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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE September 2019 | Vol.24 #11

THE

CLIMATE CHANGE:

AUTUMN ATTIRE

THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

FASHION FOR A NEW SEASON

BONNIE SCOTLAND

WHOSE JOB IS IT?

MOUNTAIN WILDERNESSES AND GLACIAL GLENS

MENTAL HEALTH

LIFE DOESN’T STOP WHEN DEMENTIA BEGINS

MINDFULNESS IN THE WORKPLACE

SETTING SAIL

WITH THE R.G.Y.C


from the editor

SEPTEMBER ISSUE EDITOR’S NOTE As summer draws to a sticky close, We thought we’d do away with prose. This month we’re being more diverse, Introducing this issue entirely in verse. We’ve got so much in store for you, From bonnie Scotland to the AWCP zoo. Find the Monkey, and Show Us Your Pets, We sit down with Jetstream for a tête-à-tête. Jimmy Dalmedo, and who he drove, And the owner of a treasure trove. Autumn attire, and back-to-school lunches, This issue sure does pack some punches! We learn about dementia, the steps we must take, Charity work, and how you can partake. So sit back and relax, put up your feet. This one’s for you – you’re in for a treat.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


EDITOR: Sophie Clifton-Tucker editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com DESIGN: Justin Bautista design@thegibraltarmagazine.com REPORTER: Kristel Coombes SALES: Advertising Team sales@thegibraltarmagazine.com

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DISTRIBUTION: DHL martin@matrix.gi ACCOUNTS: Paul Cox paul@thegibraltarmagazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jorge v.Rein Parlade Kerstin Andlaw Denise Matthews Peter Schirmer Jeremy Gomez Chris Hedley Julia Coelho Tony Segovia Resham Khiani Andrew Licudi

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Lewis Stagnetto Richard Cartwright Elena Scialtiel Marilis Azzopardi Jess Leaper facebook.com/gibmag/ twitter.com/gibmag instagram.com/thegibraltarmagazine/ The Gibraltar Magazine is published monthly by Rock Publishing Ltd Portland House, Glacis Road, Gibraltar, PO Box 1114 T: (+350) 20077748 E: editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com Š 2019 Rock Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written consent of The Gibraltar Magazine. www.TheGibraltarMagazine.com Magazine & website archived by the British Library 6

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46 80 content

39

08 Hello There: How do you celebrate National Day? 09 What's on?

cking acaque tu. M ry a rb se e Ba brow Poppy thto some hibiscus ers in hiv C y c u L By

10 Around Town 12 News

BUSINESS 19 Whose Job Is it? – Mindfulness in the workplace

49 85 63

21 Property Investment Abroad:

Asturias

27 Startups: Scale or sale?

LEISURE 57 Setting Sail with the RGYC 58 Life Doesn’t Stop When Dementia Begins 63 Bonnie Scotland: Mountain wildernesses and glacial glens 66 Wine: Sancerre’s Sauvignons

LIFE

69 Urban Eatery: Nunos at the Express

30 Climate Change: The greenhouse effect

72 Relay For Life: Raising money for Cancer Research

34 Beads for Life: Raising money for cold caps

76 Fashion: Autumn attire

39 A Zookeeper’s Diary

REGULARS

43 The Invasive Japanese Seaweed 46 Driving Force: Jimmy Dalmedo

80 Recipes: Energy Balls and Moroccan Meatballs

49 James Sanguinetti EST. 1870: Gibraltar’s treasure trove

83 Guides and Information

SCENE

86 Olympus: Gods on the Rock 88 Clubs and Societies 89 #GibsGems

52 Jetstream: Worth the wait

90 Schedules

55 Kitchen Studios: Sexhibition

94 Coffee Time

Cover: National Day Celebration Image provided by visitgibraltar.gi GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

7


hello there

HOW DO YOU CELEBRATE NATIONAL DAY?

Craig Vincent, 35, Broker at Masbro. I tend to go up the coast for the day. I celebrate from afar on a beach in the Costa de La Luz!

Giana Hermida, 23, Special Projects Executive at Masbro. I go to the beach and have a family bbq. And wear red and white of course! Later on I watch the fireworks in the evening from west view park.

Lauren Schembri, 21, Special Projects Assistant, Masbro. I traditionally go for breakfast with my family and then spend time celebrating with my friends throughout the day, drinking tinto de verano!

Aaron Guerrero, 29, Insurance Broker at Masbro. Wake up in the morning and have breakfast with my parents, then we normally go for a bit of seafood for lunch, and then a bit of socialising with friends.

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Ushuaia, 2 months, Melter of Hearts. I just love to drink and eat all day‌ but I’m still figuring out where the toilet is!

Cheyenne Woolf, 22, Customer Renewals Advisor at Masbro. I watch the speeches in Casemates and then head to Ocean Village to continue the festivities.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


WHAT'S ON SEPTEMBER 2019 TUESDAY 3 SEPTEMBER Gibraltar National Celebrations and Classical Concert St Michael's Cave, 8pm Tickets from Buytickets.gi WEDNESDAY 4 SEPTEMBER National Celebrations Art Competition 2019 Fine Arts Gallery, 7pm For further information, rules and conditions please contact the Fine Arts Association on 20052126.

TUESDAY 10 SEPTEMBER National Day Gibraltar, all day event Check Visitgibraltar.gi for full programme of events Monkey Rocks Europa Point Sports Complex, 3pm onwards Tickets from buytickets.gi

SATURDAY 14 SEPTEMBER FRIDAY 6 SEPTEMBER Boat Procession 2019 Coaling Island, 5.30pm Any boat owner interested in taking part should contact Steven Segui on 58286000 or email: steven.segui@ giboxy.gi SATURDAY 7 SEPTEMBER TO SUNDAY 8 SEPTEMBER Gibraltar Calling 2019 Europa Point Stadium, 3pm Onwards This year's Gibraltar Calling music festival will take place over the weekend of the 7th and 8th of September and will be held at the Europa Sports Ground. MONDAY 9 SEPTEMBER Andrea Bocelli and the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra to Perform in Gibraltar Europa Point Sports Complex, 8pm onwards. Tickets from buytickets.gi GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

1st Annual 12hr GDP Bikeathlon 2019 HM Naval Base, 9am Tickets priced at £20

THURSDAY 19 SEPTEMBER TO SATURDAY 21 SEPTEMBER Calpe 2019 Conference: Archaeological and Heritage Research in Gibraltar: the past thirty years University of Gibraltar, Europa Point, 9.15am For further information call +350200 74289. or email enquiries@gibmuseum.gi TUESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER Diveristy & Inclusion Seminar John Mackintosh Hall Theatre, 9am for more information email events@dyslexia.gi

Find us on Facebook and Instagram @gaiabeachclub, or call +34 956 23 78 61 to see what we can do for your special event.


around town (C) John Holmes Mrs Gibraltar Mrs Gibraltar 2019: Grace Baker 1st Princess: Claire Rodgers 2nd Princess: Karina Ortiz

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


around town (C) Angelique

Fernandez - Pause & Pose Photography

The 14th consecutive annual Wedding Dress Competition 2019

Ocean Village Marina hosts 11th Annual RAOB Charity Cardboard Boat Race.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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news COMMONWEALTH PLAQUE FOR GIBRALTAR HOUSE IN LONDON

GOVERNMENT REMINDS THE PUBLIC TO PREPARE FOR NO DEAL BREXIT

A new metallic plaque has been fixed at the entrance to Gibraltar House in London to celebrate our being part of the Commonwealth community of nations. A 2km walkway route now links Gibraltar House with the High Commissions of Canada, Cyprus, Nigeria, Uganda, South Africa, India, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Australia as well as the government offices of The Falklands. The walkway starts at Australia House and then India House, both close to Gibraltar House, and ends at Marlborough Palace, the seat of the Commonwealth Secretariat whose own plaque was set in the pavement last week.

The Government will renew its Brexit public information campaign with a view to our departure from the European Union on 31 October. This peaked in the run-up to the last target date of 12 April before the deadline was extended. The Deputy Chief Minister, who is responsible for work related to our departure from the European Union said: “We voted to remain in the European Union and this is still the preferred position of the Government. However, we nonetheless need to prepare for our possible departure.

The Government, over the next few weeks, will be reminding the public to prepare for a no deal Brexit. We intend to issue once again the advice we have given covering issues like passports, identity cards, driving licences and health cards. This is important to both the general public and to the business community. We have had over fifty meetings with companies and business organisations and intend to continue that engagement as part of the strategy for our departure. There are some areas where businesses, as opposed to individual citizens, have to prepare so those issues are being discussed directly with the relevant stakeholders in private. An advertising campaign in the local press and on the Government’s social media platforms will be part of the strategy as we prepare to leave the European Union on 31 October.”

Commonwealth countries all over the globe have sponsored their own Commonwealth Walkways and the trust, which operates with public and charitable support, has expressed the view that a walkway in Gibraltar would be a welcome addition their network. Members of the Trust visited Gibraltar in 2018.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


news BRITISH AIRWAYS PROMOTE GIBRALTAR The Gibraltar Tourist Board has collaborated with British Airways in a promotion to coincide with the airline’s 100 year anniversary celebrations.

In conjunction with the release of the August issue, an area of the Executive Club Lounge at London Gatwick airport has been branded Gibraltar for the month, with a bespoke backdrop mirroring the imagery in Highlife. The promotion

also includes an interactive area where guests may listen to recordings of live radio interviews given with some of the speakers through the years who have taken part in promotion of the festival.

The August issue of the airline’s on-board magazine, Highlife, features an 8-page spread on Gibraltar with personal interpretations of the destination written by acclaimed writers Horatio Clare, Boyd Tonkin and John Crace, all of whom have visited Gibraltar as speakers at the Gibunco Gibraltar International Literary Festival.

50 wines by the glass 40 small dishes of Mediterranean cuisine 30 John Mackintosh Square GX11 1AA Gibraltar. Tel: 200 70201 info@vinopolisgastrobar.gi www.vinopolisgastrobar.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE AUGUST 2019

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news GIBRALTAR TOURIST BOARD TO STRENGTHEN TIES WITH THE UK TRAVEL TRADE As part of their Gibraltar 2020 trade marketing campaign, the Gibraltar Tourist Board recently

ADOPT A KITTY My name is Gizmo. My purr is of a panther and my ears are of a bat, but I'm really quite certain that I'm mainly a cat. I'm a 1-year-old quirky, petite girl living in the sanctuary, spending most of my day alone. I

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hosted the first in their programme of familiarisation trips for UK travel agents. The strategy aims to further engage with the UK travel trade and increase Gibraltar’s profile as a destination with UK agents.

Minister for Tourism, Gilbert Licudi QC said: “The uniqueness of the warm British Gibraltarian welcome in the heart of the Mediterranean and a good value pound sterling destination continues to be an important message in times of currency volatility”.

The group enjoyed some of Gibraltar’s highlights with a packed itinerary of activities like getting up close with the monkeys, dolphin watching and visits to the many attractions.

The plan includes trade advertising and an incentivised e-learning course where agents can win familiarisation trip places. Visit gibraltartraining.com to find out more.

long for a kind human to take me home and give me the strokes and kisses I adore. My sanctuary aunties say I am confident, endearing and spayed.... must have been that bad haircut day. Are you my human? Please message me on Facebook: Gibraltar Cat Welfare Society or Instagram: gibraltarcatwelfare

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


news FIREFIGHTER MATTHEW COULTHARD CROWNED BRITISH CHAMPION

(coiling), carrying hefty container, casualty rescue simulation, and finally a head-to-head run. The overall fastest time being victorious. Firefighter Coulthard said, “I’m thrilled to have represented Gibraltar and to able to

compete for the British title. Fortunately, hard work, training and perseverance has paid off. I am blessed to have exceptional work colleagues who support me, training together and pushing ourselves to our physical limits. applications in Gibraltar, as well as ensuring regulatory compliance.

Firefighter (FF) Matt Coulthard has been crowned the 2019 British Champion at the British Firefighter Challenge. FF Coulthard competed against 200 firefighters in this event devised to replicate the arduous challenges faced by firefighters in the line of duty. The race consisted of running up a tower, pulling a hose externally up the façade of the tower, forced entry machine, hose dragging, subsequently making the hose up

STTPP – NEW CAR-SHAPED BICYCLE RACK AT EUROPORT ROAD

This adds to the growing stock of bicycle parking in Gibraltar and further encourages alternative and sustainable modes of transport locally. The Minister with responsibility for Transport, the Hon. Paul Balban said:

“10 bicycles potentially means 10 less cars on the road and that can only be good for Gibraltar and good for the environment. The Ministry will continue to provide cycling infrastructure throughout Gibraltar which is critical if we are to encourage sustainable alternative modes of transport.”.

The Ministry for Infrastructure and Planning has installed a new style car-shaped bicycle rack at Europort Road, an area that has fast become Gibraltar’s main cycling hub. This innovative bicycle parking solution sends a clear message of a move towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly use of our public highway by using the space normally occupied by one single motor vehicle to park up to 10 bicycles. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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news INCREASE IN NUMBER OF MPS SUBJECT TO TRIAL PERIOD

There is no change to the system of voting other than each elector will have a maximum of 15 votes instead of 10 votes. Electors would be free to continue blockvoting for the same party-block as they do now, in order to choose a Government.

A Bill was published last month to increase the number of elected members of Parliament from 17 to 25. This follows the recommendation made by the Select Committee on Parliamentary Reform to the Gibraltar Parliament on 9 May.

The Deputy Chief Minister Dr Joseph Garcia said: “The proposal to increase the number of Parliamentarians, if approved, will be monitored over the lifetime of the next Parliament in order to test its effectiveness. This trial period is really the best way to see whether the system works or not. A future Gibraltar Parliament would be free to make whatever changes it wishes after the new system has been tested”.

The number of Ministers remains the same. This increase applies to Members of Parliament only and is proposed initially on a trial basis.

SENIORS TEA FOR TWO The first Seniors Tea for Two event was a great success, paving the way for future monthly get-togethers. There was music from the 40s, 50s and 60s, conversation starters and trivia cards, and an impressive spread of hot drinks, sandwiches, scones and cakes. Seniors Tea for Two meetups will occur on the second Tuesday of every month from 2pm at the IPA Police Club (South District). The next event falls on National Day. There will be a BBQ and live music. All welcome! Thank you to all who made this event possible: Sophie CliftonTucker of Little English/The Gibraltar Magazine and Jason Harper of B2 Projects, and to the IPA Beer Garden for their incredible hospitality.

ADOPT A DOG Hello my name is Charley. I have lived a hard life, abandoned with my brother on the street, sleeping on a busy roadside. When we were found my brother was already dead but I wouldn’t leave his side. Now I am learning to trust again and am being looked after my volunteers. I enjoy a gentle walk and would love a warm bed of my own. Please think of taking 16

me home, I’ll be your best friend. Please email info@ainf.gi for more information.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


PHILLIPS - WE ARE ALWAYS IN YOUR CORNER COMMERCIAL LAW - MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE - PERSONAL INJURY - FAMILY - EMPLOYMENT CRIMINAL DEFENCE - LANDLORD & TENANT - PUBLIC LAW - PROPERTY & CONVEYANCING - PRIVATE CLIENT

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IS IT?

Mental health and wellbeing is receiving more and more attention as the number of people suffering from stress, anxiety and depression is soaring. So who’s job is it to look after employees’ wellbeing? Is it the job of the company? Or is it the responsibility of the individual?

business

WHOSE JOB BY KERSTIN ANDLAW

M

ost companies are aware that stress and pressure are an everyday occurrence for most of their people, but few companies know what do about it beyond reducing workload and providing time off which often is not a viable and sustainable option. The debate around whose responsibility it is to take care of people’s mental health and wellbeing is still out as well, which doesn’t drive widespread preventative solutions. Having worked and continuing to work with companies, providing a radically different approach to improving mental wellbeing whilst increasing productivity has provided me with some insight into the struggles companies face in creating an impactful wellbeing strategy. The first obstacle I see, is buy-

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

in from the top. If the senior management and executive team see the value in supporting their people, it will happen, and something will be put in place to support them. If the buy-in isn’t there, nothing happens. is there, the next ҇obstacle ҇ If buy-in is; what to put in place to best support people?

Many companies have spent large sums of money on a whole variety of strategies to attempt to improve wellbeing. From weekly

A different approach is required. fruit bowls, to office yoga, table football in the office, social events, to pizzas or Friday beers… it’s pretty much all been done and very much lead by the likes of

Google. But does any of it really make a difference? And is it enough to simply provide things like these for your employees? It is not a terrible idea, but it can be a tick box exercise. What it does show is a willingness and a commitment to staff, but it often doesn’t make a real and lasting difference to people’s lives and wellbeing. Creating an impactful and lasting solution to support mental wellbeing at work requires various considerations: is different and ҇we҇ Everyone all have different needs,

aspirations and priorities, which means there is no one-size-fits-all. It also means that an employer can not solely be responsible for its people’s wellbeing. It requires people to take ownership of their wellbeing which can supported through the specific approaches 19


business

and support and can be led by example from the top down.

Therefore, a different approach is required.

companies and people ҇still҇ Most look at stress as something

consider what actually ҇works; ҇ Lastly, what would make a real

we need to manage. However, managing stress and pressure at work through working less, balancing work with enough downtime to counter the negative effects is all very well but it is

difference to your people? If you are unsure, hire an expert in the field, just like you’d do with your tax and other specialised areas.

We need to place people at the centre of the conversation.

In my experience and considering evidence-based research, the most impactful and lasting change is through a person-centred individual approach that considers the function of our human psyche instead of attempting to manage external circumstances, situations and people.

not creating the desired effect as is evident in the prevailing stress amongst people nowadays.

Therefore, what we need to do is change the conversation around mental health and wellbeing. We need to place people at the centre of the conversation. We

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need to inspire and empower people to own and create their experiences. We need to take action in providing valuable and transformative support and guidance instead of covering the issues with a Band-Aid or trying to change something that isn’t changeable. This is not the sole responsibility of an employer, but an employer is in a position to create an environment that is conducive to drive a change in how we approach mental wellbeing which will benefit their people and inadvertently benefit the company. However, I believe this to be choice not a requirement. What is your experience of mental wellbeing at work?


property

PROPERTY INVESTMENT ABROAD Part VIII: Asturias - the forgotten land.

