Page 1

HEART THE

OFJACKSONVILLE ISSUE 5 | 2019

STOPPING AMPUTATIONS ACROSS THE NATION Every

30 SEC someone undergoes an amputation as a result of diabetes.

More than

30 MILLION

US adults are living with diabetes. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Come see the experts in AMPUTATION PREVENTION

IN THIS ISSUE: A PUBLICATION OF

Vascular Disease Is Your Workplace Making You Overweight? What to Eat When You Crave Sweets


ISSUE 5 2019

CONTENTS FEATURES:

SERVICE LINES:

4

Letter From The President

6

Amputation Fast Facts

5

Kids Speaking About Parents

10

Vascular Disease

17

Patient Testimonials: What Our Patients Are Saying

18

Orange Park Medical Center

18

What You Need To Know About Colon Cancer

20

Venous Disease & Swelling

19, 28 Facts About The Heart

24

Social Media Recap: Team Pictures

29

$89.99 Screening Package

8

30

Dr. Favorites: Insight Q&A

What To Eat When You Crave Sweets

Word Search

12

31

Eat Your Heart Out

Back Cover Coupons For Your Health

HEALTHY LIVING:

14 Recipe: Fish Tacos 15

23 Is Your Workplace Making You Overweight? 26

20

Venous Disease & Swelling

Get Some Fresh Air

Natural Remedies to Lower Blood Pressure

PROVIDER’S SPOTLIGHT: 16

Get To Know Dr. Fahdi

22

The Doctor Will See You Now

27

Humans Of FCCI


PHYSICIAN’S SPOTLIGHT

Dr. Yazan Khatib

Letter from the

PRESIDENT

Our fight is far from over. Awareness around cardiovascular disease has skyrocketed in recent decades. Organizations such as the American Heart Association have done a superb job in raising awareness. However, we should not fool ourselves into believing we are anywhere near the end of the fight. A report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that from 19912011, deaths related to heart disease were steadily decreasing. It seemed as though our work with heart disease was coming to an end. However, from 2011 to 2014, heart disease deaths rose by 3%, an unexpected twist that leaves us on our toes. While the loss of human life is plenty reason to wage a war on cardiovascular disease, we must not forget the financial implications as well. As a nation, we spend over $200 billion each year fighting heart disease. This includes everything from medications to treatments, and even lost productivity in the workplace, according to the American Heart Association. As healthcare costs continue to become a financial burden, we simply cannot afford this anymore. These pages are filled with the weapons to fight cardiovascular disease. Yes, diet and exercise are important, but equally important is education. Did you know spending time outside has a multitude of health benefits? Or that there is a myriad of nutritionist-approved deserts? Flip to our table of contents on page 3, find a topic of your liking, and educate yourself away. Another important part of heart disease: risk factors. Diabetes is one of the largest controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. According to the American Heart Association, almost 70% of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from a form of heart disease. In addition to heart disease, diabetes can impair quality of life. The World Journal of Diabetes estimates that every 30 seconds, someone undergoes an amputation as a result of diabetes. For us, the fight against amputation is a personal one. Every day in our clinics, we have patients walk in the door who have been told amputation is their only option. They leave with a renewed sense of hope and the ability to enjoy life with their loved ones. We will not stop until unnecessary amputations are a misfortune of the past. We hope The Heart of Jacksonville serves as a powerful guide for you. For us, this publication is one of our tools in the fight against heart disease. Will you join our fight? Sincerely, Yazan Khatib, MD President of First Coast Cardiovascular Institute

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PHYSICIAN’S SPOTLIGHT

My Dad

is a doctor at First Coast Cardiovascular Institute. He changes lives every day. He shows me how to be persistent and passionate. -Laila Ali, daughter of Dr. Vaqar Ali

Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE

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SERVICE LINE

Together, we can prevent wounds from getting to a state where amputation is the only choice.

FAS 30 SEC

Every 30 seconds, someone undergoes an amputation as a result of diabetes. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

75 % decrease in risk of amputation if the patient is seeking the care of a team specialized in diabetic foot ulcers. (Clinical Infectious Diseases)

6

THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


ST FACTS 30 MILLION More than

30 million US adults are living with diabetes. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

NEED A WOUND CARE TEAM?

If you have been told amputation is your only choice, contact us today. First Coast Cardiovascular Institute is here for you. We have a dedicated limb preservation and wound care team comprised of interventional cardiologists, endovascular experts, and wound care providers. Don’t take our word for it...

