on his musical journey By Karen Li As a high schooler, Adrian McMahon said he never would have imagined a future as a high school literature teacher. He had been heading down the music trajectory, hoping to make it as a musician. Maybe in another life he would have, but he said he doesn’t dwell on the past. After high school, McMahon said he moved out to LA to pursue a career as a musician. He lived with his would-be wife, working dead end jobs and struggling to make ends meet. McMahon described his life during that time as difficult and poor. Although McMahon never received his breakout moment, he said he is thankful for the experience. “I made a go at it and I’m glad I did, or else I’d always wonder,” McMahon said. “For every band who makes it, there are a thousand who never got there.” However, falling short professionally doesn’t make him any

less of a musician, he said. “You don’t stop music [just because] you never made a lot of money out of it,” McMahon said. “You’re still a musician. I’ve always been a musician, and I always will.” Music has always been a key part of McMahon’s identity, he said. His father was a musician and his grandmother a singer, inspiring him to pick up his first instrument in elementary school: the trumpet. When trumpets became uncool, he said he started playing bass like his father, jamming to rock, blues and funk music. Now, he plays guitar and sings. For McMahon, music is a constant in his life, that he can always turn to for solace and relief from the rest of life. “Music is an art form,” McMahon said. “Any form of art is a way to release yourself [after] having a bad day. Working on songs always makes me feel better. It gets me

out of my own head and focusing on something else.” During his adolescence, McMahon said he relied on music as a way to center himself in the midst of difficult times. “My adolescence was not easy and I moved around a lot,” McMahon said. “High school was rough and I made some bad choices. I think that having something that kept me focused — having one thing when my life was in complete chaos — allowed me to keep some semblance of sanity.” Today, McMahon said he is a teacher, a musician and extremely happy with where life has taken him. McMahon advises students to live in the present and trust that life has a way of working out, even in the most unexpected of ways. “Don’t worry about what society expects,” McMahon said. “Do what you want to do. One foot in front of the other. Life’s going to take you somewhere.”

Photos courtesy of Adrian McMahon THEN AND NOW: Adrian McMahon plays the guitar for his son. His love for music remains constant through the years.

take control of everything — not just the techies, but [also] the actors, so that is really tough,” Leuenberger said. Unfortunately, even with all the responsibilities the crew handles backstage, it is not always appreciated, he said. “Sometimes, a new actor doesn’t understand that techies are as important as them,” said Leuenberger. However, this is not an issue at HHS, he said. “Everyone [at HHS] is respectful of each other … we all like each other. If it weren’t for that, the shows wouldn’t work out,” Leuenberger said. Junior Lotus Taylor said her take on the relaby Sara Shohoud tionship depends on commication between actor and techies. “[It’s] just a really great community, and we really focused on breaking down the barriers between actors and techies,” Taylor said. Many don’t understand the true effect of techies in production, she said. Rehearsals run smoothly thanks to the hard work of the backstage crew. Without techies, productions wouldn’t be as successful.

Standing up for equality

Activist protects animal rights By Kacey Rebstock

Three years ago, Jenna Sinkinson stumbled upon a PETA stand and made the decision to completely purge her life of all animal products. Sinkinson said she adopted a vegan lifestyle, which includes only eating plant-based foods — foods that are not made out of animals — along with not using any animal products, such as leather or wool. With her supportive mom following suit, Sinkinson said she has become an outspoken animal rights activist, even speaking at March of Silence, an animal rights rally, in September. Sinkinson has dedicated herself so far as to take a “liberation pledge,” where she refuses to put herself around

animal products, she said. “I pledged not to eat with people who eat animal products at the table,” Sinkinson said. “Simply because the standard is if I wouldn’t sit with someone who’s eating a dog, why would I sit with someone who’s eating a cow or a pig? I’m not going to make exceptions for that.” Though she hasn’t always had the best experience with those who oppose veganism, she said she still tries to be compassionate towards them, “I don’t think I’ve ever been bullied or anything like that, but people will make fun of anything that’s a part of you,” Sinkinson said. “They aren’t seeing what I’m seeing, so I can’t blame [them] for how they’re acting towards me. If they knew what they were contributing to, I feel like they would have a totally different outlook.” Sinkinson doesn’t demand that those around her choose to follow the same path, but she said she will not allow for injustices to animals to occur around her. “If you really care about me and what I stand for,” Sinkinson said, “the least that you can do is [eat vegan] for Photo illustration by Katelynn Ngo one meal. No matter what backlash I face, it can’t comSTANDING FOR ANIMALS: Jenna pare to what the animals are Sinkinson protests to end animal abuse in front of Whole Foods in going through.” San Francisco.