BY BY JORGE V.REIN PARLADE

S

ome readers may wonder why after so many articles on property investment abroad I have not covered Spain yet. The answer is quite simple: It is very close and probably well-known to most Gibraltarian residents. And it may well be the case that they can do their property market research on their own. Spain, however, is a large country and prices can vary from €1000 all the way up to over €12.000 per square metre on prime seafront beach properties in Marbella, or exclusive areas of Mallorca in The Balearics. In this article we shall be travelling to Asturias. A little like the northern parts of Ireland or the UK, Asturias is a principality within the Kingdom of Spain and along Andalucia or Galicia, and is an autonomous community. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

This so-called forgotten land is far from Gibraltar but still a lot closer than other property markets we researched in the past like Greece, Malta, Croatia or Ireland. Communications by motorcar are excellent and one can join the Principality in 10 hours by car from Gibraltar, all the route being on motorways of which 95% are toll-free. Another good option is to fly up. Malaga has daily flights to Oviedo-Asturias for some €150 return if booked in advance. The flight is short and pleasant, taking just over one hour. And Oviedo airport terminal is small and very user friendly. The weather is different from our mediterranean sunny and hot conditions. As we all know well, conditions in summer can be unbearably hot in most of the Mediterranean. Up in the

Principality, summer conditions are very pleasant with day temperatures that average from 19-23°C and night temperatures of 15-17°C. Asturias is therefore very green, with lush vegetation, and incredibly pretty. Beautiful rivers coming from The Picos de Europa flows its pristine, gin-clear waters on to the Cantabrian sea. The beaches are no doubt amongst the most beautiful in Spain. And taking into consideration that its weather is heavily marked by the Gulf Stream it is a true fact that conditions are balmy for being in Northern Spain. A recent research of an ancient history book showed that two hundred years ago Asturias had the largest plantations of oranges in Spain. This somehow proves 21


property but not huge expenses. I know of a client who just purchased a stunning Casona for €90,000 and it measures about 300m². It needs work, but the leeway to profit is remarkable in the long run.

my point that conditions even in winter are very bearable 12-13°C on average. The sea temperatures in summer are not colder than, say, Tarifa. In fact, some days ago whilst fishing with an English friend, we found out that sea temperatures were about 23°C. A lot better than in Marbella. And why would I invest in a place like Asturias? One cannot think of a better or more relaxed place to spend holidays, or even retire. It is much like the UK or Ireland with much better weather and a lot closer. The British have always been great discoverers of the good places to live, but most find mediterranean summers too hot. They already discovered northern Portugal and certainly Cantabria with Santander being not only an extremely attractive city, but most convenient to travel to and from the UK and Ireland. At present there are no less than two ferries per week crossing from Plymouth and Portsmouth to Santander, plus another option from Portsmouth to Bilbao. In 22

addition, there is a weekly ferry service from Cork to Santander. These ferries do the crossings year around. Santander is less than one hour from Asturias. Another important reason is that you can still pick up beautiful properties for some €1500 per m², and less if you get there in

The Picos de Europa flows its pristine, gin-clear waters on to the Cantabrian sea. winter months. This means you can buy a really good property for less than €100,000. There are some outstanding buys out there: Casonas formerly the property of the well-off Indianos (Asturians that left for Cuba or South America to seek for fortune and came back rich and prosperous and built manor-type houses with palm trees and lovely gardens) that may need some restoration

Another well-known Spanish billionaire is buying up every historic building in Oviedo or in any other Asturias well established town. The local government is normally open to foreign investment and is willing to help getting the right permissions to restore older buildings. Short-term lets can yield good rental returns, especially in season from May to September. And what about paperwork and taxes? Asturias has similar purchase expenses of other autonomous communities is Spain. Of your purchase price one must account for a round figure of 15% which will include: tax of 8% to 10% ҇҇Transmission depending on the value of the acquisition.

tax of between 0.5% to ҇҇AJD 1.5%

҇҇Registry fee ҇҇Notary fee If you make rental income you will be subject to income tax as in any other jurisdiction. It is not far off the UK or France. Perhaps a little higher than in Gibraltar. If the corporate route is chosen, company tax stands at present at 25%. Non-residents will be liable to GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


property a 19% tax on any capital gains accrued from the sale of your property which is set off from your income tax in your country of residency. This tax is lower than in many other European jurisdictions but higher than in Gibraltar where there is no such tax. Is Asturias a safe investment area within the jurisdiction of Spain? As safe as any under developed land. The potential can be very good. The time factor will play an important role. And the investor should look into it with a view to investing in a very pleasant place. Communications are improving with the AVE being built and so is general infrastructure. There are signs that show a future market improvement.

Major Mexican investors are getting in whilst pulling out of other traditional markets. Same language (Over 750 million Spanish speakers today) and plenty of leeway to make a future profit. Lots return to their original land. Some other good reasons to give Asturias a good try are: Great value for money in every sense. It is not only fair and low housing prices. One can probably eat the best food in Spain for little more than €12 a head. Best milk, best cheese, best Fabada (Beans), best fish… all at a fraction of the cost you would pay in Madrid or Barcelona. Sport facilities are superb. Decent golf, great walks and hikes in

A relaxed place to spend holidays, or even retire. the most dramatic and beautiful scenario. Superb beaches with good surfing and safe swimming. The best salmon fishing in Spain comparable to Ireland and Scotland. Culture fans will not be disappointed. There are stunning cathedrals, monuments and Covadonga where the reconquest by the Christians started. A sound choice.

Escape to the Country... With a hill of your own covered in olive trees, close to the village of Cortes de la Frontera The property has 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, a carvan & swimming pool Build size :70m2 Plot size: 18 300m2 Price: € 260,000

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:+350 200 40026 / +34 626 01 05 84

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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business

STARTUPS FOR SCALE OR SALE Tech mergers and acquisitions. BY DENISE MATTHEWS

A

s the approach of the new season lingers on the horizon, businesses get back into the full swing of activity as they prepared throughout the inevitably slower summer months to get the most out of the remaining year. At the end of July, tech giants hit the headlines in the Financial Times: “Google parent Alphabet overtakes Apple to become the new king of cash”. For a decade Apple was the company with the biggest financial reserves at a peak of $163bn in 2017, but being dethroned does not come without serious controversy for Google’s parent company, especially within the seriously sensitive political times around the globe. Increasingly, the US Government and European Union are exerting more control over the tech giants to stifle their plans for world domination and the implication that they can influence or change the course of the mass population’s understanding and opinion of current world affairs. For the not so well-known Alphabet, what are the implications and what is it the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

company does? Launched in 2015, the mission is to keep growing and investing in innovation varying in anything from health to selfdriven cars claiming this company will help make the world a better place. CEO Larry Page made his shift to Alphabet, mainly a group of different companies with the biggest of course being Google. By December 2016, Alphabet had acquired over 200 companies, with the largest acquisition being the purchase of Motorola Mobility, the mobile device manufacturing company, for $12.5 billion. This was by no means a profitable move - they sold back a few years later at a fraction of the price - but the good news for developers and entrepreneurs is that these tech giants have plenty of cash to spare.

This was by no means a profitable move. There is more; some of the biggest tech acquisitions and mergers of all time came from the

likes of Amazon acquiring Whole Foods supermarkets for $13.7 billion or smart doorbell Ring for just over $1 billion. In these mega billion deals you would know that Facebook snapped up WhatsApp and Instagram, with Microsoft also acquiring LinkedIn. In conclusion, the art of building a product, application and scaling your business model to millions of users can nowadays result in unimaginable wealth. For our September event the guest speakers Peter Howitt and Fiona Young are going to share the journey with our audience at a local scale and how building a legal firm focused on innovation and positive core values resulted in a successful acquisition for them by the Global Law Firm Ince Gordan Dadds (now rebranded as Ince). Peter Howitt, founded the start-up law firm Ramparts in 2012, following his move to Gibraltar from London to work within the gaming industry. His vision was to found a law firm that provided niche and specialist expertise to clients in the Finance and Gaming sectors. With his extensive experience in online gaming and e-money, Peter saw 27


business

the law firm as an opportunity to focus on emerging areas of legal and regulatory work within an increasingly tech driven jurisdiction. The firm attracted a number of highly skilled legal practitioners each with extensive expertise in their relevant fields helping to grow the client base and enabling Ramparts to quickly find its place within the local legal community. It was important for the firm to build up a team of lawyers and support staff that worked well together, share a passion for pragmatism and personable service and were consistently inspired and motivated by their work. Office yoga, team building, staff lunches, flexible working, support for working parents and dynamic

communication systems are just a few of the methods that as a start-up they were able to ensure have a place to provide a positive and friendly working environment. In November 2018, Fiona Young, a local employment lawyer and mediator who specialises in facilitating positive working relationships, joined the team to assist with developing dynamic and positive working practices within Ramparts and for their clients. Key to the vision was a law firm that was able to turn legal theory in practical and pragmatic solutions for his client base. In particular, the legal team primarily had equal amounts of large law firm experience coupled with in-house expertise. This meant that they could not only find legal solutions

Office yoga, team building, staff lunches, flexible working are just a few of the methods.

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to their clients’ problems, but could relate to the practical needs of the clients and the various challenges faced by their clients in their respective traditional and technology industries. With now 13 international offices as part of their expansion, Ince saw in Ramparts a reflection of their own core values and shared the vision of pragmatic and practical support for clients extending beyond traditional legal advice. Having set their sights on Gibraltar amidst uncertain times can only signal continued growth. Peter Howitt will continue to head up Ince locally and the team continues to work in the pragmatic, practical and realistic advice and guidance to a niche and ever-growing sector in what they feel is an exciting Jurisdiction. Join us on 12th September at World Trade Center for their Fireside Chat. For more information go to startupgrind.com/Gibraltar. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


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life

CLIMATE CHANGE:

THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

Most of us know that greenhouse gases are contributing to global warming, but how does this process happen? And what is the greenhouse effect? BY MARILIS AZZOPARDI

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greenhouse receives incoming radiation from the sun through the glass, as the earth does through its atmosphere. Part of that incoming sunlight is absorbed by the surface inside the greenhouse but the rest is reflected back into space and tries to escape the greenhouse by convection. Due to the lack of airflow the heat cannot escape and so the temperature rises, a process called the greenhouse effect. This is not what happens to Earth though. What helps keep the earth warm is the presence of the gases in the atmosphere that absorb some of this heat radiation and re-emit it back to the surface, thus blanketing Earth and preventing the heat being lost to outer space. If it wasn’t for these gases creating the ‘greenhouse effect’ 30

and warming the surface by 33°C, Earth would be a much colder place - around -18°C instead of the average temperature of 15°C. Earth receives visible shortwave radiation from the sun through

The greenhouse gas that keeps Earth warm is water vapour. its atmosphere; some is reflected back by clouds, some is scattered by particles in the atmosphere, and some is absorbed by the ozone and other gases. The rest makes it to Earth’s surface where it can either be absorbed, or reflected back into space as long

wave radiation. Highly reflective surfaces such as ice and snow reflect a lot of radiation, whereas darker surfaces such as the oceans tend to absorb more than they reflect. The loss of sea ice cover with exposure of the darker ocean beneath causes the Earth to absorb more radiation and less is reflected; this in turn causes more warming at the surface which can then lead to more ice loss. Earth’s atmosphere is composed of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and the rest is composed of trace elements such as argon. Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up 0.04% of the earth’s atmosphere and is released naturally in the carbon cycle through volcanic activity and respiration in organisms. Since the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenic activities such GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


as the burning of coal and other fossil fuels and deforestation have led to increases in concentration from around 280ppm (parts per million) in the early 1800s, to around 400ppm at the present time. The greatest rise has occurred in the last thirty years and since CO2 is very long-lived in the atmosphere (having a half-life of 100-10 years) this could have consequences and is a cause for concern. You may be surprised to learn that the most abundant greenhouse gas that keeps Earth warm isn’t carbon dioxide but water vapour. Water vapour is the most important regulator of the Earth’s climate and as the Earth’s atmosphere warms, more water vapour evaporates from the oceans contributing to the formation of clouds and precipitation; this creates a positive feedback loop which GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

contributes to the greenhouse effect. The Other Greenhouse Gases Methane is another greenhouse gas produced on Earth during the anaerobic breakdown of organic material such as occurs in the decomposition of wastes in landfills, agriculture and rice fields, or as a product of digestion in the guts of ruminants, e.g. cattle. Although it only makes up 1.8ppm of the Earth’s atmosphere, each molecule of methane contributes 25 times more to global warming than one molecule of carbon dioxide. Nitrous oxide is 300 times more warming than CO2 but only comprises 0.3ppm of the earth’s atmosphere. Human activities such as biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion and the use of agricultural fertilisers have

Methane contributes 25 times more to global warming than carbon dioxide. increased its atmospheric concentration by around 15% and it too is very long-lived in the atmosphere. Ozone is formed at the earth’s surface due to pollution, especially from traffic emissions reacting with sunlight, and functions very differently higher up in the atmosphere where it forms part of the greenhouse gases and specifically helps to block ultra violet run from the sun, protecting Earth and its living 31


life things from the harmful effects of UV radiation. Each ozone molecule is 1000 times more warming than CO2. The Difference Between Weather and Climate The weather is the shortterm variation that we see in temperature, sunshine, cloud cover, rainfall, and wind whereas the climate refers to how the average of these conditions change over longer periods of time, usually around thirty years. By looking for significant changes of a 30-year time period it is possible to observe whether the climate is changing. Although the climate is always naturally changing, the term ‘climate change’ is usually understood to mean systematic, large-scale and long-term changes in the earth’s weather patterns and average temperatures.

The Consequences of Climate Change Since the Industrial Revolution, Earth has warmed by around 1°C, and recently the warming has accelerated by an increase of 0.2°C per decade; the unprecedented rise over the past 200 years means that there could be a total increase of around 2 to 5°C by the end of this century. The concern is that species living on earth are not able to adapt fast enough to such rapid increases in temperature. The direct impacts could be heatwaves, exposure and an increase in infectious diseases such as malaria. Temperature and precipitation patterns may affect the distribution and abundance of species, as well as their habitats.

Species living on earth are not able to adapt fast enough.

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Although the effects of climate change are hard to predict, it can be expected that Earth will get warmer, which will increase evaporation from water bodies and precipitation; some

regions may become dryer while others could become wetter. Communities living near the sea could be disproportionately affected. The higher atmospheric conditions of carbon dioxide could benefit plant growth, enabling them to grow more vigorously with less water, as well as changing the areas where crops grow best. Higher temperatures could allow types of agriculture to thrive in areas that have previously been unsuitable. Although most of us associate climate change with negative effects, climate change can also be seen as a global opportunity for better health by giving us the opportunity to do things differently, and by developing healthier, less polluting and more sustainable communities. By developing innovative technologies in the provision of clean energy and low-carbon technologies we can maintain economic development without sacrificing health, and the future of the planet.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


+35 0 200 674 69 • info@ifai.gi • www.ifai.gi

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Thinking outside of the box… Andy Caddick Managing DIrector


BEADS

FOR LIFE

Handmade bracelets raise money and awareness for cold caps. BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

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igh-profile charity events have become just a little more glamorous with Layla Mañasco’s handmade pink beadand-charm bracelets. They are on sale throughout August and September to fundraise towards the purchase of cold caps for the local chemo suite at St. Bernard’s Hospital. “Cold caps help prevent patients’ hair from falling during chemotherapy. An estimated £15,000 is needed for this new project. Every penny helps, and I will donate my contribution (£1.50 from each bracelet sold) to the Gibraltar Breast Cancer Support charity on 18th October during their Flag Day,” Layla says. In the build-up to the Lunar Walk last June, and on the night of the event, Layla managed to raise a whopping £400, almost singlehanded, with a little help of some local pharmacies and her friends 34

and relatives, and donated her full profits to cancer-related charities. And after a busy summer at the Ocean Village Sunday Artisan Market, Calentita and a week of Summer Nights, Layla is ‘setting up shop’ at the Relay for Life event in aid of Cancer research on 21st and 22nd September, hoping to donate profits from the weekend to this cause. “It all started when my daughter was given a large box of beads for Christmas and we wondered how we could make good use of it, after making fashion jewellery for the whole family, and still left with many to spare,” Layla told me how she discovered her penchant for

what she describes as a hobby, but has in reality fast become a passion and a lifestyle, as well as an emotionally positive way to cope with personal loss. “I thought to string them in bracelets and sell them to raise money for GBC Open Day, which I did for many years. However, after my mother passed away last September from ovarian cancer, I decided to focus on fundraising for Cancer Relief and help raise awareness on female cancers.”

It has become an emotionally positive way to cope with personal loss.

Layla praises the services that the South Barracks’ Cancer Relief Centre offered to her mum: “She attended quite regularly and received various complementary therapies, and all in all this was boosting her

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wellbeing.” The long days spent at Calpe House, when she accompanied her mother to London for treatment, prompted Layla to find something constructive to do while she watched over her mother resting and in between medical appointments: “Stringing beads gave me a reason to keep my hands busy, and stopped me from fiddling aimlessly while I sat around knowing there was nothing else I could do for her. If I went shopping in London, I would buy more supplies to string there, or bring back to Gib. Once, my suitcase was inspected at the airport because customs officers could hardly believe that such a commercial quantity was just for personal use, for me to make friendship bracelets for my acquaintances.” Of course, as soon as word spread around, Layla’s colourful wearable art became more and more in

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demand, especially because she can fully personalise them as a memento of your celebration. She is becoming quite popular at weddings, for which she strings beads in the bridal colour combinations, adding a different charm and detail for each member of the party. They are especially popular for bridesmaids’ gifts and flower girls’ tags, but mothers of the bride and groom don’t shun wearing one of her pieces on their children’s big day – nor does the bride herself sometimes, with her ‘bride-to-be’ heart-shaped charm.

their ideas, I try to accommodate it as much as I can. I once ended up creating a balloon arch for a milestone birthday party, beaded photo frames as table centrepieces, and even upcycling glass bottles, painting and decorating them with rope and beads.” Surely she is up to the challenge, and knows how to exceed her customers’ expectations with shrewd crafting that turns everyday objects into art: “My customers give me good ideas, and I am happy to take them on board for a limited-edition production. Hen nights’ favours are growing in demand, and so are Mother’s Day or Teacher’s gifts.”

