The Gorge Magazine - Winter 2022-23

Page 9

WINTER 2022-23 thegorgemagazine.com
Winter on the Water How to SUP in the cold months Staycation Guide Seek out some R&R close to home Discovery Center Take a trip through Gorge history
LIVING AND EXPLORING IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE
Stephanie Howell broker, or/wa 509-596-6177 stephanie@copperwest.com Candice Richards principalbroker, or/wa 541-912-5999 candice@copperwest.com Not Pictured Anna Guemperlein, Broker OR/WA Anne Medenbach, CCIM OR/WA • Bob Smith, Broker OR/WA Chelsea Finson, Broker OR/WA • Chris Schanno, Broker OR Elsa Kurahara, Broker OR/WA Hunter Lowery, Broker OR/WA • Nate DeVol, Broker OR Rich McBride, Broker OR • Samantha Irwin, Broker OR Sky Morgan, Broker OR Ross Henry broker, or/wa 503-709-3564 ross@copperwest.com Judy Dutcher broker, or/wa 541-490-6327 judy@copperwest.com Phineas England broker, or/wa 541-490-9666 phineas@copperwest.com Carolyn Layson principalbroker, or 541-993-0113 carolyn@copperwest.com Michael Foster broker, or/wa 509-310-9502 michael@copperwest.com Vicki Brennan broker, or 541-399-3678 vicki@copperwest.com Julie Gilbert pc broker, or/wa 541-490-4433 julie@copperwest.com Cyndee Kurahara broker, or/wa 541-490-1396 cyndee@copperwest.com Melissa Alvarado broker, or 541-980-8977 melissa@copperwest.com Paul Thompson principalbroker, or/wa 541-490-1044 paul@copperwest.com Erin V Pollard broker, or/wa 541-705-7798 erin@copperwest.com Elise Byers broker, or/wa 541-490-3769 elise@copperwest.com Sean Aiken principalbroker, or/wa 541-490-8277 seanaiken@copperwest.com Bill Irving principalbroker, or/wa 503-816-9251 bill@copperwest.com Rita Ketler managingprincipalbroker 541-400-0449 rita@copperwest.com Cody Cornett broker, or/wa 219-916-0451 cody@copperwest.com Maui Meyer owner/princ brokeror/wa 541-490-3051 maui@copperwest.com Dennis Morgan principalbroker, or/wa 541-980-3669 dennis@copperwest.com Elizabeth Turner genmgr/broker, or/wa 541-490-6552 elizabeth@copperwest.com CopperWest.com | 541-386-2330 Client Focused. Community Inspired. Since 2001. Blaine Franger / www.BlaineBethanyGallery.com
FindYourOneofaKind CHEMISTRYJEWELRY 310OakStreet,Suite103-HoodRiver chemistryjewelry.com
4 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE OUR GORGE 10 VENTURES 14 CREATE 18 IMBIBE 54 PARTAKE 58 YOUR GORGE OUTSIDE 40 WINTER ON THE WATER With proper preparation, you can paddleboard during the cold months
ARTS + CULTURE 44 WHERE THE PAST COMES TO LIFE Take a fascinating trip through history at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum
WELLNESS 48 MERCADO DEL VALLE Odell’s unique market offers fruits, veggies and a whole lot more
By Sarah Sullivan
CONTENTS | WINTER 2022-23
Courtesy
of Kings & Daughters Brewery
40 HOW TO TAKE A WINTER STAYCATION A mini vacation in the Gorge lies right out your door, promising a delightful blend of recreation and relaxation
Jennifer Gulizia
FEATURE 32 48
14
Zach Spidell
18
David Hanson
HOME + JEWELRY SINCE 1994 305 OAK STREET DOWNTOWN HOOD RIVER HOME + JEWELRY SINCE 1994 305 OAK STREET DOWNTOWN HOOD RIVER 54 1-386-6188

HoodRiverProperties.com

HOOD RIVER $699,000: Solid ranch style home in well established neighborhood just minutes from town. Lovely mature landscaping both in front & back yards. Interior: vaulted LR, beautiful polished hardwood floor in open DR/Kitchen w/SS appliances, primary BR/ BA, two guest BRs, guest BA, and laundry closet AND thru French doors is a tiled, beamed, very sunny Sunroom. Exterior: step out into the patio/backyard w/lush garden, trees & lawn. Perfect spot to relax and get away. RMLS 22575476

NEW PRICE

WHITE SALMON $675,000: Solitude-Minutes from the Hood River Bridge. This well-maintained home and property are as Tidy as they come! Mature landscaping and large trees surround this 1 ac parcel giving you a Park-Like setting. 3bd/2ba, 2422 sqft, covered parking, workshop and a backyard that may be your dream come true! 3 minute drive from downtown White Salmon. Listed by Laurie Johnston OR & WA Broker. RMLS 22256090

NEW LISTING

HOOD RIVER $685,000: Charming 1994 ranch home. Close to all that Hood River has to offer. 3 beds/2 baths + a laundry room. New roof and exterior paint in 2019. Sprinkler system, gas range, great yard space, patio and shed. 1603 sq. ft. Listed by Jill Guenther OR Broker. RMLS 22491366

Years ago, we bought our dining room table at Sustain Interiors in Hood River. is falls into the category of full disclosure, I suppose, because we have a story about the interior design and furnishings company in this issue. But when our writer Don Campbell turned in the piece, it particularly resonated with me. We bought the table after looking endlessly and fruitlessly, far and wide (though we always prefer to buy locally). We’d recently remodeled our small home and wanted a table that would be practical and timeless, hardy enough to hold up to our two young kids but sophisticated enough for dinner parties. Our open concept kitchen elevated our dining area to a central part of our main living space, so any table would gure prominently in our day-to-day living.

We’d nearly given up nding the perfect table. en one day, on an unrelated mission seeking backsplash tile, we found ourselves at Sustain. And there it was, sitting among tile samples and kitchen counter mock-ups. We learned it was made by a regional artisan with r salvaged from the Columbia River. We loved it immediately. Not only was it the perfect table, but we could support a local business and it had a meaningful story behind it.

Now, nearly a decade later, all the family meals, holiday gatherings, school projects and game nights that have taken place on and around it have made that table a beloved part of our home. Our table is, in microcosm, what Sustain’s mission is all about. “My philosophy is if you build or create something beautiful, people want to sustain that and take care of it,” said the company’s founder, Heith England. You can read more about his vision for sustainable, lasting design beginning on page 10. e company recently expanded with the opening of its Sustain Home showroom — the perfect complement to the space it occupies in the former Sheppard’s building, which the company tastefully updated while maintaining its historic essence. We’ll not ever need another dining room table, but I love to pop in now and then just to browse. Come to think of it, we are in the market for the perfect lamp.

Winter is upon us, but that doesn’t mean you have to hunker down. Writer Molly Allen turned to some local experts for tips on how to go stand-up paddling during the cold months (page 40). And check out our Staycation feature for some great ideas on creating your own winter vacation right here in the Gorge (page 32). If you’ve never been to the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum — or if it’s been a while — go! It’s a fascinating place to while away a winter’s day and you’re guaranteed to come away with newfound knowledge about our amazing Gorge (page 44). However you spend the winter, enjoy, and thanks for reading.

About the Cover

Hood River photographer Jennifer Gulizia took our cover photo on a cold November day during a group downwind paddle from Blalock Canyon to Arlington. It was the pioneering run that opened the door to downwinders in the eastern Gorge on SUP, SUP foil and wing foil. The 10-mile run is known for wide stretches of river and big swell when the west wind blows. gorge-us.photo.com

When you have read this issue please pass it on to a friend or recycle it. Together we can make a difference in preserving and conserving our resources.

6 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
WINTER 2022-23 thegorgemagazine.com LIVING AND EXPLORING IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE Winter
the Water How to SUP in the cold months Staycation Guide Seek out some R&R close to home Discovery Center Take a trip through Gorge history
on
Carol@DonNunamaker.com RealEstateinTheGorge.com
EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR

Janet Cook

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Renata Kosina

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Jody Thompson

ADVERTISING SALES

Chelsea Marr and Rachel Harrison

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Molly Allen, Don Campbell, Kacie McMackin, Peter Murphy, Sarah Sullivan

COVER PHOTOGRAPHER Jennifer Gulizia

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jennifer Gulizia, David Hanson, Renata Kosina, Kacie McMackin, Kelly Turso

TO ADVERTISE

IN THE GORGE MAGAZINE please contact Jody Thompson jthompson@thegorgemagazine.com

VISIT US ON SOCIAL MEDIA @thegorgemagazine on Instagram

THE GORGE MAGAZINE

600 E. Port Marina Way, Suite B and C P.O. Box 390 Hood River, Oregon 97031

We appreciate your feedback. Please email comments to: jcook@thegorgemagazine.com

The Gorge Magazine is published by Columbia Gorge News, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Columbia Gorge News, LLC. Articles and photographs appearing in The Gorge Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily those of The Gorge Magazine, Columbia Gorge News, LLC, or its employees, staff or management. All RIGHTS RESERVED.

The Gorge Magazine is printed at Eagle Web Press.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 7
WINTER 2022-23 Eggceptional Breakfast & Lunch  Open Daily 6am-2pm 1313 Oak St., Hood River  541-386-1127  eggrivercafe.com A FAVORITE OF LOCALS AND VISITORS FOR DECADES Specials every Friday - Sunday Current specials menu announced every Thursday on our Facebook & Instagram 10% discount for seniors and veterans
THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 9 GORGEour 10 The showroom at Sustain Home in Hood River features luxury furnishings and décor. ventures 10 create 14 imbibe 18 your gorge 58
Kelly Turso

Enduring Style

Sustain Home showcases the Hood River interior design company’s mission to create lasting beauty

Chances are you wandered past the original Sustain Interiors multiple times at its location on State Street in downtown Hood River. It was rather, well, subterranean, cloistered, hard to nd, and well below eye-level — if you noticed it at all. But its mission is anything but obscured.

Sustain has blossomed into a regional interior design in uence all its own. Its collective quest is to build a community of artisans, craftspeople, designers, project managers and builders to re ect a kind of authentically emergent Paci c Northwest aesthetic that is greater than the sum of its parts. eir edict in all things is to build something beautiful that will last.

It has all manifested itself through the sheer will, design sense and a kind of artistic fearlessness of its founder and employees that now ll its new Sustain Home location in the historic Sheppard’s building, the former location of the longtime but now relocated Hood River supplier of heavy equipment. With its slightly rough and industrial exterior, it is now an energized retail space for a broad design swath of products and services that can breathe life into a homeowner’s dreams.

On a transitional October morning, Lisa Yank — Sustain’s head of marketing and creative director, and one who has a decided

10 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
I VENTURES
OUR GORGE
Lisa Yank, creative director, and Heith England, founder (inset) in the Sustain Home showroom in downtown Hood River, located in the historic Sheppard’s building. Kelly Turso (above), Renata Kosina (inset) Kelly Turso (both images)

The showroom

features

passion for interior design — lets me stand and gawk at what I see in the shop’s interior. A live-edge counter of stunning cherry wood, master-built furniture, a state-of-the-art ethanol replace, expertly crafted textiles, artwork, kitchenware, all carefully curated in a kind of select signature style grown from a list of local, regional and nationwide creative vendors who share a certain design a nity that Sustain inspires.

e company, which has doubled in number of team members over the last year, has mindfully kept the building’s heritage and history, with the original painted sign that adorns its front, and original lighting xtures and ooring. But, she says, “We wanted to make it elevated in a beautiful, sustainable way.” at means for any good interior, life begins with the walls. “ e foundation of our business,” says Yank, who started with the company two years ago, after years in retail marketing in Portland, “is interior plasters and natural products sourced from the Earth. is building was repurposed for us.” She points to a wall of American Clay, which pervades the entire space, and that changes the way things look and feel, she says. “It’s natural, it breathes, it absorbs sound and smell and moisture. It just makes you feel good when you walk into the space.”