PAGE DESIGN BY SHRUTI MAGESH


Lifestyles Notelove aims to spread music education in the Bay Area Free lessons lift the cost barrier By Shruti Magesh Private music lessons in the Bay Area can cost anywhere from $45 to $75 for an hour of instruction, according to the Berkeley Parents Network. However, Notelove, a nonprofit aimed to partner students with instructors to provide free music lessons, is breaking the barriers of music education. HHS alumni Omar Shouhoud (‘19) started the nonprofit as his senior project. His intention was to improve access to music education for students. He recruited instructors from HHS to teach various instruments, and eventually instructors from other schools joined as well. “[Private lessons] for music education are really expensive, which is one of the reasons I never took lessons growing up,” vocal instructor senior Neeti Inderisan said. “The purpose of the program is to help give everyone more opportunities to experience a private music lesson while not having to pay for it.” Notelove provides instruction for various instruments, from percussion to piano to vocals, said Indiresan.

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Breaking the bounds of culture

Teachers share cultural experiences of queer community By Elaine Huang

Photo courtesy of Jane Park SPREADING THE MUSIC: Notelove offers free, private music lessons for stu-

dents, by partnering them with student instructors for weekly lessons.

Students can sign up to receive lessons on the Notelove website. They simply fill out a form and are contacted by an instructor to schedule a time and place for the meeting. The organization also strives to alter the stigma around pursuing performing arts as a career. “We are trying to spread music education because in the Bay Area, it’s so common to see students being pressured into STEM fields,” CEO of Notelove and junior Jane Park said. “Mu-

sic and performing arts is not pushed as heavily as STEM, so I think it’s important to create a balance.” For the instructors, teaching not only spreads the joy of music, but serves as a key social experience. “When you’re in an organization like this, especially when it’s a nonprofit to provide free lessons to people, you meet different people from socioeconomic backgrounds, who maybe you wouldn’t have interacted with otherwise,” Indiresan said.

Debbie Vanni bridges generation gap in teaching war novel

English teacher speaks about her experience, emotions living during the Vietnam War By Melody Chen AP English Literature teacher Debbie Vanni connects two different generations by weaving her own stories living in the Vietnam War with Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried.” The novel follows O’Brien’s experience as a soldier in the Vietnam War, where he merges his impressions along with the reality of the war. Vanni connects her experience to parts of the book to enhance her students’ understanding. Her brothers are often the centerpiece of her stories. Two of her older brothers were drafted to the war in ‘68 and ‘70, Vanni said, but filed as conscientious objectors — pacifists who refused to go to war. Her father urged her brothers against going into the Vietnam war because of the pointlessness in fighting a foreign war. “Names would roll up at the end of the day so you could see names of people who had died,” Vanni said. “And we knew people who had died. It was kind of in your face a lot, along with the protesting that was going on.” The pressure felt before the war was no match to the psychological effect on returning soldiers, Vanni said. The trauma that soldiers had to endure after the war is a major theme in the novel, as well as her experiences with neighbors who

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Photo by Melody Chen FAMILY ABOVE ALL: Vanni comes from a three-generation military family

whose father fought in World War II and was awarded the Purple Heart.

fought in the war. One chapter in the novel that Vanni connected to the most is “Speaking of Courage,” where a soldier drives in circles alone around his hometown lake, longing to tell someone about his pain and guilt in the war. Similarly, after the war, Vanni recalls a neighboring drunk soldier who pounded on her house window for help. “It’s not that [war] just ends and then we go on,” Vanni said. “There’s a ripple effect, and it’s insanely tragic.” Since none of her students were alive then when the Vietnam War was happening, it is a difficult concept for soldiers to fathom, let alone her students, she said. Yet, the generation gap did not

stop Vanni from finding access points for her students to relate to. “We find ways to connect even though we’re generations away,” Vanni said. “We’re still people, and so there’s ways to connect. I am always looking for that little angle that I can get where I can tap in.” Vanni said she hopes to find small pieces of information in the novel that relate to her students’ lives and bring in new way of understanding. In fact, the majority of the novel’s themes revolve around the power of storytelling and the way it shapes others. Vanni is doing just that. “Here’s a living proof and breathing proof of things that have happened,” Vanni said.