I am happy to take ideas on board for a limited-edition production.

“I carry a wide selection of colours, and brides are able to pick their favourite one. I don’t limit myself to jewellery for party decorations though; when someone asks me to give shape to

Men can pick their leather band

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One word of warning: “If you are wearing my stone bracelets because you believe in their healing powers, soak them in salted water overnight after purchase before wearing them for the first time, to cleanse them from the energy imbalance of a stranger’s touch i.e. me, when I handled them to string them, so they will be purified as if they’d been mined out of Earth that very day.” and have it decorated in a variety of nautical or sports themes, while prospective fiancés may skip the awkward down-to-one-knee routine and replace it with the presentation of a self-explanatory ‘will you marry me?’ beaded stretch bracelet! “Not all proceedings from all my jewellery go to charity,” Layla points out, “but I always inform my customers about which ones do. At the moment, I am offering the pink ones in many shades, 36

all featuring the cancer ribbon charm.” She is expanding into semiprecious stone beading, with malachite, agate, citrine, amethyst and other crystals believed to carry healing properties. Layla says: “There is no conclusive scientific evidence about the benefits of wearing stones or crystals on your skin, but some people swear by it, while most customers would buy them just because they are decorative.”

Like the Relay for Life Gibraltar page on Facebook for information on how to sign your team up. Layla’s jewellery can be viewed and pre-ordered from ‘Personalised Charms for any Occasion’. Layla would like to thank SM Seruya, Maxstead Holdings, Hairspray and Valmar, Omega and Calpe pharmacies for stocking her bracelets.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


Ring-tailed lemurs with nettle tree browse.


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A ZOOKEEPERS DIARY Our monthly spotlight on the superstars at the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park‌ and their keepers!

BY JESS LEAPER

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ummer can take its toll on any green areas in the Mediterranean. Despite being situated in the lush green Botanic Gardens, the Wildlife Park in Gibraltar is no exception. The first rains are always a welcome relief, and along with the rains comes a bounty of fresh, green and juicy wild foods for the animals at the wildlife park. The nutrition for captive exotic animals is a complicated business and not something the AWCP takes lightly. If an animal is in captivity, it must be provided with the basics for life; food and water, shelter, medical care, the freedom from fear and the freedom to move and to express natural behaviours. These are referred to as the Five Freedoms in animal welfare. Most captive environments these

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days tend to go above and beyond these guidelines and strive to provide the most enriching and natural diet for their animals as possible. Much research goes into the diets at the AWCP and all species are given access, wherever possible, to foods they are likely to encounter in the wild. Egyptian Fruit bats for example, feed on the fruits of the rubber tree (Ficus elastica) in the wild. A large rubber tree in the Botanic Gardens provides plentiful fruit during the autumn months that is offered to the fruit bats at the park to feast on. Staff at the park try to offer whole branches with the fruits still attached, to encourage natural foraging behaviours. Much of the cultivated fruit humans consume is far higher in sugar than wild fruits, this can cause health issues

g ue tuckin y Macarqowse. r a b r a B e b Poppy thto some hibiscus ers iv in h C y c u By L

for the animals. A diet lower in cultivated fruits and access to wild foods provides the complete range of nutrients required, plus added enrichment and foraging opportunities. Cece Jensen is a student from Denmark studying Zoo Keeping and has been an intern at the AWCP since April. After spending 6 months at Colchester Zoo as an intern in the reptile section, reptiles have become her passion. In Colchester Zoo, Cece worked with the Keeper team on their Browse portfolio. Browse is a term given to wild foliage and foods for animals. As part of her research project for her time at the AWCP, Cece will be compiling a file of all the animal-friendly browse and wild foods that can be given to each species at the park and also, the locations where these can

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Nispero

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be found in Gibraltar. This will be an invaluable resource for future interns and volunteers and staff to refer to in the future. All interns are given an opportunity to work with most of the animals in the AWCP in order to gain as many skills as possible. Each day, an intern is allocated to a member of staff to help them with their daily tasks within the animal section. Once fully trained, an intern, will be entrusted to carry out many of these tasks unaccompanied. One of the first tasks of the day for Cece is to search for browse for the animals, something that becomes increasingly difficult through the dry, summer months. One of the species that requires regular wild foods is the African spurred tortoise, or Sulcata tortoise, Katie. As the green weeds diminish throughout the summer, the juicy pads of the Opuntia cactus plant (prickly pear) and the aloe arborensens, both plants found throughout

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Gibraltar, provide a solution for most herbivorous reptiles. Sulcata tortoises can live more than 70 years and females can reach 105 kg in size. In the wild they would generally feed on dry grasses during the dryer seasons so hay is also offered in the diet. Most pet tortoises however, are reluctant to eat it and generally hold out for more succulent offerings. Improper diets can lead to obesity and shell deformation so it is important to persist with the correct diet. Another species that benefits from the wild foods found in Gibraltar is the Spur-thighed tortoise, these tortoises are found in Morocco but also still exist some areas of southern Spain. Commonly kept as pets, these tortoises are now endangered in the wild due to the illegal pet trade and trafficking. Due to the close proximity to Morocco, it is possible to find similar plants and shrubs in Gibraltar most of the year round.

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Every week, the Gardeners in the Botanic Gardens will provide the wildlife park with

vegetation, mostly branches of olive or other non-toxic trees or bushes suitable for consumption by the animals at the wildlife park. Primates, particularly the macaques, benefit from this. Staff try to find a variety of vegetation similar to the natural vegetation of the species in the wild. Barbary macaques would naturally feast upon roots and shoots during the wetter seasons, when the vegetation in Morocco becomes green again. A selection of weeds, dandelions, vetches and other common greens are provided regularly during the wetter seasons. In the wild, some animals, particularly primates are found to self-medicate with plants, either by ingesting to help eradicate intestinal parasites or some odorous plants are used by capuchin monkeys to self-anoint, this is thought to repel parasites or self-medicate or even provide camouflage. In captivity, capuchin monkeys have been provided with garlic, onion and fennel to self-anoint and encourage natural behaviours. Staff at the AWCP were recently given a new tree to try; the Mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus), known to contain anti parasitic qualities. This was offered to most primates GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


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In the past, parrots at the park were offered a mixture of herbs with known medicinal and antiparasitic properties. These were mixed together and offered daily. It is possible to analyse the mix after a few days to see which herbs were most popular amongst the parrots and from this, it has been theorised that it could perhaps reveal otherwise hidden ailments, depending on the herbs selected for consumption. The AWCP is lucky enough to be immersed in the beautiful Botanic Gardens. The rich, lush, vegetation gives the enclosures a more natural feel, even where it is not possible to successfully grow vegetation within the enclosure. However, staff are aware that this proximity to all that tasty vegetation, can be a source of frustration for some of the inhabitants. ‘We have to be careful to watch the vegetation surrounding the enclosures. “Near to some of our macaque enclosures we have fruiting trees, particularly the nispero or loquat, (Eriobotrya japonica) a succulent orange fruit, the size of a plum. These fruits are exceedingly tempting for many of the species at the park and this could be a source of frustration for them. It is important that we try to offer the fruits and the leaves from nearby, safe trees, as and when they are ripe enough to be eaten. This is in order to reduce the potential

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anxiety caused by an inability to reach a source of food, which is an inherently natural instinct of all animals,” explains Jessica, the Park Manager. Toxic plants also have to be watched out for, especially when collecting wild foods for the animals. Only strained staff are enlisted to do the collection and the selection must be washed through and checked before feeding to the animals.

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Many of the animals at the wildlife park are fed throughout the day, sometimes up to four times. At least one of these feeds is wild foods, browse and/ or enrichment foods. The last feed of the day is at 4pm. This important feed gives the staff at the wildlife park time to check the enclosures and well-being of the animals before closing. This feed is often one of the larger portions to see them through the evening or in the case of the larger primates and pigs, a scatter feed. This is usually a mix of seeds and pulses. This mix is scattered throughout the enclosure, particularly on the deep-litter floor. Deep litter at the park is made from chipping created by shredding waste vegetation from the Botanic Gardens. These chippings create

Egyptian fruitbats feasting on vegetable kebabs

at the park and proved to be quite popular. This plant is found throughout the Mediterranean region, from Morocco and the Iberian Peninsula.

an ideal substrate for most of the parks’ species, particularly those who would naturally forage on the ground in the wild. This encourages natural foraging behaviours in most species and keeps them busy and active for longer. The potbellied pigs have snouts designed for rooting through vegetation and undergrowth so they love to snuffle their way through piles of chippings, searching for hidden treats! The animal feeding times are now on display in the park reception so you can time your visits to watch the animals being fed and learn more about them from the friendly, informative keepers and volunteers. To find out more about the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park, visit www.awcp.gi or follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


THE INVASIVE JAPANESE SEAWEED BY LEWIS STAGNETTO, THE NAUTILUS PROJECT

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ver recent years we have all become aware of vast volumes of rotting seaweed strewn all over Western Beach. The smell is pungently putrid and its invasion of the shores is relentless. As of late, trickles of the weed have begun landing on Eastern Beach and Little Bay but on the other side of the bay vast quantities have been washing up relentlessly, drawing attention from major corporations. So, what has changed and why is this algae here? Why has this problem

suddenly started and how bad is it likely to get? Rugulopteryx okamurae is a brown seaweed which originates from the Western Pacific area. In 2002 its presence was discovered within the Mediterranean in Thau Lagoon, France. It is postulated that it was brought over through the importation of Japanese oysters, its presence in France drew little concern as the algae was not demonstrating the classic signs of an invasive species; drastically outcompeting the local

algae. It was not until it was discovered in Tangiers, Morocco in 2017, that alarm bells began to ring as this species had seemingly increased its range drastically from the original location in France.

Why has this problem suddenly started and how bad is it likely to get? Researchers began looking for signs of this species in many coastal regions to be sure it had come from the same source, and they found it, everywhere! Records of the algae were discovered down the Spanish Mediterranean coastline all the way to Algeciras. Investigators also found R.okamurae on the Atlantic coast from Tarifa all the way up to Cadiz and from Tangiers all the way to Ceuta; a Mediterranean invasion had been quietly taking place and we had

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life We had been caught horribly off guard. been caught horribly off guard. Fishermen began hauling up nets filled with the algae and beaches began to be engulfed with the volumes being washed up. In some cases, the shore has disappeared underneath metre deep quantities of algae. Under the water a similar picture emerged as R.okamurae was engulfing and outcompeting all the other native species. Anywhere you could find a hard substrate you would find the presence of the invader. Locally we are faring no better. Our western coastline, mainly rocky, has been taken over by the weed and this summer we have already begun to see the algae washing up on Sandy Bay and Eastern Beach. So, what effects will this have on the ecology? After all, isn’t seaweed meant to be in the sea? The First Mediterranean Symposium on the non-indigenous species, which was held in Antalya Turkey, published some worrying findings. Some areas of coastline had been engulfed by up to 90% coverage between a 5-30 metre depth. To put this into context the range is the most important zone for coastal photosynthesis to take place, we are talking about the base of the food web; the potential this has to

alter complete ecosystem is very real indeed. We cannot rely on the herbivores to consume their way out of this issue because published scientific research by Campos De Paula et al has suggested that chemicals within the algae actually suppress hunger of the local herbivores. Anecdotally, we have observed herbivores consuming and stripping the local algaes around R.okamurae which only creates new habitats for the brown weed to colonise. This behaviour is amplified because as R.okamurae colonises more area of coastline it removes the available habitat area for our local algal species and these species are a food source for local herbivores. Instead of eating part of an algae, hungry herbivores are stripping rocks bare of any food available on them. Consequently, it appears that our local herbivores are actually aiding the conquest of our coastline which could spell disaster for local diversity. So how serious is this invasion? Each year, Spain removes around 5000 tonnes of algae from its coastline between Cadiz and Tarifa. This comes at a substantial cost for the region and is a very short-term measure as the algae keeps washing up. Further, if, as predicted, the situation continues to worsen, it could have profound consequences on their valuable tourist industry along its southern coastline. Cepsa, Endesa, Acerinox and the Spanish Electric Network are financing a €400,000 research project lead by the University of

Chemicals within the algae actually suppress hunger.

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Seville into how they can control the invasion and its potentially devastating consequences. Perhaps that seems like a small sum to some but the fear is very real and a research project of that magnitude speaks volumes. So, what will happen and what can we do about it? My position on the matter is clear; to quote a line from Jurassic Park, Dr Ian Malcom says “Life, uh, finds a way!”. Mother Nature has been through much worse than this, and she typically comes out on top. The pause for concern which should be on our minds as a species is if that solution contains us as a necessary component.

Phylum: Ochrophyta Class: Phaeophyceae Habitat: Rocky substrate Diet: Autotroph Interesting Fact: The Mediterranean invasion of this algae is presently in full swing with potentially catastrophic consequences.

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Find out more unigib.edu.gi GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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DRIVING FORCE: JIMMY DALMEDO

From watering the, ‘palmera en el quarry’ and to giving the Iron Lady’s hand a shake through decades of ferrying Gibraltar’s most important VIPs and their equally important visitors, always with one thing forever present in his mind... mmmum’s the word! BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

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immy has no airs about him, despite having chauffeured for no less than five of our Chief Ministers - only missing out on CM Sir Bob Peliza in the early 70s. He chronicles his previous jobs, “That’s right, and I don’t mind telling you I was a messenger in the Dockyard in the 70s and joined Government as a driver in the Public Works Department (PWD) mainly driving the water bowser – La Bota!”. Keeping the townscape green was his task until he moved on 46

to government staff cars driving for the Director of Public Works. The trend then, as now, is that when other staff car drivers go on leave, you’re asked to fill in, so Jimmy would invariably cover for the Mayor’s driver and the CMs – Sir Joshua Hassan, at that time. “Yes, this would happen from time to time until I became the Mayor’s driver followed by Sir Joshua’s, full-time.

During that time I had applied for the Deputy Governor’s driver’s job but I didn’t get it!” And really, as they say, the rest is history! It’s been nonstop driving G1 from the very early 80s serving for Sir Joshua first, then Adolfo Canepa in 1987, Sir Joe Bossano from 1988 to 1996, when Sir Peter Caruana entered No 6 through to 2011, right up

Joe Bossano initially didn’t want a driver.

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to which despite my ‘delicate endeavouring’ to scoop out of him, he would not divulge... “Oh no, anything that may have happened or I was witness to, sensitive conversations etc., will go with me to North Front Cemetery!” Well said, Jimmy.

"Anything I was witness to will go with me to North Front Cemetery!”

to his present retirement in 2019 driving for Chief Minister, Fabian Picardo for the last eight years. “Each Chief Minister, as you can well imagine, has been different: different character, different ways of doing things and so on, but I’ve always been treated well and there’s always been mutual respect from all of them. I remember Joe Bossano initially didn’t want a driver, he’d want to make his own way to meetings or functions, or have a colleague GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

drive him there.” Jimmy tells me how the protocol dictated you didn’t join in conversations being had as you drove along unless specifically asked for an opinion and always opened the car door for the CMs wife or other passenger whilst the CMs car door would always be dealt with by his Close Protection Officer. After so many years on the job, there are probably issues and incidents Jimmy has been witness

However, he does recall one occasion when the Chief Minister was made to wait for a minister who was still sitting in the car, for some reason, and was not moving. “Well, when I approached him I could see he couldn’t unclip the seat belt, he’d given up and that was it! Another situation where CM Sir Peter was left waiting was when I had to pick up the Chief Secretary first who was late. On arrival at Sir Peter’s residence he was standing there waiting, not a happy bunny. I was reprimanded and told he should be picked up first and let the other man wait... ‘so don’t do it again.’ Since then, going to the airport for example, I set off two hours ahead of pick-up just in case.” 47


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I imagine there have been potentially awkward situations when there’s been a changeover of government and the new incumbent would welcome information about this or that. Jimmy tells me he’s always held back with ‘no comment’. Jimmy has also dealt with acting CMs and had good relationships with those too and highlights the GSLP’s Juan Carlos Perez as a true and excellent friend. Anecdotes abound as Jimmy tells me about our hard working Chief Ministers... “Peter Caruana’s child was about to be born and as he waited in hospital he was busy working away. Fabian Picardo once pointed out that the guests at the Ceremony of the Keys should not rise for his arrival as we drove into Casemates but only for the Governor. Thinking back, 48

I suppose Fabian was the Chief Minister I felt most comfortable with [CM Fabian drove Jimmy home in G1 on his last day!] However, Peter Caruana had a really good sense of humour - but all five have been pleasant and a pleasure to serve.” Jimmy’s proud too, of the moment he met Margaret Thatcher and shook her hand at the Convent! “There’s respect and knowing your place, but in a way, you become part of the ministers’ families,” Jimmy declares, “And I think I’ll miss that. My advice to the new driver would be, it can be a delicate situation sometimes, don’t offer opinions, and do the job well.”

Jimmy to exit also and spend time with the family, and of course there’s scouting. He also feels the time is right ahead of the next imminent election. He’s been presented with the first G1 number plate signed by all the Chief Ministers he’s served. I know he’s going to treasure that fondly.

Thinking back, I suppose Fabian was the Chief Minister I felt most comfortable with.

