__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

June 2019 Vol. 24 # 08

DIGITAL NOMADS: WORKING ABROAD SUMMER STYLING: SHORTS BEYOND THE SHIRE: EXPLORING NZ THE EMOTIONAL COST OF CARING

D

ig

t s e

50

AIR POLLUTION IN OUR HOMES

CHAMPIONING CHANGE: EXTINCTION REBELLION

YEARS ON

PLASTIC, GREEN & OVER-BUILDING


Finance available from AMC Credit at 6% interest per annum.

www.capurro.gi

Finance example shown includes ÂŁ10,000 deposit with 60 repayments over 5 years. 6% fixed interest p.a. from AMC Credit.


FILM CAMP A Fi Green Gam es Located

@

Ac tin g dventure lmmakin g Screen & VFX an d Ac tivities

Tarifa, Age

Wakana,

Alm eria

12-17

Jun e 30 th- July 13th July 14 th- July 27th Located

@

Sotogran de Age

International 8-13

July 1st-5th July 8th-12th July 15th-19 th July 22n d-26th

WWW.MADHATTERSFILMCAMP.COM INFO@MADHATTERSFILMCAMP.COM +34 673 50 58 38 / +34 682 15 96 88

Sch ool


from the editor

JUNE ISSUE EDITOR’S NOTE

J

une marks the 50th anniversary of the border closure in 1969 under Franco’s regime. It was a move of untellable consequences to those living either side of the frontier, and one designed to bring Gibraltar to its knees. As ever, Gibraltar proved to be a pillar of strength, holding steadfast at a time of great unrest. This month Peter Schirmer sits down with local historian Tito Vallejo (p. 43), and we bring you a brief history of the Gibraltar/Spain border (p. 33).

SPRING BEING A TOUGH ACT TO FOLLOW, GOD CREATED JUNE.

New Zealand, Aotearoa, Middle-earth or ‘Land of the Long White Cloud’; whatever you call it, this country might just pip others to the post on your travel list. Chris Hedley is bringing you an allyou-need-to-know guide to an island with natural scenery quite literally straight out of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Mára mesta (p. 67)! Ever dreamed of having your very own wine cellar? Andrew Licudi hands out some tips for successful cellaring, whether for professional purposes or simply for the odd convivial dinner (p. 61). To have your own cellar, you first need a home. But it’s not just the younger generation of Gibraltarians who are struggling to get a foothold in the local property market… resident Neanderthals Mr and Mrs Ug are having a tired old time too (p. 52). There’s no doubt that the sober tribe is growing in numbers, with popular social media personalities @soberfishie & @thegaysober paving the way with their encouraging and inspiring Instagram posts about finding health and happiness after alcohol. Jasmin Griffiths is urging us to slip the binding manacles of booze, prompting JOMO (Joy of Missing Out) in lieu of the all-to-familar FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) as she strives for sobriety (p. 57). Finally, a big thank you to all of you who have taken Gib Mag on holiday with you (p. 74) – we’ve loved your photos! You have until June 30th to be in the running for cocktails for 2 at Paradise Tiki Bar, and a week of meals at Supernatural. Simply take a photo of you holding your copy as far away from Gibraltar as you can get, and send to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com. Happy snapping!

4

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


(C) IMAGE COURTESY OF THE GIBRALTAR GARRISON LIBRARY CHRONICLE ARCHIVE.


EDITOR: Sophie Clifton-Tucker editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com

27

DESIGN: Justin Bautista design@thegibraltarmagazine.com REPORTER: Victoria Locke SALES: Advertising Team sales@thegibraltarmagazine.com

36

DISTRIBUTION: DHL martin@matrix.gi ACCOUNTS: Paul Cox paul@thegibraltarmagazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Mark Montegriffo Eran and Ayelet Mamo Shay Sophie Clifton-Tucker Julia Coelho Jasmin Griffiths Andrew Licudi Chris Hedley Resham Khiani Elena Scialtiel Lewis Stagnetto Peter Schirmer Jess Leaper

67

Marilis Azzopardi Richard Cartwright Claire Spencer Jorge v.Rein Parlade

facebook.com/gibmag/ twitter.com/gibmag instagram.com/thegibraltarmagazine/ The Gibraltar Magazine is published monthly by Rock Publishing Ltd Portland House, Glacis Road, Gibraltar, PO Box 1114 T: (+350) 20077748 E: editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com Š 2019 Rock Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written consent of The Gibraltar Magazine. www.TheGibraltarMagazine.com Magazine & website archived by the British Library 6

76 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


46 80 content

39

8 Hello There: What is your summer anthem? 9

rab Hermit C

What’s on?

10 News 16 Around Town

BUSINESS 19 Digital Nomads 21 Championing Change: Extinction Rebellion

30 85 21

22 The Day the Roads Stood Still

LIFE

57 Friends in High Places: Going sober

27 Dancing Across the Med

61 Your Own Wine Collection

30 The Essence of Father’s Day

64 The Emotional Cost of Caring

33 Drawing Lines – The history of the border

67 Beyond the Shire: Exploring NZ

34 Air Pollution in Our Homes

76 Summer Styling: Shorts

36 Rhizostoma luteum Sightings 39 A Zookeeper’s Diary – Fashion show 43 50 Years On: Anniversary of the border closure 46 Plastic, Green, and Over-building

SCENE 49 In a Jam: At the Royal Calpe 52 Mr & Mrs Ug: Home sweet cave 54 Short Story: The German Colonel and the Jagdterrier

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

LEISURE

REGULARS 80 Recipes: Funky Vegan Potato Salad & Dairy Free Ice Cream 83 Guides and Information 85 #GibsGems 86 Olympus: Seagull setbacks and humans health 90 Clubs and Societies 91 Schedules 95 Coffee Time 97 Kid's Korner

7


hello there

WHAT IS YOUR SUMMER ANTHEM?

Kookie, 5, Office Diva at Music Box Gibraltar A song from the movie ‘Beverly Hills Chihuahua’. It’s a song I very much identify with, being 'tiny but mighty'. It gives me positive vibes and makes want to run and bark around the office.

Nikita Shemyakin, 25, Dylan Ferro, 42, Head of Production at Music Box Gibraltar. ‘Could you be loved’ by Bob Marley. Reggae music always reminds me of the beach and Bob Marley has always been the master of this genre! This song in particular always puts a smile on my face, every single time I hear it.

Accountant at Music Box Gibraltar. ‘Summer in the City’ by The Lovin' Spoonful (1966). What I love about this classic pop rock hit is how full of energy it is. I would describe it as sounding rough and conveying a powerful motion. It sounds like the noon of a searing hot day in a centre of a bustling megapolis. The composition is excited, anxious and intense - to me, it’s the perfect summer tune.

Caroline Byrne, 40, Marketing & Sales Executive at Music Box Gibraltar. I have two favourites amongst others ‘Baby I Love Your Way’ by Big Mountain and ‘I’ll be missing you’ by Puff Daddy feat. Faith Evans. These two songs bring so many wonderful memories of two super fun summers for me. It’s amazing how music can trigger your memories and make you relive them all over again. Love the nineties and its music! 8

Karin Soiref, 24, Programme & Music Editor at Music Box Gibraltar. Calvin Harris, Rag ‘n’ Bone Man – ‘Giant’. First of all, I am a big fan of Rag ‘n’ Bone Man in general and in this song specifically. I love the lyrics and message it represents. The beat is very groovy too. It is very hard to sit still in the office when this song is playing!

Anjette Jones, 49, In-house Lawyer at Music Box Gibraltar. ‘Waterfalls’ by TLC. It reminds me of my first summer with my first born. We played the whole of TLC’s album throughout the summer, and Waterfalls was our all-time favourite.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MAY 2019


what's on WHAT'S ON? JUNE 2019 SATURDAY 1ST JUNE CHAMP Present The Mind Kind Event Commonwealth Park, 12 noon Featuring Sensory Play Art Activities, Positive Parenting, Drama Workshops and more For further information please contact Health.Promotion@GHA.gi Re-enactment Society History Alive Parade Main Street to Casemates Square, 12 noon Art Dance 2019 John Mackintosh Square, 8:30pm - 10:30pm For further information please contact gibraltar.artdance@gmail. com. St Andrews Craft & Collectors Fair Governors Parade, 10:00am - 2:00pm Enttrance £1 Miss Gibraltar 2019 Special Olympics Hall, 9pm Organised by YDS 7th Local 4x4 Charity Event Catalan Bay Area, 12.30pm Organised by Maroc Atlas Gib 4x4 Club. For further information please contact alfred4x4@gmail.com or visit www.macrocatlasgib4x4.ning.com GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

SATURDAY 8TH JUNE

TUESDAY 18TH JUNE

Book Crossing Day

Llanito Comedy

Cathedral St Mary the Crowned, 10am - 2pm For further information please contact telephone 20052126 or email: finearts@gibtelecom.net Re-enactment Society History Alive Parade Main Street to Casemates Square, 12 noon

Ince’s Hall Theatre, 6.30pm Tickets priced at £15 for adults and £10 for children For more information and ticket sales please contact Giselle Baker on mobile: 54035401 WEDNESDAY 19TH JUNE AND SATURDAY 13TH JULY

Peak Classic Bodybuilding-Fitness Deadlift Competition

Our Sporting Heroes: Gibraltar NatWest International Island Games Major Exhibition

The John Mackintosh Hall, 6.30pm - 10pm

10.30am to 6.30pm

For further information please contact Peak Gym on email: peakgymgib@gmail.com WEDNESDAY 12THJUNE Gibraltar Productions Street Party John Mackintosh Square and Irish Town, 5.30pm - 10.30pm For more information contact Jose Luis Martinez on telephone 20068894 THURSDAY 13TH JUNE Gibraltar World Music Festival 2019 Out of Chaos Concert St Michael's Cave, 8pm - 10.30pm For further information and ticket sales please contact telephone 20068999

Gustavo Bacarisas Gallery, *Saturday 10.30am to 1.30pm For further information please telephone 20067236 or email: info@ culture.gi THURSDAY 20TH JUNE Jason Manford Muddle Class Tour 2019 St Michael’s Cave, 7.30pm For further information and ticket sales please visit: www.buytickets.gi A Celebration of Opera The Convent Ballroom, 8pm For further information please telephone 20072134 or visit www. philharmonic.gi

SATURDAY 15TH JUNE

‘Go Wild for fashion’ Fundraiser in aid of the AWCP

Re-enactment Society History Alive Parade

Dusk Nightclub, Ocean Village, 8pm

Main Street to Casemates Square, 12 noon

For further information contact drinks@dusk.gi 9


news CLUBHOUSE GIBRALTAR – HIGHLY COMMENDED Clubhouse offers individuals who live with, or have suffered from, mental health difficulties with wide-ranging support, from assisting them in every day needs to offering oneto-one support from one of their qualified mental health professionals. Support in employment, health, education and housing matters is also offered, as well as a wide range of programmes to encourage a work-ordered day and social integration. Clubhouse’s aim is for people who live with a mental health illness to participate in their own recovery process by working and socialising together in a safe and nurturing environment. Clubhouse is a non-profit organisation and relies on grants, donations and fund raising.

NEW LNG TERMINAL PROVIDES CLEANER ENERGY FOR GIBRALTAR Gibraltar last month saw the official opening of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification terminal that was recently completed by Shell and Gasnor (a 100% Shell-owned subsidiary). As a result, Gibraltar is switching from diesel-fuelled power generation to cleaner-burning natural gas, using a newly commissioned 80-megawatt gas-fired power plant.

The Hon. Fabian Picardo, Gibraltar’s Chief Minister, said: “I am immensely proud that, under this government, we have made the crucial switch to cleaner power generation. Instead of using old technology up on the skyline of the Rock, we can now look forward to at least 20 years of clean, safe, gas-fired power generation from the port. This is a wonderful step-change in technology.”

Powering Gibraltar’s homes and businesses with this reliable and cleaner energy is a hugely important step towards reducing emissions and it delivers on Her Majesty’s Government of Gibraltar’s aim of reducing carbon dioxide emissions and improving air quality around the Rock of Gibraltar.

To coincide with Mental Health Week 2019, Clubhouse hosted their Annual General Meeting last month at the John Mackintosh Hall. The allocation of new premises at the Gladys Perez Centre in Main Street signifies an important milestone for Clubhouse Gibraltar. It is expected that the new premises will provide an excellent therapeutic environment. The ongoing works at the Gladys Perez Centre are expected to be completed by 30th September of 2019.

10

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


news NATIONAL CELEBRATIONS GIBRALTAR FAIR 23RD AUGUST TO 31ST AUGUST 2019

the participation of the artists. Applications must include a detailed breakdown of accounts. Entrance to the pavilion must be free of charge. The relevant sets of conditions and charges are available from the Gibraltar Cultural Services

Events Department, at 308 Main Street on telephone 200 75669 or e-mail: info@culture.gi. Applications should reach GCS the by no later than Friday 7th June 2019.

The SDGG is inviting applications from Registered Charities, Clubs, Associations and commercial entities, who may be interested in setting up a stall, run a small catering stall or a bar facility at this year’s fair. In addition, the SDGG invites applications for the running of the Family Pavilion. Applications must include a detailed programme of entertainment to be provided, with signed confirmation of

50 wines by the glass 40 small dishes of Mediterranean cuisine 30 John Mackintosh Square GX11 1AA Gibraltar. Tel: 200 70201 info@vinopolisgastrobar.gi www.vinopolisgastrobar.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

11


news SCHOOL COUNSELLING SERVICE Last month a group of 52 educators from the Department of Education (DoE), including teachers and Education Psychologists, as well as Counsellors from The Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB), attended a training and feedback session organised by the Ministry of Education and coordinated by Jackie Linares and Wayne Barton. The session, which was delivered at the University of Gibraltar, focused on the specific role of the School Counsellor and future interactions with internal and external agencies. Ms Giselle Carreras, as the current Head of Psychology and Therapeutic Services in the Care Agency, was able to effectively convey her significant experience for the benefit of those educators who it is envisaged will work closely with School Counsellors. These include Heads of Year/Year Coordinators, Deputy and Head Teachers, Behaviour Education Services Team (BEST) and Special Education Needs Coordinators (SENCo). The Department of Education will continue to work closely through their Positive Mental Health Steering Groups with key stakeholders for the benefit of children’s and young adults’ positive mental health, social and emotional wellbeing.

12

MINISTRY OF EQUALITY ANNOUNCES STREET ART COMPETITION The purpose of this competition, with the theme ‘Inspiring Women’ and which forms part of the Ministry of Equality’s Gender Equality Strategy, is to raise the profile and visibility of women, who are traditionally underrepresented in many sectors of society, and to raise awareness of their role. The chosen theme is purposefully broad. The aim is for entries

PROPHECY OF MAGIC During the last six months Therese Caruana has been working with 33 other authors to create The Prophecy of Magic box set, a project she says has been hard work but lots of fun. Therese’s installment in this box set is The Necromancer from the North: “Blood Moon, black dragon and six simple lessons. Can Zora stop the sorcerer’s curse? During the Rite of Familiar ritual, under the decennial Blood Moon Eve, Zora is lined up on stage to connect with her spirit guide. She prays that she will receive a rare animal familiar, which will give her access to advanced magical abilities, but soon wishes that she could revoke her prayers when she sees the fear in her godly mother’s, never before, panicked face.

to depict a particular woman or women, with a Gibraltar connection, who through their endeavours and accomplishments have inspired and will continue to inspire others in the future. The art design can feature a more generic representation of a woman or women, but the ultimate purpose will be to inspire women. The winning entry will be selected by a panel from the Ministry of Equality and will feature on a mural in Gibraltar. A mural painting, as a permanent visual depiction and in the context of this competition, will provide a powerful and constant reminder of shared cultural values in Gibraltar. The familiar that bonds with Zora brings about an ancient magical prophecy of a Dragon King who cursed the world to end after his queen had stolen his four heir eggs. Three, the queen hid, but one was lost to the underworld and prophesied to rise to Earth as the most powerful sorcerer to ever walk the world. But the prophecy also tells of an irresistible love, who would be the only one able to bind the evil sorcerer’s powers by a kiss of deceit.” Visit tmcaruana.com for more information. Box set available via Apple, Nook and Kobo.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


news LAUNCH OF SOLAR PV INSTALLATION AT NEW HARBOURS The Government last month presented the deployment of a solar photo-voltaic (PV) at New Harbours, as part of a scheme to produce over 3 megawatts of clean ‘renewable’ power. This scheme will also include the installation of solar PV at the Gibraltar Airport, Europa Business Centre and Mid Harbours Estate. This will amount to approximately 10% of Gibraltar’s average power consumption. Already the existing plant, operated by EUFON, under a power-purchase agreement with the Gibraltar Electricity Authority, is generating up to 700800kwh, or 2.5% of the average production. This scheme is in addition to

MARIBEL MATTHEWS AT THE CANNES BIENNALE 2019 Local artist Maribel Matthews was last month selected by curator Heinz Playner to exhibit at the Art Cannes Biennale, during the Cannes Film Festival. Basing her art on the effects of climate change, Maribel painted a series of works which depict cyclones, hurricanes , storms, changes in the seasons and other natural disasters brought about GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

the solar tender launched last year, the first phase of which will be rolled out in the coming months. These projects are important steps in shifting to cleaner and renewable power generation for Gibraltar, reducing carbon emissions and our reliance on fossil fuels. Speaking at the presentation, Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change, John Cortes said, “I am extremely pleased to be able to announce this just days after Parliament unanimously declared a Climate Emergency. While the amount is still low, it is a huge step forward considering that the past administration had no intention whatsoever of moving to renewable energy in any way. We can now say that already the equivalent of nearly 350

houses daily are powered by renewable energy in Gibraltar, and we are avoiding emission of up to 3,300kg of Carbon dioxide per day. It shows that the target of 20% renewable by 2020 is achievable, and we will aim for more. Coupled with the opening of the new LNG plant this Monday, just 3 days after the Parliament declaration, it shows the Government’s commitment that the fight against Climate Change will be very much more than just words.”

by the disrespect man has shown towards our beautiful planet.

make it even more successful.”