Topics regarding sexual identity and sexual preferences are taboo in many cultures. In fact, most countries still criminalize homosexuality to this day. Only 28 of 195 countries have legalized same-sex marrige. Math teacher Rohan Prakash, who identifies as gay cisgender male, said he grew up without any proper eduction on LGBTQ+ related topics. “I was not educated on the queer topic as a child. I didnt really understand it,” Prakash said. “My parents [told me to] be nice to gay people and to not actively hate them, but [that] it was not something I should participate in.” Despite the old traditions of India, Prakash said he was happy to see the change in perception of the queer community. Through the work of activists and social changes, the Supreme Court of India offically decriminalised homosexuality in 2018. “You are still expected to get married to someone of the opppsite sex, have children and live a very traditional family life in a heteronormative society,” Prakash said. “But the society is being more and more excepting of the queer community.” Asia has recently made strides toward marriage equality. According to CNN, Taiwan legalized same sex marrige in 2019, and it has so far been the only Asian country to do so. Japan, however, does’t seem to discuss same sex marriage in their politics. Japanese teacher Junko Birdsong, who identifies as heterosexual, said due to a strict culture in Japan, there’s little room for those who fit outside the norm. “In Japan, we believe that it is best to do everything the same way,” Birdsong said. “For example, schools require students to wear school uniforms. That probably relates

to not accepting something irregular, like being queer.” Because of the lack of education on the topic, Birdsong said she grew up witnessing many negative representations of the queer community. “Although I was aware of queer people, I was not educated on queer topics,” Birdsong said. “Growing up, I heard a lot of words disrespecting queer people. In media, they protrayed queer people as a joke.” While being part of the LGBTQ+ community is still not accepted in the mainstream, most are respected within their community. “A lot of Japanese culture is about respecting others,” Birdsong said. “Even if someone might not think it’s right, many people still choose to respect their choices.” Shawnee Rivera, who identifies as bisexual, said she experienced different reactions to her sexuality from her Native American and Mexican sides of her family. In Native American culture, being queer is accepted, Rivera said. However, the Mexican side of her family was not as supportive. “My grandmother on my dad’s side was raised strictly Catholic. She always said that she worried about my sexuality and that it might mean eternal damnation,” Rivera said. Rivera said she shares the story of her grandmother to prove love is a gateway to acceptance. “On my mother’s side, I had a grandmother that was a Catholic nun,” River said. “However, I have an uncle who is gay so she, by the time I came along, had already made her peace and was very supportive.” Rivera said as a teacher she sees a lot of negative emotions from students about their sexual identity. “I see a lot of weird shaming going on,” Rivera said. “I say weird, because on some level, I think it’s really weird when adults care so much about who their kids are making out with.”

Photo Illustration by Elaine Huang PROUD TO BE: Queer teachers at HHS take pride in their identity, promoting acceptance among students.

PAGE DESIGN BY SHREYA PARTHA


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Entertainment

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Saweetie’s descending dignity, starting from ‘ICY’

Rapper’s new album does not compare to 2017 hit ‘ICY GRL’ By Jane Park

CELEBRITY SPOTLIGHT From Netflix specials, hosting the White House’s correspondents dinner to getting 1310 on the SAT and being in a Pizza Hut commercial, stand-up comedian and TV show host Hasan Minaj has done it all. In fact, I constantly hear from my friends with immigrant parents that they should stay quiet and work hard instead of speaking out because “it’s unsafe to have an opinion in this country,” or “people will treat you less than equal.” My own immigrant parents have said similar things and as a result of disobeying them, I have dealt with racial inequality numerous times because I prefer to voice my opinions. On his tv-show Patriot Act, Hasan Minaj constantly debunks these statements. Minaj covers controversial topics, one of which was about Saudi Arabia’s government, resulting in the episode to be dropped from Netflix in Saudi Arabia as a request from the Saudi government. Minaj also covered censorship in China and corruption in Brazil. When Minaj testified in Congress about the student loan debt crisis, he spoke with humor and ended his testimony with the statement, “And now I will go back to where I came from,” according to CNN. Minaj’s view of culture is another notable factor in his success. Minaj speaks about his ethnicity and shares his ideas on Indian household sterotypes, but also speaks about serious events that occurred in his life like the harassment his Muslim family endured after 9/11. Listening to Minaj speak about the culture in India has made me become more proud of my Indian background. Being raised in America from such a young age, I was unable to learn about my Indian heritage. After listening to the rants Minaj does about the quirks coming from being Indian, I feel more able to relate with India’s culture, despite not knowing much about my native country.

The world met Diamonté Harper (professionally known as Saweetie) with her release of “ICY GRL” in 2017, a smooth and

original track about working hard and becoming successful. Saweetie released her sophomore album “ICY” on March

Illustration by Jane Park SELL OUT SAWEETIE: Saweetie’s mainstream songs like “My Type” and “Emotional” hold back her full potential.