Founder and owner Heith England, who lives in McCall, Idaho, but shares a large part of his heart in Hood River, got his start in construction doing drywall and plaster work in the Boise area during college. He spent 15 years in Sun Valley doing high-end residential work which absorbed a signi cant portion of his life, before nding his way out here for a life reset. He joins us in a conference call, a day before the entire Sustain crew was to join him in McCall for a company-wide retreat.

England eventually found his way into the Green Movement side of building, “turtled along” as he puts it, but found his way back to plaster, and to the Gorge, in 2003. “People wanted custom plaster and surfaces,” he says. “I saw a need for di erent services and to turn it into more of a one-stop thing.”

He kept overhearing that you needed to go to Portland for those services and products, and realized that there was no higherend place in Hood River for interior nishes,

furnishings and more. “More and more people were coming to Hood River,” he says. “It’s such a cool town. And we just kept evolving.”

where the engaged Gorge gets

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 11
APLAND JEWELERS CUSTOM DESIGNS MADE IN OUR STATE-OF-THE-ART STUDIO USING RESPONSIBLY SOURCED GEMS AND RECLAIMED GOLD AND PLATINUM 541.386.3977 | 3RD & OAK ST., HOOD RIVER, OR | FACEBOOK.COM/APLANDJEWELERS
Heith had no intentions of being a general contractor and this made more sense. “I was learning a lot along the way, and we were building some great relationships and great clients. I wanted to build a brand around sustainability.” ere were parts of the Green Movement and green-washing, he felt, that weren’t sustainable and re ected more of a throw-away mentality. “It doesn’t last,” he says. “My philosophy luxury home
furnishings, finishes and accessories, with a focus on locally- and custom-made items.
Renata Kosina (left), Kelly Turso (above)

is if you build or create something beautiful, people want to sustain that and take care of it.”

A clearer path was presenting itself. An old brick building. That’s sustainable. And it tells a great story. A mentor of his told him that to be successful you need to be depend able and do what you say you’re going to do, and make people your business. Don’t let fear get in the way. His vision was coming true.

England surrounded himself with a tal ented crew. “I’ve been fortunate enough to be involved with some really smart, talented people who are passionate,” he says. “It’s the people that are involved right now that are making it what it is and share my vision. I love relationships that are formed through what we do.”

Fun and hard work have propelled Sus tain into a bright future that draws visitors and clients from Seattle, Portland, Bend and beyond. England professes a love for lifestyle towns — of which Hood River is certainly one — that capture and then wholeheartedly reflect a kind of spirited sense of self, a zeit geist that infuses unique places like the Co lumbia River Gorge.

Sustain

seems to

as

na ture, pushing with all its might to build and

own

Northwest

aesthetic. Even if you don’t know Art Deco from Victorian, Rustic Farmhouse from Shabby Chic, or any of the other interior style derivations, it’s worth just popping in and taking a gander at what they’ve organically sown.

“We’re evolving and growing,” Yank says. “We all work really hard and are really passionate about what we stand for.”

And that’s a mission that’s truly sustainable. To learn more, go to sustaininteriors.com Don Campbell is a writer and musician. He hides out at a secret fortress on a

12 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
OUR GORGE I VENTURES
The team feed on that it continues to foster its fearless and creative develop its Pacific design hilltop in Mosier and is a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine Renata Kosina (above), Kelly Turso (right)

Seeking Connection Through a Lens

Annual photo contest highlights beauty, bounty and culture in the Gorge

The Friends of the Columbia Gorge an nual photo contest received more than 500 entries across seven categories. This year’s theme was “Our Gorge Connections,” and the grand-prize winning photo was the first non-landscape image to win in the contest’s history. Taken by Jesenia Robles of Hood River, it featured her father Enrique’s hands laden with just-picked apricots.

“My dad has always been in agriculture,” she said. “His family comes from a long line of farmers in Zacatecas, Mexico.” Robles’s parents have both worked for Diamond Fruit Growers for more than 30 years. “In the sum mers, he will spend all day outside tending to his garden. It’s who he is, and to me this pic ture represents my family history, and a beau tiful cultural legacy of caring for the Earth and providing sustenance for generations.”

The contest’s theme was meant to acknowledge the multitude of ways those who love the Columbia Gorge feel connected to it.

“The Columbia Gorge is a natural won derland, a major tourist destination, and a world-class venue for wind and water sports,” said Vince Ready of Hood River’s Lasting Light Photography, one of four contest judges.

“But as a full-time resident, I am very aware that community and culture are also central to the Gorge, which is why I appreciate photos like Jesenia’s which is not only technically impressive, but also rich with identity, history and family bonds.”

The 8th annual Friends of the Columbia Gorge photo contest accepts submissions from Dec. 12 thru Feb. 12. For guidelines, go to gorgefriends.org/photocontest.

14 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
OUR GORGE I CREATE
Sunset over the Columbia River from Hamilton Island near North Bonneville. By Christian Platt (Portland), winner Scenic Western Gorge category.

Above, a swimmer dives into the Columbia River one last time for the season while beach-goers begin the long walk back to the parking lot during sunset at Rooster Rock State Park. By John Pfeil (Portland), winner Community & Culture category.

Opposite top, “Hands with Apricots.” By Jesenia Robles (Hood River), Grand Prize winner. It’s the first time in the contest’s history that a non-landscape image has won the top honor. Contest officials said the image illustrates the Columbia Gorge as “more than just majestic waterfalls and windswept vistas,” but also as a “vibrant, living place with a rich and diverse tapestry of community and culture.”

Dwell with intention.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 15
alifewithtrees.com 541-80 6-2333 Preservation Pruning Removal Your Local Arborist OR CCB#: 194507 / WA: ALIFEWT 789 D 9
SERVICE INTERIOR DESIGN
FULL
hello@strucksured.com www.strucksured.com (541) 436-4341

Top

Above,

Below, Spring at Crawford Oaks. By Christopher Baker (Portland), winner Scenic Eastern Gorge category.

Above, Juvenile Sharp-shinned Hawk in Hood River. By Heidi Cardoza (Hood River), winner Wildlife category.

Below, Unnamed Falls, Upper McCord Creek. By Daniel Rappaport (Corbett), winner Waterfalls category.

Photo on Page 4 (top right), A foggy day on Larch Mountain. By Zach Spidell, age 14 (Portland), winner Youth Photographer category.

16 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE OUR GORGE I CREATE
, Bitterroot at Catherine Creek. By Bill Kirkland (Portland), winner Wildflowers and Other Flora category. Columbia River view from Mayer State Park. By Robert Meyers (Hood River), winner Camera Phone special category.
OR & WA Broker 541-705-0572 DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 DonNunamaker.com | 541 386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR Devery Broddie OR Broker 541-806-1849 Jill Guenther OR Broker 541-490-3156 541-490-4812 DonNunamaker.com | 541 386 4400 OR & WA Broker 541-490-3364 DonNunamaker.com | 541 386 4400 Alison Nunamaker DonNunamaker.com | 541 386 4400 Becky Fry DonNunamaker.com 2495 Cascade DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR Ruth Chausse OR & WA Broker 541-490-4850 541-490-0427 DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 Ave. Hood River, OR Ashlyn Neperud OR & WA Broker 541-971-5237 Amanda Curry OR & WA Broker 720-563-7192 OR & WA Broker 541-490-3109 DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR 541-490-3854 DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR Charlotte Dupuis Rhiannon DuBree Jody Thompson Mychal Lucas Kayla Easton Property Management DonNunamaker.com | 541-386-4400 2495 Cascade Ave. Hood River, OR www.NunamakerPropertyManagement.com | 541-386-5555 Thinking of buying or selling? CONTACT ONE OF OUR BROKERS!

Kings & Daughters Brewery

Hood River couple brings synergy and deep experience to their brewing business

Imagine for a minute a couple raising four young children and simultaneously launching a business. Throw in a pandemic. Picture their modest-size home as not only their office but also where their kids are home schooled. As yet, they have no employees, so they do every thing that needs to be done.

If you’re envisioning an implosion of sorts, you wouldn’t be off base. But then, you obviously don’t know Kyle Larsen and Kacie McMackin, the couple behind Hood River’s newest brewing

venture, Kings & Daughters Brewery. Their approach to everything from the beer they brew and the labels on their cans to everyday life is refreshingly distinct.

“We work well together as a couple and as parents,” McMackin said. “We deal with the stresses together very well.” That also goes for their business venture, which officially got off

18 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
GORGE I IMBIBE
OUR
Kyle Larsen and Kacie McMackin with their four kids, middle. At left, Larsen with the brewery’s first canned beer, Paradox, and a pour of Wildflowers.

The couple has long planned for their own brewery, which they formally launched in 2021.

the ground in August 2021. But the journey started long before that.

It began nearly two decades ago when Larsen started home brewing at age 21 and “instantly fell in love with it,” he said. Around the same time, he and McMackin started dating. They knew each other from attending the same high school in Kirkland, Wash., but each had been on a different path after graduation — Kyle attending school in Arizona and Kacie pursuing acting in Los An geles. During stints back home, they bonded over shared interests, including travel, and were soon saving money to travel through Europe together.

After a three-month adventure, the cou ple settled in L.A. for a time before moving to Portland. Larsen applied and was waitlisted for the Master Brewer Certificate Program at U.C. Davis, so he sought a brewery job where he could gain experience while waiting to get in. He started at a brewery in Washington before getting a call from another one he’d applied to: Hood River’s Full Sail Brewing Co., which hired Larsen as a brewer despite his lack of formal experience.

“I went from homebrewing to brewing so much beer,” he said. At the time, in 2007, Full Sail was producing 130,000 barrels of beer annually. “They threw me into the fire,” he said. When U.C. Davis told him they had a spot for him after all, he politely declined. “I was learning it all from experience,” he said.

Larsen’s proclivity for brewing, and his on-the-job training, only made him want to

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 19

learn more. He began a program of study in brewery sciences and engineering through HeriotWatt University in Scotland, highly regarded for its brewing and distilling programs. Studying in his spare time, he eventually earned his International Brewing Diploma.

Along the way, Larsen was hired by Double Mountain Brewery, where he could practice his craft at a smaller brewery with more room for experimentation. He eventually became head brewer and remained there for eight years.

“Double Mountain was such a great learning experience, but I wanted to keep pushing boundaries,” Larsen said. By then, he and McMackin had two young daughters, but instead of feeling tethered, they were thirstier than ever for adventure. Larsen wanted to expand his brewing experience in a different region altogether and applied for jobs on the East Coast.

Left to right, Kyle Larsen makes a delivery in Seattle; with former Double Mountain colleagues at a beer fes tival; and pouring one of his beers.

When nothing of interest presented itself, McMackin suggested expanding the search. “At a certain point I said, why don’t we go to Europe?” she recalled. Larsen sent off re sumes to some top breweries, and Siren Craft Brew in Berkshire, England, replied that they needed a brewer to start in six months. Larsen was hired after a video interview. The lag time gave the couple a chance to prepare to move their family overseas for three years.