Maribel admits: “I like many people in the world today have become very concerned about climate change, and about what we humans are doing to our planet.

Maribel will be exhibiting other works this year in Milan at the Espacio Tadisi and Paris at the Louvre Carousel.

At the Vernissage each artist spoke about their work. The whole event was amazing and very well attended and I met many interesting people. I was very fortunate to be selected from several thousand entries. Of course, the ambience created by the Film Festival has helped to

13


news ANNUAL OPEN-AIR PAINTING / SKETCHING COMPETITION The Gibraltar Heritage Trust held its annual open-air painting/ sketching competition on Saturday 11th May. The theme this year is “A View of the Rock” from the area of Coaling Island and the Small Boats Marina. Views and vistas are an important part of our heritage, to maintain lines of sight to our historical upper town and buildings of historical interest, and of course the Rock itself. This year’s competition is the 30th anniversary of the event which has seen participation over the years from a wide cross section of Gibraltar’s artists – amateurs to professional. The event is open to everyone, at any age. This year, familiar faces returned to The Trust, including last year’s prize winners to defend their titles.

SOLAR FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT Towards the end of 2018, HM Government of Gibraltar launched the Sale of Power Tender, for electricity generated via solar Photo Voltaic (PV) technology, in collaboration with the Gibraltar Electricity Authority, as part of its commitment to increase renewable energy production and reduce carbon emissions. Three companies were successful in their bids and now form part of the Government solar framework agreement, as part of the Government’s phased roll out of rooftop PV systems under power purchase agreements (PPAs). The first competition will take place in May, in which Framework Contractors will have

the opportunity to bid for the installation of solar PV, including their design, installation, operation and maintenance at various sites. The sites in this first phase will include the Cruise Liner Terminal, the University of Gibraltar, Ocean Views and Hillside, Grand Casemates Block and Mount Alvernia. The production capacity of each site will be determined by the configuration of systems proposed but it is estimated to be over 700 kW for Phase I. Taken together, these could produce a total of 3.5MW, approximately 10% of Gibraltar’s current energy needs. Subsequent competitions will follow in due course as PV systems are rolled out. This scheme has come as part of HM Government of Gibraltar’s shift to cleaner power and achieving greater self-sufficiency, and is an important step in fighting the climate crisis.

The art work will be on display at the GEMA Art Gallery from Friday 24th May until the 7th June.

14

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


news COMBATING GIBRALTAR’S DRUG PROBLEM HM Government of Gibraltar is to launch a major initiative aimed at combatting Gibraltar’s drug problem. Steered by a dedicated Drug Strategy Team, this will include aspects of law enforcement, prevention, treatment and harm reduction.

NEW PARK IN HEART OF TOWN HM Government of Gibraltar is delighted to announce plans to create a new park in the area between the MidTown Development and the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre. The park will be similar in style to the hugely popular Commonwealth Park, which it will link to via the Leisure Centre and along Queensway. There will

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

The initiative will begin with a comprehensive analysis of the current scale of the problem, making use of data from a Drug Strategy Household Survey and from a drug/lifestyle survey currently being carried out in Gibraltar’s schools. These two surveys will enable the Strategy Team to identify trends and patterns, to identify priority issues and to develop and evaluate effective policy and programmes. In addition, a new website will

become a reference point for all drug-related issues.

be large grass areas as well as an open paved area, which will be available for use for projections, performances and other events.

pedestrian flow between the new park, the Leisure Centre and Commonwealth Park.

The project will see the planting of 80 new mature trees, which will provide a shaded canopy and a new carbon sink for Gibraltar. It will also incorporate a natural children’s play area featuring wood structures in keeping with the environmental aims of the space. The junction linking Queensway and Reclamation road will be moved north along the edge of MidTown, allowing for a seamless

The residential facility at Bruce’s Farm will be refurbished in order to expand its range of services and a new, ground-breaking community-based programme will provide an extensive outreach, referral and aftercare service. Two Therapeutic Drug Councillors will be employed, one at Bruce’s Farm and one based in the community programme.

The Cross of Sacrifice will be moved from its current location on Winston Churchill Avenue to become a landmark feature of the new park. Its new location next to the British War Memorial will provide a new place for remembrance in a green area at the heart of town, and will provide the opportunity to conduct the annual Remembrance Day service in an open public space with minimum disruption to traffic.

15


around town

© John M Piris May Day Celebrations in Grand Casemates Square.

© Mark Galliano Photography May Day Celebrations in Grand Casemates Square.

16

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


around town

James Foot Exhibition James Foot once again demonstrates his uncanny ability to play with shadows, light and reflections in his latest exhibition.

"I've gone very bright and colourful this time. Full of life. I've got my mojo back!" - James Foot

We couldn't agree more!

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

17


ADVANCE YOUR CAREER Take your career to the next level with a part-time undergraduate, postgraduate or professional course at the University of Gibraltar.

Find out more unigib.edu.gi

OPEN DAY 5th JUNE


business DIGITAL NOMADS

BY

…and how Gibraltar can help them.

C

lose your eyes for a moment and imagine a work area. Perhaps you saw a room divided into cubicles, an open plan space, maybe a co-working office. Or perhaps – if you plan on joining the growing global ranks of digital nomads – you saw a tropical paradise and a laptop. Digital Nomads are professionals who choose to work in locationindependent roles and explore the world at the same time, rather than permanently basing themselves in one location. They spend at least a few months of the year abroad, change their destinations frequently (usually every few weeks but can stay up to 6 months), and earn a living GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

while working online. Low-cost destinations such as South-East Asia and South America are highly popular amongst digital nomads who can continue to earn ‘Western’ salary levels whilst enjoying much lower costs of living. Indeed, a recent survey by U.S based FlexJobs agency found that 18% of these digital nomad professionals reported making more than $100,000 per year, while 22% make between $50,000 and $99,999 (compared to the average US worker who earns roughly $46,600 per year). Some 38% of respondents said they

feel less financially stressed as a digital nomad, while 34% said they experience no difference in stress from when they worked a traditional job, according to the report.

҇҇ A GROWING TREND

One thing that unites digital nomads as their name implies, is their reliance on technology. They can work when and where they want thanks to the internet and a proliferation of cloud-based tools. Their toolbox may include online and video chat services, content creation tools, cloud-based storage and online services such as Airbnb and

They can work when and where they want.

19


business Google’s ITA Matrix flight-finding program. The growth of supportive services, such as coworking spaces, online talent marketplaces and job sites, digital nomad tour services and online information sites such as Nomad List, which offers data including the cost of living in various locales, along with abundance of low-cost airlines, have helped the trend grow. And the trend shows no signs of slowing down, with more people valuing their lifestyle and companies offering increased flexibility to attract and retain workers. Aging Baby Boomers will continue to ‘unretire’ and work past the traditional retirement age. Millennials will continue to flock to this lifestyle, inspired by the opportunity to pursue their travel interests while working. And older Gen Xs are reaching the stage where traveling while working is becoming more viable. Moreover, the future looks bright: 5G appears to be just around the corner and with virtual reality applications like Facebook Spaces entering the market, we may even see 3D versions of our bosses out on the beach in Thailand with us.

҇҇ THE CHALLENGES

The 9-to-5 work week is still a staple, and convincing a manager that you are doing your work when you are 5000 kilometres away is near enough impossible in most cases. Therefore, for the most part, digital nomads start out as freelancers working in positions that companies are more comfortable to outsource. But even they have obstacles to overcome: Time zones: sales calls, catch 20

ups and general meetings mostly have to be conducted during the normal 9-5 work day, regardless of where the independentlylocated worker is. When that’s San Francisco to Melbourne the nomad will have to be creative with their sleep schedule. Proof of work: digital nomad jobs tend to be results-oriented, rather than measured on timespent in an office. While most managers are fine with this, it can be difficult for digital nomads to establish themselves as reliable and trustworthy resources for a company. Providing portfolios of work, references and testimonials often help in the sales stage. Finding clients: Digital nomads, being remote, are not forced to dip into a geographicallylimited client pool. However, they do need to have strategies to source clients – whether that be on platforms like Upwork, where they will have to compete with thousands of other skilled workers, or through Facebook jobs boards like Social Media Jobs. Using technology and tools: Every company is different and expects its staff to work using specific systems, whether they are remote or office-based. Once this hurdle is jumped, digital nomads have to find platforms that work for their own workflows. Where to work: While working from the beach sounds appealing, sun flare on a laptop screen is blinding and sand gets everywhere. Most digital nomads opt to work in co-working spaces or airconditioned cafés with good WiFi.

Where to live: Now, this is tricky for travelling workers. While hotels are convenient, budgets don’t often stretch to 365 days of hotel accommodation. And hostels don’t always provide the comfort, security or amenities needed for a professional. There is a new trend – co-living – which is meeting digital nomads in the middle. RESIDENCY FOR ҇DIGITAL ҇ GIBRALTAR NOMADS A common challenge faced by digital nomads is disconnecting their tax residency from their home country. Tax authorities often continue and demand payment on income generated while working abroad. Gibraltar, which has a territorial tax regime and taxes companies and people on the basis of income accrued and derived from Gibraltar, could potentially be a favourable jurisdiction for some of those digital nomads, who would establish tax residency in Gibraltar, yet continue to work and travel around the world. For this to flourish, local banks and Government departments need to embrace this growing trend of digital nomads

ERAN SHAY, Managing Director & AYELET MAMO SHAY, Business Development Director of Benefit Business Solutions Ltd. (+350) 200 73669 general@benefitgibraltar.com GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


CHAMPIONING CHANGE: EXTINCTION REBELLION

The past few months have brought a stunning level of momentum to advocates for systemic change in the face of the dangers of climate change. From the Green New Deal to the School Strikes that even reached Gibraltar, a cross-generational global movement has taken to the streets to protest. One of the most prominent groups is Extinction Rebellion, who has a strong presence in the UK and has been occupying parts of London throughout April.

BY MARK MONTEGRIFFO

M

ark speaks to Aimee Gabay, a Gibraltarian studying journalism in London, who spends an admirable amount of her days in the city demanding change. gave you the ҇thought ҇ Whatoffirst becoming an organiser?

AG: When I first started protesting with Extinction Rebellion, I never intended to organise or lead. I just turned up on the first day ready to block some roads and found GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

myself coordinating the group at Elephant and Castle the following day. The police were hassling the original coordinator because of his bail conditions and were threatening to arrest him if he didn’t leave the area. It was only the first day in a series of nonviolent actions so he didn’t really want to get pinched so early on in the week’s escalations. He got everyone together and asked me if I was happy to coordinate and picked out another young boy to do the opposite road. Since then I’ve always put myself forward to be as involved as possible.

is the key challenge, ҇but ҇ Climate how do other values like feminism or workers’ rights fit into your worldview?

The way I see it is that climate change cannot be seen solely through the lens of greenhouse gas emissions and a warming planet; it’s the inevitable result of a broken system. In order to fully address climate change, we need to dismantle the interlocking oppressive systems that exist today - the same systems that oppress women and disregard worker’s rights - so we can 21


politics achieve true climate justice and a more equal society. Gibraltar performs poorly ҇on҇ female representation and a

number of other areas of gender equality; how do we change this in a place where politics is dominated by male lawyers?

of The Uninhabitable Earth. He shared his sobering and terrifying vision of the unfolding 21st century to a crowd of 600 people. Overwhelmed by startling depictions of climate catastrophe - from heat deaths to conflagration and mass migration on a scale one hundred times greater than the Syrian refugee crisis today - one audience member stood up and asked David if he was supposed to cancel his flight to Ethiopia the following morning. It was a legitimate question, one that made me wonder whether the recent influx of climate uprisings may have failed to highlight the importance of individual accountability. For David, solutions through politics and direct activism are more important. He is not wrong, direct action is arguably more effective for targeting the issue on a transformative scale. However, I feel there is something very dangerous about ignoring an arena of lifestyle changes that have been scientifically proven to make an impact too. It’s a confusing one. System change is the only viable option to actually meet the targets that will keep us below 1.5 degree warming but individual change isn’t unimportant. Cutting meat will punch a hole in the market and ultimately hurt the economy and nowadays that’s the only thing that makes politicians wince - the economy.

Climate change cannot be seen solely through the lens of greenhouse gas emissions and a warming planet.

Unfortunately, male domination in politics today is largely due to that same broken system I mentioned earlier. One thing I propose is making politics more accessible, not because women find it any harder than men to involve themselves in debate, but because the (also) broken school system taught us nothing about politics at all. Then we are expected to leave school and make responsible decisions all on our own about something as detrimental to our future as Brexit but with no knowledge about the political system whatsoever. It’s really just not an appealing avenue unless you’re really passionate about it. a more ҇representative ҇ Do you thinkpolitics might result in a proactive green agenda? Absolutely. do you say to ҇the ҇ What people who stress the

importance of individual change over wider collective change? This is a topic I’ve been grappling with a lot recently. Earlier this month I attended a talk by David Wallace-Wells, an American journalist and author

22

March? Honestly, I have never felt prouder to be a Gibraltarian. Some might see Gibraltar as too small to make an impact, but I believe even a tiny rock can make massive ripples. you come across climate ҇deniers ҇ Haveand how have you dealt with them?

I haven’t come across any deniers, but I’ve come across people who know of climate change and blatantly don’t care. I don’t know what’s worse. It’s quite frustrating but the best way to deal with it is to not come across as some radical vegan alarmist. Usually, prompting them to ask the questions and setting the facts straight without coming across as someone who’s trying to change their opinion is the best method. People hate being patronised or looked down on. It’s not a lecture, it’s a conversation. you give me three book ҇titles ҇ Canthat have helped form your values?

You can’t make me choose three books only - that's criminal. Let’s narrow it down to the last three months maybe: Firstly, Other Minds: The Octopus and the evolution of Intelligent Life by Peter Godfrey-Smith incredibly fascinating, not only because of the explanation of how single-celled creatures led to us but also because of his exploration into consciousness and the similarities we share with cephalopods. Second would be Noam Chomsky’s Global

Even a tiny rock can make massive ripples.

you make of the ҇Gibraltar ҇ What did climate strike in

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


politics

Discontents - I’ve ready four of his books this year already. You don’t have to agree with absolutely everything he says but you can’t deny his breadth of knowledge and understanding about the world. Lastly, I’d go for Naomi Klein’s No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need. She made me hate capitalism and I feel like I understand the world better now (also, I recommend her book “This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate”).

keep with the theme of ҇three ҇ To then, can you recall three journalists that inspired you to study journalism?

Naomi Klein, George Monbiot and maybe Jason Hickel. However, since we’re on the topic of journalists and the media, I would like to point out that today’s major news outlets are severely failing us. Vested interests, the media being run by big business and their inability to report on the severity of the climate situation means people are truly unaware the

People hate being patronised or looked down on. It’s not a lecture, it’s a conversation.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

crisis that surrounds them. I've recently been more into the less mainstream, more investigative, small outlets like Byline Times, Open Democracy, The New Republic, Common Dreams, Democracy Now and Truthout - highly recommend them all for good journalism! please give us a little ҇message ҇ Can you of hope? My message of hope comes from Extinction Rebellion - these people give me so much hope and I’m so empowered by each and every one.

23


THE DAY THE ROADS STOOD STILL

What does a future with Artificial Intelligence (AI) look like? And can Gibraltar benefit from it? Local software developer Christopher Harris has come up with a tool that uses your mobile phone’s camera to erase traffic in real-time, and replace it with the natural scene it obscures…

BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER IS YOUR PROGRAM ҇ALL ҇ WHAT ABOUT? This software is part of a series of artistic projects to imagine and facilitate improved realities. The program uses a couple of machine learning techniques to identify vehicles and then to paint in what it thinks is likely to be behind them, frame by frame, effectively removing vehicles from video footage.

҇CREATE ҇ WHATIT?PROMPTED YOU TO 24

The idea for this project came from walking down Devils Tower Road - which often coincides with an uncomfortable assault of construction dust blown into Gibraltar across that huge dirt mound and an oppressive cacophony of lorries and cars. I started imagining what an environment better suited to human living would be like: an urban environment that is greener and more pedestrian. There are many initiatives across other countries towards this shared vision and I think Gib could really

benefit from it too. ARE YOUR PLANS ҇FOR ҇ WHAT FUTURE DEVELOPMENT, IF ANY?