29, 2019, featuring the song, “My Type,” which went viral and currently stands at over 44 billion views on YouTube. I was upset and disappointed at the outcome of “ICY.” Considering her unique insight seen in the lyrics of “ICY GRL,” it’s hard to believe this is the same rapper. Listening to “ICY,” my head hurt from how many times I heard “daddy,” the n-word and ad-libs bombarding each song. In an “ICY GRL” remix with Kehlani, Saweetie said that she “don’t need a sugar daddy, they call me when they need stacks.” Ironically, in “ICY,” Saweetie repeats the idea of needing a daddy, with lyrics like “daddy, what did you get for me today?” In YouTube videos of Saweetie’s older songs and raps, fans and expressed frustration about the reformation of Saweetie’s music after fame. “This video shows she has talent. Her [recent] music [has] really basic lyrics for someone who’s been doing this for 11 years,” one commenter said. Saweetie’s previous album “High Maintenance” had some satisfactory songs on it, but the songs on “ICY” haven’t reached the level of quality her previous ones have. Saweetie seems to be begging for attention, even twerking on a basketball hoop, showing she is willing to do anything to keepherself at number one. Resorting to tasteless tactics like acting out, using vulgar language and wearing skimpy clothes is pathetic and lazy, especially for someone who has

worked so hard to gain her place in the industry. Saweetie could inspire greater amounts of people through insightful, motivating lyrics. Instead, she chooses to sacrifice her pride for fame. It’s disappointing to see an artist with so much potential let her fans down with songs that don’t immerse into deeper meaning than the modern appeals of music. Although I don’t respect Saweetie’s decision to sell herself short for fame, I admit there is something admirable about her songs. The songs are energetic and bold and the beats well mastered. It’s clear Saweetie thinks she is making a move that will advance her music career. “ICY” can be appreciated, even if the lyrics don’t poke at anything deeper than sex and money. I only hope that Saweetie regains her dignity and releases songs worth the listen.

“ICY”

Release date: March 29, 2019

Genre: Pop Rating: 2 stars

Come one, come all to this play of the fall

Drama department teaches nuances of love through comedy By Miya Liu

Leslie Lloyd, HHS drama teacher, spent six months carefully choosing this year’s fall play: “The Green Bird,” a Commedia dell’arte, which is a type of Italian comedy known for its simple characters and comical lines. The play tells the story of a dysfunctional royal family as they struggle to find a happy ending despite plot twisting enchantments. Though the plot is a little difficult to follow, you’ll be too busy laughing to notice. “It’s just total chaos, but it’s a good chaos,” sophomore actor Helen Beyer said. This commedia was written over 250 years ago, but the only thing that is dated is the language used. “Our lines are like oldish English with fantasy,” senior actor Ege Catakli said. “Our words are all mixed up at times.” Nevertheless, the play is engaging enough. According to TheaterMania, “The Green Bird’s” plot is like “Shakespeare on acid.” The dialogue is cleverly humorous but their actions also add to the comicality of the play. “There’s a lot of physical comedy and really specific blocking that makes it really funny,” junior actor Joseph Huang said.

The characters in this play are very unique and the actors do an excellent job of expressing their hilarity, though it has been difficult. “I find it really interesting to explore what being a bird means and exploring my own humanity,” Huang, who plays the puppet green bird, said. On top of memorizing lines and positioning themselves correctly, the actors also have to convey the right emotions at the right times. This involves acting serious, but it also means that they have to keep a straight face, which is challenging during a comedy. “I’m really worried that I’m going to break right in front of the audience,” Beyer said The energy the actors use to put on their best performance comes from their passion. “I love acting and drama. It makes life meaningful for me,” Huang said.“[It’s] a chance to express my love for acting.” If you are looking for a good source of entertainment, the final performances of Green Bird will be this Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. “We do all this to show people our talent, and hopefully give them a good time,” Catakli said.

What:

GREEN BIRD

A play about a dysfunctional royal family that protects their kingdom from an evil sorcerer

When: Fri, Nov. 1 and Sat, Nov. 2 at 7:30 Where: HHS Auditorium

Students: tickets are $6 presale, $8 at the door Adults: tickets are $8 presale, $10 at the door

Photo by Miya Liu ALL THE DRAMA: Everyone in the department put in copious effort to support

the production.

PAGE DESIGN BY JANE PARK


Entertainment

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Shallowest movie of 21st century

13

The privilege in Netflix original ‘Tall Girl’ Games on your phone are a great way to destress after a tiring day at school; check out some of these trendy games from past years.