By the time they headed across the pond, their girls were 5 and 3 and McMackin was five months pregnant with their third child. They settled into a rented house and their son was born three months later, in the heart of the damp England winter. Despite a bumpy start, they came to love their life in the En glish countryside.

For Larsen, it was the most formative time of his career. Siren, where he was head brewer, is similar in size to Double Mountain “but fully different culturally,” he said. “It was a big learning curve.” At the time, England was in the midst of a craft brewing renais sance where experimentation was the name of the game.

“There was always a new recipe, all the time,” he said. Because British brewers get taxed by small increments of alcohol content, Siren was looking to make exciting beers with lower alcohol. It was something Larsen came to appreciate not only from a brewing per spective, but as he and McMackin immersed themselves in British pub culture.

20 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
Now offering free delivery in greater Hood River! kingsanddaughters.com
OUR GORGE I IMBIBE

During Larsen’s tenure at Siren — where he won British Brewer of the Year — he and McMackin began making plans for their own brewery. They named it Kings & Daughters in a nod to British pubs, and because “King” is a family name on Larsen’s mother’s side, reaching back to his ancestral roots in Wales.

But the brewery name is also purposely feminine. “I’ve always felt like the brewing industry is super masculine,” McMackin said. Their logo — two intertwined pink peonies evocative of a parent and child — speaks to the family nature of their venture.

After two and a half years at Siren, fol lowed by six months of travel, the family returned home to Hood River in July 2019 aiming to launch Kings & Daughters in the spring of 2020. The pandemic delay gave the

couple time to hone their plan (and see their fourth child into the world). Their first beer, Queens & Sons, debuted in August 2021. Kings & Daughters produced four different beers by the end of the year and began ramping up production last spring.

They’ve produced twice as much beer this year as they had projected, finishing with 24 different beers comprising about 500 barrels. “The demand is there,” Larsen said. With no brewing facility of their own, Larsen brews at Back Forty Beverage Company, a contract brewer in Clackamas. They self-distribute in the Gorge (with free local delivery in the Hood River area), Portland, Seattle and Bellingham.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 21 Learn more at cathedralridgewinery.com HOOD RIVER WINERY & TASTING ROOM 4200 POST CANYON DR. HOOD RIVER, OR 97031 541.386.2882 DUNDEE TASTING ROOM 974 HWY 99W DUNDEE, OR 97115 503.537.9977 CARLTON TASTING ROOM 105 W. MAIN STREET CARLTON, OR 97111 971.708.0708 Open Daily AT 11. Reservations Preferred. Walk Ins Welcome. Choose from over 28 award-winning big, bold, reds, signature blends and delicious whites
Kacie McMackin creates the brewery’s labels from wa tercolor drawings. At right is the illustration for a pale ale brewed in collaboration with Breakside Brewery called Horticulture Baby!

MARYHILL WINERY

Wine Press Northwest’s “2015 Paci c NW Winery of the Year,” award-winning wines, full bistro menu to enhance your wine-tasting experience, Tuscan-style terrace with Mount Hood views, Bocce and gi shop.

877-627-9445 • maryhillwinery.com 9774 Hwy 14 • Goldendale

GLENWOOD GENERAL STORE

Located in scenic Glenwood. A country store providing all your essentials to tackle everything from climbing the mountain to making dinner. We have groceries, hot deli, drinks and camping supplies.

509-364-3535 glenwoodgeneralstore.com 208 E. Main St. • Glenwood

BEST WESTERN PLUS HOOD RIVER INN

e perfect base for exploring the Columbia Gorge. River view guest rooms, dining at Riverside, Cebu Lounge, heated shoreline pool, spas, and sauna. Wine tasting passes, tours and recreation packages.

800-828-7873 • hoodriverinn.com 1108 E. Marina Way • Hood River

Their next step is to open a brewery and pub in Hood River. “We want to have a place where we can serve pints over the bar,” Mc Mackin said. For now, they brew and dis tribute one batch at a time. All their labels — including the peony logo — are done by McMackin in watercolor.

“Having a creative outlet is what centers me,” said McMackin, who is a writer, pho tographer and recipe developer. (McMackin creates the recipes for the “Partake” section of this magazine.) “Watercolor is such a cool medium. It’s very much like beer in that it has a mind of its own — once it’s on the paper, you don’t have much control.”

The names of each beer and their artistic labels are peppered with literary references and inspiration drawn from children’s books. It all comes from what McMackin calls her “beer ad jacent” perspective. While Larsen is necessarily entrenched in the industry, McMackin brings her own outsider creativity to the endeavor.

“I come at it from, ‘Why can’t we do this?’” she said. “Also, Kyle is making really good beer, so if the label doesn’t resonate, I don’t sweat it a lot.” But feedback from the labels has inspired her to create fine art prints available for purchase in the brewery’s online store, along with her hand made soap and candles, and other items.

For Larsen, the names and labels fit with their mission. “We wanted to be different,” he said. “I was super inspired by what we did in England.” He felt the Pacific Northwest was ready for a good craft beer with lower alcohol content. The couple call their Queens & Sons a “soft IPA” for its full flavor and “session able drinkability.” Many of their beers have a lower ABV, but they brew a heftier stout and some other higher alcohol beers in collaboration with other brewers.

The focus of Kings & Daughters is on offering consumers a “permission slip” to be present, as the couple puts it. “It’s about being fun and playful,” said Larsen, while creating high quality beers meant to be enjoyed with others. “I’m super proud of what we’re doing. Our brand is way different from what anyone else is doing and I love that.”

McMackin agrees. “It’s a perfect representation of who we are,” she said. “It feels very us.” To learn more, go to kingsanddaughters.com.

22 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
OUR GORGE I IMBIBE
VISIT KLICKITAT COUNTY, WASHINGTON AND THE NORTH SHORE OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE! VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER: 1 HERITAGE PLAZA, WHITE SALMON, WA 98672 509-493-3630 • MTADAMSCHAMBER.COM Explore More... on the northshore of the Columbia River Gorge in sunny Klickitat County
Photo by Darlisa Black

BRIDGESIDE

WaNaPa St. • Cascade Locks

WALKING MAN BREWING

Nestled along the Columbia River, we are a must-stop destination for Gorge travelers. Experience the rst brewery on the Washington side. Enjoy our lovely, dog-friendly beer garden or cozy up in the brewpub with friends old and new. 509-427-5520 • walkingmanbeer.com 240 SW 1st St. • Stevenson

UNDERWOOD PARK & COMMUNITY CENTER e perfect venue for private events. Rental includes use of a gym, full newly renovated kitchen, stage, park, outside gazebo, picnic shelter and 5 acres of land. Handicapped access and ample parking. 509-972-6400 underwoodcommunity.org 951 School House Rd. • Underwood

CEDAR DESIGNS

OPTIMIST PRINTERS

STROIKA STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

Your structural experts for e Gorge! From new construction to remodels, we do it all. Contact us today for drawings to be used for permitting and construction! 541-716-1381 • stroikaengineering.com 390 Evergreen Dr., Ste C-5 • N. Bonneville

SKAMANIA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: 167 NW Second Avenue, Stevenson, WA 98648 • 800-989-9178 • skamania.org Experience Skamania County, Washington!
our
and
541-296-2954 •
723 E 3rd Street • The
Serving both sides of the Gorge from e Dalles to Stevenson/ Cascade Locks weeklyfor over 100 years. Call or visit us online to nd out more about
products
how we can help you!
optimistprinters.com
Dalles
Photo by Peter Marbach
Beam,
Timber
Free
modi
800-728-4474 •
info@cedardesigns.com •
Conventional, Post &
Log,
Frame, & Hybrids. Over 600+ plans and designs on website.
dra ing and no charge for
cations or custom plans. Panelized exterior walls. Price guarantees. Model home by appointment.
cedardesigns.com
Carson
Fast, friendly family dining for breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus spectacular views
the
and Bridge
Burgers • Sandwiches • Salads • Soups Baskets • A er 5 menu • Desserts Gi shop • Historic artifacts 541-374-8477 • bridgesidedining.com 745 NW Wa Na Pa St. • Cascade Locks COLUMBIA GORGE INTERPRETIVE CENTER e rst human imprints in the Gorge were le by the Indian cultures that ourished here for thousands of years. Explore the natural and cultural history of this beautiful region. Open daily 9-5. 800-991-2338 509-427-8211 990 SW Rock Creek Dr. • Stevenson BEST WESTERN PLUS COLUMBIA RIVER INN Stunning views, spacious guestrooms on the Columbia River at the Bridge of the Gods. Close to waterfalls and outdoor activities. Complimentary hot breakfast, pool, spa, tness room. 541-374-8777 • 800-595-7108 bwcolumbiariverinn.com 735
of
Gorge
of the Gods.

Health + Wellness

RESOURCE GUIDE TO THE GORGE

The Columbia River Gorge has so much to offer when it comes to healthy, active living. Opportunities to get outside for exercise and mental well-being abound and range from heart-pumping adrenaline sports to nature walks in our beautiful landscapes. Studies have even shown that simply living amid green spaces lowers the risk of depression and anxiety, and we’ve got plenty of green spaces all around. Another important part of maintaining optimal health is taking care of your healthcare needs, and we’re fortunate in the Gorge to have top-notch healthcare professionals in every field, as well as several highly rated hospitals. From preventive to specialty care, you can find solutions to all your healthcare needs. With the new year at hand, it’s a great time to prioritize your own health. Find the healthcare partners that will help you achieve your goals right here in the Gorge. Here’s to a healthy and happy 2023!

24 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
Paloma Ayala/ stock.adobe.com

IMPORTANCE OF ANNUAL WELLNESS CHECKS

No matter your age or stage of life, annual wellness checks are essential to your ongoing health. Visiting your primary care provider for regular preventive care is one of the best ways to identify and treat health issues before they get worse. ese visits help you track your progress toward optimal health goals.

What is an annual wellness check?

Rather than a quick exam, chat and some blood work, these visits include conversations about family history and lifestyle, as well as checking your vital signs, reviewing your medications, and making a schedule for preventive screenings and immunizations. It also is a time to review existing health problems; determine what health issues may become a concern in the future and how to prevent them.

“It’s invaluable we get to know you as a person - your hopes and goals, your habits and health choices, and your personal and family medical history,” said Erica Didier, M.D., Skyline Health Medical Clinic family physician. “Having a regular annual wellness appointment allows your provider to work with you to prevent future health problems.”

Know your history

Sometimes the subject matter can be hard to dig into, especially because some families don’t share much about their relatives’ health issues. If you have a grandparent who su ered from alcoholism, which can be a genetic trait, it’s something important for your provider to know.

“Sometimes there are health questions a person hesitates to bring up,” continued Dr. Didier. “Health behaviors and preferences such as how much we use alcohol or nicotine, how well we sleep, or speci cs of our

sexual health can be uncomfortable for most people to talk about, but are vital to our overall health. At Skyline Health Clinic, we ask all patients about these, as well as about anxiety and low mood. is helps us determine the most e ective plan for care, screenings and assistance.”

Be Your Own Advocate

Patients are encouraged to be much more active participants in their own health care, so Dr. Didier advises collecting family medical history, rounding up bottles of any prescriptions, over-the-counter or herbal medications you use and making a list of any issues you’d like to address before your appointment. “ e more you know about your health, the more likely you are to be your own advocate,” said Dr. Didier. “It’s important to schedule your annual wellness visit and have an honest, open conversation with your provider. It’s essential for your ongoing health.”