Future development originally included an augmented reality app to allow anyone to see this vision in real time. Following the unexpected success and reach of the original video snippet though, I feel the message has already been received. I would still like to exhibit this somewhere in a highresolution, real-time display of a busy pedestrian/vehicle area, but GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


business that would require performance enhancements of the original software and expensive hardware. EFFECT DO ҇YOU ҇ WHAT THINK THIS TYPE OF

TECHNOLOGY COULD HAVE ON HIGH-TRAFFIC AREAS SUCH AS GIBRALTAR?

Local developer Chris Harris

This technology as it is stands, is only as an imagination of what a better future might be like. It's up to our own policy decisions and community action to reclaim our urban spaces for better quality living. WHAT OTHER WAYS ҇DO ҇ INYOU FORESEE AI TAKING MORE PROMINENT ROLES WITHIN OUR SOCIETY?

On the topic of AI in general and its role in our society, it’s a tool like any other, with the potential for positive and negative use. ISSUES COULD ҇POTENTIALLY ҇ AND WHATARISE FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SUCH ROLES?

The potential issues around AI often come more out of technology-oriented solutionism, rather than intentional misuse. Machine learning techniques often rely on huge amounts of humanproduced training data and heuristics. As we humans are still affected by a large amount of cognitive biases including cultural and gender stereotypes, the information we produce often suffers from the same. This results in AI algorithms inheriting the biases of our human majority if we're not careful to manage the information we train

these systems on. We can also often be too quick to look for technological solutions to human problems, in a way that potentially negates the positive aspects of our human experience. Some big companies invested in AI technologies are starting to become aware of these issues and are increasingly respectful of the human in the human-computerinteraction communicating to the human user things like the confidence of the AI prediction, the program's specific limitations, offering manual overrides and alternative suggestions. The worst experience is a 'computer says no' without any explanation or alternative. (See Google's PAIR: People+AI Research.)

"I think Gib could really benefit from it."

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Unfortunately, the default from

many AI-driven experiences today still treat us more like a servant rather than a master, from the suggested products of Amazon, to the echo chambers of Facebook. WHAT ELSE DO YOU HAVE ҇IN҇ THE PIPELINE? I'm working on a few different projects that hope to imagine and facilitate more positive experiences, including apps to encourage moments of shared human attention (as opposed to the isolation of social media consumerism), technology to better care for our climate, apps to encourage personal development, and art focused on all aspects of the human experience. Aside from these personal projects and collaborations, I'm starting a creative studio offering existing businesses AI development skills towards socially positive solutions.

25


life

Have you applied for Hassan Centenary Terraces? Come and speak to one of our experienced advisers. Contact us to arrange an informal no-obligation meeting.

CASTIEL WINSER www.castielwinser.com T: 200 77723 26

info@castielwinser.com

14,000+ clients, established since 1985

Castiel Winser. Trust. Earned.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019 Licenced by the Financial Services Commission No. F.S.C 00022B March 2019


ACROSS THE MED

life

DANCING

Anthony Loddo the Third, ‘Ant’ to his friends, formerly known as Miss Cinnamon (more on this later), has landed a six-month contract as a dancer in the Cyprus hotel circuit. He will be based in Paphos until the end of October, touring with a company that stages a jazzy show based on the ‘Greatest Showman’ soundtrack and a medley of timeless musicals.

BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

“A

fter many years away from Gibraltar, I returned home in 2018, and tried to save some money to attend auditions in the UK, for the flights and for B&B accommodation when I couldn’t just ‘crash’ at friends’ or relatives’,” Anthony says. “Auditions are advertised on social media and specialised websites, and this one particularly attracted me, but I didn’t have the money or the time to attend it in person, so I just submitted a video demo of my dance routines, without letting my hopes too high. But the producers were actually impressed by it and I got the call back. I attended it. And GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

got the part.” At just 25, he has an impressive curriculum featuring varied experience both stylistically and geographically, having been performing in the UK, Disneyland Paris, Barcelona and the Canary Islands. He discovered his passion for dancing, acting and singing in 2012, when he had just started university, and auditions were advertised for the Olympics closing ceremony. “I knew it was a long shot but I told myself ‘why not?’ and went for it. After being part of a show watched by some 80,000 people in the arena and an estimated

three billion worldwide, I realised this was my call and career.” He continues: “There were thousands of people auditioning for that gig and I got through! Rehearsals were kept hush-hush, and groups were colour-coded and venues marked with geometrical shapes, which added to the excitement. “I appeared in the section where we danced with Fat Boy Slim and Jessie J; it was a twelveminute non-stop routine to keep the adrenaline pumping. It was televised and BBC actually zoomed in on my face a couple of times!” Anthony acknowledges that this was a stroke of luck, but the road 27


life your headshot, which was the initial criterion for pre-selection! I got selected for the second round, together with two male friends, while the girls were rejected just because they didn’t match the exotic looks that producers had in mind for the female lead. I got interviewed, but didn’t go any further. Yet, I value the experience.” A temporary setback in a glitzy career that went on with being part of a Take That tribute act in Barcelona and Girona: “I sang and danced as Mark Owen, the short one, which fits my physicality. Many times, being successful for a part depends on how you look before how you sing, dance or act, if producers have a certain type in mind.” to showbiz is long and winding, and mostly proceeding at an ants’ pace for being jammed with lengthy lines - not to learn, but to stand behind! And there are countless no’s before the so much awaited life-changing yes. He recalls how he and some friends attended auditions for the next fresh face to star in the latest instalment of a blockbuster franchise: “We were studying at the Blackpool Performing Arts College, so we got up at 4am to catch the first train to Manchester, where the auditions were held, and by the time we got there, after a 90-minute ride, the queue was already about a kilometre long. All this just to hand in your CV and

She struck me though: how you can wear a wig and make-up and look at yourself in the mirror to wonder who that person really is, bringing her to life at your whim, being as cheeky as you please and getting away with it.”

I shaved my beard and body hair, plucked my eyebrows, and changed my tone of voice.

But in showbiz everything is possible, and one can change one’s appearance dramatically, and flamboyantly, and turn into someone else entirely: thus was born Miss Cinnamon, Anthony’s drag queen act, whom has now been folded in the props trunk, yet not before enjoying her homecoming swan-song.

“I danced with Fat Boy Slim and Jessie J; BBC actually zoomed in on my face a couple of times!”

28

up, and had a say on wigs and wardrobe. I shaved my beard and body hair, plucked my eyebrows, and changed my mannerisms and tone of voice: higher and more flamboyant. I am honoured I could wear her sophisticated frocks and big hair for the recent LGBT+ evening at Dusk, where Miss Cinnamon mingled with the revellers and took the limelight once more.

“I was part of a drag queen act based in Lanzarote, occasionally travelling to Tenerife and Fuerteventura,” Anthony recounts. I was singing, dancing - on stilettos, of course – with a sprinkle of sketches and stand-up comedy, mostly already written for us, but we had our input. I had to do my make-

As long as he is performing on stage to entertain an audience, Anthony feels happy, and this feeling encompasses his brief spell as a presenter with the newborn Rock Radio, which for he aired the weekend show from January to March, right up to the eve of his jetting off to the east of the Med. “When I first started there, it felt strange not having to project my voice, and actually keep it low for the microphone, but I got used to it, and to all the buttons, that feel a bit like driving a modern sports car – and I got to enjoy the interaction with the listeners.” It isn’t goodbye to Rock Radio listeners, though: just a ‘hear you later!’ - on the other side of the Cypriot summer.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


life

THE ESSENCE OF FATHER’S DAY

Last year, his wife Cathy - whom he describes as ‘superwoman’ - told us about her Mothering Sunday. Today, Henry Earle takes the stand in occasion of Father’s Day.

BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

F

ather’s Day has been growing in emotional significance for Henry as long as his seven children, aged 13 to 41, have been growing up: “When they were little, they would wish me happy Father’s Day because they were prompted by their mother, or they had made cards and crafts in school, while now they remember it spontaneously, plan it in advance and thus it is really heartfelt. As they grow older – and I do too – I appreciate how much they care about me.” 30

The Earle children get together to organise, or ‘plot’ a surprise for Dad – as they do for Mum on Mothering Sunday. But every single Sunday is special for them: “From the start of our family, we have always called Sunday ‘Family Day’. A day to meet go to Mass and have a meal and when possible go out to the countryside or the beach. Together.”

Joseph’s as the main occurrence to celebrate fatherhood and its spiritual meaning. He notes that any excuse is good for a family reunion, so they will do it all over again – minus the gifts! - on the third Sunday in June, when the British and North American secular holiday falls, which Henry reckons as ‘commercial’ and yet worth of an extended lunch with the kids.

We have always called Sunday ‘Family Day’.

A devout Catholic and church volunteer, he marks the religious festivity of St.

“Being such a large family, with our children, their partners and their GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


life own children, we tend to gather at home, around a table laden with food and drinks,” Henry says. “We do so for birthdays too, and this makes it a busy schedule of gettogethers. We do everything as a family: we even fight as a family, but that is the beauty of being together!

If elsewhere ‘two’ is company and ‘three’ a crowd, that is not applicable to siblings, according to him: “When parents have a toddler and a new baby is on the way, they wonder how they’ll cope. And yet they do. They know they will. No matter how many times, they do it over again. They always find a way to cope with a growing family. Indeed one worries about children’s welfare and future - as a parent that is natural, no matter how many children you’ve got, or how old they are.”

"That is natural, no matter how many children you’ve got, or how old they are.”

“We’ve always made a point to go together to a restaurant at least once a year, and when we do – booking well in advance, of course – we are a loud family who enjoys an extra good time, bound to be noticed from afar.” Summer sees the Earle’s move their shindigs to the seaside: “Summer days mean trips to the beach, with rolls for lunch and barbeque for dinner. These holidays are fun, with lots of board and cards games. I find being surrounded by them all relaxing and enjoyable.”

A large family is what newlyweds Cathy and Henry wished for, she, being one of seven siblings and he one of four: “We believe in family values. We were longing for our first child to come, then we wished for a second one, and so on.”

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

He credits his wife and her superpowers for managing the household like clockwork, carrying out chores, keeping on top of everyone’s busy schedule, including Henry’s, and reminding everyone about their social engagements, deadlines, and training them for the real world out there. There are sacrifices to be made, mostly on the materialistic side of modern lifestyle, Henry admits, but materialism is something he can do without, gaining on spiritual and affective intensity: “I am most happy when I see my family happy.” The essence of fatherhood is

caring for, and communicating with, one’s children, always finding the time to spend with them individually when necessary: “And protecting them as much as we are allowed, and always being ready to pick up the pieces, should they fail.” Henry says that a good father must set the example and must demand from himself the same attitude and behaviour he expects from his children. Also, parents ought not to try and mould their children in their own image, but recognise, acknowledge and respect their personalities and aspirations. “Our children admire and support each other, but were never jealous of, and never wanted to copy each other, and we allowed them to develop their own character, sometimes going through heartbreaking tough times. There were those who dragged their feet to study for any length of time, and those who burnt the midnight oil to the point I had to clump their books shut and send them out for a walk, to unwind.” His proudest moment? “When someone relays positive comments about my children.” And now, after 34 years of marriage, and all kids but two, aged 17 and 13, having gone to university, graduated, landed jobs, flown the nest and brought grandchildren, he counts his blessings: “Fatherhood to a large family has helped me in many ways, such as growing in patience, respect for the other, knowing how to forgive, enjoying the others triumphs, knowing we can’t have it all, sharing whatever we have, supporting each other, enjoying and loving each other, no matter how different we are. Crucial lessons, I think, for a good society”. 31


life

DRAWING LINES

The history of the frontier, where sentries used smugglers’ dogs for target practice...

BY PETER SCHIRMER

F

or almost a century, only a string of widely-spaced sentry boxes marked Gibraltar’s border with Spain in an easy arrangement between London and Madrid that saw the demolition of the fortified Lines of Contravallation. These had been built by Spain on the north side of the isthmus in 1730 to isolate the Rock - ceded to Britain by Spain 17 years earlier – and which were demolished in a series of explosions by Royal Engineers based in Gibraltar in February 1810, when Spain changed sides to ally herself with Britain and Portugal in the Peninsular War. All that remain are the ruins of Fort St. Barbara, and Fort San Felipe on La Linea’s eastern seafront, currently being slowly restored.

tradition more than two centuries old and where tobacco remains the most lucrative contraband.

Where there are borders there has always been smuggling, and the Spanish/ Gibraltar frontier is no exception – continuing today in a

While this didn’t end contraband tobacco, it stopped one method favoured by the smugglers – the use of dogs, specially trained to

Only a string of sentry boxes marked Gibraltar’s border with Spain.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Then, as now, a handful of customs officers on the Spanish side could do little to stem the flow. But under pressure from the Spanish government of the day – and to reduce numbers of soldiers needed for sentry duty – in 1909 Britain built a 7-ft high chicken-wire fence running from one shore to the other. But smugglers had wire-cutters and before long the chicken-wire was replaced by a full iron fence, establishing a new de facto border on what had been a no-man’s-land separating staggered sentry posts.

carry smuggled goods strapped to their backs, between sentry boxes on either side. These became fast-moving targets and, according to one source ‘In their attempts at stopping these dogs, sentries from both sides would take shots at the animals and, in so doing, were sometimes in danger of shooting each other.’ Access was still easy. No passports were needed, though Spanish customs officials occasionally stopped and searched the panniers of donkeys and mules carrying goods in either direction... searches which allegedly could be by-passed for as little as five pesetas. But it also contributed to the current contretemps – for Spain claimed that, in building the fence where it did, Britain annexed 106 of the original 156 hectares of neutral ground... the site of today’s new airport.

Where there are borders, there has always been smuggling.

33


life

AIR POLLUTION IN OUR HOMES

Many of us spend around 90% of our time indoors, in air that is often many times more polluted than outside air. One study by the EPA’s Office of Research and Development found that levels of around 12 common pollutants were higher in homes than outside, even in highly industrialised areas. Poor indoor air quality has been linked to respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), asthma, and lung cancer.

BY MARILIS AZZOPARDI

V

OCs are one class of pollutants that are usually found in higher concentrations inside our homes than in outside air. In Gibraltar however, this is not necessarily the case due to our proximity to the refinery, industries across the Bay, as well as the ship repair yard, and proximity of ships bunkering near the shore. Generally though, the cocktail of man-made chemicals inside our homes can make the home environment more toxic than relatively clean outside air. WHAT ARE VOCS? Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) are organic compounds that are volatile and easily evaporate into the surrounding air. They include a wide variety of chemicals such as benzene, toluene and formaldehyde, that are emitted as gases from many solids and liquids, and can be harmful to human health. The 34

harmful effects are determined by the type of VOC, how long you are exposed and in what concentration. Some, such as benzene, are very toxic at even low concentrations whereas other VOCs are toxic only when the exposure is high or continued for a long time. The short-term health effects of VOCs can range from eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, to nausea and loss of coordination. Long-term exposures, especially to the more toxic VOCs can lead to serious longterm effects such as kidney, liver and nervous system damage, cancer and endocrine disorders.

household products such as paints, varnishes, waxes, as well as cleaning and degreasing products; many contribute to the odorous properties of these compounds. One study published last year in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine found that women who work as cleaners or regularly use cleaning sprays experience a greater decline in lung function compared with women who were not cleaners; the extent of lung impairment was compared to smoking just under 20 pack years. One pack year is equivalent to smoking a packet a day for one year, or 40 cigarettes a day for half a year.

The cocktail of man-made chemicals inside our homes can be toxic.

WHERE CAN YOU FIND THEM? VOCs are found in many

Other studies have found that healthcare workers and GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


life can come from building materials, carpets, copiers, printers and carbonless copy paper. HOW TO LIMIT VOCS IN YOUR HOME The combustion of fuel and tobacco smoke also releases many toxic VOCs and creates very large amounts of fine particulate matter, so avoid smoking indoors, and if you must, ventilate the home thoroughly so harmful pollutants don’t accumulate. those frequently exposed to disinfectants e.g. nurses had an increased likelihood of developing respiratory disorders such as asthma and a 22-32% increased risk of COPD. Personal care products such as deodorants, perfumes and cosmetics such as hairspray and nail polish also contain large quantities of VOCs, including formaldehyde (known to be carcinogenic), which are released into the air when we use them. Some fragrances contain compounds that can react with other compounds in the air and sunlight to form a type of photochemical smog. Air fresheners also contain a cocktail of organic compounds intended to add aromatic fragrances to the air and mask existing odours. However, they do not freshen the air but instead contribute a variety of around 100 compounds, which include VOCs such as benzene, formaldehyde and xylene and semi-volatile organic compounds such as phthalates, which can have negative effects upon the reproductive and endocrine system. They also contain terpenes such as limonene which GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

can cause allergic reactions or sensitisation symptoms in sensitive individuals or those with respiratory disease. Terpenes are also found in essential oils, which, whether natural or synthetic, also contain a wide range of VOCS, and while they may smell nice, are contributing compounds that can pollute the indoor air space. Burning incense and scented candles are two practices that generate large quantities of VOCs and fine particulate matter and can aggravate asthmatic symptoms and other health problems. Furnishings, sofas, foam insulation, chipboard or particle board, and carpets can contain large quantities of formaldehyde; the smell of a new car is due to its presence, and that of other volatile compounds. Individuals with existing lung disease or allergies can often find their symptoms worsen when exposed to formaldehyde and it is a known carcinogen. In an office, VOCs

When decorating your home, choose products, particularly paints that are labelled low VOC or VOC-free. Gases can leak from closed containers so avoid storing old cans of paint or varnish or keep them in the garage or storeroom - and buy only as much as you will need. When choosing furniture, favour solid wood over composite wood products. Most new furniture initially emits high levels of VOCs, but these tend to diminish over time. Try to limit the use of strong chemicals in the home, and don’t use insecticides which are known to cause endocrine disruption and may increase the risk of some cancers; instead use screens or traps which are effective but don’t pose a health risk to humans.

