The Heart of Jacksonville Clinic | Fall 2017 | Part 2

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TheHEaRT OF JACKSONVILLE CLINIC

A publication of

How First Coast Cardiovascular Institute is redefining the patient experience.

Fall 2017

IN IT FOR THE LONG RUN Fostering healthy lifestyles in Northeast Florida

TAKING HEART HEALTH TO THE NEXT LEVEL Fall 2017 A publication of

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OF JACKSONVILLE CLINIC

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What We Do. Why We Do It. Primary Care Personalized to You At Jacksonville Clinic, we form lifelong partnerships with each of our patients to provide a personalized medical approach. Our primary care physicians recognize that health care starts with the patient.

We recognize the valuable role each patient plays in their health, and we treat each patient as a critical team member in developing long-term care plans. Our team

OUR MISSION To enhance quality of life by providing cutting-edge care with a team of compassionate experts and advance medicine through research, education and patient empowerment.

of doctors and nurses takes an individualized approach to your health. Dr. Khalil Afsh

We are more than just a general health clinic. The Jacksonville Clinic team works closely with our multispecialty partners at First Coast Cardiovascular Institute (FCCI), to ensure our patients receive integrated care. Through our partnership with FCCI, our patients

OUR VISION

have access to a team of world-renowned specialists in the ďŹ elds of cardiovascular medicine, sleep medicine,

To inspire hope and excel in the care of individuals throughout the continuum of healthcare from wellness and prevention to the most complex disease states.

wound care and pulmonology. For specialties outside of our practice, we have lifelong relationships with other specialists throughout Northeast Florida who we trust to care for our patients.

Our goal is to ensure the highest quality of care for our Dr. Oscar Rodas

patients, no matter where they are on the continuum of health, from prevention to the most complex disease states. Sincerely,

The Team at Jacksonville Clinic

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How Primary Care Can

Improve Health Outcomes We traditionally think of our primary care physician as the doctor we go to when we are feeling a cough, the sniffles or a cold. However, primary care physicians can also play a crucial role in improving your health and keeping healthcare costs low.

Ibrahim Aloustwani, Director of Operations, does some push-ups between meetings.

Can’t Hit the Gym?

Hit your Desk! By Steve Milano

Adding short exercises to your daily routine — even if only for 5 or 10 minutes — can help maintain and improve your health. If you can’t make it to the gym, there are mini exercises that you can do right at your desk to keep you in shape. Benefits of Micro Workouts - Generally speaking, micro workouts refer to a period of exercise under 10 minutes. Micro workouts can help boost your metabolism, burn calories, build muscle and challenge your cardiovascular system without even leaving your office. Sedentary Lifestyles Increasing - Between sleeping,

sitting at a desk, commuting and eating meals, most people are sedentary for up to 18 hours a day. Health professionals are recommending that office and home workers perform some form of physical activity during the day to compensate for the number of hours they sit at their desk. Deskercise - Try exercising at your desk at least once each morning

and afternoon. ere is also a variety of desk equipment available such as standing desks or desk treadmills that can reduce the amount of time you are sedentary.

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• Resistance Band Exercises: Buy a set of resistance bands that lets you place your feet in the bottom straps at one end, while you hold the bands with your hands at the other end. There are many arm and leg exercises you can perform that will build muscle and elevate your heart rate. For example, perform bicep curls by letting your arms hang by your sides with your palms facing forward, then slowly raise and lower your hands to your shoulders, bending your arms at the elbow. • Desk Calisthenics: Use your chair or desk for support to do push-ups, sitting leg raises or chair dips. If you’re sitting at your desk, use your arms to raise yourself off of your chair. Do this for several minutes with your feet on the floor, then stick your legs straight out. You can also stand with your back to your desk, placing your palms on your desk as you raise and lower yourself. • Other Office Exercises: Stairs are another great workout. Try walking them briskly two at a time, or jogging up them quickly one at a time while lifting your knees high. Going up stairs works your calves, while going down stairs works your quads. If you have room near your desk, you can also do jumping jacks, squats or even jog in place. If you don’t have stairs in your office setting, try taking a walk around the building.

e key to maintaining and improving your strength, flexibility and heart health at work is by including short workouts in your daily routine. In case you need another reason, exercise can also improve your cognitive function, according to Stanford University researchers. Your boss will thank us for that one.