To schedule your annual wellness check with a SKYLINE HEALTH MEDICAL CLINIC provider, call 509-637-2810. The clinic accepts sameday appointments and walk-ins are welcome.

Most private and state insurers, and Medicare cover the cost of an annual wellness check.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 25 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 25
Erica

Do you long for a health care team that sees and understands you, and makes time for your story? At Healthy Connections, relationships with our clients are our #1 value and priority. We limit our practice membership in order to give each client the time and caring attention necessary to restore and promote wellness.

Healthy Connections provides a unique medical service in the Columbia Gorge. Combining personalized medical expertise with deep-dive functional diagnostic & treatment tools, Je Horacek, M.D, IFMCP,

and Heather Bates, FNP-BC, help clients resolve their health issues, understand what is “too much” and “not enough”, and create new, lasting health habits for optimal longevity. Together, Dr Je and Heather Bates bring over 40 years of experience in primary care, with a strong passion for helping others heal and thrive.

Together with our lifestyle support team, our approach is based on:

• Belief in our clients’ wisdom and motivation.

• Holistic care, focusing on mind, body and spirit.

• Appreciation of the complex interconnections of our body systems (our gut is connected to our brain which is connected to our hormones, etc.).

• A focus on optimal health – not just the absence of symptoms or dis-ease.

• A collaborative partnership with each client to take an active role in health restoration.

• A preference for natural, non-toxic therapies – harnessing the body’s ability to heal itself.

In order to provide you with the time, personalization and attention we value, HEALTHY CONNECTIONS operates with Hybrid Insur ance+Membership Model, billing most major insurance companies and including many non-covered support services with our membership fee.

We are currently accepting new clients for functional, primary care, and women’s health memberships.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION 26 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
541.386.6380 www.onecommunityhealth.org Se Habla Español Medical, behavioral, and dental care Covid vaccines, testing and treatment for the whole community Fitness and other group classes Mobile health care Health insurance navigation No one turned away because of inability to pay HEALTHY CONNECTIONS Left to right: Je Horacek, MD; Heather Nielsen-Horacek, LPC/ Clinic Director; Heather Bates, FNP-BC, Barb Berry, RN, MA healthyconnectionshr.com 541-716-5786 33 Nichols Parkway, Suite 300, Hood River

Creating Healthy Smiles For A Lifetime!

Meet Dr. Renelle Conner

Dr. Renelle Conner is enthusiastic about providing excellent orthodontic care for children, teens, and adults. “I love working with people and changing smiles. Changing a smile, builds confidence. Building confidence for a person, changes their life! My career as an Orthodontist allows for a beautiful melding of biology, chemistry, psychology and art, which I utilize to feed my passion for creating beautiful smiles in confident faces.”

Dr. Conner grew up in a small town in Washington. She earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Biology with a minor in Chemistry from Eastern Washington University. After obtaining a bachelor’s degree she went on to excel in dental school, earning a Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree, from the University of Washington. Following dental school, Dr. Conner received a Master’s in Orthodontics from A.T. Still University- Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health.

Dr. Conner’s hobbies include decorating cakes, making espresso, and reading. She also enjoys traveling, meeting new people, and trying new things.

The premier pediatric dental specialists in the gorge!
J. Kyle House DDS, FAAPD Pediatric Dentist S O L E A Offering dental laser technology Anesthesia and pain free dentistry Free dental exams for children 3 and undeR 541.387.8688 419 State St. Suite 4 Hood River 541.296.8901 1935 E. 19th St. Suite 200 The Dalles Call and set up a free consultation for braces at either location. We are accepting new patients.
LOCAL | ESTABLISHED | GLOBALLY CONNECTED $1,899,000 RMLS 22400065 gorgewindermere.com RUBY MASON REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 541-980-9104 rubymason@windermere.com THE DALLES 7 BED / 3.2 BATH / 5,852 S.F. / 19.78 ACRES $1,250,000 RMLS 22445075 BRIAN LAUTERBACH REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR 503-858-5010 blauterbach@windermere.com MOUNT HOOD 4 BED / 2 BATH / 2,412 SF / 3.27 ACRES $850,000 RMLS 22618210 JENNIFER JOSEPHSON REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 541-399-6629 jjosephson@windermere.com LYLE 3 BED / 2 BATH / 1,850 SF / ADU / 23.86 AC $699,000 RMLS 22362560 CAROL THAYER REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 360-904-4778 carolthayer@windermere.com MOSIER 3 BED / 2.1 BATH / 4,016 SF / 20.35 ACRES HOOD RIVER . CASCADE LOCKS . THE DALLES . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON HOOD RIVER . THE DALLES . CASCADE LOCKS . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON GORGEWINDERMERE.COM 541-386-3444
LOCAL | ESTABLISHED | GLOBALLY CONNECTED LYLE 4 BED / 2.5 BATH / 3,652 SF / 10 ACRES $998,000 RMLS 22137963 JACKSON VANDERPOOL REAL ESTATE BROKERS | OR & WA 360-600-6997 jacksondv@windermere.com LYLE CANNABIS OPERATION / 2 BED HOME / 10 AC $995,000 RMLS 22534572 CAROL THAYER REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 360-904-4778 carolthayer@windermere.com WHITE SALMON 3 BED / 2 BATH / 3,241 SF / 10 ACRES $700,000 RMLS 22160752 TANNER HALL & ALISHA NIGHTINGALE REAL ESTATE BROKERS | OR & WA 503-936-8985 alisha.grg@windermere.com WHITE SALMON 4 BED / 2.5 BATH / 2,420 S.F. / 0.49 ACRE $899,000 RMLS 22426977 GINGER SWANSON REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 541-806-5333 gingers@windermere.com HOOD RIVER . CASCADE LOCKS . THE DALLES . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON HOOD RIVER . THE DALLES . CASCADE LOCKS . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON GORGEWINDERMERE.COM 541-386-3444
LOCAL | ESTABLISHED | GLOBALLY CONNECTED gorgewindermere.com JENNIFER JOSEPHSON REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 541-399-6629 jjosephson@windermere.com WHITE SALMON 3 BED / 2.5 BATH / 2,337 SF / 0.48 ACRE $940,000 RMLS 22463146 BRETT STOMPS REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 503-621-6922 stomps@windermere.com STEVENSON 6 BED / 5.5 BATH / 9,326 SF / 3.61 ACRES $3,500,000 RMLS 22018161 JUANITA CUMMINGS REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 541-490-7515 juanitacummings@windermere.com WASHOUGAL 2 BED / 1.5 BATH / 1,674 S.F. / 0.80 ACRE $975,000 RMLS 22404370 STEPHANIE HUNTINGTON REAL ESTATE BROKER | OR & WA 509-493-2864 gorgeland@gmail.com $740,000 RMLS 22261131 WHITE SALMON 3 BED / 2.5 BATH / 2,010 S.F. / 2 ACRES HOOD RIVER . CASCADE LOCKS . THE DALLES . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON HOOD RIVER . THE DALLES . CASCADE LOCKS . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON GORGEWINDERMERE.COM 541-386-3444
HOOD RIVER . CASCADE LOCKS . THE DALLES . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON HOOD RIVER . THE DALLES . CASCADE LOCKS . GOLDENDALE . BINGEN . WHITE SALMON . STEVENSON GORGEWINDERMERE.COM 541-386-3444 MARKET STATS WASCO COUNTY HOOD RIVER COUNTY KLICKITAT COUNTY SKAMANIA COUNTY AVG SOLD PRICEAVG SOLD PRICE AVG SOLD PRICEAVG SOLD PRICE DAYS ON MARKETDAYS ON MARKETDAYS ON MARKETDAYS ON MARKET $437,300$747,600$486,400$478,300 46 60 32 55 19% 7% 2% 1% From Jan-Sept 2021 From Jan-Sept 2021 From Jan-Sept 2021 23 Days From Jan-Sept 2021 22 Days 16 Days 29 Days *INFORMATION GATHERED FROM THE RMLS. JAN-SEPT 2022 AND COMPARED TO JAN-SEPT. 2021

Staycation HOW TO TAKE A WINTER

32 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE

A MINI VACATION IN THE GORGE LIES RIGHT OUT YOUR DOOR, PROMISING A DELIGHTFUL BLEND OF RECREATION AND RELAXATION

Nowfirmly entrenched in modern society, the concept of a “staycation” (quite obviously a portmanteau of “stay” and “vacation”) originated in either 1944 in a Cincinnati Enquirer headline or in 2005, courtesy of either a comedian on Canadian television or via a headline in the Huntsville (Alabama) Times.

Theories vary.

No matter. With pandemics, vacation-cost inflation and travel hassles — not to mention a desperate need to just relax, rejuvenate and reinvigorate — many of us have opted to find a little peace of mind and recreate closer to home. And it turns out that the Columbia River Gorge ain’t a half-bad place to get out of one’s home, even if but for a day or two, and let somebody else take care of you and your vacation needs without breaking the bank. Here’s to getting out and getting recreationally creative!

WEATHER WATCH

It’s incumbent upon us to point out the many rami cations of the ckle and furious weather. is time of year, the Gorge can be a consequential wrath of high winds, heavy rains, blinding snow and nasty freezing rain.

e key here is to be exible with your plans and abundant in your outdoor winter apparel. Make the best of any situation and be fearless (yet sensible) about venturing out. Push your comfort zone a bit and you’ll be amply rewarded with winter vistas and a wonderland of fun.

HOME BASE AND BEYOND

Let’s start by nding the perfect accommodation. Both sides of the mighty Columbia River o er plenty of attractive options for where to lay your head and stow your bag. From Hood River to Mosier and up to e Dalles, then across the river into Washington to Lyle, Bingen/ White Salmon and west to Carson, Stevenson and Cascade Locks (and some modest forays up into the mountains and out to the plains), you’ll nd lodging to match your style and mood. From here you can then weave a variety of delightful mini vacations.

THE OREGON SIDE

HOOD RIVER

It’s hard to beat the cozy con nes of the Hood River Hotel. Situated on a lively corner in the heart of downtown, the restored hotel o ers quaint retro comfort and the indescribably delicious Nordic eatery, Broder Øst (open for breakfast and lunch). is vintage oasis boldly claims to be “your basecamp for yearround adventure,” and lives up to its name. e rooms (many themed with packages available) are classic, timeless and uber-comfortable. Hood River Hotel: hoodriverhotel.com

WHAT TO DO

If you’re reading this in December, you might still be able to book passage on Hood River Railroad’s Christmas Train, a popular winter excursion in these parts. Under new management, HRR is what’s called a heritage-and-short-line railroad that tracks up through the verdant Hood River Valley. e just-over-an-hour Christmas Train promises to instill you with holiday spirit, but don’t delay. Don that wacky Christmas sweater and make your reservation now!

A certain magazine writer and his family celebrated a couple of birthdays with a stay at the hotel combined with our collective rst foray into e-biking. A good place to start is at Hood River’s Discover Bikes e shop in downtown Hood River does indeed rent bikes throughout the winter season, unless conditions are too hazardous. Oregon E-Bikes, located down the street at Big Winds, also has a large rental eet. Both shops o er a range of introductory and high-end e-bikes by the day. Just don’t forget your mittens and earmu s. If it’s late winter when you’re reading this, check out Hood River’s Sol Rides, which cranks up its e-bike rentals and guided tours in the spring.