Burning incense and scented candles can aggravate asthmatic symptoms and other health problems.

And finally, what is perhaps the most important advice of all, increase ventilation by opening windows often. 35


life

RHIZOSTOMA LUTEUM SIGHTINGS Hidden for six decades‌

BY LEWIS STAGNETTO, THE NAUTILUS PROJECT

S

ummer is around the corner and with the inevitable blooms of jellyfish, which are gathering biomass in the Mediterranean, I felt that perhaps it is appropriate to mention an important Gibraltar connection to one in particular. The barrel jellyfish (Rhizostoma) are a group of large jellyfish whose umbrella can measure up to 60cm diameter and have a total length of up to 2 metres. These are one of the largest true jellyfish in ours waters. Their name is derived from the Greek rhizo, meaning root, and stoma, meaning stomach, and root stomach animals they are indeed. These animals have cauliflower tentacles which are so huge it gives it the barrel shape for which the group are referred to. There are three known species in the Mediterranean and surrounding Atlantic area: Rhizostoma octopus, Rhizostoma pulmo and Rhizostoma luteum. The final one had not been sighted for six decades and researchers had started to doubt its existence at 36

all. It was first discovered in the Straits of Gibraltar by Quoy and Gaimard in 1827. These gentlemen were French naturalists who were on a scientific expedition in the Mediterranean aboard the French corvette Astolabe. It was on this trip when they chanced upon this large jellyfish and were able to identify it as a new species. Subsequent to the first sighting by Quoy and Gaimardin 1827, there was only one single scientifically confirmed sighting of the species in 1959, leading to the generally held belief that R.luteum had been a misidentified R.pulmo or R.octupus. This view has persisted until the first scientific confirmation in 2013. This sighting confirmed the morphometric differences as well as using genetic analysis to confirm it was indeed a separate species.

the black appendages behind the oral arms. All three species have appendages but only R.luteums are black, making it very distinctive. Further, the bell of R.pulmo has a blue ring located at the marginal lappet and this is not present in R.luteum. Rhizostoma jellyfish have a very typical scyphozoan life cycle, a sessile polyp stage which asexually produces miniature fully formed medusae and a sexual reproducing medusae stage. But according to a paper by Keinberger et al 2018, R.luteum is the only barrel jellyfish to brood its young. Indeed, it even boasts special canal structures in order to accommodate the behaviour; another distinguishing feature.

These are one of the largest true jellyfish in ours waters.

One of the obvious differences is that R.Pulmo and R.octopus lack

Rhizostoma are important microGIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


life scientists dedicated to untangling the present populations of the elusive R.luteum. Gibraltar has been the centre of a number of significant scientific discoveries even though they might not have been recognised at the time; the Neanderthal skull was first found here. As the Rhizostoma luteum has no common name, I would humbly offer the ‘Calpean jellyfish’ as an appropriate adoption due to its discovery within the area of Gibraltar. This would help cement in the minds of the world the initial discovery in the Straits and further advocate our local marine environment. ecosystems, supporting various species directly on them or within their vicinity. Amphipods crustaceans can typically be found within the jellyfish body and these organisms make good use of any food scraps not consumed by the Rhizostoma. These large jellyfish are also a good find for marine turtles as they are a full meal, if they can finish them! Some turtles can make impressive journeys in search of their food. Leatherback turtles normally found in waters around the UK, can periodically be found around Gibraltar during the summer months. They come in search of the increased number of jellyfish that are found during this time of year. As of late, they are treated to a feast.

sightings since its original discovery, the animal remains as ‘not evaluated’ under the IUCN red list status. Subsequently, it is advised that if spotted then one should leave it well alone. But it is possible for these animals to swarm, just like any jellyfish species, in warmer waters where the plankton populations are blooming. 2002 saw the largest bloom of R.octopus off the south western coast of the UK. The large numbers gave scientists an important opportunity to study them, yielding valuable information on the species.

As of late, they are treated to a feast.

Like most true jellyfish, R.luteum can give a nasty sting and should be avoided if seen for this reason. As a large and typically solitary animal, the chances of seeing one are low and due to its extremely small number of confirmed GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

An area where the public can get involved is to capture the sighting which can significantly help to establish present populations. A free local mobile platform like NEMO makes adding these sightings very straight forward and the data are already being shared with researchers in the area. By simply reporting a sighting and legitimising the sighting with the addition of a photograph, it becomes very easy to assist

Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Scyphozoa Habitat: Pelagic Diet: Planktivore Interesting Fact: Scyphozoa are an exclusively marine class of the phylum Cnidaria, referred to as the true jellyfish!

37


life

A ZOOKEEPERS DIARY This month, our diary takes on a different form as the AWCP superstars support a very important cause by promoting conscious consuming and sustainable fashion.

rab Hermit C

BY JESS LEAPER

O

ne of the defining factors separating us humans from other animals, is our clothing. We all wear clothes, most of the time. If we didn’t, we would soon find ourselves socially isolated - or even locked up! Humans even have laws to prevent people deviating from this ‘norm’. Fashion has been increasingly important, continuously evolving for centuries. It defines who we are and where we come from; it can make us stand out or blend in. There are very few, if any, examples in nature of animals adorning objects to enhance their look. The hermit crab can be very selective about his next new GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

shell, sometimes even choosing a man-made object as his new home. It could be argued they are experiencing a similar vanity to humans, but in reality, it is more about the size and comfort or practical nature of the shell, not to mention the sad fact that humans are littering their world. Fashion has always recycled old styles, updating old looks with new quirks. Appearing to constantly change, but really, it is just a recycled mishmash of old styles and trends. A consumerist whirlwind compelling us to buy or be left out, to dress a certain way with the most up-to-date styles in order to fit in. There is no doubt fashion will remain important to

us in the future, but in a world affected by climate change, how sustainable is the current throwaway fashion trend? With the build-up of plastics in our oceans and in our food chains, things have to change, and fashion has to evolve to be sustainable. Fashion is one of the most polluting industries in the world and also raises humanitarian concerns too. Clothing production has also nearly doubled in the last 15 years to meet our demand. So, what is the solution? Sustainable fashion is defined as: clothing, shoes and accessories that are manufactured, marketed and used in the most sustainable 39


life

manner possible, taking into account both environmental and socio-economic aspects. Limiting the negative, environmental effects of the product by a. ensuring efficient and careful use of natural resources (water, energy, land, soil, animals, plants, etc); b. selecting renewable energy sources (wind, solar, etc.) at every stage, and c. maximising repair, remake, reuse, and recycling of the product and its components. A good way to minimise environmental impact is to recycle old clothing, rather than buying new. In Gibraltar we have only 2 or 3 thrift shops. Secondhand fashion, unfortunately, is still generally not a trend. Throwaway fashion however, does seem to be very much in vogue. Fashion shops such as Primark produce cheaper copies of high-end fashion with constantly changing seasons, styles and fads, encouraging consumers to throw away and buy more.

40

Currently, much of Gibraltar’s secondhand clothing makes its way to Morocco, given to charities or sold there. This is excellent, but more secondhand clothes could and should be resold locally to help discourage this throwaway consumerism.

issues locally and also in the zoo community. Naturally, the theme of the fashion show was an ideal platform for the park to promote sustainability in fashion, and raise awareness of the negative effects of unsustainable fashion on the environment.

Apart from the obvious link to the environment, what has all this got to do with Wildlife and the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park? Earlier this year, the AWCP was approached by Fairhomes (Ocean Village) to discuss ways in which they could help the park to fundraise. Their subsequent offer was two-fold, an Open Day at Ocean Village and a fundraiser fashion show hosted by Dusk nightclub.

The event aims to stimulate local fashion stores to stock sustainable clothing lines, and also to encourage more of a thrift shop culture in Gibraltar. The Gibraltar Youth Group will be presenting a range of clothing put together from secondhand clothing found at the ClubHouse charity store at the ‘Go Wild for Fashion’ event on the 20th of June. This event will be raising funds for the AWCP as well as raising awareness about sustainable clothing. The Youth Group will also be creating accessories and jewellery from plastic rubbish and disused items. Local fashion store Marble Arc will also be showcasing some of their summer collection at the event.

As a local community wildlife park, sustainability is at the heart of what the AWCP stands for, and the team strives to incorporate it into everything they do in order to raise awareness of these

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


life The younger generation have grown up with abundance of disposable fashion items amidst this ‘throwaway fashion’ trend. For this reason, it is critical for the younger generation to be involved and understand the impact of irresponsible fashion trends on the natural world. To find out more about current attitudes towards fashion and sustainable fashion, we asked this year’s work experience students from Westside School to answer a series of questions about current attitudes to fashion and their opinions on sustainable fashion and secondhand clothing. Their responses were revealing:

How do you feel about

fashion in general, how

What do you think

‘sustainable fashion’ means? Unanimously, there was little knowledge of sustainable clothing and little understanding of what it means other than ‘recycled’ clothing.

Would you wear second-

hand clothing, if not then why?

The general consensus was that of distaste at the thought of secondhand clothing. But after further probing and encouragement, some were open to it, dependent on how it looked and where it was from.

important is it to you?

The general consensus among our work experience students was that fashion, particularly the brand of fashion, was of great importance to their generation. Brands like Superdry, Louis Vuitton, Hollister and Adidas are popular amongst teenagers.

Why do you think there are so few second-hand stores in Gibraltar?

The overall agreement was: “It’s just not trendy.” But all acknowledged, if there were more second-hand shops in Gibraltar, the trend would probably catch on.

So, it seems, the lack of culture for sustainable or second-hand clothing is the reason behind the lack of interest. The selection of shops in Gibraltar is sparse, and many people order online or visit nearby Spain to purchase clothing instead. Gibraltar has a recent addition to this area: Threads is a new, stylish, industrial-style shop tucked away in a quaint passageway (between Costa Coffee shop and Edna’s Boutique). Just starting out, the owners have created a selection of branded sportswear, some of which is ‘pre-loved’. It’s a good start, and definitely worth a peek if you like your designer sportswear at a discounted price! If you would like to support the AWCP ‘Go Wild for Fashion’, fundraiser later this month, tickets can be purchased from BuyTickets.gi or directly from Dusk nightclub at £15. VIP tables for up to 8 people, can be purchased from the venue (limited availability!). A raffle will take place on the night, tickets can be purchased from the AWCP Reception.

Where do you buy your

clothes and how often do you go clothes shopping?

As the students tend to go for more expensive brands of clothing, they tend to receive new clothes for special occasions; birthdays, Christmas or family events. Other clothing will be purchased as and when needed, often at the cheaper retail stores locally. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Do you think this will

change in the future and why?

With more second-hand shops in Gibraltar, it would probably become more accepted and maybe even in vogue.

41


The day that Spain closed the frontier on the 8th June 1969, with thanks to Chris Montegriffo Snr


history

50 YEARS ON

Gibraltar sang Beatles’ hit ‘Yellow submarine’ as the border closed half a century ago… and ‘Bread of Heaven’ heralded its full re-opening.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

A

t 30 minutes to midnight on June 8th 50 years ago, as the heavy black iron gates marking the crossing of the Gibraltar-Spanish frontier clanged shut on the orders of dictator General Franco, the creaking of hinges unused for decades was drowned by the voices of some 700 Gibraltarians singing “We all live in a yellow submarine”. The Beatles hit followed a more formal and patriotic ‘God Save the Queen’ and reflected an optimistic bravado that proved unjustified - for the closure, which was to last for 13 years, hurt the populations of both the Rock and the Campo, separating families, costing thousands of jobs, and forcing many to flee the Campo, but also shaping what eventually would be a new and prosperous future for Gibraltar. “The closure of the land frontier was an important moment in our evolution as a people,” a recent statement from the Chief Minister’s office points out. “It served to cement together our identity as Gibraltarians and to move us even closer to the United Kingdom.” GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

At the time, the closure and the events leading up to it were seen in a different light. The Governor Admiral Varyl Begg insisting that “Business as usual is the word”, while with jingoistic bluster befitting what was still regarded by Britain as a naval and military dominated ‘colonial possession’ – though not by Gibraltarians – on June 10th a front page report in the Gibraltar Chronicle argued that: “Spain’s latest kick at the Rock has left Franco with a sore toe, for the Spanish authorities’ moves against men who have earned their living by coming to the Gibraltar must surely fester.”

providing the sole income for thousands of families and keeping La Linea’s economy afloat – and, arguably, Franco’s move hit the inhabitants of the Campo with greater severity than it did on Gibraltar. Driven by the resulting poverty, an estimated 7,000-8,000 people left the Campo to seek work - mainly in Holland, Germany, France and the UK.

Franco saw Queen Elizabeth’s visit to the Rock in May 1954 as an insult to Spain.

And fester it did, for some 4,730 Spaniards crossed the border daily, providing the majority of the Rock’s less skilled work force, as well as

Franco’s promise to compensate for the job losses through work at the refinery and by building a large textile factory employing women, proved hollow. The refinery could only employ 200 men, and the textile factory failed to materialise… before it could be built the director disappeared with all the funds. It is widely accepted that Franco initiated the lengthy economic and social siege in response to

43


Above - Gonzalo Arias, pacifist and regular fence-jumper. He was arrested every time. - With thanks to Luis Photos

history

who were going back to France from Morocco via Gibraltar’s ferry,” Vallejo says. “They were often kept in the sun for hours in a queue before they were allowed to cross. The next move was to make every Gibraltarian who wanted to cross into Spain apply for a special pass; the British Gibraltar Passport was no longer recognised.

the May 1969 adoption of the Gibraltar Constitution Order, which had become effective a week before the gates creaked shut and confirmed Gibraltar’s determination to remain British.* However, local historian Tito Vallejo believes it had roots more than a decade earlier; that Franco saw Queen Elizabeth’s visit to the Rock in May 1954 as an insult to Spain, and that his relationship with Gibraltar began to sour after that, “It was from then on that Gibraltar began to suffer a string of restrictions,” says Vallejo. “It was threatened that property in Spain 44

belonging to Gibraltarians would be confiscated. (As a result, my grandmother quickly sold her villa in Campamento).” By the 1960s Spain had begun its UN campaign for the recovery of Gibraltar, he adds. The campaign was headed by Spain’s Foreign Minister Fernando Maria Castiella, “who presented the United Nations with his infamous ‘Red Book’, a publication of documents which, according to Spain, evidenced that Gibraltar was rightfully Spanish”. “Spain next began to intensify the restrictions on French nationals

“Very few applied for the pass and those who did only because they needed to... living across the border and commuting to Gibraltar for work. When the UN rejected Spain’s claim to the territory, the Spanish government warned all Spanish workers in Gibraltar that they would close the border with Gibraltar. After that, there would be no way for them to go home. “Even before the closure, women from La Linea were already being denied access to Gibraltar by the Spanish authorities,” Vallejo adds. Gibraltar is a survivor. Where La Linea and other parts of the Campo suffered and continued to struggle with poverty and unemployment until the border GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


history with thanks to Luis Photos

re-opened, the Rock found in Morocco an alternative source of cheap labour and fresh produce – though tinned goods also began to find their way onto kitchen shelves in the better-off homes.

enlarged European Community. By January 1981, hopes were growing that Madrid could persuade the Spanish electorate there was a case for opening the frontier; and early in 1982 protracted negotiations between Margaret Thatcher and a new socialist government in Madrid led to a partial reopening of the border. At midnight, ten days before Christmas in a Spanish ‘gesture of goodwill’, watched by 1,000-strong crowds on both sides of the frontier, a Spanish civil guard unceremoniously unlocked the gates. Streams of tearful relatives poured through to be reunited – some for the first time in 13 years.

Streams of tearful relatives poured through to be reunited.

And there were illogical anomalies – among them the fact that, twice a week, BEA’s Trident flights en route from Gibraltar to London stopped at Madrid.

Hopes that Franco’s death in 1975 might cut short the siege proved empty. But Spain’s ambitions to become a member of the European Union faced a British government that it was inconceivable that the frontier should remain closed in an GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

However, neither vehicles, tourists nor businessmen of any other nationality were allowed to cross. It was another two years before the border was fully opened and the first cars and tourists passed through the open gates. Fittingly, the siege, whose start was marked by song, ended on a similar choral note. The cars and tourists were greeted by members of a visiting Welsh Male Voice Choir singing 'Guide Me Through, O Great Jehovah’ [better known to rugby fans as ‘Bread of Heaven’]. *The 1969 Constitution was sparked by the outcome of the 1967 sovereignty referendum, in which 99.19% of Gibraltarians voted against passing into Spanish sovereignty. 45


PLASTIC, GREEN AND OVER-BUILDING!

Not necessarily in that order, but I’m sure you’ll agree these are the social topics at present commented on by most people downtown...’Brexit’ has become a nuisance so we’ll leave that one to continue annoying us, as a backdrop!

BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT We’ve been reminded, have we not, of the dangers of plastic and how it affects seabirds and marine life; even affecting the food we eat because of the plastic microscopic particles potentially entering our digestive system. Locally, The Nautilus Project has been a frontrunner on marine issues of late especially, and are seriously committed to getting the message across in schools, other institutions, on boat trips and even walks, along our shoreline. It can’t be said we are not constantly reminded of our modern-day list of do’s and don’t’s, like encouraging the use of flasks or bottles to be refilled 46

at a number of cafeterias and bars with tap water (which is fine in Gib) and cutting down on plastic carrier bags. Also putting the message across is – and have been for many years now – The Environmental Safety Group (ESG) with their clean-up campaigns year in year out, and their promoting all matters regarding the environment and ‘better living’, not letting any day or week pass without checking what developer or government department may be crossing the red lines!

Meanwhile, let’s remind ourselves that the constantly-used word ‘environment’ means everything that’s around us, whether living or non-living, including buildings, roads, and of course, the air that we breathe - hence the popular push for more cycling and the use of electric cars, if you must drive! And then there’s the ‘green’ word. “We must see more green around the place,” I hear you declare! Well, there have been improvements. We have the Commonwealth Park, green on

The Alameda and Botanic Gardens are not frequented as much as they should be.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


buildings’ rooftops, over-hanging greenery from balconies on new developments, pretty flowerbeds at the Trafalgar Interchange, the Waterport Roundabout (pity about the drab water fountain), Ocean Village and other places and there are promises of much more to come, especially with all the building projects coming on stream. We have the Alameda and Botanic Gardens which many citizens point out are not frequented as much as they should be, although young children are having a great time learning more about flowers, plants and the like, by attending fun, group sessions organised by the Gardens’ enthusiastic team. There are trees and other ‘greens’ around the place that have been there forever, but stand unnoticed. Many tourists GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

take pictures of the Law Courts’ gardens and the balconies of the flats opposite, next to where I live in Main Street; I see them quite often. Someone said to me, “But there are nooks and crannies and other little corners that can be made more of, which are looking bare and scruffy.” Then we have our street furniture which in many cases could do with a good lick of paint, including the planters at Casemates and elsewhere; they have more ‘greens’ in them and the newly built park at Governor’s Parade was recently, already looking a bit tired and a tad unkempt. But it has to be said, there are efforts to encourage ‘green.’

The Horticultural Society has become alive again, encouraging planting and gardening where possible in patios and window boxes. Then we have our hundreds – or is it thousands these days? – of dog walkers, who genuinely seem to be taking the environment on board more seriously also, picking up and spraying their animals’ contributions on our pavements with detergent infused water, well done to you, but there are still a few, stubborn individuals who don’t pick up... naughty!

Our street furniture could do with a good lick of paint.

Streets are to be flushed more often, and not just Main Street, we hear from the new street cleaning company. They need to be tackled more often especially during the 47


many of us have talked about how scruffy Devil’s Tower Road and that northern area of the Rock looks (or better said, looked). It’s always been the industrial area of Gibraltar so now there’s a lot going on down there and a number of developments up and running and others on the go. “Too much development, too many high-rises, spoiling the area,” so on and so forth. Well, those too are outside the City Walls and good for Gibraltar’s companies, making developers richer, true, but helping businesses prosper in town and elsewhere in many ways and lest we forget, keeping individuals in employment and providing more jobs.

summer months and so far, there have been some improvements - we’ll see how things progress. But it can’t all be left up to the authorities’ relevant departments and private companies. We too have to play our part and be more conscious of what’s around us and how it could look better. It’s called civic pride and we need more of it and it doesn’t hurt to be little more considerate when putting out rubbish for collection at the wrong times and other practices. Avoid giving unsightly impressions to passersby, visitors and locals alike. Europa Advance Road is the place to deposit unwanted household items, large or small. Restaurant and Bar owners need to flush out their frontages by removing tables and chairs – some do. And so we arrive at... “Gibraltar doesn’t look the same anymore with so much building going on,” 48

a common fanfare heard these days around our busy town. “It’s being spoilt, not the same anymore, it’s lost its character!” Well, on that one, I think it’s one to ponder over. First of all most, if not all of the high developments going up are being built outside the City Walls, just like Marbella has Puerto Banus and other areas away from El Casco Viejo - the old town on the upper side of the coast and beaches. The difference there, it’s looked after and preserved. Surely we can do the same?

Not all the flats sold are for investment purposes - some are lived in. There’s also office space for more companies wanting to relocate here and other benefits. Regarding other developments going up closer to town, such as Eurocity, if one puts one’s hand on one’s heart, in some cases not all, are the complaints ‘against’ solely due to the environment and “too much building going on,”? Or is it the inconvenience of dust and disruption for two or three years and loss of light and the “spoiling of my view” that’s uppermost in the complainant’s mind?

It’s called civic pride and we need more of it.

There have been some improvements in restoring our Upper Town, but yes, there’s a need for more. It seems to go too slowly; we all point it out but not a lot gets done or not as fast as we’d like to keep it spruced up and its character alive. I think

So how does a government boost their coffers? Where do they build then? Nowhere?

So while the jury is out on some of our architectural issues ruling the talk about town, let’s concentrate on a couple such as the #PawsOffStraws and refill campaigns... whilst Brexit looms! GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


scene IN A JAM

Philip Valverde’s Live Jam at The Royal Calpe Gibraltar.

BY CLAIRE SPENCER

G

ibraltar has a fine musical heritage going back many years, with some of its sons and daughters going on to find fame and fortune. Philip Valverde, along with his elder brother, Hubert, who played as The Valverde Brothers, are most certainly part of that rich tapestry that has seen some fine musicians who have flown the flag for all of us that call this Rock our home. These days, Hubert lives in California, so Philip is instrumental in continuing their musical heritage solo. The Royal Calpe live jam on

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Friday evening is but one venue on The Rock where you can get up and share your talents with an appreciative audience. The jam primarily features Philip Valverde, but he certainly is not one to hog the limelight, and all musicians are welcome to get up and perform.

an hour, and so I order a drink at the bar from the welcoming bar staff, who are very helpful and bring the drink to your seat for you. At six o’clock sharp as the Cathedral clock is chiming over the way, Philip starts with Steely Dan’s ‘Ricky Don’t Lose That Number,’ as well as some fine renditions of a couple of Beatles classics; his fingers caressing the frets beautifully on

These days, Philip is instrumental in continuing their musical heritage solo.

The pub itself is certainly a welcoming place; Philip has already set up in the corner by the door as I walk in. He tells me the music will be starting in about half

49


scene George Harrison’s ‘Something’ and ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps.’ I also hear, amongst many other favourite tunes, The Eagles ‘Taking It Easy’ and the Shadows massive hit ‘Apache,’ dedicated to Tony Cruz, sitting close by. Tony is the bassist in The Rock Shadows,

who are a Shadows tribute band based here in Gibraltar. After the break, local guitarist Leo Sanguinetti is playing some heartfelt renditions of John Lennon’s masterpiece, ‘Working Class Hero,’ Cat Stevens ‘Father

and Son,’ and Pink Floyd’s ‘Wish You Were Here.’ Leo sometimes starts the ball rolling at The Lord Nelson’s Jam on a Thursday as well. Another regular here is Gill Chesney Green, who, like Leo, also plays the Nelson’s jam. It’s always a pleasure to hear her singing, her voice is soothing and as pleasing as the summer sun and clear as polished glass; she gives some meaningful versions of evergreen popular tunes, accompanying herself on the guitar. Philip is now joined by a guest vocalist called Bettina Manner for the fabulous Amy Winehouse song, ‘Valerie.’ Bettina’s vocals sit well alongside Philips guitar; The Royal Calpe crowd are well into this, they’re singing along too. Sista Dee, another well-known Gibraltar musician is in the crowd as well tonight, and Philip now asks her to get up and sing. Sista

50

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


scene Dee, also known as the Bob Marley Lady, has been gigging around the Rock as well as the UK and Europe for some time, always draws an appreciative crowd and doesn’t need to be asked twice, and smiling, joins Philip for Bob Marley’s ‘Three Little Birds.’ There’s no shortage of talent tonight, as, after more music from Philip, his cousins Nikolai and Kristian Celecia take the podium for George Ezra’s ‘Shotgun,’ with Kristian on guitar and Nikolai providing the vocals. After they finish their set, they enthuse with me about The Gibraltar Live Music Society, which has an excellent website and Facebook page. If you want to keep up to date with what’s happening with the music scene on the Rock, this page is a must, as it’s chock-a-block with info. Chatting afterwards with Philip, I ask him whether he’s played with Albert Hammond, to which he says that he hasn’t, but he does say that Albert pops into his shop, The Studio, just around the corner in Bomb House Lane from time to time when he’s back home from gigging around the world and visiting his Mum. He goes on to tells me that the jam is a relatively newcomer to the flourishing music scene around town, having started earlier in the year after a very successful fundraising pub crawl to raise money for the GBC open day. Apparently, the management of The Royal Calpe were so impressed that they booked him to do a regular gig So, if you’re into live music, or if you’d like to perform, make a date to call by The Royal Calpe of a Friday Evening, where the music goes on between about 6pm and 9pm. You won’t be disappointed. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

51


MR & MRS UG: HOME SWEET CAVE The sorry tale of Gibraltar’s first high-rise builder…

When Ug was courting Mrs Ug he swore he’d skimp and save to acquire a smart apartment, off-plan in Gorham’s Cave where the sea views were terrific and the mussel-beds profuse, and fish-traps were provided for everyone to use. There was firewood by the armful for a very modest fee And to use communal middens was absolutely free; A management committee would keep residents in line. They’d be happy, hunt and gather, and the sun would always shine. But plans of a Neanderthal, like ours, could sometimes fail. The developers went bankrupt and the cave was up for sale, thus the hopes of our young couple were blown away like dust... Ug’s father felt benevolent and urged: ’Come live with us. You must! You can help me knapping arrowheads, and she can help your mother dig for roots and gather sea-food. It won’t be any bother.’ Their marriage was traditional – he bashed her on the head and dragged her, screaming, by the hair to the Ug family’s bed. For two sweet moons peace reigned within the Cave of Stalactites, though drops dripping from the ceiling caused the couple restless nights. But Ug’s new bride soon tired of sharing board and sharing bed, she wanted something better, something tres tres chic instead, She knew there must be more to Life than daily gath’ring grub, (her brand-new bridal digging stick was worn down to a stub).

52

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


A girl should have ambition and should rise above her station. But to do so she would need a much, much smarter habitation. So she slyly started nagging when the couple were alone, telling Ug they’d both be happier in a shelter of their own. Poor Ug gave in – he had to – he had promised her the earth, so he scanned the petroglyphic ads to find another berth, but the rentals were exorbitant and way beyond his reach; he couldn’t even rent a rough bush shelter on the beach. Ug quit his flint-stone toiling and he started to explore, higher stretches of the mountain where he’d never been before. His daily search was arduous, but at last Ug found a ledge with a well-protected overhang where, standing at the edge, the world spread out below him stretched far as he could see, Ug smiled and whispered to himself: ‘This is the place for me’ Bricks hadn’t been invented yet, nor was there any mortar Ug knew he needed something to keep out the wind and water. He found square rocks and flattish stones, then cobbled them together; and crammed moss into any gaps as proof against the weather. He viewed with undiminished pride the work that he had done; walked slowly down the rock y slope - then broke into a run. His wife would be delighted with a place to call her own; but when he told her, all she did was pull a face and groan. The daily trek down to the sea, and then back up again would be bad enough in sunshine, but even worse in rain. The mountain top was far too high for anyone to go Especially someone like herself who suffered vertigo. The only climbs she wanted was up the social scale... Poor Ug capitulated – put up a sign: ‘FOR SALE’ Thus this prehistoric ancestor of Taylor, Woodrow, Butcher Set the pattern for Gibraltar’s Ug-ly high-rise future.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

53


prose

THE GERMAN COLONEL AND THE JAGDTERRIER (PART I)

First in a two-part series, Jorge brings us the charming tale of a dog named Kira, and her new master. But their newfound bond and leisurely walks around Retiro Park are threatened when a foreign gentleman with a strong German accent calls…

BY JORGE V.REIN PARLADE (Based on a true story.)

M

adrid 1946.

The Café Gijon was busy as usual in that cold January morning of 1946. The smell of Colombian coffee and black tobacco smoke was the order of the day back then. The well-appointed white uniformed staff never stopped in the rush to serve their customers in the morning shift. Steaming 54

coffee, churros and brandy flowed around the tables, satisfying the discerning clientele of the legendary Café. Writers and journalists would share a table, exchange a few stories and tell each other a few lies. Business as usual in a landmark founded as far back as in 1888. Padre Fernando de Ayala, the local Parish priest of El Barco, a remote village in Avila, ordered a café sombra which was promptly

served together with half a portion of churros. Borja Benitez del Campo, the Spanish Major, came over right on time to join his old-time friend for a coffee. “Father, my dear old friend. How good to see you again. What brings you over to the capital in this cold weather?” “Well, well. I came to see my sister and to collect the dog of a friend who had to leave the country GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


prose unexpectedly. Son, I need to ask you for a favour: This old friend of mine has suddenly been posted abroad. The Argentine in South America to be precise. The thing is he had this young Jagdterrier dog which he could not take with him on his trip. He asked me to find the dog a caring owner and a good home here in Madrid. I took the liberty of thinking that you, being a bachelor, and a keen field sportsman as well as a countryman, could very well be the ideal person to have the dog. I know it is very short notice but I desperately need your help, Borja. What do you say?” The major touched his well manicured moustache as he always did when any difficult situation came up. “Well Father, I guess we better give it a try and take the dog for a few days. We shall simply take it from there.” “Splendid, Major. The dog (a beautiful female flat-coated black and brown Jagdterrier) could not be in better hands. I am delighted that you have agreed to become Kira´s new master. Give me a few minutes and I shall bring her out of my car.” It took the priest less than five minutes to bring the dog over to The Café Gijon where all the staff admired the good looking blackand-gold Terrier. Rather unusual, remarked an elderly waiter. Good looking dog, remarked another. Rich man’s dog no doubt, said the cook. It was at the Café Gijon in that cold month of January when Major Benitez from The Spanish Army Engineer Corps became the new rightful owner of this young Fox GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Terrier. The dog was shy in the beginning. She did not know what was going on but she gradually gained a little confidence and started trusting her new master. In a funny sort of way the dog must have noticed a certain resemblance or possibly certain things that reminded her of her former master. They went for long walks in The Retiro Park where the major would release her and she was free to chase the odd pigeon or thrush bird. Much to the amazement of passersby, Kira would also jump into the lake and swim in the company of some mallard duck or waterfowl. This was quite different from her former days in Northern Europe where it was a lot colder and snow as well as ice were quite common in winter, making it impossible to swim until the weather melted the ice on the lakes. The Major and the Terrier enjoyed morning as well as evening walks down along the Paseo de La Castellana to the Royal Engineers Army headquarters, where his waiting chauffeur would take Kira back home for a siesta until the boss returned at the end of the day. A favourite walk was no doubt The Retiro Park where the Major would let Kira run as much as she wished. The dog was well behaved and obedient, professionally trained the Major admitted, and not by him but most likely by her previous owner, who had done a remarkable job. The Major had a place in the country near Talavera and the Tagus River. Weekends where spent there in the company of friends and relatives. Kira, as part of the family then, enjoyed the Spanish social life as another of the Major’s guests. She was quite

spoilt to some extent and always had a crunchy biscuit or two during breakfast time courtesy of a friendly guest, and a little snack of tortilla or chorizo during the fabulous and lavish luncheons given in the house by the open fire. Kira’s life was so good that Mario the chauffeur used to say some wished they were dogs in the Major’s house. One day, some years afterwards, the Major received an unexpected telephone call from a foreign gentleman with a strong German accent. The gentleman in question introduced himself as Colonel (Oberst) von Stauffer, ex German Army, and explained to the Major that he needed to see him as soon as feasible. It was regarding a personal matter, he claimed. The German gentleman said that it was Father Fernando, their mutual friend, who had suggested he ring the major and ask if they could possibly meet the following week at The Café Gijon. The Major agreed on the condition that Colonel von Stauffer would brief him beforehand about the final reason of this unexpected encounter. His sole reply was: “It is regarding Kira, the Jagdterrier dog…”. 55


leisure FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES The Sobering Reality of Not Drinking Anymore.

BY JASMIN GRIFFITHS

O

ver 123 days ago, I was probably hungover, or sat in a pub having what I assumed was fun with people I thought I liked. It’s not until you stop drinking that you realise you’re always just a little bit hungover, like some foggy haze you don’t realise is hanging over your life; not too dissimilar to when I first wore glasses after thinking I didn’t need them, or literally the famous quote (bible story excerpt?) “I was blind but now I see” - although I think that is far more literal and not at all a metaphor in the context. It’s not that I ever had a problem

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

with my drinking, I don’t think. I drank as much as any regularly depressed twenty-four-yearold who feels like they haven’t achieved as much in their life as they were supposed to, and enjoys a trip to the pub and getting hammered on a Sunday, or Monday, or Thursday, or... Ok, so maybe there was a slight problem with my drinking.

I think I am, hiding behind a few glasses of wine until the confident booze monster of Drunk Me emerged was an easy way out, and then I could just sort of take the back seat until I woke up the next morning surrounded by absolute D-OO-M and regret for what I had said to whom, and at what cost. Which of course then leads to more depression and anxiety, so it’s all a vicious circle.