He’s driven a number of CMs vehicles from a Ford Taunus to the latest all electric Tesla, “And it’s been fantastic, I wouldn’t change anything. Over time, I’ve observed how the general public behaves when a Chief Minister is no longer...It’s very interesting!” And so it’s time for 66-year-old

Well I too will treat him differently, as I won’t be able to threaten to report him for parking G1 in ordinarily No Parking areas when driving the CM to some meeting or event! Happy retirement Jimmy. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


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JAMES SANGUINETTI EST. 1870

Seek and you will find! Treasure-trove, Aladdin’s Cave or antique and curios enthusiast’s hunting ground, you’ll never know what you’ll come across... and that’s not all: furniture restoring, French polishing and professional waxing tasks undertaken inhouse also! Way back in the mid- to late-19th century however, that’s not how the family business got off the ground. BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

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hree Genoese brothers settled on the Rock in search of a better life no doubt. Gibraltar was a military garrison bursting at the seams and shipping coming in and out of the Mediterranean meant replenishment of food supplies and other goods were in constant demand at this first or last port at the western end of the Med. Whilst two of the brothers competed for business in Main Street premises, James Sanguinetti was a cabinet maker and worked from Horse Barrack Lane (formerly Sir Joshua Hassan’s law chambers), moving to Library GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

Street and then to its present home in Main Street. Granddad James’ business also built coffins for the Ministry of Defence

Knowledge and gut feeling play an important part in this business. (MOD) on the Rock, as well as for the local population, which included pauper’s funerals paid for by the local authorities.

So cabinet making and supplying coffins meant James Sanguinetti became funeral directors - for the Hindu community also - right up to the early 2000s when the crematorium was built. “That’s right,” Robert nods. “My grandfather died and my father James, who worked with my granddad, took over. He worked hard employing more than half a dozen Spanish craftsmen – all of whom had to leave when the frontier closed! In my early teens I became a mechanical fitter in the Dockyard and the Public Works Department (PWD), but as a child I would listen to conversations going on at home 49


life

and in the workshop. My father was a hoarder and during those early years I’d set about clearing the workshop and that’s how I became interested in the business. I left my job and got stuck in up to the present day!” These days many tourists take snapshots of Sanguinetti’s entrance and often have a snoop around inside and buy the odd item: a sewing machine, an old valve radio or a water pump, (common in Gibraltar patios years ago). There are coats, jackets, dresses and hand bags, tea sets, 50

paintings, pictures and old picture postcards, and that’s just taking a quick glimpse of what you can find in what is potentially a goldmine!

couple of ceramic potties. Yes, the chamber ones you’d find under the bed in days of old - just in case!

As you enter, all along the corridor there are brightly lit cabinets bursting with trinkets, custom jewellery, knick-knacks, bits and pieces, odds and ends and all sorts – chosen mainly by Robert’s wife Frances when visiting street markets in London and other capitals. Above the cabinets there are even larger items... I spot a

Further down, in the workshop, Abdesalam will be busy mending, waxing, polishing, painting or meticulously restoring a piece of period furniture. He’s always on the go. Hands-on Sanguinetti director, Robert gets stuck in also (if not visiting some home in search of odd items of furniture which may be worth acquiring). GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


life

Shop door closed? They’re off delivering a ‘job done’ piece of furniture in their van. At the time of writing, Robert was working on a couple of cannon balls and some bulky bits of shrapnel (many of which fell on the town during the sieges). “It’s funny the things you come across. I’m now working on these, and I recently took out three chandeliers I’ve had for about 15 years and did a type of art nouveau paint job on them. A couple of American tourists walked in last week, and bought one of them. Then another customer offered more for it but it was too late - sold,” Robert grins... sadly. “And now the hard work begins to pack the chandelier in such a way it doesn’t suffer any damage in transit to the States!” Not the first packing job for Robert which he achieved very successfully. All kinds of people and potential customers pop into the shop with items to sell in the hope they’re worth something or just seeking information about granny’s long lost piece of GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

jewellery found in a dusty draw somewhere. “There is a refuse collector guy who brings me stuff from time to time and the other day produced a 50’s type vase for which I gave him ten pounds. I managed to sell it for quite a bit more but it caught my interest and I checked one of my many reference books to see if it was worth real money: I couldn’t believe it, £1800! I really lost out on that one.” The thing is I suppose, you never know who or what’s coming through the door and what the outcome might be,

so knowledge and gut feeling play an important part in this business which in large measure, comes from experience - not in short supply as far as Robert is concerned. Through trial and error he’s kept the business going and many families’ heirlooms find their way to James Sanguinetti’s workshop for a professional, restoration job. It’s the place to go and a visit is a must. Pop in with your mobile whilst looking out for curios. It’s a grotto of unforeseen surprises! 51


scene

WORTH

THE WAIT

Local band is jet-setting around the UK festival circuit. BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

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ibraltar’s iconic indie rock band Jetstream is releasing a full album this September, a collection of their smashing hits The Last Goodbye and Delta Blues, as well as their new single Worth the Wait, released shortly after their Summer Nights’ live concert last July, and a few more surprises on the lines of their acclaimed pop-rock with a local twist style. “Our songs remain true to the indie rock sound we’ve been producing since our first recordings,” the band says. “However, the new ones reflect a more advanced sound, and carry messages for the listeners. Inspiration comes from different directions: personal occurrences, world news or fiction, like book or movies.” The band has been performing over half of their new songs, even if incomplete, at the UK venues and they reckon that they are going down with the crowds better than their classics like Lala and F5. Frontman Nolan Frendo and lead guitarist Stuart Whitwell wrote the lyrics and the bulk of musical arrangements: “Writing songs is a 52

constant journey and songwriters always strive for improvement and originality of their craft,” they say. “The more you write and test it with an audience, the more natural it becomes for the musician, who shouldn’t be afraid of trying new things, breaking barriers and showcasing the product to band mates and fans.” The Last Goodbye, which isn’t at all signalling the band’s retirement from the music scene, like some fans dreaded at the time of its release – phew! – is included in the album, as it has been their hit throughout summer at UK festivals and Costa del Sol hip gigs: “The song speaks about someone who is no longer able to continue living amongst us and takes a last breath whilst offering their last goodbye - a very touching and powerful theme.”

and producing them, although this is time-consuming work that, like live performances and rehearsals, has to be juggled with band members’ work and personal life: “There have been times when some members weren’t able to make certain shows but we have that ‘show must go on’ attitude and try our best to adhere to our commitments.” Surfing the UK festival circuit has been a learning curve: “The biggest eye opener was to understand that there’s a whole new world out there who have never heard our material, therefore it is essential to give our all on every performance to showcase our music in the best light,” the band says. “We have had nothing but positive experiences so far: organisers have been amazing with us, our coperformers have always been warm and welcoming backstage, so it’s nothing but love! The only downside are the extensive hours travelling to and from venues.”

Writing songs is a constant journey

Delta Blues and The Last Goodbye feature artistically designed videos available on social media platforms and the band is committed to continue their trend of offering high-end visual support to their audio, since they enjoy devising

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


music

"We have that ‘show must go on’ attitude." this business than hard work there’s no luck involved.” Jetstream formed in November 2007, when Nolan and Justin Pou were rehearsing for the New Year’s Eve Casemates concert: “Before we knew it, with the addition of Stuart and our former drummer Nick, Jetstream was born. This means we have now been at it for eleven years, although we’ve only been writing our own material for five. With Aaron [Ignacio, guitar] and Tristan [Tonna, drums] now on board we feel we have the strongest formation ever.”

And they flash some namedropping too: “We have been fortunate enough to perform alongside Jason Derulo, Alesha Dixon, Tinie Tempah, Toploader, The Feeling etc. We’re realistic and we know how our career is all work in progress.” Jetstream believe their music fits well the festival atmosphere, prompting positive response and crowd sing along to what they describe their ‘poppy choruses’: “The element of indie lick and rocky riffs helps in giving us an edge which the listeners may identify themselves with.” They believe that there’s only GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

one set formula when trying to get into any musical circuit: “It’s all about hard work, about being persistent to the point of annoyance. It’s about putting yourself out there to an extreme and being noticed, whether it’d be via constant phone calls or numerous emails until the festival or concert organisers decide they’ll hear you out. Once they do, you sell the product to them and hope for the best. We work tirelessly, and this has come to fruition in many cases. The more we perform, the higher the exposure, the bigger the chance people can connect with us and end up following what we do. There’s no other set formula in

Their secret is friendship. “Of course, having a band that gels and gets on well together certainly helps but it’s not the ‘be all and end all’. As with every band there are difficult moments but we always see the bigger picture and try and clear out those moments in order to advance,” they claim. And they assure their fans that there will be more songs, more releases, more concerts, more festivals – no doubt about that. This couldn’t be achieved without the band’s broad fanship, whom there are giving a huge shout-out and thanks. They conclude: “We would make no sense if it wasn’t for those who follow us. We are extremely fortunate to have amazing people support us and we hope we can continue to make you all proud.”

53


art

KITCHEN STUDIOS SEXHIBITION Local art collective Kitchen Studios presented their latest offering Sexhibition in early August. An exploration of bodies, sexuality and human relationships through art, Sexhibition included the work of artists from both sides of the border.

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rtists Alex Menez, Stefano Blanca Sciacaluga, Lizanne Figueras, Ermelinda Duarte, Naomi Martinez, Aroa Nuñez, Jenny Brown and Judith Shaylor brought to the table fifteen thought-provoking and inspiring pieces of varied artistic disciplines; from a short film to sculpture work, photography and even some installation art. Sexhibition organiser Alex Menez said, “Sex is fun, natural and anything you want it to be, and this is why Kitchen Studios have decided to celebrate the one thing all humans like to do by organising an open call for artists from within Kitchen Studios and beyond to submit their exploratory work”. The event took place at what Kitchen Studios consider their second home, The Kasbar, who have already collaborated with Kitchen Studios on a number of projects. Sexhibition was wellattended by both artists and nonartists alike, and received positive reviews from all for essentially GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

also constantly getting work sent to us from artists who wish to collaborate and partake in our events. Whilst turning down work and being selective isn’t ideal, it only means we have more than enough to choose from; artists are keen and it only gives us more opportunities to fill our calendar with fantastic events”.

being an exhibition about sex but without being offensive, and in-keeping with being about the art and the freedom of artistic expression. Given the success of the event and the fact that due to the reduced size of the intimate venue some artworks had to unfortunately be turned down, Kitchen Studios will be strongly considering a second event at a later date. Kitchen Studios cofounder Stefano Blanca Sciacaluga said, “It’s really good to see how we are constantly receiving not only good reviews from people attending our shows, but we are

Kitchen Studios are constantly moving onto bigger and better things, with a very interesting proposal coming up next October. Together with Andalucia-based artist Judith Shaylor, Kitchen Studios will be partaking in a two-weekend artist’s residency in Tarifa from October 18-20th and 25-27th, with the intention of bringing together artists from Gibraltar, La Linea, Algeciras and Tarifa, with work produced being exhibited in the Tarifa Castle. If you’d like to get involved in this or other projects, or for more information, please get in touch with Kitchen on:  gibkitchen@gmail.com.

55


Have you always fancied yourself as a bit of a sailor? Now’s your chance!

leisure

SETTING SAIL WITH THE RGYC BY TONY SEGOVIA

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ince 1829 the Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club has been organising sailing competitions in Gibraltar, with the Victory keelboat as the main class sailed out in the bay between May and September. Some members have also very successfully competed in other classes, such as Lasers J24, J80 and yachts. The club has for the last twenty-four years organised the Gibraltar Regatta, and for the last four years hosted one of the regattas in the Interclubs del Estrecho for cruisers. The RGYC launched its Sailing School in May 2001. In 2004 the sailing school became a Royal Yachting Association (RYA) recognised Teaching Centre, with the aim of encouraging the development of sailing in Gibraltar. Sailing is a sport that is open to all; there is no need to be a member of the RGYC to learn. The school, initially run by volunteers, now has fulltime instructor Miguel Galiano running most of the courses, and now has a good fleet of sailing dinghies, keelboats, a small yacht and powerboats. It runs a comprehensive range of RYA courses in sailing, powerboating GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

and will shortly be introducing theoretical courses. The RGYC has been in a state of transition since it moved from its old premises at 25 Queensway to its new location at 10 Coaling Island. The main club house was relocated in 2012, and the sailing facilities have still to date not been fully re-provided. This summer’s Island Games Sailing Event was organised very successfully with the launching area, or slipway, completed five days before the start of the competition. The rest of the sailing infrastructure, victory sheds, crane and sailing school building will be completed in the near future. The Island Games has been a catalyst, getting members and sailors to work together. The new

world class slipway and the legacy of 10 new laser Olympic sailboats will permit sailing to grow in the future. The RGYC and Gibraltar will soon be marketed as a warm weather sailing training venue - some of the visiting islands of northern Europe were keen to sail here in winter. Once the sailing complex is finished, the sport of sailing should flourish, providing a pay as you go sailing facility. Developing the: •

Learning of sailing and powerboating,

Competitive sailing in different sailing classes and

Recreational sailing.

For more information or to learn how to sail, contact Sydney Pilcher RGYC Secretary at +350 200 48847. 57


health

LIFE DOESN’T STOP ONCE DEMENTIA BEGINS

Gibraltar Alzheimer´s and Dementia Society (GADS) chairwoman Daphne Alcantara explains to The Gibraltar Magazine why she is passionate about spreading awareness, and what Gibraltar can do to further their dementia-friendly environment. BY RESHAM KHIANI

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aphne begins by saying, “Keep on seeing the person, not the dementia”. In other words, the aim is to maintain the same relationship though the disease is taking over. Yes, easier said than done, but we all have to start somewhere in helping the sufferer who is undergoing “vast amounts of confusion” know that love and unconditional support remains. I challenge her saying it’s difficult watching someone you love lose their memory. As someone who has experienced first-hand loss of seeing my grandmother´s memory gradually crumble, I find it hard to search for a word that describes what I experienced, considering my relative was based in India and I was in Gibraltar. Pain, frustration, anger, impatience, sorrow, sadness – these are some of the words that can come to mind. On a weekly basis I would watch via Skype that I was losing my loving grandmother to a disease, which yet requires a cure. 58

Few people realise that there are more than 100 types of dementia, with Alzheimer's disease known to be the most common form. Anyone who has a family member or friend suffering with this condition can tell you one thing for sure: it's a highly emotional, confusing and scary journey that the sufferer and carer experience. Rather than a specific disease, dementia is a range of symptoms caused by disorders affecting the brain. It affects thinking, behaviour and the ability to perform everyday tasks and while it’s more common in people over 65, those in their 40s and 50s can also develop dementia.

to know why this is the case. Everyday there is a new article citing various reasons behind this disease: anaemia, stress, genetics, unhealthy eating… but there is still nothing to stop it. In some cases, medication can slow it down, but then in other cases pills have no effect. “This disease is very unique to each person and I´m hoping one day there is a way to control it,” Daphne says.

Keep on seeing the person, not the dementia.

Alzheimer´s International Association confirmed in a study that in comparison to men, women are far more susceptible to dementia, but no one seems

Gibraltar's Dementia Day Centre provides cognitive therapy via computers and software funded by the charity. The aim is to keep the brain active through arts and crafts so that people “can feel useful”. Another creative method Mount Alvernia is going to introduce is for nursery children to visit the elderly; Daphne is paving the path for kids to also come to the centre so they can “hear stories from the elderly”.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


health

Pony therapy for patients is one of the latest therapies introduced by a Scottish couple so patients can experience the healing effects of animals. I ask Daphne whether cats or dogs could be an alternative, but she makes a valid point: “Not everyone will go for that because if they didn´t like animals before dementia, I don´t think they would feel encouraged or agree to having pets around. I know there have been a few soft toy animals at Mount Alvernia where patients stroke them as if they were real”. Daphne recalls watching BBC programme The Restaurant That Makes Mistakes. An emotional series where dementia patients - people who were once gynaecologists, doctors, lawyers - are hired as food servers. They GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

It's a highly emotional, confusing and scary journey would note meal orders but within seconds the information would slip away, only to return to the waiting tables to ask customers for their choices once again. Overall, the show emphasised that despite their illness, they still could play a vital role in society. Daphne does not hesitate to say that dementia stigma exists in Gibraltar, emphasising how families feel hesitant to reveal someone is suffering from this condition. Often, she says, there

can be a mix up between a failing memory and mental illness – something which she already experienced with her father, which is why, I believe, she has an unwavering determination to spread awareness. “GADS wants to change how people with dementia are viewed. We are the only support group to help people handle such situations. If you know someone at work has this condition, we should all be able to understand what it is to live with dementia so you can allow this person to continue working for as long as possible”. The emphasis is on adopting a healthy lifestyle, but in the same breath, Daphne highlights a common phrase: “You can have 59


health a very active and healthy life and still get dementia.” An example being her father who power walked every day, never overate or drank, but at 70 years old dementia got him. In her opinion, you can exercise your mental activity as much as you want, “but there is no guarantee that you won´t get it”. Surprisingly, I´m told her father was “treated for

The truth was dementia was taking over. depression for a number of years because he felt something was wrong”. The truth was dementia was taking over. The conversation turns emotional when she mentions her father again, confessing that her guilt haunts her every day because she “never understood what was happening” with her parent. The knowledge we have today could have been the key to the patience he needed. Awareness is part of the solution as Daphne continues to say: “Many people still don’t understand dementia and in turn they are labelled as ‘aggressive’. People do not realise how scared they feel”. She recalls when her father would turn angry, her mother would call at 2am saying he wanted to leave the house and in stopping him, he would be become difficult. Various times doctors would prescribe pills to calm him down, but the family wanted a different type of help: they wanted emotional therapy to handle the mental deterioration of a loved one. This is why Daphne has a special phone to answer 60

calls at any time of the day or night for people wanting help or advice. A simple mirror is what ignited feelings of her anger in her father: within seconds he would flare up, unable to recognise himself. According to Daphne, she realised, her father had no idea who the man staring back at him was: all he viewed was a fragile, ageing human. Showing him a photo of his younger self immediately sparked recognition, but bring out a mirror and it was just sheer confusion. His only recollection of himself was as a young man. Again, she hits on the awareness note: had she had this information, she would have simply removed

the mirror to “stop such episodes”. Fast forward to the future and this has led to one of the dementia centres providing hide-away mirror screens that can be used at the patients will. “See the person, not the dementia” is a message to all of us on how sufferers do not want to be confined by their illness. Understandably, on a daily basis they battle raw emotions of who they are, and the last thing they want is for their loved ones to treat them differently, or to become estranged from them. In contemplating Dementia Awareness Month this September, consider the way you respond to people living with this disease.