By Sara Shohoud No other movie could highlight the epic highs and lows of being a high school student like the Netflix original “Tall Girl.” Being a slightly taller than average white middle-class female is definitely the biggest obstacle anyone could go through. In all seriousness, “Tall Girl” is possibly one of the worst movies I have ever seen. Not only is the plot poor and lazy, but the mere thought that someone had the idea to turn someone’s height insecurity into a serious movie physically pains me. I am not invalidating height insecurities, but being slightly above or below average height is not a real issue to base an entire hour and a half movie on. An obvious example of this privilege is when the main character, Jodi, says “you think your life is hard? I’m a high school junior wearing size 13 Nikes. Mens size 13 Nikes.” Oh, Jodi you poor poor child. Who cares about others with much bigger issues. Being a minority? Having family problems? Having money issues? Living in a war torn country? None of that measures to being a thin, white, wealthy, traditionally pretty girl who despite what she thinks, is sought after

Photo Illustration by Sara Shohoud SCENE TURNED MEME: Jodi takes a moment of self pity which people rightfully

mock on social platforms, such as TikTok.

by virtually every boy she comes in contact with. Teenagers have many other problems that are more real and relatable than being tall. A glaring issue amongst students in Silicon Valley is the amount of stress and pressure we feel, both by our parents and by the school system. As a high school student, I have been more concerned with what score I received on the SAT or if I passed my APUSH class. Even contemplating what to

wear in front of my crush is a far more pressing issue than my height. As a serious movie, “Tall Girl” should not be given praise. A movie conveying important issues amongst teenagers, such as mental health, environmental issues, and the impact of today’s beauty standards, would be more relatable. Unfortunately, Netflix came out with a movie featuring an abundance of cringey unrealistic drama that cannot be related to on any level.

Infographic by Allen Zhang

Flashback to Flappy Bird

Mobile gaming influenced by peer pressure By Allen Zhang

according to SensorTower. I unlock my phone and Mario Kart World Tour App, scroll past four folders chockreleased Sept 25, saw 10.1 milfull of different games I have lion downloads on the first day, downloaded over the past according to Apptopia. Immediyears. Games like Minecraft, ately following its release, I saw Pokemon Go, Jetpack Joyride, many people on camand Temple Run pus steering Toad or remind me of my Dry Bones around vichildhood. sually-pleasing tracks By no means am and cursing whenevI an avid gamer, so er they got hit by a why did I play these shell. However, just games? Because three weeks later, it I saw my fellow is less common to see classmates playing someone playing the on their iPhone 4s game. and iPod Touches By all means, and I wanted in on Mario Kart had the the action. markings of a quintThis type of essential game that peer influence is would last forever; it what causes games has gorgeous graphto become popuics, easy mechanics lar. People install Illustration by and a nostalgic factor games to feel part of an exclusive commu- Sara Shohoud that brings up memories of steering around Luigi nity. and Rosalina with Wii remotes. According to a professor However, World Tour falls into from the University of Tolethe same trap many recent games do, for every additional one have had: microtransactions. The hour of playing video games high prices combined with the per week by peers, the amount often unrewarding loot boxes of time a male teenager plays makes players feel like pawns in video games increases by 28.2 Nintendo’s cash grab scheme. minutes. Video games will always be This is obviously reflected part of our lives. However, the in today’s gaming world. Take relevance can span from days to Fortnite, debatably the most years, depending on the consenpopular game right now; it was sus of the players. Ultimately, it’s downloaded 22.5 million times up to players to deem it worthy. in the first week of its release,

Ultimate festival survival guide They see me rolling, they hatin’

By Jaqueline Beaufore After two days of mosh pits, dehydration, and cute outfits, Rolling Loud has come to an end. Was it worth $250 for the ticket to see some of my favorite artists like Trippie Redd, Meg The Stallion, YG and Rico Nasty? Yes and no. Attending this festival was one of the better decisions I have made, but I definitely would have changed a few things. Since Rolling Loud was my first music festival, I had no clue what to bring, who to talk to, and what to expect. But I am here to tell you what I should and should not have done. When I first heard about the festival, I jumped onto the payment plan, which was probably the best decision I made. The payment plan was a simple $50 taken out of my account for five months so I did not have to worry about paying at the gate or trying to

buy the tickets when they hit the market and have a huge chunk of my paycheck gone. Closer to the festival, nerves started kicking in and the lack of outfits I had was on my mind. After multiple Pinterest tabs and Instagram wishlists later, I decided on just going to the mall and finding an outfit. My friend and I went to Valley Fair in search of anything that would suit the attire of a music festival. In short, we could not find anything and had to settle for a neon yellow top from the clearance section of H&M. We realized that shopping the day before the festival was not the best idea, and thus I learned lesson number one. Throughout almost every single set, my group and I were victims of a mosh pit. Everytime I heard an artist say “open it up!” or “come on the Bay! I need to see those crazy mosh pits,” I died a little inside. The worst set was either Rico Nasty and Blueface