Ask the tens of thousands of patients who have come to us for wound care & limb preservation. Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE

7


PHYSICIAN’S HEALTHY SPOTLIGHT LIVING

What to eat when you crave

Sweets PowerBalls

It’s Monday, which means it is your third week in a row starting your diet. The beginnin of the week is easy. You have your healthy snac of fruit cups and yogurt ready, and all your lea meat and veggie meals are prepped. Three day in and your cravings get stronger and harder t ignore. The good news is that it is okay to give into these cravings every once in a while. It is essential to treat yourself on occasion so you don’t feel deprived. The key is to try to find healthier versions of our favorites. Below are some simple, healthier dessert options, that even our doctors would approve of.

These power balls are quick, easy to store, and perfect to eat on the go. Ingredients: • 1 cup oats • ½ cup peanut butter • ½ cup ground flax seed

• ½ cup chocolate chips • 1/3 cup honey • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Directions: 1. Combine all the following ingredients into a bowl. 2. Cover the bowl and let it chill for about 30 minutes. These little balls of energy stay good in the fridge for up to a week. Creates 10-12 power balls. 8 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


ng cks an ys to e s u

PHYSICIAN’S SPOTLIGHT

Angel Food Cupcakes

Nothing helps willpower more than bite sized treats. These angel food cupcakes are a tasty 60-calorie treat that will satisfy your sweet tooth with no regrets. You will need: • 1 box of angel food cake mix • Water • Cool whip • Your choice of berries cut into bite size pieces • Cupcake liners Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Follow the directions on the angel food cake mix.

3. Serve the batter into the cupcake liners about ¾ full. 4. Bake for 8 minutes until the top is slightly colored. 5. Let the cake cool completely. 6. Add two tablespoons of cool whip to each cupcake. 7. Add any berries you want for decoration. Creates about 40 cupcakes.

Yogurt Bowl

Need a quick, simple and sweet treat to fight your sweets craving at any time in the day? A delicious energizing, super food yogurt bowl is just the treat. Another great feature about a yogurt bowl is that it is completely customizable. What you need:

• Nuts and seeds— such as walnuts, pecans, pumpkin seeds, and chia • Yogurt seeds • Fruit of your choice – such as blue berries, strawberries, mango, cherries, • Now you can get creative! Add your favorite granola, honey or syrup, dark black berries, or any other fresh or chocolate chips, cinnamon, etc. frozen seasonal fruit

Directions: 1. Dish one serving of yogurt into a small serving bowl. 2. Top off with your favorite fruits, nuts and sweeteners. Creates one large bowl. Issue 55 2019 2019 || THE THE HEART HEART OF OF JACKSONVILLE JACKSONVILLE Issue

9


SERVICE LINE

VASCULAR DISEASE When vascular disease affects you or your loved ones, you want experts.

Stroke is the #5 leading cause of death in the U.S., and the leading cause of long-term disability, according to Aortic aneurysms the CDC. were the primary cause of almost 10,000 deaths in 2014, according to the CDC.

Every 34 seconds, someone has a heart attack, according to the Heart Foundation.

8 million people in the U.S. are affected by peripheral artery disease, according to the NIH.

10 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019

10-30% of people diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis/ pulmonary embolism will die within one month of diagnosis, according to the CDC.


First Coast Cardiovascular Institute (FCCI) has the experts A Dedicated Vascular Department We recognize vascular disease as a state that requires its own set of trained experts. While other facilities integrate vascular disease, we have a dedicated vascular department. Our department follows through on all aspects of vascular disease, from prevention and diagnosis, to management and treatment.

Accreditation in All Modalities An accreditation ensures a facility has met the highest standard in the healthcare field. We have earned accreditations for all aspects of vascular disease, from vascular testing to vascular medicine. Our outpatient catheterization laboratory, where we perform most treatments for vascular disease, has also earned an accreditation.

Innovative Treatments at a Cost Savings Most treatments for vascular disease will be performed in our freestanding, outpatient catheterization laboratory, providing cost savings to the patient and the system.

Most common vascular disorders • Stroke • Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) • Renal disease (hypertension) • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) • Chronic venous insufficiency (leg swelling) • Varicose veins • Visceral disease, unexplained weight loss If you or your loved one is suffering from a vascular disorder, call us at 904.493.3333.

Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE

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HEALTHY LIVING

Eat

Your Heart Out

Popcorn We are not talking about the “dripping in butter, extra cheese” popcorn that comes in a tub at the movie theater. We are talking about the original popcorn, made on the stove. It is actually a whole grain, a food group that is high in fiber and pivotal in the battle against heart disease.

Yogurt Yogurt contains calcium and other beneficial vitamins and minerals. Be careful when choosing your yogurt as they can often contain a lot of sugar. Look for one marked “no sugar added.” To give your yogurt a kick, you can mix in fruit or nuts.

12 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


The best snacks your heart will thank you for.

Pretzels & tortilla chips

Go nuts True nuts are high in fat. The type of fat found in nuts is considered a heart healthy fat that lowers bad cholesterol levels. However, still be mindful of the portion, since they are high in calories. Stick to a handful or about 1.5 ounces.

If you are looking for a healthy alternative to chips, try pretzels or baked tortilla chips. These heart healthy snacks will give you the satisfaction of a crunch without the empty fats found in traditional chips.

Dark chocolate We know it couldn’t be more exciting to find chocolate on this list. Dark chocolate contains flavanols, a plant chemical that could be protective against heart disease. One ounce of dark chocolate is proven to be heart healthy. However, one ounce is likely less than you think. Make sure to check the nutrition label to see how many ounces the chocolate bar contains.

Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE

13


PHYSICIAN’S RECIPES SPOTLIGHT

FISH TACOS

with Broccoli Slaw

A HEART HEALTHY MEAL FROM THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

We bet you never thought tacos could be healthy. These tacos are more than just a tasty treat from the sea; they are also jam-packed with omega-3 fatty acids. The benefits of these acids are vast. Having inflammation in your body can damage your blood vessels and lead to heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids may decrease this inflammation, lower your blood pressure slightly, reduce blood clotting, decrease stroke and heart failure risk, and reduce irregular heartbeats. Talk about eating with your heart!

What You Will Need

Directions

1

• Pour the water into the pressure cooker. Place the steaming rack in the pressure cooker. Place the fish on the rack. • In a small bowl, stir together the chili powder, cumin, and garlic powder. Sprinkle the mixture over the fish. Secure the lid. Cook on high pressure for 4 minutes. Quickly release the pressure. • Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, stir together the broccoli slaw, cilantro, and green onion, tossing gently to combine. Stir in the mayonnaise and lime juice until blended. • Heat a small nonstick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Warm the tortillas, one at a time, turning until heated through. Transfer to a work surface. Place the fish on the tortillas. Top with the slaw. Serve immediately. Serves 4.

cup water

4 firm white fish fillets (about 4 ounces each), such as cod or halibut, 3/4 to 1 inch thick, rinsed and patted dry 1

teaspoon chili powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/8 teaspoon garlic powder 2 cups broccoli slaw 1/4 cup chopped, fresh cilantro 1

medium green onion (thinly sliced)

3 tablespoons light mayonnaise 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 4 6-inch corn tortillas

14 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


HEALTHY LIVING

GET SOME

FRESH AIR

The Health Benefits of Spending More Time Outside In a moment of stress, worry, or anxiousness, you have likely been told to go outside and get some fresh air. Multiple studies from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and others have shown that getting some fresh air isn’t just a cliché. Reduces stress levels. According to a study published by the NIH, spending time outdoors has been linked to lower cortisol levels, the body’s stress hormone. Researchers have named the phenomena “nature therapy” and believe it can play an important role in preventive medicine. You don’t need to go on a week-long camping trip in the woods to reap the benefits though. Even going on a short walk at a local park will have a tremendous impact on your well-being. Combats mental fatigue. Nature is considered a restorative environment because of its natural beauty, which can help boost your mood when you need it most. If you’re feeling overwhelmed or burnt out, head outside for some fresh air. Improves concentration. If you’re ever feeling stuck on a project or task, it may be time for a mental break. This is especially true for office workers who spend the majority of their day indoors surrounded by computer screens and artificial light. Instead of aimlessly scrolling through Facebook or Instagram during your break, try going for a short walk around your building or even eating lunch outside. When you return to your desk later, you’ll feel refreshed and ready to focus on the task at hand. Lowers blood pressure. In addition to the mental benefits of nature therapy, there are many physiological benefits as well. According to a study from the NIH, spending time outside can lower your pulse rate, blood pressure and sympathetic nervous system, which all have a relaxing effect on the body. These are also great ways to maintain your heart health and lower your risk for heart attack or stroke. Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 15


PHYSICIAN’S SPOTLIGHT

Get to Know Dr. Ibrahim Fahdi Cardiac Telemedicine, and Associate Director for the Cardiology Fellowship Program. Of all these various roles, Dr. Fahdi has most enjoyed teaching the next generation of physicians. “Preparing physicians to take on the world of medicine is incredibly fulfilling,” Dr. Fahdi says, “They challenge you and ensure you are always staying relevant in the field.”