Her father had no idea who the man staring back at him was.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


travel

BONNIE SCOTLAND

Dramatic landscapes, rich history, and the Loch Ness Monster. Here is your complete itinerary for a trip to the land of mountain wildernesses and glacial glens.

BY CHRIS HEDLEY

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hat comes to mind when you think of Scotland? The cold? The rain? The heroin? Yes, all of these things feature in the northern country of Great Britain. But if you can cast away your desire to spend your days in the unforgiving sun, if you can let go of the yearning to be consistently dry, if you can resist the urge to intravenously selfmedicate with powerful opioids, you’ll find a country with a fascinating history and a wealth of wilderness to keep you occupied for long enough to forget about any other lazy stereotypes that you may have heard about the place. The dramatic mountains, rolling hills, forests, and coastlines of Scotland rival those of the likes of New Zealand and Canada. With this in mind, and the free camping laws that encompass much of the Scottish countryside, making the wild your home for the night in campervan or tent is the best

way to visit the country. Standard manners and respect apply: no camping where prohibited, and leave no trace. Two similar attractions that may well already be on your itinerary are beast hunting in Loch Ness and visiting the bonnie banks of Loch Lomond. Loch Lomond is the larger of the two and generally considered to be more beautiful. If you’re heading north from the largely flat landscape of the South, the mountains will begin to spring from the ground, making it a popular destination for hikers and vantage point seekers. Balloch, on the Loch’s southern shores, is the main village complete with castle, but a day of driving around will take you to plenty of quieter,

A great place to bag a few more munros.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

picturesque villages with plenty of stop offs to look at highland cows, or even better, Highland calves. In the Sottish Highlands, Loch Ness is, of course, famous around the world for its faked photos of a tim’rous beastie lurking in its depths. That doesn’t stop sprawls of tourists paying for the privilege of a ‘Monster Hunting Cruise’. Presumably there are a few diehard believers who leave disappointed when they are told how to doctor their photos to resemble an image of Nessie. The ruins of nearby 13th century Urquhart castle can provide calming condolences in the wake of your shattered beliefs. As you’re in the highlands, you may as well ‘bag a munro’ (Munro bagging is the act of climbing every mountain in Scotland over 3000 feet, named after Sir Hugh T Munro, who surveyed and catalogued them in 1891), although you may not have the time to climb hundreds of 63


travel and woodland dales, with a river chucked in for added value. A great place to bag a few more munros - try your hand at rock climbing, or turn your attention to the river. Watersports such as rafting and kayaking (and other adaptations with varying degrees of terror) are available down the River Coe from well established companies. The area should certainly be a destination on your road trip for more reasons than ‘it’s easy to get to and looks a bit nice’.

mountains, you can at least go and see the highest. The tourist track of Ben Nevis isn’t the hardest of the munros, but the hike takes you from sea level to walk every foot of the 4,411 on offer and should not be undertaken lightly. Precautions such as water, food, and appropriate clothing need to be adhered to. Incidentally, if you are an experienced mountaineer, try the tantalisingly named Inaccessible Pinnacle at the top of Sgùrr Dearg. For many, Glencoe epitomises wild Scotland: Fierce juxtaposition of scrambling mountain passes 64

Of the plethora of islands that skirt the coastline, the Inner Hebridean Island of Skye stands out. It’s now very easy to get to with the relatively new bridge, and you can set off in any direction and be guaranteed a stunning drive. The mountainous centre is surrounded by a series of peninsulas with their own characteristics for you to explore. The Fairy Pools are a stretch of waterfalls and pools near Glen Brittle, crystal enough to entice those who would otherwise be put off by the cold water. Very cold water. On the drive to and from Skye keep an eye out for Shetland Ponies, who like to hang around in the west. Perhaps beaches aren’t the first thing that springs to mind when you think of Scotland, but this reason, combined with the small matter of the climate, is why the Ardnamurchan Peninsular back

on the mainland has unspoiled beaches. Not unspoiled in the way described to you by a gap year student on their return from Thailand - actual unspoiled beaches. Head to Sanna Bay to spot whales, dolphins, and the Northern Lights. Scotland isn’t all about nature, though. At some point you’ll probably find yourself in one of the two big-name cities. To describe Glasgow in all its glory, the food, arts and culture scene, you’d have to come up with a new concept. A decade or two ago, to sum the city up in a word, ‘cool’ would have sufficed, but over the years it has lost its gravitas and become too wideranging. These days ‘hipster’ is used adjectively or nounally, but stirs the unpalatable potion of irritation and disdain deep in the bellies of some. Perhaps, ‘effortlessly cool’ or ‘hipsterwithout-your-pretentious-beretwearing-attitude’ kind of cool. Historically an industrial powerhouse, Glasgow has undergone changes over the last several decades and become a centre of culture and tourism. Being a UNESCO City of Music, you can pretty much pick your genre and attend a gig in the city. The Victorians left behind an array of architecture to make for a pleasant day’s stroll as well as numerous museums and art galleries to keep you walking too far without stopping. There are also more parks here than in any other city of Britain. As for food, gone are the days where you go to Glasgow for a deep-fried pork sausage kebab and end up with a stroke-inducing lump of beige calories. Vegan GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


travel cafes are on the rise alongside an abundance of eclectic restaurants boasting recipes from around the world. That being said, you’ve got to try a deep-fried Mars bar. And deep-fried ice cream. Also, apparently, if you talk to the right people in the right way, you get something called a ‘Glasgow kiss’, which sounds lovely. However, deciphering the words of a Glaswegian in the first instance is quite the challenge on any given braw, bricht, moonlicht nicht. Edinburgh is an incredibly goodlooking place. The effortless blend of structures from medieval, through gothic, all the way up to modern architecture merge together in atmospheric streets. The popular tourist attraction of the castle looms over Scotland’s capital, offering elevated views of the city and beyond. Edinburgh counters Glasgow’s music scene with its own status as a UNESCO City of Literature. Robert Louis Stevenson was born here, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous character, Sherlock Holmes, was inspired by someone he met while studying at University in Edinburgh, and J.K Rowling liked to write in The Elephant House, a cafe in the city. If you miss the book festival, try to make it for one of the worldrenown festivals such as The Fringe or Hogmanay. Stirling is worth a look if you can fit it in. It’s the best place to go to get your fix of Scottish history with many battles for independence taking place in the area due to its strategic positioning. As stated by Scottish poet Alexander Smith: “Stirling, like a huge brooch, clasps Highlands and Lowlands together.” The castle is one of the best preserved in Scotland, and GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

the William Wallace Monument provides the view over the town once you’re finished learning about the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The more adventurous among us might like to travel further north to visit the Orkney Islands, best known for their Neolithic structures, the country's northernmost whisky distillery, and, interestingly, the world’s shortest flight, in which the minute or so of airtime between islands is barely long enough to notice the tartan decor. Upon completion you’ll be presented with a certificate to proudly display on the wall with your university degree, that star that’s named after you, and your World Poohsticks Championship certification.

places are enough to lure you to the land of the Scots, perhaps you have a lifelong desire to fill up every page of your passport. With Britain’s promised exit from the EU, Scotland could hold another referendum for their own independence, so you may well get another coveted stamp in your passport. As a final note and parting gift, it would be unfair of me not to share one of the best things to come out of Scotland: A 1999 picture of (then) first minister Alex Salmond feeding a Solero to a girl, and the ensuing search to find out who she is and what on earth it was all about. (Follow one of the quests at buzzfeed.com/jamieross/do-youwant-a-flake-and-an-independentscotland-with-that.)

If none of the aforementioned 65


wine

SANCERRE’S SAUVIGNONS

Could Sancerre be the Sauvignon capital of the world? Andrew educates us on the darling of Parisienne bistros. BY ANDREW LICUDI DIPWSET

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f I had been asked what regions like Ribera del Duero, Champagne and Sancerre have in common, I suspect I would have answered that they are all wine producing appellations with their own laws, regulations and so on. A rather silly question I would have thought, particularly as their styles, locations, grape varieties and even their bottles are quite different. Champagne producing sparkling wine, Ribera mostly reds and Sancerre world- famous for their Sauvignon Blanc whites. They do however share something important to their commercial success. Consumers, whether in bars or restaurants, will ask for these wines by their appellation or region without really caring about producer or vintage. How many times have we heard “I’ll have a glass of Ribera” or “I’ll have a glass of champagne” when we are out with friends? It would appear that for some lucky regional wines, customers feel confident enough to order them by their generic designation without going into further details presumably confident their expectation on style, quality or price will be met. In Gibraltar we are familiar with 66

Consumers ask for these wines without really caring about producer or vintage. both Ribera del Duero and Champagne, though things appear to be changing and I did have someone tell me recently their currently preferred wine was Sancerre, citing its crisp acidity and attractive, mouth-filling grassy notes. So, what is Sancerre, and why does it continue to be the most asked-for, generic white wine in countless bistros in Paris and beyond? Our journey had started some day before in Nantes where, having picked up a hire car, we planned to travel the length of the Loire Valley from east to west ending in Sancerre. It’s a magnificent journey traversing not only famous vineyards and wine regions but innumerable forests, castles and magnificent

chateaus. Nantes is right next to Muscadet, an underrated region famous for its inexpensive, crisp white wines regularly paired with oysters or smoked salmon for very good reasons. Our memorable wine/dish in Nantes turned out to be Muscadet paired with a raw beetroot salad! The rest of the journey was like going through a wine enthusiast’s wine notes: Anjoue, Saumur, Chinon, Vouvray, Touraine eventually ending up in Sancerre. Having seen so much beauty over the last few days, our expectations of Sancerre was muted. How wrong we were! Approaching the town from the east gave us a magnificent view of this pretty, hilltop town - a former fortress. Sloping vineyards reluctantly giving way to ancient stone buildings. Once there its winding streets, ancient houses and central square with cafes and restaurants jostling for position a joy to walk around. Needless to say, there were several shops were local wine producers let the passer-by taste their wines hoping for a sale or two. Sancerre is undoubtedly Loire’s most famous white wine. A global GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


wine brand whose qualities can be easily appreciated even by novice drinkers. It can be can be ordered with confidence knowing it will very approachable and provide value for money at least when compared with the likes of white Burgundy. More importantly perhaps, in the mind of the consumer, Sancerre somehow confers a degree of sophistication to the drinker! Sancerre’s commercial success started as far back as the eighties, becoming the darling of Parisienne bistros. Much later it became very fashionable in London and the rest of the UK where a chilled glass of this famous Sauvignon

Chavignol’s goats cheese - considered the best in France. Blanc marked the beginning of the weekend to innumerable column writers in newspapers and magazines. With commercial success came a wave of mediocre wines as everyone in the region wanted a piece of the action. Even Spain started making Sauvignon Blancs as did New Zealand, the latter with significant commercial success with its mouth busting, flavoursome wines. Sancerre wines tend to be ready for drinking as soon as they are made and will rarely benefit form cellaring, though some producers intent on producing the highest quality possible have been experimenting using a degree of oak and longer cellaring. The climate in Sancerre is continental GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

and can get rather cold, though the navigable river Loire does ameliorate the cold weather. Inevitably, as a result of the climate, Sancerre’s wines tend to be subtler and less exuberant than elsewhere. When we visited the area, we chose to stay in nearby Chavingol. A mere 5 minutes away having pre-booked our stay at the La Cote Des Monts Damnés. A simple, inexpensive hotel but with a bistro on the ground floor with a very high reputation. Some of the dishes currently on the menu, can be viewed online. They also have a ‘gastronomique’ restaurant for fine dining. (The bistro offers amazing value for money.) Here we tasted wonderfully crafted dishes, though perhaps what we best remember about dinner there was Chavignol’s

goats cheese - considered the best in France. It was interesting to see French diners expertly choosing their cheeses as Chavignol ages each mini cheese differently so the same basic cheese ends up quite different from each other. Some with penicillium some younger ones without. It’s an extraordinary cheese which I urge you to try. Back to wine. Top names here include Alphonse Mellot producing single vineyards wines (£15 and up depending on the cuvee) and similarly Henri Bourgeois (£20 and up depending on the cuvee). Locally Sancerres are not easy to find but they are available. Worthwhile tasting against New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs or Spanish such as Marques de Riscal. Which will you prefer, I wonder? 67


“ �

Honest Italian food, well-prepared and attentively served.


food

URBAN EATERY

A new ambience for a traditional menu.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

U

rban chic. The term conjures images of expensive warehouse conversions, exposed riveted cast-iron girders, concrete floors, yuppies with acquired champagne tastes... But while Gibraltar’s first ‘urban eatery’ borrows visually from this imagery, at its core – the food – it is a friendly and welcoming restaurant offering traditional dishes at moderate prices, and designed for a wider market than that shaping urban chic. Nunos at the Express, which occupies the ground floor of the Holiday Inn Express but is a separate entity, sprang from the experiences of globe-trotting local entrepreneur Bruno Callaghan. His business travels have taken him to a gamut of hotels and restaurants – good and bad – in the Americas, Europe and the Orient, shaping a service philosophy at whose core lie a friendly, comfortable ambience, good quality and affordability. Criteria which the new urban eatery meets in spades. Combining ‘chic’s’ modern decor – the exposed girders, air-ducts and even a hint of bare brick walls – with a menu typical of an GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

It is all starkly modern... yet unexpectedly comfortable and welcoming. Italian trattoria’s, Europe’s first such ‘urban eatery’ took shape in Devil’s Tower Road little more than a year ago. And, in a way, it symbolises the renaissance of an ill-defined area that for decades was a semi-industrial sprawl dotted with unfashionable blocks of flats. Though Nuno’s at the Express takes its name from its fashionable and more costly

counterpart in the Caleta Hotel – which is generally regarded as one of the Rock’s best places to wine and dine – the ‘urban eatery’ caters to a different, and growing, clientele. It offers no fancy dishes with ‘foreign’ names difficult to pronounce – just honest Italian food well-prepared and attentively served in pleasantly modern surroundings. “When the family decided to go ahead and build a proposed Holiday Inn Express on Devil’s Tower Road, we realised that although the former industrial area was becoming increasingly residential – there was no restaurant to serve the growing population of home owners,” Callaghan explains. “There were at least 2,000 residents in the apartment blocks which have sprung up in the area. And in the 69


year since the restaurant opened that number has continued to grow.” “We wanted something different, hence the ‘urban’ look of an old warehouse conversion with the services and metal girders exposed although, the reality is that it was all newly built.” Red and black dominate the decor, and against the ‘distant’ blacks of the true ceiling, suspended air-ducts and imitation girders gleam in silver, while mock bare bricks grace the chimney wall of the pizza oven – it is all starkly modern... yet unexpectedly comfortable and welcoming. “Though Nuno’s as a brand name is recognised as standing for quality, it also suggests ‘expensiveness’, and no way did we want to duplicate it,” Callaghan adds. “From the outset, value for money, good food reasonably priced, and a comfortable environment while providing something different - in both menu and decor – has been at the core.” The food is defiantly Italian – 70

pastas of every shape and variety as well as colours and flavours; risottos and pizzas with a selective range of toppings dominate the menu as veal dominates the traditional meat dishes. The pastas – fresh daily – are made on the premises and supply not only Nuno’s at the Caleta, but also the recently-opened delicatessen, which forms part of the entrance to the restaurant. This offers not only fresh take-away pizzas and pasta, but pasta to take home and cook as well as a range of Italian sauces to accompany it.

Although there are synergies, all three of the Callaghan operations - the Holiday Inn, the Caleta Hotel and Nuno’s at the Express – are run as separate entities. And, unexpectedly, far more of the Holiday Inn’s customers are using the hotel’s own restaurant in preference to Nuno’s at the Express.

[Though for me pride of place must go to the delicatessen’s traditional Venetian desert: tiramisu – better than any I have tasted in its home city of Venice, or elsewhere in Italy, save perhaps on the roof terrace of the Hotel Diana in Rome. In both places, a dish to die for.]

“I expected that between 10 to 20 per cent of the Inn’s guests would eat here at the Express, but we haven’t had anything like those numbers...Though I suppose it shows that the hotel’s restaurant is performing better than I expected,” says manager Franco Ostuni.

In a world of steadily rising prices and the need to budget we all face, the attraction of knowing that for £20 a head one can enjoy good food in comfort is clear, though it is still in the exploratory stages.

Nevertheless the ‘urban eatery’ continues to grow in custom and popularity and has more than justified the hopes of Callaghan and his team. Try it. You’ll enjoy it. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


health

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(+350) 2005 0932 or access@gibraltarshuttle.com GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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charity

RELAY FOR LIFE In May of 1985, Dr. Gordy Klatt decided on a novel way to raise donations for cancer research, he decided that he would do what he does well – running, but with a new challenge set. BY JEREMY GOMEZ

A

n avid marathon runner, Dr. Klatt decided he would run around a track for a set time rather than the standard marathon distance of 26.2 miles. He ran for 24 hours and he ran further than a marathon; 83 miles. Step after step, minute after minute. Dr. Klatt was supported by family, friends, and many donors on that day in May, but he believed that this event had legs and could go further. Dr. Klatt started running alone that day, but the very next year he ran with 19 teams and shared the distances together, one person at a time. From 1986 and every year after, thousands of teams have run and walked the Relay For Life. On the 21st of September, this year, the local Relay For Life committee will be organising their sixth event in aid of Cancer Research UK in twelve years at the Victoria Stadium. If you were to ask any of the committee members, who have worked tirelessly over the last year in preparation for the event, 72

why is the relay 24 hours long? Why not 12 hours or shorter (a considerable display of endurance in itself)? They would tell you that just as the teams won’t take a break, nor does cancer. Cancer never sleeps and is with us 24 hours. The Relay For Life is a 24-hour, non-stop event to raise funds to fight cancer, but it is also a celebration of life for those who have survived; an event in memory of those we have lost, and most of all, a moment where we come together in hope.