You can improve your chances of preventing disease by scheduling regular appointments with your primary care physician. The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion states that preventive steps can detect early warning signs before your symptoms morph into a more serious condition. Additionally, preventive services can help catch a disease in an earlier, more treatable state, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. What does this mean for your health and the healthcare system at large?

All of these benefits amount to two key goals in our healthcare system: reducing healthcare costs and keeping patients healthy. A study published in the Journal of Health Affairs found routine check-ups can reduce the cost of care. This is attributed to regular preventive screenings, open communication and streamlined health history that ensure coordinated care. In addition to cost savings, primary care physicians can also save patients time, hassle and confusion when they need to see a specialist for more comprehensive care. It is likely that your primary care physician has longstanding relationships with specialists they can trust. Therefore, patients can rest assured that their primary care physician will refer them to a specialist that will best meet their needs.

Primary care providers typically place prevention at the forefront of their care. Prevention can reduce or even eliminate treatment and suffering for patients. Patients will have to undergo less treatment or, in many instances, no treatment at all, when the provider is able to prevent conditions. Most importantly, increased use of preventive services would likely save more than 100,000 lives every year, according to a Dr. Ulises Caraballo, primary care physician, listens intently to his patient. report published by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. It’s important to have a strong relationship with your primary care provider to maintain your health. Keep Patients who are regularly seeking care from their an open relationship with your doctor and let them primary care provider are also less likely to find know when you start experiencing symptoms themselves in the emergency room and hospital, as this can have immense benefits to your health. according to a study published in Health Affairs. Since primary care physicians see their patients To schedule an appointment with a Jacksonville Clinic regularly, a patient is less likely to get to the point primary care physician, call us at 904.622.9035. where the emergency room or hospital is their only option for prompt medical care.

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Physician Spotlight :

Marinated, Grilled Portobello Burgers

Dr. Zwinda Ortiz-Roldan

No one can deny the incredible taste of a juicy, meaty hamburger. However, a traditional hamburger can be quite high in saturated fat, cholesterol and calories. If you want a healthy version, try this marinated Portobello mushroom burger recipe from our friends at Native Sun. Portobello mushrooms are not only rich in nutrients such as fiber, potassium and B vitamins; they also contain less calories, fat and cholesterol than a conventional burger. The best part of all — it tastes good — so you get the best of both worlds.

Dr. Ortiz-Roldan fulfilled the goal she set for herself by attending Universidad Central del Caribe School of Medicine in Puerto Rico. During her time in medical school, she was inspired by how she could use her profession to care for families. “I have the privilege of taking care of many generations of the same family,” says Dr. Ortiz-Roldan. “My family medicine specialty allows me to care for the family as a unit.”

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When she decided to specialize in family medicine, Dr. Ortiz-Roldan moved to Jacksonville to pursue her family medicine residency at University Medical Center of Jacksonville. Twenty years later, Dr. Ortiz-Roldan still enjoys practicing in the Jacksonville community. Dr. Ortiz-Roldan is fluent in both English and Spanish, allowing her to break language barriers with her patients. “It is unfortunate that language barriers can often lead to less successful health outcomes,” says Dr. Ortiz-Roldan. Outside of the clinic, Dr. Ortiz-Roldan loves to travel. She particularly enjoys the places where great ancient civilizations previously existed, such as Athens and Rome. She would like to continue traveling and counts the Great Wall of China, the Egyptian pyramids and the Grand Canyon among her bucket list.

Fall 2017

Proficiency in both English and Spanish allows me to ensure patients fully understand their plan of care.

From a young age, Dr. Zwinda OrtizRoldan knew that she wanted to pursue a career in medicine so she could help others. “I was intrigued by the intricacy of the human body and how every element works harmoniously,” says Dr. Ortiz-Roldan. “The disease process can be overwhelming, both emotionally and physically for the patient. I knew I wanted to play a role in facilitating the process for my patients.”

Aside from her travels, Dr. OrtizRoldan has home improvement on her bucket list. She enjoys watching HGTV for inspiration, tips and tricks. On a lazy Saturday, Dr. Ortiz-Roldan likes to catch up on movies she has recorded on the DVR and HGTV’s “House Hunters International.” Dr. Ortiz-Roldan calls medicine a healing ministry. This is what keeps her going day in and day out. She is motivated by the idea that each day brings a new journey and a new opportunity.