Ibrahim Fahdi, MD, FACC, FASE

Preparing physicians to take on the world of medicine is incredibly fulfilling.” Dr. Fahdi’s relationship with his patients is long term. “When a patient comes to you in need, it isn’t just about helping them with their immediate needs,” Dr. Fahdi says, “As the physician, we should be spending adequate time with the patient and their families, asking questions, and gathering enough information to prevent future problems.” Education & Experience Dr. Fahdi started his journey in medicine at the University

Why Cardiology?

of Aleppo in Syria where he received his Doctorate of Medicine. He then came to the US where he completed his cardiology fellowship at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas. In his 8 years’ tenure in Arkansas, Dr. Fahdi was very active in his roles as the Director for the Cardiac Non-Invasive Laboratory, the Co-Director for the UAMS Cardiovascular Center, the Director for

16 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019

Dr. Fahdi finds cardiology instantly gratifying. “You are helping ameliorate the patient’s symptoms and improving their quality of life,” says Dr. Fahdi, “In doing so, you are saving lives at risk.” Care Philosophy Dr. Fahdi believes in practicing medicine with a tremendous sense of humility, compassion and ethics to his patients. Combined with experience and expertise, every patient leaves the office at ease.


PATIENT TESTIMONIALS

ONLINE TESTIMONIALS Providing the best possible care from the moment a patient checks in to when they walk out the door is extremely important to us. To be sure we are achieving this goal, we listen to our patients’ feedback. We love hearing positive feedback; it means we are doing our job!

(Dr. Lamba) has helped me so much. I feel great; I have more energy to walk, shop, go on vacation and take my granddaughter to the park. I would recommend Dr. Lamba to all.”

~ Healthgrades Review

Dr. Alnabki saved my life. I came in with a heart attack, and he did not leave my bedside until he made sure that I was doing well. My family and I appreciate all he has done for us. He is the best heart doctor we have ever had.”

~ Healthgrades Review

He

is very informative about the procedures. I had an aortic stenosis. Dr. Al-Saghir ensured me I did not have to have open heart surgery for this. I’m referring my family member to him.”

Dr. Zuberi was able to diagnose and repair (stent) arterial blockages in both of my legs. I have had leg pain and leg cramps for years. Dr. Zuberi listened, sent me for diagnostic testing and repaired the damage in a short time. His staff and diagnostic technicians are among the best.”

~ Google Review

I was seen in a timely manner. Everyone was polite and performed their individual responsibilities efficiently and promptly. They listened patiently to hear what I had to say. They gave me a clear action plan including an appointment for follow-up and guidance on when to call the doctor. Outstanding session.”

~ Google Review These reviews have been edited for spelling and grammar.

~ Healthgrades Review Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 17


SERVICE LINE

CONGRATULATIONS,

Orange Park Medical Center (OPMC)! OPMC’s cardiac program ranks among the best in the nation. OPMC’s cardiac program is the only program in the Greater Southeast,  a network of over 800 hospitals, to earn awards in all five American Heart  Association programs including recognitions in stroke, heart failure,  resuscitation, and atrial fibrillation, for two years in a row.  First Coast Cardiovascular Institute is a proud partner of OPMC.  We have been the primary cardiologists treating cardiovascular patients at OPMC  since 2013. Through our partnership, OPMC was able to earn more awards than  any other hospital in the area.

What You Need to Know About Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer affects a large portion of the United States: it is the third most common cancer diagnosis in both genders, according to the American Cancer Society, as well as the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The goods news is that deaths related to colorectal cancer are dropping. The American Cancer Society estimates there are more than 1 million colorectal cancer survivors in the US. Much of this success can be attributed to the robust screening methods we have in place. The most popular screening method is a colonoscopy. The test examines the structure of the colon and rectal to detect any abnormalities. The American Cancer Society recommends having your first colonoscopy done at age 45, if you are average risk. From there, a colonoscopy can be done every 10 years. The intervals between tests may differ based on the findings. If you have a family history of colorectal disease, then you will likely want to start screening earlier than age 45. Talk to your doctor about the best age for you to start. 18 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


SERVICE LINE

FACTS ABOUT THE

Did you know your heart beats

100,000 times a day?