Just as the teams won’t take a break, nor does cancer. On Saturday morning, the perfectly orchestrated day begins with a moment of triumph over adversity as those who have survived cancer begin the relay and are then treated to a survivors reception. During the last relay, in 2017, Relay For Life Gibraltar

had the privilege of hosting the highest number of survivors at the relay in their history with 96 survivors opening the Relay. Once the survivors have begun the relay, the teams take to the track. The main aim is to have one team member on the track throughout the 24 hours. Though being a test of stamina and a challenge to complete, the day is far from being a hard slog as there is live entertainment, with numerous musicians and dance groups performing throughout the day and there are also bounties of food provided by the committee, our local Indian community (who have been a growing success and now cater for two meals), and others. There are also stalls of treats and frozen sun tops to satisfy the sweet tooth of any spectator or participant, who might want a sugar lift. Then after the sun sets on Saturday evening, there is the Candle of Hope ceremony. The ceremony encapsulates, what the relay is about and what it is for. This is the only time that Relay stops during the 24 hours. Paper bags are decorated with messages GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


charity

of encouragement to those faced with the prospect of fighting the disease or words dedicated to those who cancer has taken from us, and a candle placed in each. They are then placed around the track and in the stadium stands, where they are aligned to spell the words: ‘life’ and ‘hope’. A candle, by itself, causes a space of light in the darkness but during the Candle of Hope ceremony, a multitude of candles become a beautiful message to the darkness. The ceremony always includes a surprise performance and in GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

previous years have included a cellist, a bagpiper, a choir, and a solo singer. Each year the number of teams from local companies,

It is a celebration of life. societies, or groups of friends have increased and this year in particular, a team made up of Americans and Belgians, who will be travelling to our tiny corner of Europe specifically to take part in the relay.

One of the organisers, Giovi Viñales, noted that our local relay has garnered international attention in the past and the committee have also participated in a Relay in Peterhead, Scotland. Giovi explained that Cancer Research UK holds annual summits which local representatives from the RFL Committee attend, and that the presence of international teams shows that just as cancer doesn’t have borders, nor does the fight against it. The event will be held on the 21st September with the relay starting at 11am and finishing on the same time on Sunday morning. It is an event to raise funds but also to raise awareness, so come down and take on a fun, social challenge in aid of Cancer Research UK Gibraltar Branch, who have already raised a gigantic £1.7 million to help the worldwide fight against cancer.

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Show Us Your Pets! Have you reached for your copy of Gib Mag, only to discover it’s disappeared? We think we have the answer… check your dog beds, cat posts, fish tanks and bird cages - pet intellect is on the rise!

Clockwise from top left: Daisy, Cersei, Gary, Ollie, Bernie.

Snap us a pic of your sneaky pet reading Gib Mag, and you could win a week’s worth of meals from Supernatural, available from 6 locations around Gibraltar! Send your pet pics to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com. Competition ends September 30th.

#showusyourpets


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MHG For more information or to enjoy the Mayfair Hair Gallery experience, call the salon on 00350 20075913 87 Governors Street, Gibraltar, GX11 1AA • www.mayfaironmain.gi


fashion

AUTUMN ATTIRE

September on the rock means we’re still pretty much in the thick of summer, but the autumn collections have already begun saturating our favourite shops, with ankle boots and jackets rapidly replacing our favourite sandals and dresses. BY JULIA COELHO

E

ven though I’m definitely not ready to say goodbye to my bare legs just yet, a change of season is the perfect time for a wardrobe refresh. As much as I love shopping, I do believe that the ideal autumn wardrobe is based on a foundation of staple items and classics we can revisit every year, updated with a few tweaks and new pieces to make it feel fresh and exciting. As usual, the autumn/winter trends are expansive and varied, but there are a few styles in particular that have really caught my eye this year. If you’re a minimalist, sophisticated tailoring is a key theme this coming season, which makes for a refreshing change after so many seasons of sportswear and athleisure. If you're on the opposite end of the spectrum, however, you definitely won’t be left disappointed either; sunny brights, bold prints and statement details are soon set to become all the rage. 76

YELLOW

If you dread heading into the winter months with subdued colours to match the sombre weather, then you’ll be pleased to know that varying tones of yellow were all over the autumn and winter runways. If too much colour isn’t your thing though, you’ll also find that shades of beige and caramel are still very much on the scene, and incidentally make for a perfect

LEFT: LOOSE FIT RIBBED JUMPER IN MUSTARD, BERSHKA, £19.99 RIGHT: CONNIE JACKET, TOPSHOP, £30.00

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


fashion pairing with yellow, should you wish to pluck up the courage and brave a bright.

PUBLIC DESIRE EXCLUSIVE MIAO HEELED SANDAL IN YELLOW CROC - £32.99

HERITAGE BLAZERS

This season, minimalism is having a bit of a moment, and we’re seeing a newfound appreciation for the more refined; a stark contrast to the joggers and trainers trends that have taken hold over the past couple of years. 70s-style bourgeois glam found its way onto many an autumn catwalk, and one of the standout pieces, of course, was a classic checked blazer. A tried and trusted autumn staple, checked blazers are one of my favourite pieces to shop for and look just as good with a satin midi dress as they do with jeans and a simple tee. In a similar vein, statement trench coats are

back in full force, so be prepared to see many Burberry-inspired iterations amongst the high-street racks very soon.

LEFT: VINYL TRENCH COAT, TOPSHOP, £79.00 BELOW: - BLAZER IN CHECK, RIVER ISLAND, £68.00 RIGHT: CHECK DOUBLE BREASTED JACKET, WHISTLES, £199.00

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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fashion

DARK FLORALS

BELOW: ASOS DESIGN - LEATHER LOOK PLEATED MIDI SKIRT - £30.00 MIDDLE: GRID PLEATED SKIRT BY BOUTIQUE. TOPSHOP, £85.00

Floral dresses are a wardrobe staple no matter the season, but instead of dainty micro-florals and vivid colours, autumn will see a moodier colour palette and unapologetically-sized prints.

FAR RIGHT: WRAP BLOUSE WITH GREEN FLORAL PRINT, PRETTYLITTLETHING, £18.00

BELOW: LONG BUTTON DOWN FLORAL MAXI DRESS, FRENCH CONNECTION, £130.00 BOTTOM RIGHT: FLORAL PRINT RUFFLE MIDI DRESS, TOPSHOP, £49.00

PLEATED SKIRTS

Pleated skirts have always been a long-time classic, and this season they’re about to make a major comeback. In terms of silhouette, the longer length and cinched waist flatters all figures, and the pleats do wonders to inject a burst of femininity and put-togetherness to any look. Try two trends at once by pairing a sharp jacket with a flowy pleated skirt and a tucked-in blouse for a stylish juxtaposition. 78

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


fashion

CHOKER NECKLACES

LACE-UP BOOTS

I love my strappy sandals as much as the next gal, but I must say I am so excited to step back into my boots. The word on the street is that lace-up boots have arrived on the fashion scene and shaken things up; a particular pair from Zara has already sold out various times since first making an appearance. This particular style and silhouette feels very Victorian-esque, but they’ve been updated for the modern woman and ooze contemporaneity and wearability. Pair them with a flowy midi dress or even with some rolled up straight leg jeans for the perfect transitional look

TOP LEFT: LACE-UP LEATHER HIGH HEEL ANKLE BOOTS, ZARA, £95.99

It was only a matter of time before chokers made their way back onto the scene. For the past few seasons, it’s been all about dainty and layered jewellery. Sometimes the smallest details are the ones that are able to make the biggest impact on your wardrobe, and this year, almost no catwalk was complete without a choker as its standout accessory.

BELOW: TECHNICAL HIGH-HEEL LACEUP ANKLE BOOTS, ZARA, £59.99

FRAME HANDBAGS

When it comes to handbag trends, the frame bag is the key piece you’ll see all over the high-street these days. Comprising of a simple rigid structure with a top handle, it’s a classic style with a vintage feel, and inherently possesses a great staying power. Although last season’s micro styles are still very much in vogue, a growing love for larger bags is emerging slowly, making them one of the most utilitarian trends of the season. LEFT:STORM CREAM BUCKLE SHOULDER BAG, TOPSHOP, £29.00 BELOW: CHECK KNOT HEADBAND, TOPSHOP, £10.00 RIGHT: DOUBLE LINK CHAIN CHOKER, TOPSHOP, £7.50

HEADBANDS Headbands first made an appearance back in spring, and have quickly become one of this year’s biggest accessory trends. Not only do they conveniently conceal the awkward stages between hair washes, but they also work well with pretty much any aesthetic, from formal and feminine, to a lazy day of knitwear and jeans. Although I’m not usually big on hair accessories, I think it may be time to channel my inner Blair Waldorf this autumn at last. From silks and satins to polka dot prints and oversized bows, there’s more than plenty to choose from.

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SUGAR-FREE ENERGY BALLS

Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/ thegibraltarvegan

Stuck for ideas for healthy lunch box fillers for kids? Want an energy hit before a work out? Trying to tempt yourself away from sugar filled treats? Then these easy sugar-free energy balls are for you! These ingredients make 15 30g balls.

Flavourings: •

You can change the juice to either blueberry for a sweeter taste or orange juice if you fancy a sharper citrus hit. You can also change the dried apricots to golden sultanas. Make these energy balls your own and mix and create new flavours. INGREDIENTS •

130g pitted dates

45g pumpkin seeds

75g porridge oats

45g dried apricots

95ml mixed red berries juice

1½ cocoa powder

80

Choose from 4g freeze dried strawberries, 25g chopped pistachio nuts, 30g desiccated coconut, 2 tsp peppermint essence.

METHOD 1. Chop the dates into small pieces and soak in the red berries juice for ten minutes. 2. Chop the apricots into small pieces and set aside.

5. Mix together with a spoon, alternatively you could use a blender if you want more of a truffle texture. 6. If you are making them mint flavoured, add the peppermint essence now and mix well. 7. Using your hands roll the balls into whatever size you wish, I make them between 25-30g but for children you might want to make them smaller.

3. Blend the pumpkin seeds and oats.

8. For all none mint flavoured balls roll them in whichever flavour you opted for.

4. Add the apricots, pumpkin seeds, oats and cocoa to the soaked dates .

9. No need to put in the fridge but in doing so they do get firmer. The balls can be stored for two weeks. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


MOROCCAN MEATBALLS IN A TOMATO TAGINE SAUCE

Recipe by Mama Lotties: www.mamalotties.com

I enjoy meatballs and this recipe was similar to one I tried many years ago. All the spices and simple cooking method makes this an easy dish for any evening. INGREDIENTS •

400g beef mince (or meat free alternative)

400g tomate triturado

1 garlic clove

2 eggs

Olive oil

1 tsp sugar

Fresh coriander

Tagine spices (ground, toasted cumin, sweet paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, ground coriander, salt, black

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

pepper, mint, cinnamon, mustard seeds, clove, tumeric, fennel, nutmeg). METHOD 1. In a large bowl, mix the meat with two tablespoons of the tagine spices, a drizzle of oil and roll out the meat into meatballs in the palm of your hand. You should be able to get 12 – 14 balls. 2. Briefly fry the outside of the meatballs and remove from the heat.

3. Chop the garlic, very finely, and fry with a bit of oil. Pour in the tomato and mix with a teaspoon of sugar and a tablespoon of the spices. 4. Once the sauce thickens, beat two eggs in a bowl and pour onto the mixture, keeping it from mixing in. Lay the meatballs in and around the sauce and place the dish in the oven at 180°C for 10 – 15 minutes. Serve with chopped coriander. 81


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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


restaurants, bars & pubs THE LOUNGE

SOLO BAR & GRILL

ALL’S WELL

Stylish Lounge Gastro Bar on Queensway Quay Marina serving best quality food prepared by passionate, qualified chefs. Popular quiz on Sundays from 7pm and a relaxed friendly atmosphere. A separate Lounge Bar Area serving a wide range of hot drinks, wines, beers, spirits and cocktails at reasonable prices, with large TV’s for sports and events coverage.

Solo Bar and Grill is a stylish and modern eatery — perfect for business functions or lunches — and part of the popular Cafe Solo stable. Serving everything from Goats’ Cheese Salad, Mediterranean Pâté and Cajun Langoustines to Beer Battered John Dory, or Harissa Chicken, and Chargrilled Sirloin Steak. This is a delightful venue in Europort with a cosy mezzanine level and terrace seating. Well worth a visit, or two! Available for private functions and corporate events — call 200 62828 to book your function or event.

In the fashionable Casemates square stands Gibraltar’s last historical themed pub, named for the 18th-century practice of locking gates to the city at night when the guard called ‘All’s Well’. Their food menu caters to all cravings; whether it’s fish and chips, a homemade pie, or maybe even a delicious sharing platter, they have it all. All’s Well have an amazing range of bottled beers as well as being the only pub in Gibraltar to offer craft beer on tap. Happy hour is daily from 7-9pm. Large terrace. Karaoke Mondays & Wednesdays until late.

Open: 10am-late Mon - Sun Be sure to arrive early to ensure a seat! The Lounge, 17 Ragged Staff Wharf, Queensway Quay Marina Tel: 200 61118 info@thelounge.gi

Open: 12-8pm. Solo Bar & Grill, Eurotowers Tel: 200 62828

All’s Well, Casemates Square. Tel: 200 72987

NUNOS ITALIAN Nunos Italian Restaurant, overlooking the Mediterranean, is popular with hotel guests, tourists and local residents. This 2 rosette rated, AA restaurant is renowned for its eclectic interior, intimate atmosphere and fine cuisine. Savour a wide selection of freshly prepared Italian delicacies, including bread, pasta, meat and fish, followed by delicious desserts. In the summer months, the hotel offers alfresco dining for private parties in the Garden Grill. Sitting nestled in the colonial garden you can enjoy a mouth-watering menu of charcoal-grilled meats and freshly prepared salads in candlelit surroundings. Open: Mon-Sun 1-3pm lunch, 7–11pm dinner Nunos Italian Restaurant and Terrace Caleta Hotel, Catalan Bay Tel: 200 76501

Email: reservations@caletahotel.gi

CAFÉ SOLO Modern Italian eatery set in lively Casemates square. Everything from chicory and crispy pancetta salad with walnuts, pears and blue cheese dressing, or king prawn, mozzarella and mango salad to pastas (eg: linguine with serrano ham, king prawns and rocket; smoked salmon and crayfish ravioli with saffron and spinach cream) to salads (eg: Vesuvio spicy beef, cherry tomatoes, roasted peppers and red onions; and Romana chorizo, black pudding, egg and pancetta) and pizzas (eg: Quatto Stagioni topped with mozzarella, ham, chicken, pepperoni and mushroom) and specialities such as salmon fishcakes, beef medallions and duck. Daily specials on blackboard. No smoking. Café Solo Grand Casemates Square. Tel: 200 44449

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information EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY: ALL EMERGENCIES................................. 112 FIRE...............................................................190 AMBULANCE.............................................190 POLICE.................................................................199

Business Information Financial Serv. Commission Tel: 200 40283/4 Chamber of Commerce Tel: 200 78376 Federation Small Business Tel: 200 47722 Company Registry.Tel: 200 78193 Useful Numbers Airport (general info.) . Tel: 200 12345 Hospital, St Bernards. . Tel: 200 79700 Weather information. . Tel: 5-3416 Frontier Queue Update Tel: 200 42777 Gibraltar Museum Tel: 200 74289 18/20 Bomb House Lane 10am-6pm (Sat 10am-2pm). Admission: Adults £2/Children under 12 - £1. Exhibitions also at Casemates gallery.

Police 200 72500

Gibraltar Services Police Emergency Nos: (5) 5026 / (5) 3598

Gibraltar Garrison Library Tel: 200 77418 2 Library Ramp Mon-Fri: 9am-5pm. Free Library tour offered every Friday at 11am. chris.tavares@gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi

Gibraltar Public Holidays 2019

Registry Office Tel: 200 72289 It’s possible to get married within 48 hours. A fact taken advantage of by stars such as Sean Connery & John Lennon.

Good Friday

Rock Tours by Taxi Tel: 200 70052 As well as offering normal fares, taxis provide Rock Tours taking in the Upper Rock, Europa Point etc.

Spring Bank Holiday

Monday 27th May

Queen’s Birthday

Monday 17th June

John Mackintosh Hall Tel: 200 75669 Includes cafeteria, theatre, exhibition rooms and library. 308 Main Street 9.30am - 11pm Mon-Fri.

Late Summer Bank Holiday

Monday 26th Aug

Gibraltar National Day Tuesday 10th Sept

New Year’s Day Commonwealth Day Easter Monday

Monday 1st Jan Monday 11th Mar Friday 19th Apr Monday 22nd Apr

Workers Memorial Day Monday 29th Apr May Day

Christmas Day Boxing Day

Wednesday 1st May

Wednesday 25th Dec Thursday 26th Dec

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD Gibraltar adhdgibraltar@gmail.com facebook.com/ADHDGibraltar/ Alcoholics Anonymous meet 7pm Tues & Thurs at Nazareth House Tel: 200 73774. A Step Forward support for single, separated, divorced/widowed people, meet 8pm Mon at St Andrew’s Church. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group those who are pregnant, breastfeeding or have breastfed to get together for coffee / support. Partners and older children welcome. Meets 1st Wed / month at Chilton Court Community Hall at 1.30pm. Enquiries and support 54014517. Childline Gibraltar confidential phone line for children in need. Freephone 8008 - 7 days a week 5pm - 9pm Citizens’ Advice Bureau Open Mon-Thur 9:30am-4:00pm, Fri 9:30am- 3:30pm. Tel: 200 40006 Email: info@cab.gi or visit at 10 Governor’s Lane. Free & confidential, impartial & independent advice and info.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

COPE Support group for people with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia or Rheumatoid Arthritis. Meetings at Catholic Community Centre Book Shop at 7.30pm first Thur of each month. Tel: 200 51469 Email: copeadsupport@hotmail.com Dignity At Work Now Confidential support and advice for those who are being bullied at work. Tel: 57799000. Families Anonymous Support group for relatives and friends concerned about the use of drugs or related behavioural problems. Meet weekly on Thurs at 9pm at Gladys Perez Centre, 304A Main Street, Tel: 54007676 or 54014484. Gamblers Anonymous Telephone: 54001520 Gibraltar Cardiac Rehabilitation and Support Group meets on the first Tues of every month at 8.30pm at John Mac Hall, except for Jul & Aug. Gibraltar Dyslexia Support Group 72 Prince Edwards Rd Tel: 200 78509 Mobile: 54007924 website: dyslexia.gi Gibraltar Marriage Care Free relationship counselling, including pre-marriage education (under auspices of Catholic Church, but open to all). Tel: 200 71717.