Ingredients

Method

FOR THE MARINADE:

FOR THE TOPPINGS:

3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

4 oz shredded plant-based mozzarella, such as Daiya

2 Tbsp Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp maple syrup 2 cloves minced garlic 1 Tbsp olive oil FOR THE BURGERS: 4 Portobello mushroom caps 1-1/2 tsp Fresh Jax Herbes de Provence French Sea Salt (or other Herbes de Provence blend with salt) 4 whole grain buns

Thinly sliced red onion 1 avocado, sliced thin Fresh Romaine

1. Whisk the marinade ingredients in a wide covered container and place the Portobello mushroom caps in, tossing well to coat; let marinate for one hour or up to overnight. Remove from marinade and season with Herbes de Provence French Sea Salt. 2. Preheat the grill to medium-high and place mushroom caps on grill grates, top side down; cook 7 minutes; flip, top with 1 oz shredded mozzarella cheese and cook an additional 8 minutes. Toast whole grain buns on grill for the last minute and place a mushroom cap on the lower half of each bun. 3. Top burgers with red onion, avocado and fresh Romaine and place the top half of the burger bun on top of the burger and fixings.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Ortiz-Roldan, please call 904.727.5151. Fall 2017

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Our Team is ON THE RUN! We are always encouraging our patients to live the healthiest life possible. We start by being an example. Our dedicated running club hits the trails each week.

• Get fueled: Don’t underestimate the power of getting fuel before you run! The ideal meal, about an hour and a half before your run, is a 200-calorie meal that consists of complex carbs and proteins. Not eating enough before you run, can make you feel fatigued; eating too close can cause an upset stomach. And don’t forget to eat after your run. It is recommended that you eat a 4:1 ratio of carbs to protein 30-40 minutes after your run to allow your muscles to rebuild quickly. • Warm up: Before starting your run, be sure to warm up all muscle groups with stretching and a light walk. This will reduce the risk of injury and muscle tightness during your run. • Stay hydrated: Remember to drink, drink, drink! Drinking 16 ounces of water an hour before your run will prevent you from dehydration and improve your performance. • Change of scenery: Try a variety of different routes and trails so you always have a new location to look forward to.

$89.99 could help you avoid being another statistic. Vascular imaging can detect the onset of many heart and vascular diseases so we may have the chance for early prevention & intervention. The Issue: • • • •

Some USEFUL TIPS and TRICKS According to the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, “Even five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years, compared to not running at all.”

• Join a running group: Running with a group will keep you motivated and is a great way to meet people in your community — just ask members of our club!

TIPS FOR RUNNERS:

• Develop a plan: There are great running plans available online or at your local running store. You can also download many apps that map out a running trail for you (such as “Map My Run”).

• Invest in a good pair of running shoes that cater to your running style: There are many different types of running shoes that will boost your running.

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Most health insurance companies will not pay for vascular screenings without the presence of certain signs and symptoms, even for high-risk individuals. If you have one or more cardiovascular risk factors, you should consider getting screened. Check with your insurance company to see if you qualify for vascular screening coverage. If not, our package allows you to be screened at a low cost without having to worry about insurance coverage. Cardiovascular risk factors include a family history, diabetes, high cholesterol, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, high blood pressure, or being overweight. The more risk factors you have, the higher your risk for stroke, heart attack, and other vascular disorders.

Schedule your vascular screening today. The $89.99 package includes: Aorta Screening An ultrasound test to assess your risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Carotid Artery Screening An ultrasound test that measures blood flow to detect a carotid blockage (stroke) Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) Test This test can detect a blockage in the leg (peripheral arterial disease)

www.firstcoastcardio.com | 904.493.3333

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To Be An ENGAGED

HOW PATIENT

MANAGE BLOOD PRESSURE MANAGE BLOOD PRESSURE

1

UNDERSTAND BLOOD PRESSURE READINGS AND LEVELS

The first step to managing blood pressure is to understand what the levels mean and what is considered normal, prehypertension, hypertension and hypertensive crisis. heart.org/BPlevels

Systolic

1

The top number, the higher of the two numbers, measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats (when the heart muscle contracts).

Blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers, written as a ratio like this:

The bottom number, the lower of the two numbers, measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart is resting between heart beats. 3

THE AHA RECOMMENDATION FOR HEALTHY BLOOD PRESSURE IS : Blood Pressure Category

Systolic mm Hg (upper #)

Normal

< 120

and

<80

Prehypertension

120 –139

or

80 –89

High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Stage 1

140 –159

or

90 –99

High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Stage 2

160 or >

or

100 or >

Hypertensive Crisis (Emergency care needed)

> 180

or

> 110

2

TIPS FOR SUCCESS EAT BETTER Eat a diet full of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish and nuts. Limit sugary foods and drinks, fatty or processed meats, and salt. 4

GET ACTIVE

Diastolic 2 Read as "117 over 76 millimeters of mercury."