What’s a winter season without a sip or two of your favorite libation? Downtown Hood River o ers a walkable selection of wine tasting rooms. Amble up Oak Street (with a block or two on either side) in the downtown core and you’ll nd a half dozen shops. e Hood River Wine Alliance o ers a downloadable map (hoodriverwinealliance. com/hood-river-wine-walk) that will steer you to Evoke (evokewinery. com), Cerulean (ceruleanwine.com), Cascade Cli s (cascadecli s. com), Upsidedown Wine (drinkupsidedownwine.com), Stave and Stone (staveandstone.com) and The Pines (thepinesvineyard.com), all on Oak Street. Venture o Oak, and you’ll nd Stolz Winery (stolzwinery.com) nearby on State Street.

If the frothy goodness of fresh local beer is more your thing, check out Full Sail Brewing on Columbia Street, founded in 1987 and

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 33
Robert Kneschke/stock.adobe.com

a pillar of the Gorge brewing industry. In the same neighborhood you’ll discover Double Mountain Brewery on Fourth Street, another lynchpin of Northwest brewing, which o ers an amazing array of fresh beer, cider, pizza and other comestibles.

the art of downhill skiing), and the farm-totable Crooked Tree Tavern & Grill.

Cooper Spur Mountain Resort: cooperspur.com

MOSIER

Outlier: Cooper Spur

For those not traveling to Kitzbühel, Austria, or Zermatt, Switzerland, this year, it’s hard to beat the easily reached and self-contained Cooper Spur Mountain Resort, south of Hood River, up Highway 35 toward Mount Hood. It o ers a rustic mountain experience, with cabins and hotel rooms, miles of cross-country skiing and snowshoeing (and the very nearby Cooper Spur Ski Area, an unintimidating place to learn

One might not think of little Mosier, a tiny burg between Hood River and e Dalles, as a site with staycation potential. But you’d be wrong. e newly completed Camp Randonnée, a joint venture between Bryan McGeeney and Brian Nicholson (long-time residents of the area), is a little oasis with four modern cabins overlooking the river that offer welcome packages from Brenna’s Mosier Market, its own savory co ee shop where they do their own roasting, and a pleasant greenspace in between with re pits and comfy chairs.

WHAT TO DO

Far from an urban hub, this is a place to slow way down and take a breath. Scramble up the nearby Mosier Plateau for some great river vistas. Round up local wines from Analemma, Idiot’s Grace and Garnier, or a

34 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
SOL RIDES: 13 Oak St. suite #A, Hood River, OR • solrides.com • 541-399-5215 Daily Tours | E-Bike Rentals | Wine | Custom Tours Alexandre/stock.adobe.com
HOW TO TAKE A WINTER STAYCATION
Val Thoermer/stock.adobe.com

selection of locally made ciders (including that of nearby Runcible) at Brenna’s full-service market for your own private little tasting. Hike or bike the famed nearby Twin Tunnels Trail that links Mosier to Hood River. And you might consider booking a massage with Missy Mortensen at the Mosier Massage Studio.

For eats, scramble across the street and grab for-real Mexican food from the outstanding La Vaquita food cart. May we suggest sh tacos and the hearty quesabirria?

THE DALLES

Tramp east from Mosier on Highway 30 (part of the Historic Columbia River Highway, America’s rst scenic highway and a National Historic Landmark) past the famous Mayerdale Estate and Rowena Crest, and you’ll hit The Dalles, that toddling town on the shores of the Columbia. It’s more than meets the eye and is over owing with fresh energy. Your staycation here should include lodging at the coolly chic and boutique-y Celilo Inn, atop a knob on the east edge of the city with excellent river views.

Celilo Inn: celiloinn.com

WHAT TO DO

Visit the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum for a bit of history, stop in at The Dalles Art Center for a truly unique perspective on local art, and whet your whistle at the iconic Sunshine Mill, grab a beer at Freebridge Brewing (formerly a U.S. Mint) or Sedition

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 35
Kathleen Perdue/stock.adobe.com sphraner/stock.adobe.com

Enjoy

HOW TO TAKE A WINTER STAYCATION

Brewery — both in downtown e Dalles — and wander by the Wasco County Courthouse, scene of famed legal shenanigans wrought by the Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, his followers in the town of Antelope and the townspeople in the 1980s.

Of note is a walking tour of downtown e Dalles using an app called Otocast (otocast.com) that will guide you on a discovery of amazing mural art, celebrated buildings and much more, courtesy of All Together e Dalles.

Outlier: The Balch Hotel

South of e Dalles lies historic Dufur, an agricultural community that doubles as a great winter spot to recharge your depleted batteries. Park yourself at the three-story Balch Hotel and your quiet personal staycation is all but complete. Your hosts Josiah Dean and Claire Sierra will take great care of you. ey o er several choice rooms appointed in period antiques, a bistro that serves breakfast and dinner, spa packages to untie those neck knots and rejuvenate the soul, and a whole lot of peace and quiet. Maybe best of all, there are no telephones or televisions.

Balch Hotel: balchhotel.com

THE WASHINGTON SIDE LYLE

After crossing over engineering masterwork e Dalles Dam, connect with Washington State Route 14 and turn left. Drive to where the Klickitat River meets the Columbia and you’ll nd the little burg of Lyle. Tucked in near the railroad tracks lies the historic and recently reopened and remodeled Lyle Hotel, a 10-room European-style, or possibly closer to country-rustic, inn long on charm.

Lyle Hotel: thelylehotel.com

WHAT TO DO

e Lyle Hotel is perfect headquarters to do some outdoor exploring. Take a driving foray up the Klickitat River where you’re likely to see eagles along the lower banks in mid-winter. Keep motoring up as far as the burg of Klickitat some 13 miles away and you’ll be rewarded with a steak dinner at the famed Huntington’s Bar & Grill. All along the river is the 31-milelong rails-to-trails Klickitat River Trail, beautiful on a winter day.

36 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
C.S.A. Floral Subscriptions
www.thefloweringfarmhouse.com 6-Week Spring
6
of locally grown spring flowers delivered to your
Weeks
door. Gift certificates available.
Bob/stock.adobe.com Rex Wholster/stock.adobe.com

Wine tasting can be found out east on Washington’s Highway 14 at Jacob Williams Winery’s Wishram, Wash., tasting room, open November through mid-December then reopening Jan. 21, 2023. Also in Wishram is the Cascade Cli s tasting room Tetrahedron winery is located in Lyle, or take a drive up Old Highway 8 for the rest of the renowned Wineries of Lyle: Domaine Pouillon, Cor Cellars and Syncline Winery. Check individual websites for hours and information about tastings.

BINGEN/WHITE SALMON

A 10-minute drive west of Lyle along the river you’ll nd Bingen, Wash., and its unique Society Hotel It’s billed as “modern boutique.” We call it heaven. Its coterie of cabins o ers clean and simple lines and great creature comfort in several con gurations good for singles, duos or families, plus a bar and cafe.

But the best part of the stay is surely the spa and bath house, with its multiple pools of sensuous hot water and the heat and steam of a

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 37 541-308-0770 413 Oak St, Hood River, OR MON-SAT 10-6 PM & SUNDAY 11-5 PM
We
Are PDX

HOW TO TAKE A WINTER STAYCATION

relaxing cedar sauna, including an indoor saltwater soaking pool, an outdoor hot pool and a cold bracing plunge pool. ough there’s plenty to do nearby, you may never leave the compound.

Society Hotel: thesocietyhotel.com

WHAT TO DO

Once you do towel o , just up the hill is Bingen’s sister, White Salmon, with its bustling main street replete with shops (Le Doubblé Troubblétasting room, White Salmon Baking Company, The Book Peddler, Blackbird & Ivory), eateries (Everybody’s Brewing, Henni’s and Feast Market and Delicatessen), and more.

With wineries on Underwood Mountain close by, the great outdoors all around (including nearby Jewett Creek Watershed and Catherine Creek/Coyote Wall, and Mount Adams to the north), and a host of other distractions, you’ll not want for things to do.

CARSON

is time of year, it’s hard to get enough of hot water. Enter Carson Hot Springs Golf and Spa Resort. You’ll immediately feel its long history of sharing the joy of its rejuvenative natural hot springs. e old Hotel St. Martin building still stands, housing the resort’s main o ce, and the

Khunatorn /stock.adobe.com

spa buildings are a rustic throwback as well, with clawfoot tubs for sulphur-rich soaking, the chance for a sweat-inducing body wrap, massage services, mineral soaking tubs and an outdoor mineral pool. e resort o ers a range of rooms, some including their own private hot tub. eir slogan? “Unplug and reconnect.” Truer words were never spoken.

WHAT TO DO

e company’s Elk Ridge Golf Course stays open year-round unless there’s snow on the ground. It’s engineered to drain extremely well and is a challenge for golfers at every level. Like most of the Gorge, outdoor activities are abundant with biking and hiking trails, waterfalls, and nearby eateries and breweries — something for everybody’s winter needs. Resort sta can help point the way. And a little tip: Backwoods Brewing Company not only produces stellar beer, but some of the best handmade pizza you’ll nd anywhere on the planet.

38 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE

STEVENSON & CASCADE LOCKS

Continue a few miles west and you’ll hit Stevenson, a lively riverside burg with beautiful views of the central Gorge all around, including dramatic Table Mountain. Lodging options include the new boutique Hotel Stevenson and Wilder and Pine Riverside Cabins. A walking tour of the downtown core will present lots of possibilities for shopping, eating and imbibing, but don’t miss Walking Man Brewing, the oldest brewery on the Washington side of the Gorge. Visit the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center to bone up on the natural and cultural history of the Gorge.

Cross over the Columbia on the Bridge of the Gods and hit up Cascade Locks. For stunning views out your window, stay at the Best Western Plus Columbia River Inn, also home to Bridgeside restaurant. It’s been a popular spot to grab a bite for more than six decades and features a newly updated menu. Or head down the street to Thunder Island Brewing Co. and sample their tasty, small-batch beers and enjoy the view from their second-story pub and restaurant (located above their brewing facility). No visit to Cascade Locks is complete without a stop at East Wind Drive-In. A mainstay since 1939, it’s known for generous servings of soft serve ice cream, but it’s a burger joint, too. And well worth waiting in the famously long lines that often extend down the street — which you might not have to contend with in the winter. Just one more reason to head out for a cold-season staycation in the Gorge.

Don Campbell is a writer and musician. He hides out at a secret fortress on a hilltop in Mosier and is a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 39
77
Avenue Stevenson,
hotelstevenson.com
Visit Cascade Locks IN THE HEART OF THE GORGE www.cascadelocks.com  tourism@cascade-locks.or.us YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE AWAITS. MAKE CASCADE LOCKS YOUR BASECAMP FOR EXPLORATION.
SW Russell
WA
Newest Boutique Hotel in the Gorge
Robert Appleby /stock.adobe.com

Winter on the Water

With proper preparation, you can paddleboard during the cold months

For paddleboarders, nothing compares to the feeling you get being out on the water, the sense of accomplishment as you enhance your skills with each stroke of the paddle and the views you get to take in along the way. But once the weather cools and the water temperature drops, should you still be out on your board? For many, the proper preparations make paddling a year-round sport.

“Paddling in the winter can be one of the most beautiful times to be out on the water,” says Fiona Wylde, three-time SUP World Champion and the founder of Wylde Wind & Water in Hood River. But it’s not quite as simple as just getting up on your board and heading out. With winter weather comes different conditions for paddling.