Photo Courtesy of Getty Images ROLLING EVEN LOUDER: G-Eazy takes the stage at Rolling Loud 2019 as

after every song they called for a mosh pit. My advice is to be careful and do not, under any circumstances, leave your friends. When moshing, do not be afraid to push people back so you do not fall over or get separated from your friends. Just make sure you say “excuse me” or “sorry, I need to be with my friend.” People are usually understanding. When you are in between sets, make sure you get water, sit and eat. This is the time to prepare for upcoming sets; use it wisely. The first day of the festival, my group and I took around two 30-minute breaks and made sure that we got out of the concert area early so we could go to the next stage without running. Rolling Loud was definitely an experience. As my first festival, it went well thanks to my friends. We made sure we took breaks, protected each other from mosh pits and enjoyed every minute of seeing our favorite artists. Will I take my advice for the next festival and pick out my outfits early and not misplace my wrist band? Hopefully. I will encourage everyone to at least experience a festival once in their life — there is nothing like screaming the lyrics to your favorite artists with friends and just having the time of your life.

fans scream his lyrics.

PAGE DESIGN BY SARA SHOHOUD


14

Sports

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Fighting through the limits in boxing

Junior Katrina Stadler overcomes adversities in persuit of ambition By Saanvi Thakur

With AP classes and the looming presence of the SAT, junior year is known to be the hardest year of high school. For junior Katrina Stadler, it is just one year closer to becoming a pro MMA fighter. Stadler has participated in MMA, wrestling, jiu jitsu and kickboxing since she was seven years old, she said “I started [martial arts] because my dad wanted [my siblings and I] to learn discipline,” Stadler said. “[At first] I was annoyed by my dad ... but it was actually a blessing in disguise; MMA has saved me in so many ways.” Stadler said she goes to the American Kickboxing Academy

to train before and after school. In order for amateur MMA fighters to go pr0, they must show dedication and pers eve r a n c e, Stadler said. “There are people who say there are athletes who are [naturally] gifted and I kind of believe that, but it’s also because a lot of people don’t see behind the

scenes of how many hours you put into training,” Stadler said. Intense training that takes 25 to 30 hours a week, combined with the pressures of maintaining a 4.0 GPA might seem stressful for some students, but fighting is Stadler’s coping mechanism from the pressure coming from school. “I feel like it’s contradictory

“Everyone thinks fighting is so brutal, but [it’s] how I cope with all the stress.”

A field hockey bond like no other Sport brings new friendships, new hobby

By Shreya Partha

Sophomore Claire Flickner said she joined the field hockey team the summer before freshman year. Flickner, who was also a soccer player, had trouble fitting field hockey into her busy schedule. However, Flickner said she cherishes the new friendships she has made on the field hockey team. She said she believes the the bond she has with her teammates is different from ones she has experienced on other teams. “I feel our entire team has a unique bond where all of us are super close,” Flickner said. Like most sports, field hockey requires a large time

commitment from its players, she said, adding that game days are especially busy. “We get to the field 45 minutes before the game to start warming up. Halfway through warm-ups, our coach tells us the lineup and then we have a talk with them,” Flickner said. “After that, we finish warmups and do our cheer before we start. Then we talk for

a few seconds as a team and get into positions on the field.” Flickner said she is looking forward to playing with the team but does not think she will continue playing in college, despite her strong bond with the sport and her team. “I most likely won’t have time, however, I might play for fun,” she said.

because everyone thinks fighting is so brutal, but that’s how I cope with all the stress,” Stadler said. “[Fighting] is my mental break from school.” It is not easy going pro in MMA according to The Arena Gym, a San Diego gym for martial arts. Knowing this, Stadler said she plans to attend college and get her teaching credential, all while pursuing her dream to go professional in MMA. Stadler also said some of her major inspirations for continuing with MMA despite the amount of effort it requires came from people she met at school. “I want to help younger kids because I’ve been in their shoes and I know how important [a role model] is,” Stadler said. “Mrs. Rivera [is one of my inspirations]. I think that, although she’s not your typical or traditional teacher, she’s really relatable to students and [can] help them a lot.” Despite the obstacles Stadler faces, such as gender stereotypes, she said she is adamant about being treated equally. “Being a girl in MMA with aspirations to become a pro fighter has shown me how much people underestimate you,” Stadler said. “However, women’s MMA and combat sport ... it’s becoming accepted that we can perform just as well and [perform] just as exciting as men.”