3

Diastolic mm Hg (lower #)

LEARN AND TRACK LEVELS Medical providers can take blood pressure readings and provide recommendations. Check.Change.Control helps track and manage progress in reducing blood pressure. Track online with ccctracker.com*

Physical activity not only helps control blood pressure, but also weight and stress levels.5

KEEP A HEALTHY WEIGHT If you're overweight, even a slight weight loss can prevent high blood pressure.6

QUIT SMOKING Every time you smoke a cigarette, it can cause a temporary increase in blood pressure.7

LEARN THE SALTY SIX Limit the amount of sodium you’re eating each day. Learn the Salty Six — common foods loaded with excess sodium.

Cold Cuts & Cured Meats Pizza Breads & Rolls

*Use campaign code HEART to create a Tracker account. 1. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Encyclopedia/Heart-Encyclopedia_UCM_445084_Encyclopedia.jsp?levelSelected=&title=systolic blood pressure 2. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Encyclopedia/Heart-Encyclopedia_UCM_445084_Encyclopedia.jsp?levelSelected=&title=diastolic blood pressure 3. Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, et al. Seventh report of the joint national committee on prevention, detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure. Hypertension. 2003;42(6):1206-1252. doi: 10.1161/01.HYP.0000107251.49515.c2. 4. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Encyclopedia/Heart-Encyclopedia_UCM_445084_Encyclopedia.jsp?levelSelected=&title=DASH diet 5. Warburton DE, Nicol CW, Bredin SS. Health benefits of physical activity: The evidence. CMAJ. 2006;174(6):806. 6. Appel LJ, Brands MW, Daniels SR, Karanja N, Elmer PJ, Sacks FM. Dietary approaches to prevent and treat hypertension. Hypertension. 2006;47(2):297. doi: 10.1161/01.HYP.0000202568.01167.B6. 7. Najem B, Houssière A, Pathak A, et al. Acute cardiovascular and sympathetic effects of nicotine replacement therapy. Hypertension. 2006;47(6):1164. doi: 10.1161/01.HYP.0000219284.47970.34.

Dr. Chris Rathburn greets his patient.

Medication Compliance

Sign Up for the Patient Portal

According to the American Heart Association, poor medication compliance is responsible for 125,000 American lives every year and a total of $300 billion annually from costs related to additional doctors’ visits, emergency department visits and hospitalizations. ese staggering statistics warrant talking about this crucial issue more often.

e patient portal is a great way to manage your health with the touch of a button and communicate with your healthcare provider outside of your appointment. Most patient portals will allow you to view lab results, request prescription refills, access educational materials and contact your healthcare team.

Ask Questions

Soup

LEARN MORE AT HEART.ORG/MYLIFECHECK AND HEART.ORG/HBP

If you conduct an online search of “patient engagement,” you will receive upwards of 31 million results. Healthcare providers are looking to increase their patients’ involvement in their care. Patients are also looking to become more active participants in their health. Both sides of the spectrum agree that patients who take part in their care have better outcomes and often drive costs down. Sounds great, right? Here are a few tips from our physicians on how to effectively engage in your care.

Chicken

Your provider understands that consistently remembering to take your medication can be challenging. Keep an open relationship with your doctor about your medication. 1. If you have skipped a dose or two, let your provider know. There are helpful tools such as the patient portal that will remind you when to take your medication.

Come to your appointment with a list of questions for your physician. Remember that your physician will often be the best source of reliable healthcare information that is personalized to your condition.

Shop the Market Do your research. Consider the following before scheduling an appointment with a physician:

2. If you experience barriers in taking the medication such as cost or side effects, talk to your pharmacist about your options.

• How do their out-of-pocket costs compare to those in the area?

3. If you doubt the effectiveness of your medication, express your concern to your provider.

• Do they have a location convenient to you?

4. Talk to your pharmacist about medication management. This includes what time of day to take the medication, which foods to avoid, and how the medication interacts with other medications you may be taking.

• Are they able to offer testing in their offices?

• Do they have patient education resources available on their website? • Have previous patients been happy with the care they received?

Burritos & Tacos ©2017 American Heart Association 1/17DS11671

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OPTIMISTIC

Q&A

PEOPLE May LIVE

Longer

We asked our team of Jacksonville Clinic nurse practitioners and physician assistants...