“I love encouraging people to paddle year-round,” says Joel Yang, who started Hood River’s Stoke on the Water, which offers guided downwind SUP tours and clinics,

40 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
OUTSIDE
Matt Luchsinger heads to the water at Blalock Canyon in the eastern Gorge, left. Top, T.J. Gulizia demonstrates form on a calm, wintry day. Jennifer Gulizia Courtesy of Fiona Wylde Jennifer Gulizia FIONA WYLDE

in 2017. “Your water access is a beautiful thing.” But ultimately, it’s an exercise in informing yourself of conditions, dressing for the weather and properly gearing up for a safe, fun time on the water.

KNOW YOUR SKILL LEVEL

Understanding your skill level is important any time you’re heading out on the water. is will play a role in choosing the location and length for your paddle. In winter, it’s even more important. If you’re paddling for the rst time, winter may not be the ideal time to start.

But if you’re a competent and experienced paddler, with the proper gear, it can be the most magical time of the year.

CHECK THE WEATHER

e weather in the Gorge can turn in an instant. Checking what the weather is doing when you’re ready to go out is important, along with checking what the weather is forecasted to do.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 41
Checking the forecast at Big Winds before a winter paddle, above. At right, Fiona Wylde and her dad, MacRae Wylde, paddle in Nichols Boat Basin. Jennifer Gulizia Courtesy of Fiona Wylde

DRESS PROPERLY

According to Wylde, deciding what to wear while paddling in winter can sometimes be the hardest part of the paddle. “You don’t want to overheat, which can commonly happen, but you also don’t want to get cold,” she says.

Dressing for winter paddling is all about layering. You want to stay dry and warm, both on your board and if you end up in the water.

“ e biggest thing is understanding the layers that are important to you and what works with the type of riding you’ll be doing,” says Yang. “It’s about being comfortable and being able to climate control.”

But keeping warm doesn’t mean throwing on a beanie and a down jacket and calling it good. ose items aren’t meant for submersion, especially in winter’s cold water. “Tights and a sweatshirt might be really warm, but if you fall in the water, your sweatshirt is going to make you very heavy and swimming will be di cult,” says Wylde. Finding the proper attire for your body and the type of paddling you’ll be doing is key to not only comfort but also your safety on the water.

You can consider a full wetsuit, but Yang suggests looking at separate neoprene pieces, selecting pants and a top to better suit the temperature and type of paddling you’ll be doing.

at way, you can choose di erent levels of neoprene thickness to suit your body. Looking at options for layering, such as a wind barrier vest, pants with a wind barrier or a sailing jacket can make all the di erence.

Yang also recommends an Exo Skin layer made in Hood River at ProMotion Wetsuits, which provides a soft, water-repellant and wind-resistant shell on the outside and eece on the interior. Dry suits are a great option as well, however they tend to be more cost-prohibitive and may cause you to get too hot while paddling.

Gloves and booties are also crucial pieces to out t yourself for winter paddling. “When you wade out, your feet will get wet,” Yang says. “You want really good booties to keep your feet warm.” is will help to keep you comfortable while getting on your board from your launch point, as well as keep you warm and dry during your paddle.

GEAR UP FOR SAFETY

A lifejacket, or PFD, is required by law any time you’re out on the water. Yang says it’s best to avoid belt-type PFDs, especially in winter. And as a bonus, a vest PFD can add another layer for warmth. is will be your rst line of defense if you fall in and are unable to get back up on your board or get to shore safely.

Using a leash should be top of mind as well. is piece of equipment is attached to the tail end of your board with a cord. On the other end is an ankle strap to attach the leash to you,

connecting you with your board.

“ e leash is a very important piece of safety equipment because it helps you stay connected to your board if you fall o . In winter, this is extremely important because the water temperature is very cold and swimming is very challenging in those temperatures,” says Wylde. “Having your board attached to you is the safest way to ensure that you will be able to get back to your board and you won’t have to swim back to shore.”

When you’re ready to go out, be sure to have a paddle plan and let someone know where you’re headed and when you plan to be back.

Yang also suggests bringing a light with you, as it gets dark so much earlier in the winter months. A headlamp can come in handy if you take a bit longer coming back in from your paddle, or if you need to signal for help. In addition to having a cell phone, a VHF radio is also at the top of his list, which can be helpful for communicating while paddling with others or reaching assistance in the event of an emergency. A handheld VHF radio will still work in locations where you don’t have cell phone service and can be used to call the local sheri ’s department.

CHOOSE A LOCATION

With the proper safety gear and clothing ready, where should you head out to paddle in the winter? If you can access the location just as easily in the winter months as you can in summer, it’s probably going to be a great spot. Local at-water favorites such as Lost Lake and Trillium Lake aren’t as easily accessible. However, other nearby lakes, as well as the Columbia River certainly are. Yang says that paddling out on the Columbia in the winter months is truly special.

“In the wintertime, I like to paddle close to shore. e water is cold, and the weather can change very quickly,” adds Wylde. “One of my favorite places to paddle in Hood River is Nichols Boat Basin, which is a calm, protected part of the river where there is very little current and it is protected by the wind.” Particularly if you’re new to winter paddling, it can be a great, safe option.

Ultimately, it’s all about choosing a location that you feel con dent and comfortable with, and then making sure you’re properly geared up for the occasion. Keep warm, be safe and have fun.

Molly Allen is a food, beverage and travel writer who lives in Hood River.

42 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
OUTSIDE
Paddlers head into the Port of Arlington after a 10-mile downwind run from Blalock Canyon. The stretch is considered one of the premier Gorge downwinders for its wide sections of river and big swell. Jennifer Gulizia
2023 AXIS REVOLVER 1444 TUCKER ROAD, HOOD RIVER, OR 97031 | (541) 4363833 | INFO@AXISVEHICLES.COM Start your journey at AXISVEHICLES.COM

Where the Past Comes to Life

Take a fascinating trip through history at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum

Less than five miles from where Lewis and Clark once made camp along the Columbia River, there’s a place for discovery by modern day travelers.

In 1805, the two men and their companions on the Corps of Discovery made camp near what would become The Dalles. Rock Fort, as it came to be called, is along Mill Creek, a tributary of the Columbia that flows through the city and into the river just west of downtown. Not far from there, on a similar promontory above the river known as Crates Point, sits the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Wasco County Historical Museum.

The official interpretive center of the Co lumbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, it commemorates the creation of the nation’s first designated National Scenic Area, signed into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. But its 48,000 square feet are filled with ex hibits that tell the multi-faceted story of the Gorge, from its geologic origins and Native American history to the arrival of white set tlers and even the area’s flora and fauna. It houses the Wasco County Historical Museum in one wing, and comes alive with a famed raptor program, featuring seven birds of prey that live on-site due to injuries they sustained in the wild that render them non-releasable.

44 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE ARTS + CULTURE
story by PETER MURPHY | photos courtesy of COLUMBIA GORGE DISCOVERY CENTER AND MUSEUM Marylee Jones, left, and the Yakama Nation’s Little Swan Dancers during the Discovery Center’s annual Indian Autumn celebration.

e $21 million facility was thoughtfully designed on its 54-acre plot between I-84 and the Columbia River. It opened in 1997, but not before two competing entities joined forces. ere had been grand talk about creating a Wasco County Historical Society building and a Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area building. Eventually, the two factions came to realize that working together would produce a ne facility for both.

Architect Jonah Cohen remembers the negotiations. “It was fascinating to watch how the two sides came together and the design played out,” he says. He calls the result an “amazing symbol of how government and individuals can work together to build a posterchild of design standards for the Scenic Area.”

One of the most striking design elements is the River Gallery, visible when you walk in the front entrance. Its high, rough-cut rock walls mimic the Gorge itself, with a granite “river” running through the oor.

Cohen recounts how the architects used a six-foot step ladder in the area that would become the River Gallery to visualize the center’s plan. at experiment resulted in its diagonal layout with views of the Gorge and the Klickitat Hills in the background. e building won the American Institute of Architects Honor Award for its appealing design.

To visit the Discovery Center is to nd a cornucopia of exhibits detailing the geology and beauty of the Gorge and the history of the peoples who have inhabited it. Permanent exhibitions tell of important events and activities that have shaped the Gorge, including an Ice Age exhibit that helps visitors understand how the Columbia Gorge is linked to that period of time, and the eons of physical changes wrought by the river that left the chasm we see today.

Another exhibit details the 10,000 years of indigenous Native American history of the Gorge, which makes it one of the oldest areas inhabited by humans in the western hemisphere. e early peoples established permanent settlements here and traded with other Native Americans who traveled from farther away to meet and exchange goods. Many things revolved around the salmon, which ran in great numbers through the river.

Yet another exhibit explores the cargo of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Interactive exhibits include a canvas tent like the ones used on the journey. You can step inside to see what it was like, bearing in mind that it sheltered up to six men. You can also feel the weight of items expedition members routinely carried.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 45
HONKE HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING “Comfort You Can Trust” For more than 50 Years! Service & Installation of Air Conditioning Ductless Systems • Furnaces • Heat Pumps Gas Fireplaces • Hot Water Heaters We Service all Makes and Models We are working with Energy Trust of Oregon to help you reduce energy costs and improve the comfort of your home. 503-666-3725 • 541-386-0018 www.honkeheating.com HONKE HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING “Comfort You Can Trust” For more than 50 Years! Service & Installation of Air Conditioning Ductless Systems • Furnaces • Heat Pumps Gas Fireplaces • Hot Water Heaters We Service all Makes and Models We are working with Energy Trust of Oregon to help you reduce energy costs and improve the comfort of your home. 503-666-3725 • 541-386-0018 www.honkeheating.com CCB#71762 Preferred Alliance PGE approved heat pump contractor Service & Installation of Furnaces Heat Pumps • Ductless Systems Gas Fireplaces • Hot Water Heaters • Air Conditioning LuckyLittlesBoutique 201 Oak Street 541-436-3514 shopluckylittles.com LuckyLittlesHR
The Meyer Memorial River Gallery, above. At left, a dusting of snow on the Klickitat Hills beyond the Discovery Center, and Liberty, one of two resident bald eagles.

Teaching a school group in the Kids Explorer Room, above. The museum grounds span 54 acres and include a riverfront trail and native plant walk, replica cabins and a teepee, right.

The Wasco County Historical Museum is a 17,200-square-foot wing of the facility that tells the story of what was once the largest county in the United States. It stretched from the peaks of the Oregon Cascades to the Continental Divide. Lewis and Clark trekked much of their journey across the Wasco County of old.

An exhibit lets you wander through a replica of The Dalles at the turn of the century. It includes old hotels and shops that remind visitors of the relatively new impacts made by immi grants who made their way to Oregon and left their indelible mark on its history.

Travelling exhibits come and go and have included those from the Smithsonian Institution, the Oregon Historical Society, and the Oregon Museum of Science & Industry. Members of the Yakima and Warm Springs tribes are also integral to activities at the Discovery Center; a multi-tribe fashion show is scheduled for November 2023.

Outside the center is a handicap accessible paved interpretive trail that winds through the museum grounds. Its stunning vistas provide the opportunity to consider the impact of the Missoula Floods that created the Gorge. If you let your imagination run, with a little help from the restored natural vegetation, you can picture the way the land looked even before man arrived: the rapids of the river, the huge runs of salmon leaping over the cascading falls (did you know “The Dalles” is French for describing the rapids in a deep, narrow stream confined between rock walls?) and wildlife of days gone by.

That’s the idea, according to Discovery Center board member Jill Durow, who was there from its inception. There was great attention paid to restoring the natural vegetation when the facility was built. “Even the circuit of paths around the center help tell about the way the Gorge was made and the wet-to-dry weather patterns from the western Gorge to the eastern end.”