Photo courtesey of Katrina Stadler 9 YEARS EXPERIENCE: Stadler is willing to put more hours into her practice to reach a professional level.

Photos by Shreya Partha

A SUPPORTIVE TEAMMATE: Above: Flickner takes on her opponents in a recent game. Below: making the motion for good luck with her team.

PAGE DESIGN BY DEXTER TATSUKAWA


Sports

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Scoreboard Senior Harold Rucker III led HHS with 16 carries for 94 yards.

Photo by Kacey Rebstock

Varsity field hockey made a comeback in the second half of the game and scored three points. Photo by Andrea Sun

Pictured: Carolyn Shan

Sophomore Olivia Haynes is one of the three middle blockers for junior varsity. Photo by Jacqueline Beaufore

Boys varsity water polo lost in a close match 11-10 against Wilcox High School.

Pictured: Alec Mortemsen

Photo by Meldoy Chen

Junior’s devotion to biking spans a 100 miles

Gavin Hlady builds confidence from mountain biking By Shruti Magesh For some, the prospect of racing down a mountain with nothing but a bike and a helmet seems daunting. For junior Gavin Hlady, however, it is a norm and centeral part of his life. “I really enjoy the thrill of going downhill in general, but at the same time I kind of like [the] suffering ... like the pain when you end,” Hlady said. Hlady began mountain biking when he was in eighth grade. Since then, Hlady has competed in various biking tournaments. Also, he is an avid member of the biking team Black Mountain Composite. Some of his achievements include placing fourth in the state championships

for mountain biking and being crowned the Norcal champion biker. The Norcal biking champioships are a series of five races. Hlady competed against 100 people before being crowned Norcal champion, he said. Hlady attributes his adoration for biking to his father. “My dad used to be a professional bike racer, so he helped get me into bike racing,” Hlady said. Contrary to many sports, there is no adequate way to prepare for bike marathons. “[To build endurance], at least once a week I’ll go on a longer [bike] ride. I’ll try to go as far as I can … every week doing a longer ride, and it helps,” Hlady said. Hlady said he finds biking to be enthralling. In fact, Hlady

recently biked 100 miles in the course of a single day. The strenuous expenditure started as an idle day off. Hlady didn’t have much to do, and decided to go biking with his friends. Yet, this seemingly modest activity transformed into a 100 mile journey, as Hlady and his friends biked over seven hours through an expanse of mountains. “[I would do it again] because I really like spending time with [my friends] and it’s really fun to be biking,” Hlady said. Hlady said he credits biking to buildimg character as it requires much effort and rigor. “You’ve got to be okay with suffering, but [biking also] builds confidence,” Hlady said. “If you feel confident that you can do something, it helps mentally.”

Photo courtesy of Gavin Hlady

COMPETITIVE BIKE RACING :

Hlady started mountain biking four years ago and has gained much recognition and several awards since.

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FARIA FOCUS By Jackson Faria Governor Gavin Newsom passed a bill on Sept. 30th that will allow college athletes to profit from their image and likeness. For example, if a player’s jersey is sold, they will profit off the purchase. Even though it will not go into effect until 2023, the passing of this law is groundbreaking and limits the oppressive rule the NCAA has over student athletes. The NCAA is a non profit organization that reached over $1 billion in revenue in 2017, according to USA Today. However, not a penny goes to the players, all while President Mark Emmert’s salary had a 42 percent increase from 2015 to 2016, earning him over $2.4 million, according to USA Today. Emmert’s salary increased again from 2017 to 2018 to $3.9 million, a 60 percent increase. University of Wisconsin basketball star Nigel Hayes has protested the rules, holding a sign outside of ESPN’s set for College GameDay that said “broke college athlete anything helps,” with his friend’s Venmo account listed. While Hayes was not in need of money, he wanted to create conversation about compensating college athletes. NCAA President Mark Emmert has publicly shown his dissatisfaction on the passing of the law in multiple interviews, arguing that rather than being paid with a paycheck, players receive free housing and education at their schools. He believes that allowing players to profit off their likeness will increase competition amongst schools, potentially leading to players getting paid to play. What Emmert failed to mention was the existing workload players have. Student athletes typically spend 40 hours a week on school work and their sport. They have little or no time to get a job like non-student atheletes.