(Source: Cleveland Clinic)

Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 19


PHYSICIAN’S SERVICE SPOTLIGHT LINE

Venous Disease &

Sick of Painful, Achy, & Swollen Legs? Didn’t get the outcome you wanted? Venous disease comes in many forms and is quite common in the US. Varicose veins, a type of venous disease, affects nearly 15% of US adults. One of the most common symptoms of venous disease is swelling. Not only is swelling painful and uncomfortable, but it can also be quite disabling. First Coast Cardiovascular Institute (FCCI) is committed to stopping swelling and other painful symptoms of vein disease. We have been doing this for over 12 years. We start with assessing your symptoms. Swelling is one of the most common symptoms. Other symptoms of venous disease include:

We perform thousands of diagnostic venous procedures every year across Duval, Clay, St. Johns, and Putnam counties. These diagnostic procedures help us recognize what the issue is, so we know how to best care for you. After the diagnosis is made, we begin developing a comprehensive care plan personalized to you. Most patients with venous disease will undergo a procedure. These procedures are typically short in length and painless. Some of the most common procedures we perform include: Venoplasty

• Irritation or itchiness

This is a procedure performed to widen the veins using an inflatable balloon, which results in improved blood flow.

• Darkening of the skin

Stenting

• Pain

Stents are used to keep the veins open to allow for adequate blood flow.

• Skin that changes color • Ulcers

20 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019

Endovascular Laser & Radiofrequency This technique uses heat to treat the underlying causes of varicose veins.


Come get a second opinion from the experts in venous care. Phlebectomy This procedure eliminates persistent varicose veins through a tiny needle puncture. There is a quick recovery time and no large scars as a result of the procedure. Sclerotherapy Sclerotherapy is a type of chemical ablation used to eliminate the appearance of spider or reticular veins. After a procedure is performed, we then focus on the maintenance of your venous health. We educate our patients on the prevention of venous disease and make sure they are continuously monitored. Compression stockings may also help in the prevention and maintenance process by improving blood flow. We are able to order compression stockings for you directly in our office.

SCHEDULE YOUR FREE VEIN SCREENING: Venous screening is a test that takes about 20 minutes to determine your risk level for venous disease. The test involves taking an ultrasound scan of the leg to assess vein function and identify vein blockages that could lead to CVI. Call us at 904.493.3333 to schedule your free vein screening.* *THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT

Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 21


PHYSICIAN’S SPOTLIGHT

The doctor will see you now... We asked you to submit your questions for our doctors.

YOU ASKED... I need to know how to fix my coronary artery spasms and microvascular spasms. These spasms wear me out.

I have a history of deep vein thrombosis I have a on and have been history of deep vein anticoagulants thrombosis and and have been on anticoagulants and am still taking them. am still taking them. I had a I cvc had a cvc filter whichfilter was removed but I am still having pain. which was removed Compression stockings do seem to help. What butnot I am still having some alternative pain.areCompression options? stockings do not seem to help. What are some alternative options? 22 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019

Dr. Khatib says…

Coronary artery spasms is likely an entity that occurs a lot less than we think in day-to-day life. What we used to call coronary spasms when I went to school 30 years ago turns out to be actual blockage and plaque formation. Smokers are more prone to coronary artery spasms. Start with cardiac testing. If you have negative cardiac testing, there is plenty of data to suggest that your prognosis is going to be good, especially if your risk factors are addressed appropriately. If you have negative cardiac testing, pursue risk factor modification with your physician.

Dr. Ali says…

This is most likely associated with obstruction. You may need additional testing such as a venogram or intravascular ultrasound to assess venous patency. The best thing you can do is schedule an appointment with a physician.


HEALTHY LIVING

Is Your Workplace Making You OVERWEIGHT? The short answer, in most cases, is yes. Stuck in the middle of donuts for breakfast, pizza parties for lunch, and sodas from the vending machine, it is almost impossible to resist. Between birthday parties, catered lunches and desserts, there seems to always be a reason to eat at work. While there is nothing wrong with work celebrations, a new federal government survey found that about one-quarter of Americans “acquire” nearly 1,300 calories at work every week. This survey only includes foods that employees did not bring themselves. Essentially the common workplace adds 1,300 free calories to its employees’ diet weekly. When the researchers looked at the foods by calories, pizza was the leading source of calories obtained at work, followed by sandwiches and regular soft drinks.