Gibraltar Society for the Visually Impaired Tel: 200 50111 (24hr answering service). Hope miscarriage support Tel: 200 41817. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support: Meets every Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous Tel: 200 70720 Parental Support Group helping parents and grandparents with restrictive access to their children and grandchildren. Tel: 200 46536, 200 76618, or 54019602. Psychological Support Group, PO Box 161, Nazareth House. Meet Tuesdays at 7pm, Fridays 8pm. Tel: Yolanda 54015553 With Dignity Gibraltar support for separated, divorced/widowed or single people. Meet Weds 9pm, Catholic Community Centre, Line Wall Rd. Outings/activities. Women in Need Voluntary organisation for all victims of domestic violence. Refuge available. Tel: 200 42581 (24 hrs).

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The Gibraltar Magazine is published and produced by Rock Publishing Ltd, Gibraltar. Tel: (+350) 200 77748

NON-URGENT CALLS: Ambulance Station 200 75728


GODS ON THE ROCK Town or country? Zeus opts for city life.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

‘W

hy would anyone want to live in the countryside?’ Zeus tossed the question lightly across the Olympian breakfast table. He asked it quietly, as though he really was interested in the opinion of others, with none of the usual stentorian bark accompanying a rhetorical question to which he would give his own damning reply. ‘Cities, even towns, have so much more to offer, yet people flock to the countryside... not just for holidays and weekend breaks, but to actually have their homes there. It beats me.’ ‘Ah, but it also works the other way too,’ said Apollo. ‘Villagers and even people from smaller 86

country towns move to the cities or bigger towns. I’ve seen it often on my daily travels – there are villages dying for want of inhabitants, not just in Spain but in other European countries – in Wales, in Austria – as well as in the America’s and China...’ ‘So many Chinese want to live

How swiftly the aged forget – even we, oldest of all immortals. in cities that they have to keep building new ones, but not

through any development process as most cities do – you know... villages, becoming towns, then slowly growing into cities and, eventually, megalopoli,’ Athena interrupted her worldly-wise brother. She had her eye on China. The possible trade war between Beijing and Washington was having a serious impact on her bitcoin investment. ‘Chinese prove my point,’ said Zeus with uncharacteristic reasonableness. ‘They move to cities for a better quality of life; all the things they can’t get in the country. Or start whole cities so they can get ‘em.’ How swiftly the aged forget – even we, oldest of all immortals, thought Hera as she listened to GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


satire her husband’s argument. ‘We lived in the countryside for millennia,’ she reminded him. ‘What do you think Olympus and its environs were, their landscape hardly touched by mortals? They were a Utopia. A Nirvana. No towering office blocks or concrete canyons of apartments. There was clean, healthy air. And…’ ‘And look at what all that got us,’ Zeus barked as memories of their former home prodded him back to his usual self. ‘It got us a climate which was too hot in summer and too cold in winter... hard marble benches and thrones which were uncomfortable to sit on, or unreliable clouds to sleep on... an endless dull diet of manna, nectar or ambrosia... little to do other than squabble among ourselves or interfere in the lives of mortals... and an endless stream of those mortals pleading for our help in their wars, with their crops - and even in their attempts to manage affairs of state. ‘That was country life, Hera. But here’ – and he swung his arm in a gesture that took in the large penthouse apartment and the patios with their views of the Rock and Marina Bay – ‘we have Comfort and with a capital C. Comfortable chairs and sofas, comfortable beds, a choice of cuisine, hundreds of TV channels for our entertainment, and Google and Facebook to exercise our minds. That’s progress. So – why would any mortal turn his or her nose up at that? Why do they want to live in the countryside, particularly when they seem to want to change it when they get there?’ ‘Perhaps they prefer clean, healthy air untainted by carbon GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

monoxide and exhaust fumes,’ said Artemis who - irked at the lack of progress among the Sisterhood seeking to bridge the very real male/female pay gap and dismantle the ‘glass ceiling’ – had turned her attention to the ‘Green’ cause with the same boundless energy that she had hunted stag and boar centuries earlier. ‘Maybe they prefer food with fresh, healthy ingredients, rather than a diet of fast-food burgers and pot-noodles... or even fish and chips,’ added Dionysus. ‘Though, for myself, it wouldn’t matter whether it was country or town –

Here we have Comfort and with a capital C. as long as I could lay my hands on a bottle of decent rioja or a stiff gin and tonic.’ ‘There no surprise to that,’ sniped Hebe. ‘But why the sudden interest in where mortals choose to live, Pops?’ Zeus frowned at her use of the slang diminutive. His children’s adoption of mortal attitudes and lack of old-fashioned values – particularly, such as respect for parents – was one of the few things which he missed, lost from the past in the Olympians’ emigration from Greece to Gibraltar. ‘I was thinking about the French village whose mayor took one of his neighbours to court because he had refused to fill in his fishpond. In-comers from the city

had complained about the loud croaking of frogs which shared the pond with his carp and koi. The mayor wanted it filled “for the good of the community”, he claimed. ‘But the pond had been there for centuries, and no one had ever complained before.’ ‘I suppose that, next, someone will complain about being awakened too early in the morning by the crowing of cockerels,‘ suggested a sarcastic Poseidon, who had spent the night under water collecting Red Sea barnacles particularly tasty morsels, he had decided - from the hull of a tanker arrested by the British and Gibraltar authorities while en route to deliver Iranian oil to Syria in defiance of an United Nations ban. ‘That’s precisely what did happen,’ Zeus told the sea god. ‘Another in-comer said that a cock’s cowing next door so disturbed his daughter’s sleep patterns – she had not slept soundly enough on the eve of her exams – that she had done badly in her baccalaureate. ‘But that complaint didn’t get far. The mayor has the largest shareholding in the biggest local egg co-operative.’ ‘Ho-hum,’ said Apollo. ‘Town or country – doesn’t matter where you live; wheels within wheels and business as usual, then.’ He looked at his Rolex. ‘Must dash, I’ve an appointment at No.6. Fabian wants to make sure that the sun shines on September 10. Can’t imagine why... but it’s probably something political.’ ‘It always is, with Fabian,’ Zeus muttered.

87


clubs & activities Arts & Crafts Cross Stitch Club: John Mackintosh Hall, 1st Floor, Mon 6-8pm, fee £1. Gibraltar Arts & Crafts Association: Children: Mon&Fri 12.30-2pm, Mon-Fri 3.45-5.15pm Adults: Wed 5.45-7.15, Sat 10.30 to 12.30, Tel: 20073865 email: gibartsandcrafts@hotmail.com Knit and Natter Group: Tues 11am-3pm, Thurs 5.30-7.30pm, at Arts & Crafts Shop, Casemates balcony. Free to join and refreshments provided. Tel: 20073865. The Arts Centre: Prince Edward’s Road, Art classes for children and adults. For more info call Tel: 200 79788. The Fine Arts Association Gallery: At Casemates. Open 10am-2pm, 3-6pm Mon-Fri, Sat 11am-1pm. The Arts Society Gibraltar: Monthly illustrated talks open to the public. Registration from 6:30pm every 3rd Wednesday of the month. Guest fee £12. We meet at The Garrison Library. Contact gibraltar@theartssociety.org or Claus Olesen on 54036666. Website with all informaiton is gibraltar.theartssociety.org Board Games Calpe Chess Club & Junior Club: meets in Studio 1, John Mackintosh Hall Thursday, Juniors: 5p.m. - 7 p.m. / Tuesday & Thursday 7p.m. - 10:30 The Gibraltar Scrabble Club: Meets on Tuesdays at 3pm. Tel: Vin 20073660 or Roy 20075995. All welcome. The Subbuteo Club: Meets in Charles Hunt Room, John Mackintosh Hall. Dance Adult Dance Classes: Wed evenings at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre from 7-8.30pm. Contact Dilip on 200 78714. Art in Movement Centre: Hip-hop/Break Dance, Contemporary Dance, Pilates, Capoeira, Acrobatics, Street Kids & Tods, Modern Dance. Performance and Film opportunities. Judo & Jujitsu Classes: Tue/ Thur with Sensei Conroy. All ages. Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. www. artinmovement.net FB: Art In Movement A.I.M, tel 54025041 or 54007457 Ballet, Modern Theatre, Contemporary & Hip-hop: weekly at Danza Academy. Training from 3 years to Adult Advanced. 68/2 Prince Edward’s Rd Tel: 54027111. Bellydance Classes, all levels, Tue 8-9pm at the Ocean Village Gym (non–members welcome). Contact 54005593. DSA Old & Modern Sequence Dancing: Sessions at Central Hall Fri 8.30pm, beginners 8pm. Tel: 200 78901 or tony@ gibraltar.gi Everybody welcome. Modern & Latin American Sequence Dancing: Mon at Catholic Community Centre 8pm. Tel. Andrew 200 78901. Modern, Contemporary, Lyrical, Flexibility, Hip Hop & Dance Theatre: Classes weekly at Urban Dance Studio, 2 Jumpers Bastion. Tel: Yalta 54012212 or Jolene 54015125. Rockkickers Linedance Club: Governor’s Meadow 1st School. www.rockkickers.com Salsa Gibraltar Salsa: Tues at Laguna Social Club, Laguna Estate. Beginners 7-8.30pm. Intermediates 8.30-10pm. Tel: Mike 54472000 or info@salsagibraltar.com Zumba Classes at Urban Dance: Jumpers Bastion, with certified instructor Tyron Walker. Tel: 20063959 or 54012212 or Twitter: @UrbanDanceGib History & Heritage The Gibraltar Heritage Trust: Main Guard, 13 John Mackintosh Sq. Tel: 200 42844. The Gibraltar Classic Vehicle Association: Dedicated to the preservation of Rock’s transport/motoring heritage. Assists members in restoration / maintenance of classic vehicles. New members welcome. Tel: 200 44643. Garrison Library Tours: at 11am on Fri, duration 1h 50mins. Tel: 20077418. History Alive: Historical re-enactment parade. Main Street up to Casemates Square every Sat at 12 noon. Music Gibraltar National Choir and Gibraltar Junior National Choir: Rehearses at the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Tel: 54831000. The Calpe Band: Mon & Wed. For musicians of brass/woodwind instruments of all standards/ages/abilities 7-9pm. Tel: 54017070 or thecalpeband@gmail.com

88

Jazz Nights: Thurs at 9pm at O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel. Tel: 200 70500. Outdoor Activities The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award Gibraltar: Exciting self-development programme for young people worldwide equipping them with life skills to make a difference to themselves, their communities and the world. Contact: Award House, North Mole Road, PO Box: 1260. mjpizza@ gibtelecom.net, www.thedukes.gi. Social Clubs The Rotary Club of Gibraltar meets the Rock Hotel, 7pm Tuesday evenings. Guests welcome. For contact or info www.rotaryclubgibraltar.com Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes: (Gibraltar Province) meets RAOB Club, 72/9 Prince Edward’s Road - Provincial Grand Lodge, Thu/month, 7.30pm. William Tilley 2371, Thurs 8.30pm. Buena Vista 9975, monthly, Social Lodge. www.akearn1.wix. com/raob-gibraltar, william.tilley.lodge@ hotmail.co.uk, Clive, tel: 58008074 Special Interest Clubs & Societies Creative Writers Group: meets up on Tuesday mornings at 10.30 in O’Reilley’s Irish Bar and it is free to attend. Tel: Carla 54006696. Gibraltar Book Club: For info Tel: Parissa 54022808. Gibraltar Horticultural Society: meets 1st Thurs of month 6pm, J.M. Hall. Spring Flower Show, slide shows, flower arrangement demos, outings to garden centres, annual Alameda Gardens tour. All welcome. Gibraltar Philosophical Society: devoted to intellectually stimulating debate. Frequent lectures and seminars on a range of topics. Tel: 54008426 or Facebook: facebook.com/gibphilosophy Gibraltar Photographic Society: Meets on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. Wellington Front. Induction courses, talks, discussions, competitions etc. For details contact the secretary on, leslinares@gibtelecom.net Harley Davidson Owners’ Club: www.hdcgib.com Lions Club of Gibraltar: Meets 2nd and 4th Wed of the month at 50 Line Wall Road. www.lionsclubofgibraltar.com St John’s Ambulance: Adult Volunteers Training Sessions from 8-10pm on Tues. Tel: 200 77390 or training@stjohn.gi The Royal British Legion: For info or membership contact the Branch Secretary 20074604 or write to PO Box 332. UN Association of Gibraltar: PO Box 599, 22a Main Street. Tel: 200 52108. Sports Supporters Clubs Tottenham Hotspur Supporters Club: Meets at Star Bar, Parliament Lane, when Spurs games are televised - call prior to matches to check game is televised. Great food for a lunch if KO is early or an early supper if the game is later. Gibraltar Arsenal Supporters Club: Meets match days upstairs at Time Out Café, Eurotowers. Gooners of all ages welcome. For info/news visit www.GibGooners.com Tel: 54010681 (Bill) or 54164000 (John). Gibraltar Hammers: Meets on match days at the Victoria Stadium Bar, Bayside Road. All league games are shown live. All West Ham supporters and their families are welcome. For details visit www.gibraltarhammers.com or gibraltarhammers@hotmail.com Sports & Fitness Artistic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Artistic Gymnastics Association. Tel: Angela 200 70611 or Sally 200 74661. Athletics: Gibraltar Amateur Athletics Association holds competitions through year for juniors, adults and veterans. Two main clubs (Calpeans 200 71807, Lourdians 200 75180) training sessions at Victoria Stadium. Badminton: Recreational badminton weekdays at Victoria Stadium (Tel: 200 78409 for allocations). Gibraltar Badminton Association (affiliated to BWF& BE) junior club/tournaments, senior leagues/ recreational. www.badmintongibraltar.com Ballet Barre Fitness: Adults on Wed 10am & Fri 6pm at The Arts Centre. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Basketball: Gibraltar Amateur Basketball Association (affiliated FIBA) leagues/ training for minis, passarelle, cadets, seniors and

adults at a variety of levels. Tel: John 200 77253, Randy 200 40727. Boxing: Gibraltar Amateur Boxing Association (member IABA) gym on Rosia Rd. Over 13s welcome. Tuition with ex-pro boxer Ernest Victory. Tel: 56382000 or 20042788. Cheerleading: Gibraltar Cheerleading Association, girls and boys of all ages. Cheerleading and street cheer/hip-hop at Victoria Stadium. Recreational / competitive levels. Tel: 58008338. Canoeing: Gibraltar Canoeing Association. Tel: Nigel 200 52917 or Arturo 54025033. Cricket: Gibraltar Cricket, National Governing Body & Associate Member of ICC. Governs International & Domestic Men’s, Women’s, Boys’ & Girls’ cricket- league & cup competitions and in-school coaching. www.gibraltarcricket.com, info@gibcricket. com, Twitter: @Gibraltar_Crick Cycling: Gibraltar Cycling Association various cycling tours. Darts: Gibraltar Darts Association (full member of WDF & affiliate of BDO). We cater for men, ladies & youth who take part in leagues, competitions and a youth academy for the correct development of the sport. Tel: Darren 54027171 Secretary, Alex 54021672 Youth Rep, Justin 54022622 President. Email: info@ gibraltardarts.com Football: Gibraltar Football Association leagues/competitions for all ages OctoberMay. Futsal in summer, Victoria Stadium. Tel: 20042941 www.gibraltarfa.com Gaelic Football Club (Irish sport): Males any age welcome. Get fit, play sport, meet new friends, travel around Spain/Europe and play an exciting and competitive sport. Training every Wed on the MOD pitch on Devil’s Tower Road at 7pm. Andalucia League with Seville and Marbella to play matches home and away monthly. Visit www.gibraltargaels. com or secretary.gibraltar.europe@gaa.ie Hockey: Gibraltar Hockey Association (members FIH & EHF) high standard competitions/training for adults/juniors. Tel: Eric 200 74156 or Peter 200 72730 for info. Iaido: teaches the Japanese sword (Katana), classes every week. www.iaidogibraltar.com Ice Skating: Gibraltar Rock Stars Figure Skating Club lessons every Tuesday evening & Saturday morning, all levels including adults. Contact grsfsc@gmail.com or 58700000 Iwa Dojo, Kendo & Jujitsu: Classes every week, for kids/adults. Tel: 54529000 www. iwadojo.com or dbocarisa@iwadojo.com Judo and Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Budokai Judo Association UKMAF recognised instructors for all ages and levels at Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. Tel: Charlie 20043319. Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Ju-jitsu Academy training and grading for juniors/seniors held during the evening at 4 North Jumpers Bastion. Tel: 54011007. Karate-do Shotokai: Gibraltar Karate-do Shotokai Association - Karate training for junior & seniors at Clubhouse, Shotokai karate centre, 41H Town Range. Monday: 9:30 p.m. & Wednesday 9:45 p.m. Karate: Shotokan karate midday Mon beginners, other students 8.30pm. Thurs 8.30pm. In town at temporary dojo or privately by arrangement. Contact Frankie 54038127 or info@fhmedia.co.uk. Motorboat Racing: Gibraltar Motorboat Racing Association Tel: Wayne 200 75211. Muay Thai and Muay Boran Club: Tues & Thur at Boyd’s Kings Bastion Leisure Centre at 6:30pm, Tel: John – 54024707 FB: Gibraltar Muay Thai Netball: Gibraltar Netball Association (affiliated FENA & IFNA) competitions through year, senior/junior leagues. Tel: 20041874. Petanque: Gibraltar Petanque Association. New members welcome. Tel: 54002652. Pilates: Intermediate Pilates: Tues & Fri 9.30am, beginners Pilates: Fri 10.50am at the Shotokai Centre, 41H Town Range. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Gibraltar Pool Association: (Member of the EBA) home and away league played on Thurs throughout the season, various tournaments played on a yearly basis both nationally and internationally, Tel: 56925000 gibpool@ gibtelecom.net, www.gib8ball.com Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Rhythmic