The Discovery Center tells us of the days when Native Americans fished at Celilo Falls, when The Dalles was the economic hub of the region and steamboats plied the river, and when nearby Shaniko was the wool capitol of the Northwest.

But it’s not all about yesteryear at the Discovery Center. Casting an eye to the future is front and center too. As renewable energy in the form of wind farms have sprung up in the area to harness the blustery forces, the center has a new exhibit about environmental stewardship for the future. It’s about our energy sources for the years to come in the form of solar, wind and hydro — and the solar panels on site are actively producing electricity.

If you happen to arrive at the Discovery Center from Portland, the drive through the Co lumbia River Gorge takes you through one of nature’s grandest spectacles. Take the Historic Columbia River Highway where you can along the way, and you’ll see why it was known as the “King of Roads” for its dramatic route and views of the Gorge. The last section of the historic road takes you past the turn-off for the Discovery Center, where you can learn more about the landscape you just passed through. You’ll come away with new knowledge and a new perspec tive on the Gorge, the peoples who settled here, and its past, present and future.

“You’ll be surprised by how much it encompasses,” says Tammy Quinton, a volunteer at the Discovery Center. “It’s much more than a small-town offering.”

To learn more, go to gorgediscovery.org.

Peter Murphy worked as a television news reporter and anchor prior to a 15-year stint as public information officer for the Oregon Department of Transportation. Based in Bend, he writes about Oregon for several regional publications.

46 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
ARTS + CULTURE
Driven by our Members, Committed to our Community. 1995 12th Street Hood River, OR 97031 (541) 386-2757 3811 Eagle Loop Odell, OR 97044 (541) 354-3000

Mercado del Valle

Odell’s unique market offers fruits, veggies and a whole lot more

Mercado del Valle is more than a farmers market. Imagine a mariachi band, children dancing traditional Baile Folklorico, hand-made tamales, a bike-powered smoothie maker, a mini library, and bins of colorful peppers and tomatillos and you get a picture of what this unique market is all about.

Mercado was created by and for the community of Odell in 2014. The agricultural town seven miles south of Hood River has a population of about 2,500. Approximately 65 percent

48 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
WELLNESS

is Latinx, and many residents work in the agricultural sector.

Gorge Grown Food Network, a non-pro t dedicated to building a resilient, inclusive local food system, supports the Mercado with grants, and contracts with Latinx leaders who organize the twice-monthly seasonal event.

Yelitza (Yeli) Boots, a bilingual outreach librarian for the Hood River County Library, is the Mercado del Valle Ambassador. She recruits musicians, runs the information booth, processes transactions and promotes literacy in partnership with the library. One of Boots’ favorite parts of the job is passing out “power of produce” (POP) tokens: Anyone under the age of 13 receives a $2 token to buy fresh fruits and vegetables, plus a stamp in their POP passport book. is gets young people excited about trying new things like kale.

Joel Pelayo is co-founder of Raíces Cooperative Farm, a program that provides organic gardening education and small business development services to Latinx market gardeners. In addition to growing and selling produce like tomatoes, chiles, and blueberries at Mercado, Pelayo also coordinates the Mesa Comunitaria (Community Table) where other gardeners can drop o their produce to be sold.

Juan Reyes, a community organizer, goes from door to door handing out yers and inviting Odell residents to join the festivities.  Reyes is dedicated to teaching his three daughters to be civically engaged, and he sets a great example by working with Washington Gorge Action Programs, Radio Tierra, the Spanish GED/Continuing Education Program and others.

POP tokens are a popular part of the market, below right. Anyone under 13 can get a $2 token to buy fresh fruits and veggies, plus a stamp in their POP passport book.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 49 A festive atmosphere prevails at the Mercado del Valle, with lots of music, dancing and kids’ activities to accompany the many market booths. Opposite top, market organizer Joel Pelayo sells fresh peppers. Vertebral Compression Fracture Spinal stenosis Spinal nerve pain and Arthritis 5413869500 1010 10TH ST HOOD RIVER 3601 KLINDT DR SUITE 200 THE DALLES 6542 SE LAKE RD SUITE 100 MILWAUKIE 19255 SW 65TH AVE. STE. 110 TUALATIN MINIMALLY INVASIVE SPINE & PAIN SPECIALISTS columbiapain.org
50 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE WELLNESS 1867 12th Street, Hood River | rosauers.com | 541.386.1119 ROSAUERS ROSAUERS SUPERMARKETS HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET ORGANICS • PRODUCE DELI & BAKERY • MEAT & SEAFOOD WINE & BEER • FLORAL Fresh HolidayFlavors T he scoop on all things food in Hood River, and our neighboring communities in the Gorge. Follow us for weekly updates on the website and social media: hoodrivereats.com @hoodrivereats on Instagram facebook.com/HoodRiverEats The Gorge has so many talented chefs and entrepreneurs o ering an array of food as unique as our region. We invite our food + drink businesses to share their o erings with us and promote them on Hood River Eats! Now under the ownership of Columbia Gorge News and The Gorge Magazine. Contact therealhreats@gmail.com Welcome to HoodRiverEats.com FOOD + DRINK
Mercado del Valle has always been a great opportunity to bring the whole community together to celebrate and enjoy fresh pro duce, food, activities, resources and music
Reyes says.
shoppers can use various forms of currency to purchase fresh produce. The SNAP Match
shoppers
picked peppers, above, and corn-on-the-cob, opposite, are popular
market. Vendors can sell produce
own
or drop off items to be sold at
WELLNESS
“The
with all of our neighbors,”
Mercado
program provides an extra $20 to
using EBT (formerly known as food stamps). Women who Freshly
at the
at their
booth,
the Mesa Comunitaria (Community Table).

are pregnant or have young children can use their WIC vouchers to purchase food, too. The organizers’ commitment to diversity and inclusivity is reflected in their recruitment of Latinx and other BIPOC vendors selling cul turally appropriate food.

This year, more than a dozen agencies participated in the Mercado including Hood River Parks and Recreation, WIC, One Community Health, Head Start, Migrant Education, Hood River County Health and Prevention Departments, Work Source, and Empowered Movement Aerial among others. Gorge Grown Food Network helps to fill in any gaps in seasonal products at Mercado with the Mobile Farmers Market, a veggie van that delivers fresh produce from 27 farmers to some of the most isolated parts of the Gorge.

“People come to Mercado to support each other and to get to know the community’s or ganizations,” Boots says.

Odell residents have also identified three related projects to strengthen Odell’s food system: a community garden, a shared food storage facility, and a community crop swap when gardens are overflowing.

Mercado organizers dream of the event growing into a flagship market that helps small businesses get a solid start while con tinuing to provide a vibrant space for the community to connect.

To learn more, go to gorgegrown.com.

Sarah Sullivan is the executive director of Gorge Grown Food Network.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 51 Make an appointment with The Oregon Clinic Urology for a quick, worry-free procedure done in just one office visit. Our board-certified urologists, Dr. Amanda VanDlac & Dr. Jacob Richard, provide exceptional care and treatment for all urologic conditions. (503) 488-2323 | oregonclinic.com 1790 May Street, Hood River, OR Time to get a vasectomy? UROLOGY HOOD RIVER 541-436-4111 Hood River

Gorge Grown helps cut hunger with Veggie Rx

One in three people in the Columbia River Gorge worry about where their next meal will come from. Gorge Grown Food Network’s award-winning Veggie Rx program seeks to address hunger by enabling healthcare providers to prescribe food-insecure patients with fresh, locally grown produce. Since the program began in 2014, over $360,000 has gone directly to local farmers for Veggie Rx produce.

is year, Gorge Grown is supporting 52 families in partnership with Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital, Mid-Columbia Medical Center (MCMC), Mid-Valley Elementary School, and the Gorge Farmers Collective. Also, the region’s Coordinated Care Organization, Paci cSource, is currently funding a successful Veggie Rx pilot through “ exible services” which support Oregon Health Plan Members with non-medical needs that are critical to wellness. Gorge Grown is hopeful that this is a step toward sustainable funding to integrate food access and health care. Veggie Rx programs have been proven to improve diet, mental and physical health, nancial security and a sense of connection.

To learn more, go to gorgegrown.com/veggierx/

52 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE WELLNESS Dennis
305 Cascade
Hood River, OR 97031 Bonded & Insured OR LIC. #241283 WA LIC. #604933437 EMERGENCY HOME RESPONSE TEAM, LLC 4 Elements Specializing in damage caused by •WATER •MOLD •FIRE •SMOKE •and MUCH MORE “If an emergency happens, call us & we’ll be there”
Howe, 541-645-5305 Email 4elements50@gmail.com
Ave,
RESERVE AN AD now in the SPRING 2023 issue! Space reservation by January 13 LIVING AND EXPLORING IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE Advertising Inquiries: Jody Thompson jthompson@thegorgemagazine.com 425-308-9582 General Inquiries: Janet Cook jcook@thegorgemagazine.com 541-399-6333 Never miss another issue SUBSCRIBE Order online at thegorgemagazine.com or call 541-399-6333 Part of the Gorge community for more than 10 years! thegorgemagazine.com
immediate care 551 Lone Pine Blvd., The Dalles mcmc.net/ImmediateCare 541.506.5880 We accept Medicare and many insurance plans. Any required copayments and/or deductibles will be collected at the time of service. Walk In. Feel Better. Get the care you need when you need it at MCMC Immediate Care. •Treatment for minor illnesses and injuries •No appointment needed •Open 7 days a week, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. •Masks required for visit We accept Medicare and many insurance plans. Any required copayments and/or deductibles will be collected at the time of service.

Mediterranean Hummus

Recipe and photos by

Growing up, my mom was a teacher. One of her student’s parents had a Mediter ranean restaurant and would bring her tubs of the creamiest, smoothest hum mus. For years I’ve tried to find similar hummus and have never succeeded, so I did a lot of research and testing and dis covered some tricks which have resulted in this recipe. I always make a lot, but feel free to halve this recipe.

Ingredients

• 2 15-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained

• 1 tsp. baking soda

• 1/2-3/4 cup lemon juice

• 2 large garlic cloves, peeled

• 1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt

• 1 cup tahini

• 1/4-1/2 cup ice water

• 1 tsp. ground cumin

• 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

• sumac, paprika, parsley (optional)

cold water over them.

Add the tahini to the food processor and blend until the mixture is thick and creamy. With the blender running, add 1/4 cup ice water. Add the chickpeas and cumin and blend. While the blender is running add the olive oil. Add the cumin and the drained, over-cooked chick peas to the food processor. While blending, drizzle in the olive oil, stopping to scrape down the sides and adding more ice water if needed to create a creamy mixture.

When the hummus is completely smooth, taste it for salt and lemon juice and add more as desired. When serving you can garnish it with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkle of fresh parsley, a sprinkle of sumac (my favorite), and sweet or smokey paprika. Enjoy!

54 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 55
Kacie McMackin is an avid cook, writer, and owner of Kings & Daughters Brewery. She’s a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine.

BACKWOODS BREWING COMPANY

509-427-3412 • backwoodsbrewingcompany.com 1162 Wind River Hwy • Carson

Backwoods Brewing is family owned and located in Carson, WA. Established in 2012, we o er delicious beers, hand-made pizzas, outdoor seating, and welcome all ages.