I kissed goodbye to my sweet loves of Sauvignon Blanc.

Between the alcohol culture in this country, my self-medicated depression and how bloody boring

One morning I decided that enough was enough. I don’t like

57


leisure who I am when I’m drunk more than I don’t like who I am when I’m sober at this point, I was spending an obscene amount of money in the pub, and the hangovers were just getting worse and worse. I kissed goodbye to my sweet loves of Sauvignon Blanc and basically any other wine, beer or spirit, and jumped head first into sobriety. It’s been a fairly easy and straightforward ride so far. Working in a music venue that doubles as a nightclub that occasionally hosts horrific student events is a beautiful reminder on those nights of who I don’t want to be anymore. Watching people angrily babble some incoherent string of words to you as you tell them they’re too drunk for another drink, people walking round with a confidence I dream of having whilst simultaneously having sick all down their fronts and possibly encrusted in their hair, and the ghastly make-out sessions that I have to bear witness to, are what I like to think of as an ASMR Positive Affirmations video but IRL and to very loud dance music.

There’s no potential for a good night if there’s no alcohol involved. A vital part of being an adult is apparently being half cut most of the time and no one seems to be questioning it. Hard day? Need a drink. Good day? Deserve a drink. Whatever the question is, the answer seems to be “drink” and I hate to be the one to have to tell you this, and maybe you just think I’m bitter, but we’re all really sodding boring when we’re drunk. I know that might come as a shock to you, because it would have been a shock to me too. But when I’m sat in a beer garden and everyone around me is just hammering on about the same suffering thing over and over again for hours, I start to lose the will to live.

It’s around this time of realising the people you hang out with are tedious that you might stop getting invited out. FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) is a real thing. I’m telling you this from the bottom of my heart. But FOMO doesn’t even strictly apply to when you’re not at a place. You can be there and be the sober one in the crowd and it’s a bit like everyone else is in on a big joke that you missed the memo on.

There was a big change I went through at some point in the last 123 days where I suddenly realised the confidence I had when I was drunk is actually always in me. Maybe not to the same extent, I don’t really think I could do some of the things that ‘drunk confidence’ made me think I could do, but I definitely don’t think I’m an absolute boring egg anymore. Not all the time at least. Anything I could do, I can do sober. I can talk to people I don’t know (possibly more coherently), I can do a gig without needing a shot of tequila, or three, before I go on stage, I’m an interesting person with things to say and I don’t need to be drunk to say them... anymore. I’ve discovered that I really enjoy tonic water, some alcohol-free beer doesn’t just taste like dish water, and there’s a lot more sober people at shows than I thought. I’m not scared of going out in case the temptation to drink is too strong, if it is, I can just go home. There’s nothing lost in not drinking one night.

Everyone is a bit loose and rosy cheeked, happy probably, but

So that’s how I’m taking it. One day at a time. And it’s working

We’re all really sodding boring when we’re drunk.

I feel better, I’ve lost weight, I’ve got more money (sort of)… it all seems to be going wonderfully, right? Except, I don’t actually have any friends anymore. Did I anyway is the real question here I suppose. But from seeing someone every day because I’d invite them to the pub, and no one says no to a pint, to spending some very sober, very lonely days is quite a drastic change. It seems like no one knowns how to have fun anymore unless they’re three pints in. 58

there’s a constant buzzing in the back of your head because you can’t quite get into that same place. A metaphysical block that isn’t allowing you to access the fun-happy zone everyone else is in. But FOMO also applies to when you’re sat in your bed and you check your Instagram stories and all your friends are out and none of them even messaged you to ask you to come along even though you’d spoken to one of them like, two hours ago. But whatever, I don’t even care. I might have even said no, if you had asked. But that doesn’t mean I don’t want to be.

Everyone is talking but no one is actually listening anymore, they’re just waiting for their turn to be heard and be loud and vocal and pissed. Nothing of any value is being said, the same sentence is cropping up every sort of forty-eight seconds or so, and by god I might love you but please shut the fudge up.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


leisure

so far. I’ve got an app that tells me how many days I’ve not had a drink for, how many calories, pounds and units of alcohol I’ve saved based on the probably accurate amount of alcohol I told them I drank when I signed up. Someone once sort of sniggered when mentioned I have an app for my sobriety, which really quite hurt if I’m honest. I did used to log in to it every day and obsessively check how I was doing, now it’s sort of once every four or five days just to catch it all up. So, it’s not like I’m reliant on an app to stay sober, it’s just a nice little pick-me-up when I’m feeling a little disheartened about

the whole thing. It’s really great apart from the whole ‘how much money has been saved’ part because I can tell you now, that amount of money is not in my bank account so I’ve definitely found something else to spend it on.

Anything I could do, I can do sober.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

The friends I’ve kept and new friends I’ve made since I stopped drinking have really helped me along. I’ve had no snide comments like “come on, you can have ONE drink” (which I have definitely done in the past without realising how harmful and insensitive it is, and I’m sorry to those I’ve said it to) and everyone

seems genuinely interested in the changes it’s made to my life. I’ve even had a lovely chat with a taxi driver about it who, next time he picked me up a couple of weeks later, said I had inspired him to stop drinking. He made it to four days and then said he couldn’t do more after that, but I admire the attempt he made and I’m thankful that a conversation with me made him think a bit more about his drinking habits. But if you ever find yourself thinking “I wonder if I could stop my casual and social drinking?” then I urge you to give it a go. Even if it’s just one weekend where you go out and don’t drink. You never know what you might learn.

59


www.gibraltarlawyers.com

ISOLAS Trusted Since 1892 Property • Family • Corporate & Commercial • Taxation • Litigation • Trusts Wills & Probate • Shipping • Private Client • Wealth management • Sports law & management

For further information contact: info@isolas.gi

ISOLAS LLP Portland House Glacis Road PO Box 204 Gibraltar. Tel: +350 2000 1892 Celebrating 125 years of ISOLAS


leisure

YOUR OWN WINE COLLECTION Tips for successful cellaring and more.

BY ANDREW LICUDI DIPWSET Many people who enjoy wine will have at some time or another have thought about starting a wine collection or ‘having a wine cellar’ as its more commonly referred to. The thought of pulling a bottle from an older vintage no longer available in the shops or a never-heard-of-before wine you managed to pick up on a visit to Greece or Portugal and sharing with friends over a convivial dinner is something most wine lovers fantasise about. Perhaps your idea of a wine collection is a rack of twelve bottles in the kitchen, or perhaps you prefer to view wine as a potential investment. After all, if you had bought a bottle of Chateau Lafite 1982 you would have paid just over £30 per bottle at the time, but it is now approaching £5000 - a massive increase, making property or investing in shares look paltry. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Realistically, few have the disposable income to gamble on wine, but if you do, then professional advice and storage (now available here through Gibraltar Vault) are essential. For the rest of us, a little bit of planning and taking the trouble to search out suitable wines for a modest collection should prove a highly enjoyable experience. Having mature wines which have gained in complexity and interest can be very satisfying - something I can personally vouch for.

longer term some sort of cooler or wine storage cabinet is essential. At home I would go for an electric wine cabinet where individual bottles can be kept at 16°C or below but ready should you need to open a bottle at short notice. Wine cabinets come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. My preferred option would be a cabinet with a capacity of around 100 to 200 bottles but should you require more then I would advise to combine this with professional storage of full cases as building your own cellar is not only expensive, but will require all year-round cooling and humidity control even if underground. A 200 bottle Liebherr wine cabinet will set you back just over 1000 euros, though they regularly come on the second-hand market

It is something most wine lovers fantasise about.

Gibraltar’s weather, ideal for lounging on the beach in summer, is disastrous for storing wines. Heat kills wine which should ideally never go above 16°C. That’s not to say that keeping a few bottles under the stairs for consuming in the short term is not feasible, but for the

61


leisure

in Spain for around 600 euros or less. Perhaps not cheap but should last for years as unlike a fridge, they have no motor or moving parts. Wine cabinets also keep bottles in the dark with no vibrations - essential to long term wine storage. Assuming you have decided on a 100 to 200 bottles cabinet, what wines should you now go for? Clearly this is a personal choice, but assuming mature wines is what we are after, the bulk of wines should be those with ageing potential which will improve year by year. You may also want wines for the medium term and certainly a few bottles for immediate

consumption. You may also want wines from different countries; perhaps iconic examples such as Chateau Musar from Lebanon, which afford exceptional value for money and will last and improve for decades. Take your time stocking up your cellar, look out for bargains which seem to appear regularly at our local wine merchants and do your homework by consulting sites like Cellar Tracker which is free and have millions of wines and wine ratings by regular wine lovers.

Gibraltar’s weather is disastrous for storing wines.

62

So as an example, here is my wish list for a 100 to 200 bottle wine collection: GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


life Rioja

This is a must. It’s one of the great wines of the world affording exceptional value for money and are very longed-lived. I have tasted many examples from the 40s, 50s and 60s still fresh and vibrant. Tondonia Reserva Red (Classic Rioja) - Current Vintage on sale is 2004, around £23, a bargain for a 15-year-old wine! Keep for a decade or more. Tondonia Reserva White - The best white wine in Spain but an acquired taste due to its oxidative nature. Current vintage on sale 2000 around £23. Tondonia Gravonia White Around £13. As far removed from supermarket Sauvignon Blanc as its possible to get. Cune - Another classical Rioja winemaker. All the Cune range are worthy of collecting, they offer astounding value for money. I would be looking at their Reservas (around £14). Gran Reservas (around £16) and their Imperials both Reservas and Gran Reservas (£22 to £42). All these wines should improve with age.

Priorato I have found that Priorato red wines age extremely well. After a few years the wines transform into something rather special. Well worth waiting for. Can be pricey. I would aim to have half a dozen bottles, at least, for the long term. I wish I had bought more. Do your homework before you buy.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Champagne

It’s really worthwhile ageing champagne. After a few years the wine will acquire extremely attractive notes of ripe apples and show a richness and complexity which is just not there when young. Mature champagne is fashionable and expensive but not if you mature your own. Both Vintage and non-vintage will improve with age. Widely available here. Try Bollinger, Lanson, Laurent Perrier, Krug (expensive!), Ruinart and many others. All will taste better after a few years in your cellar. Don’t bother with Moet & Chandon which relies more on image than quality and certainly keep away from Spanish Cava or Proseccos. They are fine for casual drinking but not for a cellar.

Ribera del Duero Not a region I admire hugely. Wines tend to be jammy, ultimately simple and lacking in interest. Judging by some friends of mine it seems more difficult to give up than tobacco but those that do never look back. Some good examples do exist like the venerable Vega Sicilia or their second wine Valbuena. Go for it if you can afford it and want to impress guests.

French Reds and Whites

A must in any good cellar. France still produces the best wine in the world. Their red Bordeaux’s, unapproachable when young, can turn into very special wines given time. Top Bordeaux is expensive but ‘lesser’ wines can still be almost as good. Gibraltar is not the best place to buy Bordeaux but The Cellar in Irish Town are trying hard

to get us to go ‘French’. Pay them a visit, then do your homework, then buy! Frances age-worthy whites can be exceptional but the choice locally is exceedingly limited. Red Burgundy is now so expensive few people can afford to drink fine examples. In my wine group we all have good stashes of Burgundybought when it was affordable, proving it makes sense to start a cellar as soon as you can! If you can’t get hold of Burgundy, mature Rioja is almost identical except for its distinctive vanilla notes from Rioja’s American oak barrels.

Germany

Germany is still hounded by its disastrous wine laws designed to confuse the consumer, hard to understand labels, and industrial quantities of cheap sugary wines. Nevertheless, top notch Rieslings can challenge France’s best at a fraction of the price. Few white wines have the ageing potential of German Rieslings which will last decades. Note the interplay of sweetness and acidity. Heavenly! These wines are the Desert Island wines of many wine experts. Soon to be discovered by millionaires I am told. Do your homework and buy, buy, buy!

Port

No cellar would be complete without a few bottles of vintage port. The wines geek’s sweet wine par excellence. Vintage port one of the cheapest and easiest ports to produce is the most expensive with consumers expected to age the wine in bottle! Nevertheless, it’s a must. Vintage Port is widely available in Gibraltar but will not be at its best for 20 years more. Drink Late Bottled Vintage Port whilst you wait! 63


leisure

THE EMOTIONAL COST OFCARING

Feeling burnout happens frequently in today's society. Our hectic, socialmedia-attached and sleep-deprived lives render us permanently exhausted. But what do you do when you’re emotionally burnt out? What name do you give the feeling of no longer feeling sympathy to those around you because you feel powerless? What happens when the world wants more empathy than you can give?

BY RESHAM KHIANI

C

ompassion fatigue is a type of stress that involves physical and emotional depletion as a result of caring for someone or getting involved in situations that are emotionally exhausting. People experiencing this usually begin displaying a gradual lack of empathy or indifference toward the person they are caring for. Other symptoms include headaches, digestive problems, feeling overwhelmed and irritability. It affects people in nursing where over-exposure to trauma can lead to health problems for the nurses, and worsened outcomes for patients because they are at the receiving end of a burnt-out helper.

64

It’s normal to feel emotionally overburdened when you take on a ‘helping role’. And in most cases, a simple way to alleviate this is by taking a step back and making sure you’re taking care of yourself first. Trying to help a friend through a tough situation not only impacts you because you care about your friend and want to help lessen their struggle, but also because not knowing how to help to take away their pain can feel overwhelming.

in Harley Street in 2009, I was exposed to hundreds of patients speaking about unimaginable traumas, always wishing I could ease their pain - but gradually I became numb. And not because I did not care, quite the opposite; I cared excessively, I just knew that such situations were battling for my empathy, my kindness, my compassion. I genuinely care about helping people (I love it!), but at that time of my life my empathy levels were dangerously depleted. I could no longer give the emotional attention others required from me.

Not knowing how to help to take away their pain can feel overwhelming.

I can relate to the symptoms of compassion fatigue: having worked as a medical assistant

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


leisure I spoke to a local nurse about my experiences and asked if she ever experienced anything similar from dealing with patients: “Yes I have felt traumatised, especially if you are dealing with a patient that reminds you of that trauma. For example, I remember dealing with someone who had cancer. This brought back painful memories of losing a relative to cancer who died and left behind three children. It was very painful because they were very young.” The American Institute of Stress website describes it perfectly: “We have not been directly exposed to the trauma scene, but we hear the story told with such intensity, or we hear similar stories so often, or we have the gift and curse of extreme empathy and we suffer. We feel the feelings of our clients. We experience their fears. We dream their dreams. Eventually, we lose a certain spark of optimism, humor and hope. We tire. We aren’t sick, but we aren’t ourselves.”

the details of local and global disasters, with every shocking crime, political scandal and climate calamity here and abroad that are saturated with pleas for attention to help? Sexual crimes. Terrorism threats. The Global Warming crisis. Professionals are trained to watch for signs of compassion fatigue, but lately it feels as if everyone is at risk. In today's world, where every tragedy is instantly broadcast live in living colour directly into our living rooms (TV), laptops and our hands (smartphone), this is no longer unique to certain professions.

always succeed.

Numbness or indifference to real atrocity may, from the outside, seem callous. But as psychologist Charles Figley has argued, such fatigue stems from a desire to help. There is no compassion fatigue without compassion: the caregivers at risk see somebody suffering, and they want to reduce that suffering – but they can’t

To see where you fall on the compassion satisfaction/fatigue continuum, take the Professional Quality of Life (PROQOL) questionnaire, which was developed by Dr. Beth Hundall Stamm, one of the world's leading experts on compassion fatigue.

We can’t be there for others if we aren’t there for ourselves first.

Often times this type of exhaustion is a result of either forgetting to check-in with yourself. Sometimes it just feels easier to put other people’s needs before your own. However, we can’t actually be there for others if we aren’t there for ourselves first. Many people feel shame towards themselves for not being able to support their friend the way they would like too. When you begin to feel overwhelmed and overburdened by helplessness, the best thing to do is to reach out for support because dealing with compassion fatigue is hard and something you don’t have to go through alone.

Mother Teresa, the beacon of compassion and empathy, understood the value of selflove and self-caring. She made it mandatory for nuns to take a sabbatical year from caregiving work, every four years, as a means to recuperate. She touted the message how this world requires healers, empaths, carers. But, giving these beautiful emotions to the people around us can sometimes lead to compassion fatigue. After all, if empathy is the root of making this world a better place to live in, what happens when we feel bombarded every day with GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

65


travel

BEYOND THE SHIRE: EXPLORING NZ (PART I)

Sparsely populated mountainous landscapes, empty beaches that stretch for miles, an underlying sense of tranquility emanating through the terrain and the all people you meet along the way… These are the qualities of what is possibly the furthest destination from Gibraltar that should earn a place on your bucket list. New Zealand’s South Island often gets the plaudits for its stunning natural beauty, but with so much to do across the Cook Straight, is its slightly smaller, northern sibling often visited too fleetingly?