IF YOU COULD GIvE YOUR PATIENTS ONE PIECE OF ADvICE, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Katie Wendt, PA-C

Ruth King, PA-C

“ My advice to my patients is that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. It is easier to stop something from happening in the first place than to repair the damage after it has happened.”

“ Don’t skip your annual check-up with your family doctor. As primary care providers, we are at the front line of patient care. If you skip your check-up, you could put yourself at risk for missing underlying health concerns.”

Raquel Perez, ARNP

Whitney Nimmo-Olsen, ARNP

“ Do not be afraid to ask questions about your condition. The more you understand, the more likely you are to successfully manage your condition.”

“ Invest time and energy into health promotions and prevention. This is the best way to improve overall health and well being.”

Dr. Mohammad F. Taj brightens the room wherever he goes.

We know optimistic people are generally cheerful and pleasant to be around. A study recently found that even your heart doctor will thank you for an optimistic attitude.

A study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that heart attack survivors who had an optimistic outlook were more likely to live longer. e study examined more than 600 individuals under the age of 65 between 1992-1993. Researchers followed up with the patients in 2015 and found that participants who had scored in the highest third of optimism levels were 33 percent more likely to have survived than those who had scored in the middle and lowest third. ere’s something to be said about having a positive attitude! Optimism in this context refers to a hopeful outlook of the future. is doesn’t mean turning a blind eye to hardships but rather learning how to deal with the hardships in a productive way. Optimists typically take proactive steps in their health, compared to pessimists who can often engage in health-damaging activities. Increasing your optimism levels can take time and personal growth.

TEST OUT THESE STRATEGIES TO HELP INCREASE YOUR OPTIMISM: Set reasonable goals for yourself.

• While it might sound great to become a marathon runner overnight, setting unrealistic goals will only set you up for failure. Try increasing your distance a little more every day instead. Keep a journal of your progress toward your goals.

• The journal will serve as a tool to show you just how far you have come. Take the time to tell yourself three things you are grateful for everyday.

• If you are feeling extra daring, try thinking of three new things you are grateful for every day. Identify stressors and strategies to cope with them.

• It isn’t always easy to avoid stress. Instead, learn how to deal with your stress in a productive manner. Spend time around people who uplift you.

• There is always enough time for this one.

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HOW to turn YOUR

Selfie Stick INTO

HEALTHY LIVING

A HEALTHY Stick

Herbs

Self-foot exams involve a patient examining the bottom of their foot to detect the early onset of ulcers that may have long-term consequences. “Complications can develop quickly and become problematic at a rapid rate,” says Dr. Desmond Bell, Wound Care Specialist. “I’ve seen significant foot complications that have been detected earlier as a result of self-foot exams,” he adds. Dr. Bell emphasizes to his diabetic patients that one of the simplest yet most beneficial practices is to examine your feet twice a day. When performed Your selfie stick can be a powerful tool in consistently, self-foot exams are a major preventing life-threatening ulcers. step toward prevention. “Many amputations are preventable,” says Dr. David Swain, Wound Care Specialist. “Often times, it comes down to patient education and empowering the patient with the knowledge they need to manage their condition.” The onset of complications can be visible through redness, breaks or swelling of the skin, to name a few. That is what makes self-foot exams so effective. However, conducting these self-foot exams can be particularly problematic for the diabetic population. “We realize that not every diabetic has good eyesight or is able to use a mirror, which is often recommended for checking the bottom of your feet,” says Dr. Swain. Dr. Bell has come up with a simple solution to this challenge using a cell phone and a selfie stick. Follow these steps to turn your selfie stick into a healthy stick: 1. Attach your smartphone to a selfie stick. 2. Maneuver the phone into position so that the screen is facing the bottom of your foot. 3. Capture the image.

We often think of herbs as the leafy greens that we put on our food to add a little bit of culinary flair. But did you know that adding herbs to your diet can result in tremendous health benefits? Keep reading to learn more about how to incorporate some of our favorite herbs into your diet. Basil – There are more than 60 varieties of basil that are used as seasoning for many types of food. Basil is most commonly used to make pesto, but it also tastes great in other pasta sauces, or on salads and sandwiches. Basil provides nutrients essential for cardiovascular health, such as vitamin A, through its concentration of carotenoids like beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a powerful anti-oxidant that helps prevent cholesterol build-up in the blood vessel walls, which can initiate the development of atherosclerosis.