Gymnastics Association runs sessions from 4 years of age, weekday evenings. Tel: 56000772 or Sally 200 74661. Rugby: Gibraltar Rugby caters for all ages from 4 years old to veterans (over 35’s). It organises competitions and sessions for Juniors; 4 x Senior Clubs; Veterans team; Touch Rugby and a Referees Society. Email admin@gibraltarrfu. com or visit www.gibraltarrfu.com Sailing: Gibraltar Yachting Association junior/ senior competitive programme (April - Oct) Tel: Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club at 200 78897. Shooting: Gibraltar Shooting Federation. Rifle, Europa Point Range (Stephanie 54020760); Clay pigeon, East Side (Harry 200 74354); Pistol, near Royal Naval Hospital (Louis 54095000). Snooker: Members of European Billiards & Snooker Association - facilities at Jumpers Bastion with 3 tables. Professional coaching for juniors/seniors. Organised leagues/ tournaments and participation in international competitions. Tel: 56262000 / 54000068, or info@gibraltarsnooker.com Squash: Gibraltar Squash Association, Squash Centre, South Pavilion Road (members WSF & ESF). Adult and junior tournaments and coaching. Tel: 200 44922. Sub-Aqua: Gibraltar Sub-Aqua Association taster dives for over 14s, tuition from local clubs. Voluntary sports clubs: Noah’s Dive Club and 888s Dive Club. Tel: 54991000. Commercial sports diving schools available. Time - Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.. Telephone, Jenssen Ellul - 54027122 Swimming: Gibraltar Amateur Swimming Association (member FINA & LEN) opens its pool for leisure swimming. Junior lessons, squad for committed swimmers, water polo. Pool open Mon&Thurs: 7-10am, 12.30-4pm. Tue, Wed, Fri: 7-10am, 12:30-5pm. Sat: 3-5pm. Sun: closed. Mon to Fri from 5-6pm groups training. 6-7.30 squad training. Mon, Wed, Fri 7.30-8.30 swimming joggers, Tues & Thurs 7:30-8:30 junior Water polo. Mon, Tues & Thurs 8:30-10pm Adult water polo. Tel: 200 72869. Table Tennis: Gibraltar Table Tennis Association training and playing sessions, Victoria Stadium, Tues 6-10pm and Thurs 8-11pm with coaching and league competition. Tel: 56070000 or 20060720. Taekwondo: Gibraltar Taekwondo Association classes/gradings Tel: Mari 20044142 or www. gibraltartaekwondo.org Tai Chi: Tai Chi for children and adults. MonThur 6.30-8pm at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre and Sat 9am-1pm at the Yoga Centre, 33 Town Range. Tel: Dilip 200 78714. Tennis and Paddle Tennis: Sandpits Club. Junior and adult training available. info : www. sandpits.club. Tel (Louis) 20077035 Ten-Pin Bowling: At King’s Bowl in the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre every day. Gibraltar Ten Pin Bowling (members FIQ & WTBA) leagues, training for juniors and squad. Tel: 200 52442. Triathlon: Hercules Triathlon Club organises swimming, running and cycling training sessions and competes regularly in Andalucia and Internationally. Contact chris.walker@york. gi or Facebook “Hercules Triathlon Club” Volleyball: Gibraltar Volleyball Association training, indoor leagues, beach volleyball competition, 3 v 3 competition, juniors and seniors. Tel: 54001973 or 54885000. Yoga: Integral Yoga Centre runs a full programme of classes from Mon-Fri at 33 Town Range. Tel: 200 41389. All welcome. Theatrical Groups Gibraltar Amateur Drama Association: Meet at Ince’s Hall Theatre Complex, 310 Main Street. Tel: 20042237. Trafalgar Theatre Group: Meets 2nd Wed of month, Garrison Library 8pm. All welcome.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


BY @TANGUY_TOUT_SIMPLEMENT

TAKEN A GREAT PHOTO OF GIB AND THINK EVERYONE SHOULD SEE IT? Email your high resolution photo to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com and you might see it published here!


information

CRUISE SCHEDULE SEPTEMBER 2019 ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY 3082

Mon 02 Sep 19, 07:00

EMERALD PRINCESS

17:00 American/British

Princess Cruises

Tue 03 Sep 19, 08:00

SEA CLOUD II

20:00 German

Sea Cloud Cruises

94

Sun 08 Sep 19, 09:00

WIND SURF

18:00 American

Windstar Cruises

310

Mon 09 Sep 19, 08:00

AZAMARA JOURNEY

23:00 American/British

Azamara Cruises

690

Wed 11 Sep 19, 13:00

CELEBRITY SILHOUETTE

18:00 International

Celebrity Cruise Lines

2886

Thu 12 Sep 19, 00:30

HARMONY V

13:30 American

Variety Cruises

50

Thu 12 Sep 19, 07:30

CORINTHIAN

17:30 American

Travel Dynamics International

114

Sat 14 Sep 19, 09:00

WIND SURF

18:00 American

Windstar Cruises

310

Sun 15 Sep 19, 07:00

CELEBRITY REFLECTION

17:00 International

Celebrity Cruises

3046

Tue 17 Sep 19, 08:00

QUEEN VICTORIA

14:00 British

Cunard Line

1990

Tue 17 Sep 19, 13:00

AZURA

19:00 British

P&O

3100

Wed 18 Sep 19, 08:00

BRITANNIA

14:00 British

P&O

4324

Thu 19 Sep 19, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 2

18:00 -

-

Thu 19 Sep 19, 13:00

COSTA PACIFICA

20:00 Italian

Costa

2977

Fri 20 Sep 19, 11:00

BRILLIANCE OF THE SEAS

20:00 International

Royal Caribbean International

2112

Fri 20 Sep 19, 14:00

HARMONY V

06:00 American

Variety Cruises

Sat 21 Sep 19, 11:00

CELEBRITY REFLECTION

22:00 International

Celebrity Cruises

Mon 23 Sep 19, 08:00

NIEUW STATENDAM

23:00 -

-

Tue 24 Sep 19, 11:00

EXPLORER OF THE SEAS

16:00 International

Royal Caribbean International

Wed 25 Sep 19, 07:00

CELEBRITY CONSTELLATION

17:00 American/Canadian Celebrity Cruise Lines

Thu 26 Sep 19, 00:30

HARMONY V

13:30 American

Variety Cruises

-

50 3046 3114 2034 50


R U N W A Y

Victoria Stadium

3

4

REFERENDUM HOUSE ←→ SOUTH BARRACKS

Market Place loop (Eastbound)

http://www.gibraltarbuscompany.gi

Routes operated by

BOTH WORLDS ←→ ROSIA

Rosia loop (Northbound)

MARKET PLACE ←→ EUROPA POINT

3

Midtown loop (Southbound) Midtown loop (Northbound)

Ocean Village

Glacis Kiosk

WILLIS’s ROAD

MOUNT ALVERNIA ←→ ORANGE BASTION

AIRPORT/FRONTIER ←→ TRAFALGAR

EUROTOWERS ←→ ROSIA

http://citibus.gi

H

Bishop Canilla House

PLACES OF INTEREST

Coach Park

Cable Car

Airport

Lighthouse

Cathedral

Museum

BI

Taxis

Seaport

Castle

Beach

Stadium

Trafalgar Cemetery

QUEENSWAY

King’s Wharf

Queensway Quay

Referendum Gates

MAIN STREET

Commonwealth Park

Mid-Harbour Estate

Europort Building 8

A AN RU CA D OP A SH RO

Edinburgh House

58

10

PRINCE EDWARDS ROAD

Eliott’s Way

48 BOTH WORLDS

ROSIA ROAD

Alameda Governor’s House Meadow House Victoria House

H KS RO AD

BA RR AC

Mount Pleasant

3

New Harbours

Cumberland Jumpers Road Building

South Gates

New Mole House

Garrison Gym

© VK (2018)

ce ur So

Gibraltar Bus Network

rg p.o ma et tre ns pe O :

Rosia Plaza

North Gorge

Eliott’s Battery

March 2019 version : correct at time of going to print

Map of Gibraltar

University of Gibraltar

EUROPA POINT

2

Schematic Diagram of Bus Network (not to scale)

Buena Vista

Mosque

BUS NETWORK

GIBRALTAR

9 ROSIA ROSIA 4

Brympton

EUROPA ROAD

SOUTH BARRACKS

SOUTH PAVILION ROAD

St. Joseph’s School

MOUNT ALVERNIA

Schomberg

SO UT

Shorthorn Farm

7

R e s e r v e

Rock Old Hotel Casino

RED SANDS ROAD

Lower Flat Bastion Rd Wilson’s Gardiner’s Ramp Road

Morello’s Ramp

TRAFALGAR Convent Place

Blackstrap Cove

N a t u r e

FLAT BASTION ROAD

Sacred Heart Church

Flat Bastion Rd

R o c k

Caleta Hotel

RECLAMATION Cathedral ROAD Square

King’s Bastion

Arengo’s Palace

PORT St. Bernard’s EURO Hospital GASA Swimming Pool

ROAD

Varyl Begg Estate

MONTAGU GARDENS

9

British War Memorial

LINE WALL ROAD

BOTH WORLDS ←→ RECLAMATION ROAD

Artillery Arms

WILLIS’s ROAD

MAIN STREET MAIN STREET

Moorish Castle Estate

AIRPORT/FRONTIER ←→ RECLAMATION ROAD

Albert Risso House

Sir William Jackson Grove

Waterport Road

QUEENSWAY

Orange Bastion

Fishmarket Steps

1

William’s Way

U p p e r

SIR HERBERT MILES ROAD

1 2 MARKET PLACE

CASEMATES

Routes operated by

10

9

8

7

5

Notre Dame School

Faulknor House

Constitution House

REFERENDUM HOUSE

WINSTON CHURCHILL AVENUE

Park & Ride

MARKET PLACE ←→ WILLIS’S ROAD

R U N W A Y

2

1

BUS ROUTES

5 10

AIRPORT/ FRONTIER

DEVIL’S TOWER RO AD

St. Theresa’s Church

GLACIS ROAD

Eastern Beach

CORRAL ROAD

WATERPORT ROAD

C A R C A B L E

Catalan Bay

N


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE SEPTEMBER 2019 DAY

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

12.20

EZY1964

12.55

Manchester

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

18:25

BA2663

19:15

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

10:15

BA2663

11:05

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

10.50

EZY2246

11:30

Luton

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:00

Heathrow

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

15.35

EZY8906

16.05

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:35

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:05

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:05

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

18:40

BA2663

19:35

Gatwick

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

20:00

AT991

20:40

Tangier

CHESS PUZZLE ANSWER: 1 Nf4! Wins Material

92

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


information DAY

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:30

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:30

BA2663

21:40

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:45

EZY8902

12:15

Gatwick

BA492

British Aiways

Heathrow

14:20

BA493

15:20

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:20

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

20:00

EZY2246

20:40

Luton

BA2662

British Aiways

Gatwick

20:05

BA2663

20:55

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

09:45

EZY6300

10:15

Bristol

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EAZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Aiways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

20:00

AT991

20:40

Tangier

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:20

BA2663

21:45

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

03 Sept '19 - 09 Sept '19

DUTY PHARMACY OPENING HOURS

10 Sept ‘19 – 16 Sept ‘19

Monday to Friday (7pm to 9pm) Weekends & public holidays (11am to 1pm & 6pm to 8pm)

17 Sept ‘19 –23 Sept ‘19

For updates, check facebook.com/PharmaGuide

24 Sept ‘19 – 30 Sept ‘19

Calpe Pharmacy ICC

Unit C9, ICC  200 77977

Ocean Pharmacy Pharmacy

Unit 2 Ocean Village Avenue   200 76822

Wesley Pharmacy

299b Main Street  200 67567

Family Pharmacy

151 Main Street  200 68861

This schedule is correct at time of print. For up to date details and changes visit www.gibraltarairport.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

93


coffee time CROSSWORD 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

12

11

10

1

2

1

13

15

16

1. Linguini, fettuccini etc (5) 2. Hanging rope (5)

10. Survive (7)

13 14 17 18

7 6

7

19

20

21

13. Paul McCartney song; it won’t recur (9)

23

15. Never shuts (5,4)

7. Attractive (6)

18. Games meeting (eg whist); impel (5)

12. Dry (4) 14. Eastern European sea linked by a narrow strait to the Black Sea (4)

22. Body height; eminence (7)

24

4. Permits (6)

6. Thread; maroon (6)

21. South American desert (7)

22

3. Inhabited land offshore the north east of Scotland (6,7) 5. One of the tribes that argued over boiled eggs in Gulliver’s Travels (6-7)

11 White poplar tree (5)

14

1

1. Adrian Mole’s girlfriend; she caused havoc by opening a box (7) 9. Underwater breathing device (7)

10 11

DOWN

8. A salmon-spear (7)

8

9

ACROSS

15. Thinly spread (6) 16. Language of many middle eastern countries (6)

23. Con (7) 24. Pudding (7)

17. In stages (5) 19. Harden; accustom (5) 20. Expend energy (5)

& YOU COULD WIN

SUDOKU

lunch for two at

2 3

Either SNAP and SEND your completed crossword to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com or RETURN TO THE CLIPPER by 20 th September. August Answers. (Apologies for the error in Guatemala.)

1

9

A

L

2

A

B

3

4

S

I

M N N N

S

T

A G G

E 11

S

1

O Z 12

E

1

E

P

R

15

G U

2

L

A

16

A

I

M P

N X 23

E

A

94

A A

N

S

R N

I

T

L 13

E

T

L

R

I

S

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A

E

U

I

A

C

L

S

E

D

S

I

D

E

11

P

E

I

D V

U

R

G

E

E 22

L

A N 18

6 19

I

L

A G H

T

F

R

E

R

G

R

7

20

L

A

R N

E

A

S

T

T

R Q M C

E

E

R

24

E

N D U

S

8

1

8

6

5

3

3

1

9 9

5

8

Kyle Sivers

4 1

6

7

N G 1

8

4

5

T

N E

THE WINNER IS:

S

14

14

J W V

R O V

I

L

R

S 8

7

E W

V O H O U O 17

A M A

R E

10

B

I

U O M O 21

E

E

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6

H C D

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U

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13

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8

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5

A M A

9

5 4

2

1 7

4

8

9

6 1

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTMEBER 2019


CHESS COLUMN BY

GRANDMASTER RAY KEENE OBE Kramnik Retires

Whether to exchange queens or not here is a critical decision. After 16 ... Qxd2 17 Bxd2 Ne5 18 Bb4 White has good play in the endgame thanks to his bishop pair. 17 Qc1 Nd4 18 Bxd4 Bxd4 19 Rxe7 Ra7 20 Rxa7 Bxa7 21 f4 Qd8 22 Qc3 Bb8 23 Qf3 Qh4 24 e5 g5

This month I pay tribute to one of the greats of the modern game who was successful in three World Championship contests against Garry Kasparov, Peter Leko and Veselin Topalov, retaining the championship from 2000 to 2007. Kramnik was crowned champion when he defeated Kasparov in their match in London 2000. This was a match which I personally organised. One of the key elements in Kramnik’s success was his liking for a big pawn centre, as in this crucial game from the match which first brought him the world championship title. Kramnik-Kasparov; World Championship, London (Game 2) 2000; Grünfeld Defence 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cxd5 Nxd5 5 e4 Nxc3 6 bxc3 Bg7 Kasparov has chosen the Grünfeld Defence, an opening which has performed notably badly at World Championship level. Alekhine had trouble with it against Euwe (1935) and Botvinnik had suffered against Petrosian in 1963. 7 Nf3 c5 8 Be3 Qa5 9 Qd2 Bg4 10 Rb1 a6

Kf6 38 a5 Ra2 39 Rb6+

Kasparov wrongly believed that this liquidation should lead to an easy draw. 25 Re1 Qxf4 26 Qxf4 gxf4 27 e6 fxe6 28 Rxe6 Kg7 29 Rxa6 Rf5 This endgame is very un¬pleasant for Black despite the presence of opposite-coloured bishops which are standardly a significant drawing factor. 30 Be4 Re5 31 f3 Re7 32 a4 Ra7 33 Rb6 Be5 34 Rb4 Rd7 Kasparov had intended 34 ... Bd6 35 Rc4 Rc7 apparently forcing the exchange of rooks. However, he had missed 36 Bc6 which is very strong for White.

39 ... Ke7 A disastrous concluding blunder by the champion which allows White a sudden winning stroke. 40 Bd5 Black resigns

PUZZLE

White to play. This position is from Ward-Ledger, Torquay 2019. White has an extra pawn and activity along the b- and g-files. How did he continue?

35 Kg2 Rd2+ 36 Kh3 h5 37 Rb5

The struggle is between Black’s flank pressure and White’s dominating pawn centre. 11 Rxb7 Bxf3 12 gxf3 Nc6 13 Bc4 0-0 14 0-0 cxd4 15 cxd4 Bxd4 16 Bd5 Bc3 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

Answer on page 92 95


kid's korner THE MAZE Oh no! our puppies have lost their way. Can you help the doggies get to the dog house? Try and find the easiest way to the middle using your finger. Don't get lost on the way!

SENIORS TEA FOR TWO A Little English/B2 Projects initiative to help combat seniors' loneliness

Live M usic

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96

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


little dictionary

plenteous WE'VE HIDDEN A

SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE MAGAZINE...

CAN YOU FIND HIM? send us an email to

monkey@thegibraltarmagazine.com

adjective being more than enough without being excessive

with his location by 20th September

AND YOU COULD WIN A HUNGRY MONKEY VOUCHER!!! Last month's winner:

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The Gibraltar Magazine September 2019  

As summer draws to a sticky close, We thought we’d do away with prose. This month we’re being more diverse, Introducing this issue entirely...

The Gibraltar Magazine September 2019  

As summer draws to a sticky close, We thought we’d do away with prose. This month we’re being more diverse, Introducing this issue entirely...