PAGE DESGIN BY SAANVI THAKUR


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Last Word

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Halloween Happenings: when fun falls on a Thursday Students keep the Halloween spirit alive despite school By Kacey Rebstock and Allen Zhang The night when children prowl the streets in search of candy is quickly creeping up. People of all ages deck themselves out with gore and glitter to celebrate this fall holiday, which originated as an ancient Celtic festival full of bonfires and frightening costumes to ward off ghosts. This year, Halloween happens to fall on a Thursday, proving to be unfortunate for many — students cannot stay out very late, as the next day is a school day. Other extra-

curricular activities such as sports and clubs could potentially be affected. “The band has practice [on Halloween] and the next day we leave for Disneyland,” junior Bella Huang said. “So in order to make it fun, Mr. Rendon decided to plan and organize a ‘trunk-or-treat.’” This new event includes parents decorating their cars and passing out candy from their trunks of their cars. Colorguard and band members walk around in costumes and celebrate Halloween without ignoring their responsibilities. However, some students are willing to sacrifice their night for a charitable cause.

Battle of the PSLs

“This Halloween, me and my Model United Nations club are going to go around collecting money for UNICEF, instead of candy,” senior Sophya Diwan said. “We’ll get candy too, but we want to do something good, as well.” Last year MUN raised about $80 worth of pocket change going door to door, which all went to disadvantaged children. Other students plan to maintain the traditions of their childhood and continue to dress up and trick or treat. Freshman Ido Tal plans on trick-or-treating with his friends on Knickerbocker Avenue, a popular street to visit for Halloween, but doesn’t plan on staying out much later than 11 p.m.

More popular spots for trick-ortreating are Los Altos and downtown San Jose, Diwan said. Other students, such as sophomore Daphne Pinzon, would rather attend a Halloween party and hang out with friends. “We had an original costume idea [to dress up as bears and a hunter],” Pinzon said. “It was pretty funny, but we decided to let that go. We decided on going [as] government officials [instead].” Though Pinzon said she plans on staying in and playing games, there’s a possibility she might go out around the neighborhood to collect candy. An essential

Halloween activity is staying home to pass out candy to the next generation of trick-ortreaters. Seeing the faces of the little kids dressed as Elsa and Spiderman light up when they are handed a Snickers bar can be just as rewarding as going out yourself. There are a variety of ways to celebrate this haunting holiday, but they all have one thing in common: if too much schoolwork is due Friday, plans for a fun, spooky night will have to be abandoned.

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By Kacey Rebstock and Allen Zhang Peet’s Pumpkin Chai Pumpkin chai is mankind’s best invention. The odd, yet comforting aroma of Cinnamon Toast Crunch fills your heart. Additionally, this isn’t the traditional PSL; the coffee is replaced by chai, making it sweet and spicy.

1 Starbucks Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew If you’re looking for a genuine coffee drink, the Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew is the one for you. The foam atop the drink gives it a delightful creaminess and balances the strong flavor of the coffee. The pumpkin isn’t the focus of the drink but more of a hint.

2 Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte The OG Pumpkin Spice Latte hasn’t changed at all. It’s overpoweringly sweet and milky, completely lacking a coffee flavor. The taste of artificial pumpkin overwhelms your tastebuds; drinking it is trial for anyone who doesn’t have a sweet tooth.

3 Peet’s Pumpkin Latte This is the drink for coffee snobs who don’t want the excessive flavors of a traditional PSL. The coffee is strong, and lacks the sweetness of the other drinks. Besides the sprinkling of spices on the foam, the pumpkin spice flavor is absent.

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7-Eleven Pumpkin Spice Coffee

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The bitter, low-quality coffee tastes burnt and can’t be covered even by pounds of cream and sugar. The pumpkin spice flavor is non-existent. But, for the price of a convenience store coffee, it gives an adequate caffeine boost.

Photos by Allen Zhang and photo illustrations by Elaine Huang

Infographic by Elaine Huang and Miya Liu

Scan the QR code for recommendations, how-tos and recipes to complete your fall checklist! PAGE DESIGN BY KACEY REBSTOCK AND ALLEN ZHANG

Profile for The Epitaph

The Epitaph Volume 57, Issue 2  

Homestead High School's student-run newspaper, The Epitaph. Volume 57 Issue 2. 2019-2020 schoolyear.

The Epitaph Volume 57, Issue 2  

Homestead High School's student-run newspaper, The Epitaph. Volume 57 Issue 2. 2019-2020 schoolyear.

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