BY CHRIS HEDLEY

B

eing so far away from everything, the country as a whole was one of the last land masses to see human settlement. The old forests of New Zealand were ruled by the birds, and with a lack of indigenous mammals to scoff them up whilst taking some time to relax on the ground, a few of these birds developed flightlessness, including the famed (and much loved) kiwi. Of course, eventually humans came over, obliterated the forest in classic human fashion and introduced various animals to feast on the unsuspecting birds, threatening their future existence. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Fortunately, conservation efforts are proving fairly successful nowadays. With the North Island Brown Kiwi being the most common species, you’re more likely to spot a kiwi here than in the South Island. Interestingly, some scientists speculate that its nocturnal habits are a result of trying to avoid introduced predators, with kiwis frequently being seen during the day in the safety of their sanctuaries, but if you’re hoping to spot one in the wild, head out during the night.

Auckland is the main international airport in the North, and with a third of the country’s population choosing to make it their hometown, there’s plenty on offer. Don’t be worried about this being a crowded city, as a third of the population is just somewhere over the 1.5 million mark, and Auckland is one of the most spread out cities in the world.

Auckland is one of the most spread out cities in the world.

Feast on a reasonably-priced dinner in the Orbit 360° restaurant atop the Sky Tower whilst gazing upon incredible 67


travel

views of the city and harbour - just remember that with the revolving floor, your table won’t be where it was if you get up to go to the toilet! If you don’t fancy taking the lifts back to the ground floor, you can always do a (controlled) jump from the top. If jumping off things is your thing, you can also bungy from the harbour bridge, with the added option of being dunked headfirst into the Waitematā. A nice day trip from Auckland is to hop on a ferry to the nearby Waiheke Island where you can soak in the island’s sights with an abundance of walks and biking trails. Ziplining and olive tasting are a couple of the activities on offer, although Waiheke is best known for its wine, so pitch up in one of the vineyards and see if you can find something you like (you will).

68

Driving up from Auckland to the Bay of Islands, many tourists envisage the journey involving a ninety mile stretch along the beach/public highway, seemingly aptly named Ninety Mile Beach. This probably won’t be possible on one count, as rental car companies won’t allow you to drive here for a myriad of reasons, and definitely won’t be possible on the other count as the beach isn’t ninety miles. Not even ninety kilometres. You can still visit the falsely-named beach for the scenery though, but if you really want the experience of beachy road-ness, you can take the bus.

by boat, hopping in and out as you please. This is the best place to get your snorkelling or diving in, and is also a particularly popular fishing destination. Once you’ve had your fill of exploring by water, get yourself back onto dry land and utilise Twin Coast Cycle Trail through old rail tunnels and into New Zealand’s rural countryside. Get your colonial history fix in Waitangi by visiting the site where Maori chiefs signed over sovereignty to the Crown.

You can get your kicks from a number of adrenaline highs.

The Bay of Islands is home to a plethora of other beaches, islands, and waterfalls for you to explore

Variants of the phrase ‘best beaches in the world’ are thrown around all too often, but the Coromandel undoubtedly boasts all the hallmarks of being able to shoulder the claim without demur. Even the drive out East from Auckland (and driving is

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


travel the only option for seeing this country. And by only, I mean best) is a pleasant foreshadowing of the coastal beauty to follow. Go online and book a ‘batch’ (rentable holiday home) near one of the many beaches, and marvel at how you can enjoy the crashing of the rough waves against the shore on these amazing beaches with few others in sight. The busiest area is Hot Water Beach, with hot springs underground that filter up, allowing for, as the names suggests, pools of hot water. It is also, as the name suggests, a beach. One of the two main stops on everybody’s itinerary is Rotorua, and rightly so. People will tell you this is because of the city’s natural geysers, which spray hot water and steam tens of metres into the air, or perhaps its fame as a spa town with thermal hot pools, as well as mud pools. The truth is, there’s an awesome luge activity not far from the city centre where you can race down a hill on a kart/ toboggan through the Redwood Forest with view of Lake Rotorua. Stack your wallet with dollars because you’re going to want to spend them all here. Just note that while walking round and taking in the smells of Rotorua, there’s no need to give your partner those accusatory eyes - it’s the sulphur. The other ‘must see’ of the island is Lake Taupo. As you will have come to expect now in your travels around the North Island, a certain level of serenity can be found here. Paradoxically, as you may also have come to expect, you can get your kicks from a number of adrenaline highs, the most popular being a flight over the top of the lake, with a little jump out of the plane when you get to the middle. Parachute GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

provided. In November you can take part in the 160km bicycle race around the lake. Nearby Huka Falls does it’s best to drain Lake Taupo with its set of waterfalls, which is worth a visit. And a short walk from here you can sample some of the best artisan New Zealand and Manuka honey around at the Huka Honey Hive. Of course, Taupo also has its own natural hot springs to laze in and geothermal park, Craters of the Moon, to walk around. If you really like walking, you’ll want to visit the nearby Tongariro National Park.

active volcanoes that feature in the films. But over fifteen years after the release of the final film, coming here just for the gimmick of having seen it on the big screen is on the decline. I guess now you’ll just have to visit the park for its emerald lakes, steaming moonscape, and giant red crater. Volcanoes and hot springs come as standard. Of course, if you have flown all this way to go Lord of the Rings spotting, you’ll want to visit Hobbiton, a twohour drive from Auckland. The once film set has been preserved and renovated, re-used for the later series of ‘Hobbit’ movies, and is now still a popular enough attraction to warrant booking a tour before arrival.

Visit the park for its emerald lakes, steaming moonscape, and giant red crater.

The Tongariro Alpine Crossing grew in fame in the aftermath of the Lord of the Rings film, given that you cross over two

69


travel in the area, the soil has given the city a reputation for its gardens. New Plymouth is also known for hosting numerous events, art festivals, garden shows, music concerts and so on, so check out what’s on before your arrival.

reason people come here. The real reason is a combination of caves and the inhabitant worms that illuminate them. There are numerous boat tours on offer to see the extensive cave network, decorated with what seems to be the lights of a distant, intricate galaxy system rather than the backsides of a thousand maggots. In true New Zealand fashion, you can intertwine your peaceful nature holiday with a spot of black water rafting or abseiling. Any of the aforementioned activities is reason enough to visit on its own. Each year almost a million people flock to the little village of Waitomo. It’s pretty rural and has a number of nice walks that will take you past a couple of waterfalls and over a natural bridge. Even if you tried to drive around the area to escape the natural beauty, you wouldn’t be able to. But that’s not the 70

On the west coast, New Plymouth is visited by fewer tourists than the big names of the North Island each year, and therefore effuses even more repose. The coastal walkway offers scenery that you have come to expect, and the conical, volcanic Mount Taranaki offers a pleasant backdrop. Because of all the volcanic activity

The similarities between New Zealand’s capital city and the southern Spanish seaside town of Tarifa aren’t immediately apparent, but as you walk around Wellington you’ll start to feel something flowing through you that intrinsically links the two. The city’s varied architectural styles from over the 150 years aren’t so similar. For example the engineering feat that is Te Papa. The combined National Museum and Art Gallery has transformed Wellington into a busier tourist destination since its inception in 1998. Then, as you’re outside overlooking the harbour, enjoying your lunch, it suddenly hits you. It’s always windy. Fine for a day or two, annoying after a week, and one can only assume that the deepest circle of hell, amidst the fire and brimstone, has an ever present, slightly-too-strong breeze. With so much on the list of things to do in the North Island, so many volcanoes to climb, beaches to visit, and lakes to swim in, the truth is that the best part is driving out into the wilderness and getting lost in the countryside. A campervan is a great way to see the place with plenty of sites dotted around. The natural course is to vaguely head south after arriving in Auckland because after all, if you are finishing up in Wellington, it’s just a three-and-a-half-hour ferry ride across the Cook Straight to the wonders of the South Island…

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


Need to get to Malaga Airport? Twice daily shuttle between Gibraltar and Malaga Airport

www.gibraltarshuttle.com

Blands Travel also offer a shuttle service from Gibraltar Airport to local hotels. Find out more on

www.gibraltarshuttle.com Please contact us on the details below for further information:

(+350) 2005 0932 or access@gibraltarshuttle.com


Our team of barristers and solicitors have over 25 years of experience in dealing with a wide range of disputes including high level commercial litigation, constitutional matters, as well as actions against various governmental, financial and banking institutions. Phillips are pleased to offer you a free 30 minute consultation to determine how we can assist you in solving your legal problems. Trusts • Employment • Commercial • Family • Private Client • Public Law • Criminal • Medical Negligence • Personal Injury • Ship & Yacht Registration • Landlord & Tenant • Financial Services • Wills & Probate • EU Law • International Private Law • Conveyancing

www.phillips.gi 292A Main Street, Gibraltar • +350 200 73900 • info@phillips.gi


travel

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

73


GIB MAG CHAL L ENGE

HOW FAR AWAY FROM THE ROCK CAN YOU GET YOUR COPY OF THE GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE? Send us a snap of you holding the magazine somewhere exotic, and you could win a week of meals at Supernatural, and cocktails for 2 at Paradise Tiki Bar! Competition closes June 30th. Email entries to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com


fashion BLACK SHORTS WITH ORANGES PRINT, DOROTHY PERKINS £22.00

SUMMER STYLING: SHORTS

There’s no doubt that the clothes we wear are able to have a direct impact on how we feel about ourselves. At this point, I know myself well enough to gravitate towards my go-to colours, silhouettes and styles, and steer clear from that which doesn’t make me feel my best self. I’ve personally always been a big lover of shorts, but I’m not sure if the majority of women would agree with the sentiment… BY JULIA COELHO

F

or some reason, many people feel intimidated by shorts, or perhaps they still struggle to live down their fairly bad rep of being somewhat unflattering and unfeminine. Aside from tiny booty denim styles, which are a firm favourite particularly among the Gibraltarian youth, it seems that a huge chunk of the female population continues to steer clear of shorts, reserving them for our male counterparts instead. With a little guidance, you’ll find that shorts can actually be many things: adaptable, flattering, stylish, formal and also fun. Bare leg season is here at last, so why 76

not embrace some of this year’s shorts trends and wear them with confidence?

BELOW: POCKETS STRUCTURED BLAZER AND BELT BERMUDA SHORTS, MANGO, £119.98

SHORT SUITS It is often the most uncomplicated ensembles that pack the most stylish punch. Suits are as simple and timeless as it gets, but as we’ve all experienced at some point or another, they’re not exactly ideal for the heat and humidity we experience in Gibraltar throughout the summer months. But fear not, because an updated weather-appropriate iteration has burst on the scene, as short suits are set to become one of the key focuses of summer GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


fashion

‘Jorts’: the type of shorts an older aunt might wear on holiday. novel and unrealistic look reserved solely for a small percentage of the population. Just as I was getting to the point where I wasn’t finding them totally shocking, the fashion world decided to throw out yet another curveball and introduce a new style to the mix. Believe it or not, denim cycling shorts are the latest addition to emerge from this already polarising trend. ABOVE: SUPER SKINNY SUIT IN STONE LINEN, TWISTED TAILOR, £175.00

2019, with dozens of versions already hitting the high street at full pelt. A blazer and matching shorts may strike you as a bit of a fashion faux pas, but the combination is unarguably quite practical. It’s a complete look; chic yet comfortable, and the best part is that you can wear both items separately, essentially making it a 3-for-1 purchase. Ditch the blazer when the real heat starts to kick in and pair the shorts with a cute cami or oversized tee, and wear the full set on cooler evenings, particularly when you require a smooth desk to drinks transition. Luckily, they can be styled in various ways; with smart mules for the ultimate put-together look, and even with minimal trainers for the perfect marriage of business and casual. CYCLING SHORTS When the dreaded cycling shorts trend first burst onto the scene a few seasons back, I wrote them off as nothing more than a fleeting Kardashian-inspired trend - a GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

We've been conditioned to associate longer cut-offs, otherwise known as ‘Jorts’: the type with somewhat questionable taste; the type of shorts an older aunt might

wear on holiday. The trend has been keeping a fairly low profile for the past few seasons, but as summer begins to loom closer, brands and retailers have begun stocking them in all shapes and colours, confirming that they are officially a thing. If you’re like me and the knee-grazing length still terrifies you, try out a mid-length pair to build yourself up to the trend slowly. PAPER BAG WAIST

Probably my personal favourite style, paper bag waist shorts are extremely flattering and look good on absolutely everyone. I like to make the most of the higher waistline by pairing them with cute crop tops or bodies; they have the ability to make any outfit look effortlessly stylish and feminine, as well as cinching

ABOVE: ACID WASH JONI CYCLING SHORTS, TOPSHOP, £26.00

RIGHT: SHORTS WITH PAPERBAG WAIST AND TIE, ASOS, £12.00

77


fashion in the waist just that little bit more, to complement your body in all the right places.

sure to show off those statement pockets. RUFFLE SHORTS Ruffle shorts are probably the more feminine of the styles on offer this season. Let the ruffle detailing do the talking, whether they’re all over or just on the hem, and keep the rest of your look fairly simple and understated. They make for a lovely beach outfit, but are also perfectly appropriate for a summer’s

Pleated shorts present the perfect balance between fashion and function. Their traditionally midlength silhouette elevates their suitability for the workplace, as they’re not far off from a traditional suit. They can be styled in so many different ways, from a smart pair of court heels and refined blouse, to a pair of chunky trainers and baggy tee.

ABOVE: RUST UTILITY DENIM SHORTS, TOPSHOP, £35.00 RIGHT: SCHEME CARGO SHORTS IN CAMO, BILLABONG, £55.00

BELOW: RELAXED SHORTS WITH PLEATS IN TEXTURED FABRIC, ASOS, £25.00

UTILITY SHORTS If you love utilitarian pieces and were into last autumn and winter’s boiler suit trend, the next item on your list should be a pair of utility shorts. Also known as cargo shorts, these are easily the most practical of the bunch, and this year they’ve undergone some stylish tweaks from the styles we used to wear back in the 90s. Pair them with a billowy linen shirt for a casually cool look - and be 78

ABOVE: BEIGE GINGHAM FRILL SHORTS WITH LINEN, TOPSHOP, £22.00

night out. BOX PLEATS GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


MAYFAIR

HAIR GALLERY

by

MAYFAIR ONMAIN

Gibraltar’s first Champagne Blowdry Bar

The

Chelsea

The

Sloane

The

Knightsbridge

The

Notting Hill

The

Mayfair

The

Westminster

Get red carpet, wedding or meeting ready whilst being pampered in luxurious surroundings. Mayfair Hair Gallery offers Mayfair On Mains trademark luxury styling, exclusive service and private members club feel which ensures you can get social before, during and after we work our magic on your crowning glory. Select which London style* suits your event and leave the rest to us. *Bespoke and express options also available.

MHG For more information or to enjoy the Mayfair Hair Gallery experience, call the salon on 00350 20075913 87 Governors Street, Gibraltar, GX11 1AA • www.mayfaironmain.gi


recipes Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/thegibraltarvegan

FUNKY VEGAN POTATO SALAD

This is no ordinary potato salad, this leaves Russian salad, Olivier salad and all others for dust! What makes this potato salad so funky is instead of plain vegan mayonnaise it uses sriracha mayo chilli sauce from Flying Goose. This gives the salad a tasty slight heat that is great by itself on the beach or a fantastic accompaniment at any BBQ.

This makes one medium sized serving bowl. INGREDIENTS 3 Medium sized white potatoes 1 Large carrot 140g Green peas 140g Sweetcorn 7g Cornichons

80

7 Tbsp Flying Goose sriracha mayo chilli sauce

minutes

METHOD

5. Once cooled, dice the cornichons and add to the dish

1. Dice the potatoes and carrots 2. Boil these two ingredients in a pot until cooked, not al dente but not mushy either 3. Add the peas and sweetcorn and cook for a further three

4. Drain the potatoes, carrots, peas and sweetcorn and leave to cool

6. Mix in the Flying Goose sriracha mayo chilli sauce 7. Leave for a few hours before serving to get the best taste, but it is ok to devour immediately GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


recipes Recipe by Mama Lotties: www.mamalotties.com

DAIRY FREE BANANA CHOC ‘ICE-CREAM’

If you know me by now then you’d know I love a good sweet treat, coconut and simple things. Truth be told I don’t think there’s anything simpler than this when making a dessert, especially one that will keep you nice and cool in the summer.

INGREDIENTS 5–6 bananas 300ml coconut cream 100g 70% dark chocolate METHOD 1. Peel the bananas and place them in the freezer over night GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

or for a few hours before until entirely frozen. 2. Remove them from the freezer 20 minutes before making your ice cream and grab a food processor. 3. Chop the bananas down and add bananas to the food processor, Give them a few spins

to break them down until crumbly then pour in your coconut cream and continue to blend until you have a smooth puree mixture. 4. Roughly chop your chocolate and add a few into the icecream mixture and serve with a chocolate sprinkling on top.