Open daily: 11:30am-9pm

BRODER ØST

541-436-3444 • brodereast.com 102 Oak St. Suite 100 • Hood River

Offering Nordic inspired breakfast and lunch to the gorge. Something new and exciting for the whole family to enjoy. Come try traditional recipes such as aebleskiver (danish pancakes), swedish meatballs, norwegian lefse (potato crepes) and lots more! We look forward to serving you!

#broderost

DOPPIO COFFEE

541-386-3000 • doppiohoodriver.com 310 Oak Street • Downtown Hood River

Relax on our beautiful patio in the heart of Hood River. Enjoy a hand crafted, in-house roasted espresso drink. Serving breakfast and lunch all day: panini sandwiches, fresh salads, smoothies and fresh baked pastries and goodies. Gluten free options available. Free Wi-Fi and our patio is dog friendly. Our tables are spaced apart and disinfected after each guest.

BETTER TOGETHER MOBILE TAP TRUCK

bettertogethertaptruck@gmail.com bettertogethertaptruck.com

Dakota and Greg Wilkins serve the Gorge bringing the bar to you with 6 beverage taps on a classic GMC pickup. They are ready to serve your favorite baverage at your event!

Reserving now for 2023

CASA EL MIRADOR FAMILY MEXICAN RESTAURANT

541-298-7388 • casaelmirador.com 1424 West 2nd Street • The Dalles

Quality Mexican food prepared with the freshest and finest ingredients. Warm, friendly service and a lively atmosphere. Indulge in generous portions of flavorful sizzling fajitas, fish tacos, savory enchilada dishes and daily specials. Drink specials & Happy Hour menu from 3-6pm, Mon-Fri. Full service bar, take-out menu, gift certificates and catering services. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week.

BRIDGESIDE

541-374-8477 • bridgesidedining.com

Exit 44 off I-84, Cascade Locks

Stunning views next to the Bridge of the Gods – Bridgeside (formerly Charburger) serves tasty char-broiled burgers plus an extensive menu of breakfast items, chowders, fish & chips, salads, sandwiches, and desserts. Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner with friendly service.

Gift shop • Special event room & terrace

EL PUERTO DE ANGELES III

541-308-0005

1306 12th Street • Hood River, on the Heights

We are open and happy to serve you. Authentic Jalisco Cuisine. We provide a safe dining experience. Enjoy good food and good times. Offering daily lunch and dinner spe cials, served all day. Happy Hour Mon-Fri. Outdoor dining available (weather permitting).

Open Daily 10am-9pm Dine-In or Takeout

CELILO RESTAURANT & BAR

541-386-5710 • celilorestaurant.com

16 Oak Street • Downtown Hood River

Celebrating over 17 years, Celilo began with a desire to honor the bounty of the Northwest. Our ever-changing menu reflects the seasonal highlights of the region’s growers and foragers. We offer the most innovative in fresh, local cuisine as well as an award-winning wine list, full bar, small plate menu, and happy hour.

Open Tuesday-Saturday from 5pm

EVERYBODY’S BREWING

509.637.2774 • everybodysbrewing.com

177 E. Jewett Boulevard • White Salmon

Everybody’s Brewing sits perfectly nestled on the cli s of White Salmon, WA, overlooking the beautiful Columbia River Gorge. With award-winning beers, a globally-inspired food menu, and jaw-dropping views of Mt. Hood, you’ll quickly discover why Everybody’s is a Gorge favorite.

Visit Website for Updated Hours | Indoor/Outdoor Dining and Takeout (Order Online or Call)

56 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
PARTAKE I EAT & DRINK

GRACE SU’S CHINA GORGE RESTAURANT & TIGER LOUNGE

541-386-5331 • chinagorge.com 2680 Old Columbia River Drive • Hood River

A Gorge favorite known for authentic flavor and friendly service. Proudly serving Hunan and Szechuan cuisine since 1978. From our family to yours, we’re honored to have you at our table!

Open Tue-Sun, closed Mon. Call or visit Facebook.com/ ChinaGorge for updates on takeout & dine-in service.

GROUND ESPRESSO BAR & CAFE

541-386-4442 • groundhoodriver.com 12 Oak Street • Downtown Hood River

Get your daily fuel for your Gorge sports and activities here! A long time locals favorite coffee house and eatery, Ground features fresh in-house roasted coffee, house made pastries and cookies with lots of gluten free options. We make our soups from scratch every day and source mostly local and organic ingredients. Nitro cold brew on tap.

THE LITTLE SEVEN SEVEN RANCH HIGHLAND BEEF

509-767-7130 • L77Ranch.com

Grass-Fed Highland Beef from our ranch to your home. The L77 Ranch Shop is tucked away in the woods in Lyle. Highland Cattle can be viewed from the roads as you travel through the ranch. See all we have to offer in an open airy space. We stock a full selection of premium steaks, roasts, ground beef and more. Email for our Local Price List.

By appointment only.

PFRIEM FAMILY BREWERS

541-321-0490 • pfriembeer.com 707 Portway Avenue, Suite 101 • Hood River Waterfront pFriem artisanal beers are symphonies of flavor and balance, influenced by the great brewers of Europe, but unmistakably true to our homegrown roots in the Pacific Northwest. Although they are served humbly, each glass is overflowing with pride and a relentless aspiration to brew the best beer in the world. We’ll let you decide.

Open Daily | 11:30am-9pm

SOLSTICE HOOD RIVER

541-436-0800 • solsticehoodriver.com 501 Portway Ave • Hood River Waterfront

A destination dining experience that unites friends, families, & community with a love of wood-fired pizza, shareable appetizers, and gluten friendly offerings. Inspired by the Gorge & seasonal harvests from our neighboring farms, our food & beverage menus are chef-driven & handcrafted. Walk-ins welcome! Reservations for in-house dining & takeout at our cafe/pizza truck available on our site!

REMEDY CAFÉ

541-716-4020 • remedycafehoodriver.com 112 Third Street • Downtown Hood River

Organic juice, smoothies, bowls, burritos & salads. House-made almond and coconut milks. Vegan and paleo options. Best quality organic and local ingredients. Organic espresso. Order Online - RemedyCafeHoodRiver.com

Dine-In, Takeout and Curbside Options. Kids Corner. WiFi. “Where Healthy Food and Your Cravings Meet!”

Welcome to Riverside, where you’ll find the best food, drinks and views in the Gorge. Dine indoors or outdoors on the waterfront with fresh menus changing seasonally. Plus an award-winning wine list and 14 taps with all your favorite local breweries. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner with the freshest ingredients grown and harvested by thoughtful, intentional local growers.

SUSHI OKALANI

541-386-7423 • sushiokalani@gorge.net 109 First Street • Downtown Hood River

We are the local’s favorite spot for fresh fish, Pan-Asian cuisine, and a huge sake selection, all available to-go only. We offer curbside pickup, 7 nights a week. With creative rolls, rotating specials, and fresh sashimi and nigiri, we also offer staples like Teriyaki, Tempura, and stir-fry dishes to satisfy all tastes. Phone orders only, starting at 4, pickup 5-8pm. Check IG & FB for specials and current menu.

A brewery and taproom located in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge. The river and mountain views pair beautifully with craft beer and delicious food. Well-behaved dogs are welcome on the patio. All guests are welcome, and are expected to follow Oregon state COVID guidelines. Cheers! Reservations are recommended. To book, visit thunderislandbrewing.com.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE II WINTER 2022-23 57
PARTAKE I EAT & DRINK RIVERSIDE & CEBU LOUNGE 541-386-4410 • riversidehoodriver.com Exit 64 off I-84 • Waterfront Hood River
ISLAND BREWING CO. 971-231-4599 • thunderislandbrewing.com 601 NW Wa Na Pa Street • Cascade Locks
THUNDER

Photographer Robby Miller was on a late-winter hike at Catherine Creek in search of the season’s first grass widows when he captured this image. He was hoping for a pretty sunrise, but the overcast sky kept his ex pectations low. When he got to the west ridge of the Catherine Creek drainage, he stopped to watch the fog flowing out of the Klickitat River onto the Columbia. “You could actually watch the fog moving down the river,” he said. “It would ebb and flow. It was almost like the river was breathing.” The sun poked out and illuminated the fog and the green ridgeline in front of him in beautiful winter light.

The Photographer

ROBBY MILLER grew up in the Mid-Hudson Valley region of upstate New York, and it was there that he started dabbling in photography in his early 20s. He loved taking pictures of the fall foliage and the area’s lakes, and began taking his camera with him on hikes. While hiking in the Adirondacks, he captured a photo of the sun setting on Whiteface Mountain. After posting it to an online forum, he got a request for use of the photo in a geology display. “That inspired me,” he said. He lived in Utah for several years, where he continued to hone his photography skills, before moving to White Salmon in 2016. “Now I want to carry my camera everywhere I go,” he said. “You never know what you’re going to see around here.” robbymillerphotography.com

58 WINTER 2022-23 II THE GORGE MAGAZINE
GORGE
OUR
I YOUR GORGE

LEGACY ESTATE

LEGACY ESTATE

Nestled at the base of Mt Hood, the iconic and beloved Mt Hood Bed & Breakfast is 42 acres of stunning beauty. Operated as a world-renowned B&B/destination wedding venue since 1994. Enjoy this triple mountain view property with 6 bed/ 6 bath farmhouse, 2 guest cottages including the original 1880’s homestead, quintessential red barn, and modern 7200 sq ft metal event barn/shop. Property features a captivating reflecting pond with bridge surrounded by manicured grounds, 16 acres state-of-the-art trellised pear orchard, & 10 acres of forest. A once in a lifetime chance to fall in love and take ownership of this magical place.

Nestled at the base of Mt Hood, the iconic and beloved Mt Hood Bed & Breakfast is 42 acres of stunning beauty. Operated as a world-renowned B&B/destination wedding venue since 1994. Enjoy this triple mountain view property with 6 bed/ 6 bath farmhouse, 2 guest cottages including the original 1880’s homestead, quintessential red barn, and modern 7200 sq ft metal event barn/shop. Property features a captivating reflecting pond with bridge surrounded by manicured grounds, 16 acres state-of-the-art trellised pear orchard, & 10 acres of forest. A once in a lifetime chance to fall in love and take ownership of this magical place.

Property details and price available upon request.

Property details and price available upon request.

Vicki Brennan Licensed in OR 541-399-3678 vicki@copperwest.com

Vicki Brennan

Licensed in OR 541-399-3678 vicki@copperwest.com

Candice Richards

Licensed in OR/WA 541-912-5999 candice@copperwest.com

Candice Richards

Licensed in OR/WA 541-912-5999 candice@copperwest.com

Say “yes” to the
IN LOVE
Blaine Franger
address! FALL
FOR SALE: 8885 Cooper Spur Rd, Mount Hood/Parkdale Blaine Franger
Say “yes” to the address!
FOR SALE: 8885 Cooper Spur Rd, Mount Hood/Parkdale

Home sweet home.

Cyndee is a NW native and has called Hood River home for over 20 years. Winter is a great time to reflect on the past year and get ready for the new year. If your plans for 2023 include buying or selling Real Estate, let Cyndee help you find your own “home sweet home” in the Gorge, in Oregon or Washington!

Excellent support and results. Cyndee worked very hard in insuring it all came together!! She was always there and on top of everything! Would encourage all to let Cyndee help them! Would highly recommend her. She not only knew what to do, but was a lot of fun to work with! Thank you Cyndee!

Cyndee Kurahara BROKER, OR/WA 541-490-1396 cyndee@copperwest.com IG: cyndee_kurahara

HHHHH
Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.