1

The best action to take is to bring your own lunch.

The secret to a healthier lifestyle is self-control, which isn’t ever easy. Bringing your own lunch to work can help you become more in charge of what you eat on a day-today basis.

2

If you cannot bring your own lunch, seek out healthier options near you.

4

Seek help from your co-workers.

Odds are you are not the only one in the office trying to live a healthier lifestyle. Find a few co-workers and start a lunch club. You can take turns making lunch for one another, share recipes, talk about your experiences, and simply motivate one another to stay on track!

With a quick Google search, you can find all the healthy spots near you. You can always hit your local grocery store; most have premade salads and wraps.

3

Keep healthy snacks on you throughout the day.

Snacks are essential to fighting those unbearable cravings. Try something easy like dips or spreads with nuts or fruit.

If you have seen these habits at your workplace, there are steps you can take to reduce your caloric intake on work days. Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 23


SOCIAL MEDIA RECAP

JACKSO 24 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


ONVILLE Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 25


HEALTHY LIVING

Uncontrolled high blood pressure, or hypertension, is a silent killer amongst us. For many, high blood pressure symptoms are non-existent and without being treated can cause severe damage to your heart, brain and more. An astonishing 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and only about half actually have it under control. Although healthy lifestyle choices are necessary and efficient for lowering blood pressure, you can also try the natural remedies below according to Health Line.

HAWTHORN Hawthorn is a natural plant and a member of the rose family that has been used in some medicines. The flower contains powerful complexes responsible for treating the heart and blood vessels as well as high blood pressure and more. You

Natural Remedies to Lower Blood Pressure can take hawthorn as a pill, liquid extract or put it in your tea!

CINNAMON Cinnamon is s a sweet spice from the bark of an evergreen tree native to Southeast Asia. Studies have suggested the popular spice can lower both blood glucose and total cholesterol. It is also an easy addition to your everyday diet. You can add this natural remedy to cereal or oatmeal in the morning, or give some extra flavor to your stir-fry for lunch or dinner.

BASIL Basil is an herb of the mint family and an easy addition to your heart healthy meals. Basil contains a chemical that has been proven to tighten blood vessels, therefore lowering blood pressure. Pair basil with tomatoes, soups, pastas and more.

26 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


TEAM SPOTLIGHT

Humans of FCCI

Endovascular Fellow

Dr. Tomas Rivera-Bonilla “I remember a patient who had chest pain. He had seen multiple doctors about it and all had told him the same thing: the pain was in his head. He came to me, and I worked with him to try to find out what was going on. Turns out, he had triple vessel disease. He was turned down for surgery so we performed a high-

risk intervention. His chest pain diminished and his life has never been the same. In my field, your patients become your family. I will never forget how the ability to listen and practice compassion changed a man’s life forever.”

Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE 27


SERVICE LINE

FACTS ABOUT THE

The heart pumps blood through 60,000 miles of blood vessels. The United States coast-to-coast is about 2,500 miles. (Source: Cleveland Clinic)

28 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019


89.99

$

HEALTHY LIVING

could help you avoid being another statistic.

Vascular imaging can detect the onset of many heart and vascular diseases so we may have the chance for early prevention & intervention.

The issue. • Most health insurance companies will not pay for vascular screenings without the presence of certain signs and symptoms, even for high-risk individuals. • If you have one or more cardiovascular risk factors, you should consider getting screened. • Check with your insurance company to see if you qualify for vascular screening coverage. If not, our package allows you to be screened at a low cost without having to worry about insurance coverage. Cardiovascular risk factors include a family history, diabetes, high cholesterol, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, high blood pressure, or being overweight. The more risk factors you have, the higher your risk for stroke, heart attack, and other vascular disorders.

Schedule your vascular screening today.