Thyme – Thyme is an excellent source of vitamins C and A, iron, manganese, copper and dietary fiber. Thymol – This herb has well documented health benefits including a variety of flavenoids, which increases its antioxidant capacity. Rosemary – There are many foods that pair well with rosemary such as vegetables, potatoes, white beans, chicken, lamb and fish. Rosemary contains substances that are useful for stimulating the immune system, increasing circulation and improving digestion. It also contains anti-inflammatory compounds that may make it useful for reducing the severity of asthma attacks. Oregano – This herb goes well in Mediterranean dishes, salad dressings, marinara sauce, pizza and soup. Oregano is a strong source of vitamin K, manganese, iron, dietary fiber and calcium.

4. Enlarge the image. Take note of any redness, breaks or swelling in the skin. If you notice any causes of concern, send a copy of the photo to your doctor’s office. If you have further questions about what to look for, contact your physician.

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Read What Patients Are Saying About Us On the Web

Jacksonville Clinic & First Coast Cardiovascular Institute

WORDSearch

Check out what patients had to say on the web about our dedicated group of primary care physicians.

How many words can you spot? Q J M F V I K U E L F N M R H

T V N D A M P E P V F O T D E

A G F W J S N R O F R I W D A

E P E R P I E A C Q U T W K R

B Q O H L M T C S L N A L S T

T X N G W I U Y O M N T H P T

R C Q J G T L R H Q I I E U C

A G X M L P G A T H N D A K C

E A W E B O E M E E G E L C S

H S A D I J P I T C M M T E E

W V X I D K P R S M Z G H H X

K W C C K N G P G T Z K B C K

R C C I N I L C X A J N H E N

F X M N X C O M P A S S I O N

K C M E D O C T O R W A U P H

FCCI DOCTOR GLUTEN HEART PRIMARY CARE OPTIMISM

“ Jacksonville Clinic is a top-notch group! You won't find a more dedicated, friendly and efficient team to handle your health care needs.” –A Google review

“ My wife and I are super picky about the doctors we see. We look for physicians that are open minded, up-to-date with the most recent medical findings, and open to new ideas. Dr. Afsh is a very intelligent and qualified physician, who inspires confidence.” –A Google review

CHECKUP JAX CLINIC HEARTBEAT RUNNING COMPASSION MEDICINE STETHOSCOPE HEALTH MEDITATION

“ (I’m) very happy with Dr. Taj. He solved my blood pressure problems on the first visit. Other doctors worked months with no results.”

“ My family and I have been patients of Dr. Caraballo for five years and I can say he is excellent. His bedside manners are great. He is never in a rush. I would never change this doctor’s office for any other one in town. Five stars to Dr. Caraballo and his staff.”

–A Healthgrades review

–A vitals comment

TheHEaRT OF JACKSONVILLE CLINIC

Interested in Writing for The Heart of Jacksonville Clinic? We are always on the lookout for talented writers who are passionate about healthy living. Sound like you?

“ Dr. Roldan has been my primary care provider for more than 20 years. The staff has always shown care and concern for the patients. I would highly recommend to new patients.” –A Healthgrades review

“ (Dr. Rodas is) thorough, careful and conservative in his recommendations. He explains his thinking in detail. The staff is genuine, kind and detailoriented. I love their attitude. Overall it's a fantastic practice.” –A Healthgrades review

Email your resume and two writing samples to: marketing@firstcoastcardio.com.

*These reviews have been edited for spelling and grammar. 15

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2017 Social Media

RECAP

Jax Clinic FCCI @hearthealthjax

#jaxdocs #hearthealth Fall 2017

Q&A Q:

What is the best compliment you have ever received?

Dr. Afsh: “ The best compliments that I have received have come from my patients. There is nothing better than a happy patient!”

Q:

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Dr. Taj: “ My coworkers give the best compliments about my work ethic.”

Doctor FAVORITES

Q:

What is your favorite sundae topping?

Dr. Tecson: “ I like to add something healthy to my ice cream sundae such as fruit.”

What is your favorite city in the world?

Dr. Caraballo: “ There is no place like home. My favorite city is Cartagena, Colombia.”

Dr. Rodas: “ I enjoy visiting Guatemala City, Guatemala, where I was born.”

Dr. Ortiz-Roldan: “ I visited Vatican City and it was breathtaking!”

Dr. De La Hoz: “ Anywhere in South America!”

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