The package. The $89.99 package includes:

Aorta Screening. An ultrasound test to assess your risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

Carotid Artery Screening. An ultrasound test that measures blood flow to detect a carotid blockage

Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) Test. This test can detect a blockage in the leg

www.firstcoastcardio.com | 904.493.3333 Issue 29 Issue 55 2019 2019 || THE THE HEART HEART OF OF JACKSONVILLE JACKSONVILLE 29


PHYSICIAN’S DOCTOR SPOTLIGHT FAVORITES

Doctor Insight

Q

Our phones are constantly evolving and there is always a new feature to make life easier. What new feature would you want to add to your phone to make your life easier? Dr. Khatib – I would love a feature that could prevent me from losing my phone. Dr. Ali - An app that makes me feel like I’m running outside, even when I’m on the treadmill. Dr. Al-Saghir - I need a feature that helps me be two places at once. Dr. Zuberi - I would love a feature that helps me read patients’ minds. Dr. Alnabki - I would like a feature that allows me to smell the food I see in pictures.

Q

Q&A

If you could invent any new device that would make life easier, what would it be? Dr. Punjani - Traveling from place to place takes up too much time. A teleportation device would be ideal for the future. Dr. Lamba - I’m imagining a device that could prevent a heart attack before it happens. Dr. Sasseen - A device that could make all foods vegan-friendly. Dr. Schimmel - A safe device that could get me from one end of the hospital to the other as fast as possible. Dr. Rose - For women, heart attack symptoms are not always the common chest pain as with men. A device that would make it easier for women to detect a heart attack would be useful.

Dr. Snyder - Chocolate cake Dr. Constantin - Burger & fries Dr. Fahdi - Baklava, one of the most popular middle eastern deserts. It is as tasty as it is full of calories. Dr. Rivera-Bonilla - I love real ice cream, if it was healthy I’d eat it all the time. What cultural trend is really popular now, but in five years everyone will look back on and be embarrassed by? Dr. Swain - If I had to take a guess, I would say that I think the “manbun” is the mullet of the 2010’s. Dr. Goel - With technology moving at such a fast pace, I believe all things paper will be vanished within the next five years. Dr. Thielemann - I will never If there was a magic understand the popularity of wand in the future crocks. In five years I think and it could make one they will be irrelevant and unhealthy food item healthy, embarrassing. what would it be? Dr. Hamdani - With the growth of Dr. Illovsky - Cookies are my apple pay, people in five years will favorite. If they were made healthy, probably think it’s ridiculous we I would eat them every day. used to have wallets.

Q

30 THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE | Issue 5 2019

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WORD SEARCH O M B C D V N G U I S G J Y U I K E H H K L K Y N W H L V N P C I Q Z X C B W W Q I E R G L C H X O A B X A U K E Y F I Z V C J U V A E I V H P K W I S P T A O R N J O S V S J Y L R B B W U A X F P T B Z R O S N D R G Z D S Z Q T Z Y H Y R L N T E A J J S X A K O S O Y V B X D E M F G G Y Y U U N T Y X M W R D V V H R B K I A P G E O W U U H P S U Z E X B T G A U A B K S Z L A D I E B C P D L F P K H O N L X S Y K R E N B G T D P B W H E A D K M J Z W M U R C T W A V T O K R Q L L N L T K B N A O H U O R D U M S L X G E A S O E Q R Z K Y C P A Y U Y B A A L E D A Y E C N O I S N E T R E P Y H J L K S L H A G S Z G O I X I N Y B H Q O N G B X Y U A H U O R C A T H E T E R I Z A T I O N E B S G O O Q C Y O G J C Y I W R O C D K I J Y K C V D D C I J S L G D E M P O K M K I T J Z C K E R U A F W N I A D Y O P Y C A Z D W X C T O N S L G P E M M C Z V D Q O L R H Q D H L G E U R U P A T K W E S N O A D V H J O E Z U B G V D U O Y O W E L C Z P D S R T X P J V N S S H W T X N C S V E D M B B Z M K T F D M J T L O S V Q B E F V H Q E E W J Z Y Z Y N X Q B P M J K M U A V Z R K Q O C B Y X M V H I I D L V Q N L S U L R A L N H A B Z G H W X N N R N X B A Q B E A R F U E I F K H Q A F L T D O O C I S F Y L Q W D T F B P Z H T G D U Q R B AMPUTATION

BLOODPRESSURE

ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY

ENDOVASCULAR

HYPERTENSION

INTRAVASCULAR

PULMONOLOGY

CATHETERIZATION HEARTDISEASE ULTRASOUND

VENOUS Issue 5 2019 | THE HEART OF JACKSONVILLE

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The Heart of Jacksonville | Edition 5  

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