81


SOVEREIGN INSURANCE SERVICES THE MOTOR INSURANCE YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR Now available in Gibraltar for the first time, and arranged through Sovereign Insurance Services, high quality insurance for high quality Gibraltar-plated cars. Chubb Masterpiece policies offer unrivalled features not currently available through a local policy, from an international specialist in offering tailored cover for all your property, art, jewellery and motor insurance requirements. For a private consultation, quotation or further information on how we can tailor an insurance solution that exactly matches your needs, please contact Neil Entwistle on 200 52908, or via e-mail at enquiries@sis.gi

THIS INNOVATIVE APPROACH OFFERS SIMPLE ADMINISTRATION

AWARD-WINNING CLAIMS SERVICE

No proposal or claims forms needed

Designed to be hassle free

PROVEN VALUE FOR MONEY

WIDEST BREADTH OF COVER CURRENTLY AVAILABLE IN GIBRALTAR

Compared to your existing arrangements

Including underinsurance and replacement value protection

2-4 Ocean Village Promenade, Gibraltar +350 200 52908 www.sis.gi Bespoke Insurance for Corporate and Private Clients 82

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Sovereign Insurance Services (SIS) is licensed by the Gibraltar Financial Services Commission (FSC 00957B) to act as an insurance intermediary for general insurance business in Gibraltar, the United Kingdom and elsewhere within the EEU under EU passporting directives.


restaurants, bars & pubs THE LOUNGE

SOLO BAR & GRILL

ALL’S WELL

Stylish Lounge Gastro Bar on Queensway Quay Marina serving best quality food prepared by passionate, qualified chefs. Popular quiz on Sundays from 7pm and a relaxed friendly atmosphere. A separate Lounge Bar Area serving a wide range of hot drinks, wines, beers, spirits and cocktails at reasonable prices, with large TV’s for sports and events coverage.

Solo Bar and Grill is a stylish and modern eatery — perfect for business functions or lunches — and part of the popular Cafe Solo stable. Serving everything from Goats’ Cheese Salad, Mediterranean Pâté and Cajun Langoustines to Beer Battered John Dory, or Harissa Chicken, and Chargrilled Sirloin Steak. This is a delightful venue in Europort with a cosy mezzanine level and terrace seating. Well worth a visit, or two! Available for private functions and corporate events — call 200 62828 to book your function or event.

In the fashionable Casemates square stands Gibraltar’s last historical themed pub, named for the 18th-century practice of locking gates to the city at night when the guard called ‘All’s Well’. Their food menu caters to all cravings; whether it’s fish and chips, a homemade pie, or maybe even a delicious sharing platter, they have it all. All’s Well have an amazing range of bottled beers as well as being the only pub in Gibraltar to offer craft beer on tap. Happy hour is daily from 7-9pm. Large terrace. Karaoke Mondays & Wednesdays until late.

Open: 10am-late Mon - Sun Be sure to arrive early to ensure a seat! The Lounge, 17 Ragged Staff Wharf, Queensway Quay Marina Tel: 200 61118 info@thelounge.gi

Open: 12-8pm. Solo Bar & Grill, Eurotowers Tel: 200 62828

All’s Well, Casemates Square. Tel: 200 72987

CASA PEPE

NUNOS ITALIAN

CAFÉ SOLO

A delightful terrace, bar, restaurant on the prestigious Queensway Quay Marina. Wonderful location for business meetings, weddings, anniversaries and other special occasions. Specialising in fresh fish caught locally with daily specials including seabass, dorada, sole, and bream, plus a very comprehensive a la carte menu. Also available are tapas and raciones (double size tapas) to share (or not!) prior to a main course. Mixed paellas also available, as well as fish cooked in rock salt, whole suckling pig and baby lamb to order.

Nunos Italian Restaurant, overlooking the Mediterranean, is popular with hotel guests, tourists and local residents. This 2 rosette rated, AA restaurant is renowned for its eclectic interior, intimate atmosphere and fine cuisine. Savour a wide selection of freshly prepared Italian delicacies, including bread, pasta, meat and fish, followed by delicious desserts. In the summer months, the hotel offers alfresco dining for private parties in the Garden Grill. Sitting nestled in the colonial garden you can enjoy a mouth-watering menu of charcoal-grilled meats and freshly prepared salads in candlelit surroundings.

Modern Italian eatery set in lively Casemates square. Everything from chicory and crispy pancetta salad with walnuts, pears and blue cheese dressing, or king prawn, mozzarella and mango salad to pastas (eg: linguine with serrano ham, king prawns and rocket; smoked salmon and crayfish ravioli with saffron and spinach cream) to salads (eg: Vesuvio spicy beef, cherry tomatoes, roasted peppers and red onions; and Romana chorizo, black pudding, egg and pancetta) and pizzas (eg: Quatto Stagioni topped with mozzarella, ham, chicken, pepperoni and mushroom) and specialities such as salmon fishcakes, beef medallions and duck. Daily specials on blackboard. No smoking.

Open: Tues-Sat lunch & evening, Sunday lunch only, closed Mondays. Casa Pepe, 18 Queensway Quay Marina, Tel/Fax: 200 46967 casa.pepe.gib@gmail.com. www.casapepegib.com

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

Open: Mon-Sun 1-3pm lunch, 7–11pm dinner Nunos Italian Restaurant and Terrace Caleta Hotel, Catalan Bay Tel: 200 76501

Email: reservations@caletahotel.gi

Café Solo Grand Casemates Square. Tel: 200 44449

83


information EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY: ALL EMERGENCIES................................. 112 FIRE...............................................................190 AMBULANCE.............................................190 POLICE.................................................................199

Business Information Financial Serv. Commission Tel: 200 40283/4 Chamber of Commerce Tel: 200 78376 Federation Small Business Tel: 200 47722 Company Registry.Tel: 200 78193 Useful Numbers Airport (general info.) . Tel: 200 12345 Hospital, St Bernards. . Tel: 200 79700 Weather information. . Tel: 5-3416 Frontier Queue Update Tel: 200 42777 Gibraltar Museum Tel: 200 74289 18/20 Bomb House Lane 10am-6pm (Sat 10am-2pm). Admission: Adults £2/Children under 12 - £1. Exhibitions also at Casemates gallery.

Police 200 72500

Gibraltar Services Police Emergency Nos: (5) 5026 / (5) 3598

Gibraltar Garrison Library Tel: 200 77418 2 Library Ramp Mon-Fri: 9am-5pm. Free Library tour offered every Friday at 11am. chris.tavares@gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi

Gibraltar Public Holidays 2019

Registry Office Tel: 200 72289 It’s possible to get married within 48 hours. A fact taken advantage of by stars such as Sean Connery & John Lennon.

Good Friday

Rock Tours by Taxi Tel: 200 70052 As well as offering normal fares, taxis provide Rock Tours taking in the Upper Rock, Europa Point etc.

Spring Bank Holiday

Monday 27th May

Queen’s Birthday

Monday 17th June

John Mackintosh Hall Tel: 200 75669 Includes cafeteria, theatre, exhibition rooms and library. 308 Main Street 9.30am - 11pm Mon-Fri.

Late Summer Bank Holiday

Monday 26th Aug

Gibraltar National Day Tuesday 10th Sept

New Year’s Day Commonwealth Day Easter Monday

Monday 1st Jan Monday 11th Mar Friday 19th Apr Monday 22nd Apr

Workers Memorial Day Monday 29th Apr May Day

Christmas Day Boxing Day

Wednesday 1st May

Wednesday 25th Dec Thursday 26th Dec

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD Gibraltar adhdgibraltar@gmail.com facebook.com/ADHDGibraltar/ Alcoholics Anonymous meet 7pm Tues & Thurs at Nazareth House Tel: 200 73774. A Step Forward support for single, separated, divorced/widowed people, meet 8pm Mon at St Andrew’s Church. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group those who are pregnant, breastfeeding or have breastfed to get together for coffee / support. Partners and older children welcome. Meets 1st Wed / month at Chilton Court Community Hall at 1.30pm. Enquiries and support 54014517. Childline Gibraltar confidential phone line for children in need. Freephone 8008 - 7 days a week 5pm - 9pm Citizens’ Advice Bureau Open Mon-Thur 9:30am-4:00pm, Fri 9:30am- 3:30pm. Tel: 200 40006 Email: info@cab.gi or visit at 10 Governor’s Lane. Free & confidential, impartial & independent advice and info.

84

COPE Support group for people with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia or Rheumatoid Arthritis. Meetings at Catholic Community Centre Book Shop at 7.30pm first Thur of each month. Tel: 200 51469 Email: copeadsupport@hotmail.com Dignity At Work Now Confidential support and advice for those who are being bullied at work. Tel: 57799000. Families Anonymous Support group for relatives and friends concerned about the use of drugs or related behavioural problems. Meet weekly on Thurs at 9pm at Gladys Perez Centre, 304A Main Street, Tel: 54007676 or 54014484. Gamblers Anonymous Telephone: 54001520 Gibraltar Cardiac Rehabilitation and Support Group meets on the first Tues of every month at 8.30pm at John Mac Hall, except for Jul & Aug. Gibraltar Dyslexia Support Group 72 Prince Edwards Rd Tel: 200 78509 Mobile: 54007924 website: www.gdsg.co.uk Gibraltar Marriage Care Free relationship counselling, including pre-marriage education (under auspices of Catholic Church, but open to all). Tel: 200 71717.

Gibraltar Society for the Visually Impaired Tel: 200 50111 (24hr answering service). Hope miscarriage support Tel: 200 41817. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support: Meets every Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous Tel: 200 70720 Parental Support Group helping parents and grandparents with restrictive access to their children and grandchildren. Tel: 200 46536, 200 76618, or 54019602. Psychological Support Group, PO Box 161, Nazareth House. Meet Tuesdays at 7pm, Fridays 8pm. Tel: Yolanda 54015553 With Dignity Gibraltar support for separated, divorced/widowed or single people. Meet Weds 9pm, Catholic Community Centre, Line Wall Rd. Outings/activities. Women in Need Voluntary organisation for all victims of domestic violence. Refuge available. Tel: 200 42581 (24 hrs).

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

The Gibraltar Magazine is published and produced by Rock Publishing Ltd, Gibraltar. Tel: (+350) 200 77748

NON-URGENT CALLS: Ambulance Station 200 75728


BY STEFANO BLANCA SCIACALUGA (WWW.STEFANOBLANCA.COM)

TAKEN A GREAT PHOTO OF GIB AND THINK EVERYONE SHOULD SEE IT? Email your high resolution photo to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com and you might see it published here!


satire

SEAGULL SETBACKS AND HUMAN HEALTH As the gulls fly free, the Gods mourn high-rise butchery.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

‘F

ish and chips may seem an unlikely source of political policy-making, but there’s the proof,’ Athene nodded towards the chaise longue where Zeus was jabbing an arthritic index finger at a page of newsprint splattered with the grease and remnants of his lunch.

‘You must have noticed just how many of the ideas for Pop’s election manifesto are sparked by items he reads in the wrappings of his take-away lunches. In fact, those old newspapers from the Casemates chippy are all he reads - other than competition entry forms on packets of breakfast cereals.’

Hermes raised a questioning eyebrow: ‘Explain?’

The Goddess of Wisdom and her wing-footed brother had spent

86

the morning on the penthouse patio reluctantly taking to pieces the seagull loft that Hermes and Dionysus had built to house the racing gulls which Zeus had hoped to breed and sell to fund his election campaign. It had all begun so well. The previous week, half a dozen mackerel, speared by Poseidon and laid out on the patio, had attracted a squadron of GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


satire squabbling seagulls, five of which were easily netted and confined in the lath and chicken-netting loft. Surprisingly, in millennia punctuated by improbable muddles, the first step in Zeus’ funding campaign had gone as planned. But, where gods’ interventions could tumble the best laid plans of mice and men, so mortal intervention could upset the Olympian apple-cart. Although the inhabitants of Marina Bay were used to the cries and squabbles of gulls, the incessant cacophony of the five captives prompted a string of un-neighbourly complaints... and, in an urgent response 72 hours later, a town planning official armed with a clipboard and an array of multi-coloured biros, arrived at the penthouse to inform the Olympians that their seagull loft was ‘an illegal structure’ and must be removed ‘forthwith’. [However, by then, not only had the decibel levels dropped to the murmur of traffic on the streets below, but even the usual avian activity in the vicinity of the penthouse had stopped. It was as though the birds were deliberately avoiding Zeus and his offspring, Hera remarked.

taken the captive birds to open water west of Europa Point, and released them. But, instead of flying back up the Bay towards Ocean Village, the gulls had headed on a course to Morocco.] Two days later, Zeus’ angry response to the town planner’s demolition demand was ignored, and even a waved fist clenching a clutch of mini-thunderbolts was met with a ‘say’s-who’ sneer. Long after the bureaucrat had left, the Father of the Gods continued to seethe and fume, ranting against ‘tin-pot authorities who allow the development of ugly concrete canyons which are filled with lethal exhaust fumes, but bar ordinary citizens permission to own a simple aviary.’

Helped by a friendly fisherman, Hermes and Poseidon had GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

‘Well it doesn’t specify sexual responsibility, though you’re probably right. Male mortals are not much use when it comes to multi-tasking.’ Hera had joined her husband, and was peering at the newsprint. ‘What it does say – and I quote – is that “Nature’s current rate of decline is unparalleled, and the accelerating rate of extinctions means grave impacts on people around the world”,’ she read aloud.

And the outburst against ‘ecological criminals’, ‘bureaucratic wrong-doers who issue permits’ and the resultant ‘high-rise monstrosities’ had rumbled on...

‘I heard about the UN report on the BBC,’ said Athene from the patio door. ‘It links the loss of species to human activity and shows how those losses are undermining food and water security, as well as human health.’

Now, like some volcano about to erupt, Zeus continued to rumble, his plaints now centred on the news report which he continued to jab,

‘But it has nothing to do with gender’, said her brother. ‘Ouch!’ as a piece of the coiled chicken wire snagged Hermes’ ear. ‘Something to do with carbon footprints – whatever they are.’

‘It says here, and I quote’, he rumbled – savouring the phrase he had come upon during a foray into doorstep canvassing – ‘and I quote (he repeated) “One million plant and animal species are on the verge of extinction, with alarming implications for human survival, according to a United Nations report. More plants and animals are threatened with extinction now than any other period in human history,”

‘Carbon dioxide emissions,’ said Zeus firmly. ‘And they come from everything - from the concrete used for high-rise buildings, to the exhaust fumes of cars and scooters that clutter the streets, high-rise buildings are anathema (another word to be savoured from the party-canvasser’s lexicon) they are...are...’ - Zeus searched for a word to fit the occasion – ‘they’re a blasphemy. Against nature,’ he added quickly.

Half a dozen mackerel had attracted a squadron of squabbling seagulls.

And the loft at the heart of the neighbours’ complaints was empty, for, as Zeus was forced to admit, gulls clearly did not share the homing instinct of pigeons.

‘That sounds really serious,’ said Artemis looking up from her iPad, where she was preparing a pamphlet urging female emancipation in Anatolia. ‘And I bet it will be the men who are to blame...’

‘How anyone permits them to 87


satire be built amazes even me... I who have seen so much of mortal folly and idiocy, heard it from the lips of Sophocles and Aristotle when there were arguments among the Athens hoi-poloi about the ecological impact of building the Parthenon. And as for those who inhabit the highrise apartments – they’re as guilty as the builders and town planners. They should be lined up and...’

an exception...There’s always exceptions which prove the rule,’ said Zeus firmly. ‘Without the concrete and the exhaust fumes and town planners, Gibraltar’s Rock would be as perfect a home as was Olympus three millennia ago. And when I move into No6, one of the first things the Codswallop Coalition Government will do is to close down the town planning department.’

‘But Pops, we live in a high-rise... and one with a luxury penthouse to boot,’ Hermes interrupted his father’s rant.

‘Dad is right about things changing for the worse,’ said Artemis ‘But forget the millennia, I’ve seen photographs showing what Gibraltar looked like only 30 or 40 years ago. There were a few low apartment blocks,

A waved fist clenching a clutch of minithunderbolts was met with a sneer.

‘Well, we’re not mortals, so it doesn’t apply to us. We are

04 Jun '19 - 10 Jun '19

DUTY PHARMACY OPENING HOURS

11 Jun ‘19 – 17 Jun ‘19

Monday to Friday (7pm to 9pm) Weekends & public holidays (11am to 1pm & 6pm to 8pm)

18 Jun ‘19 – 24 Jun ‘19

For updates, check facebook.com/PharmaGuide

25 Jun ‘19 – 1 Jul ‘19

but not a high-rise to be seen. Beautiful,’ she sighed. ‘You could say that what has happened here is a classic example of how nature can be butchered...’ bother to look up the meaning of a word like that. The majority, the hoi-polloi won’t be bothered, and it’s their vote that the Codswallop Coalition is looking to win.’ ‘There’s also another definition’, said Athene. ‘Meaningless or insincere flattery, or conventions,’ she read from the iPad. ‘Damn. Damn. Damn’, Zeus frowned. ‘That’s far too accurate a description. We can’t use it.’

Ocean Pharmacy

Unit 2 Ocean Village Avenue  200 76822

Morrison's Pharmacy

Morrisons Store Westside Road  200 75765

Wesley Pharmacy

299b Main Street  200 67567

Valmar Pharmacy Europort 1.0.08 Eurotowers  200 63868

CHESS PUZZLE ANSWER: 1...Qxe1+

88

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


little dictionary

shrewdness WE'VE HIDDEN A

SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE MAGAZINE...

noun

CAN YOU FIND HIM?

the quality of having or showing good powers of judgement

email monkey@thegibraltarmagazine.com with his location by 20th June

AND YOU COULD WIN A HUNGRY MONKEY VOUCHER!!!

e.g. The politician's shrewdness led to his triumph in the debate.

Last month's winner: Nagrani (Omni Crystal) hungrymonkey.gi | info@hungrymonkey.gi | +(350) 200 78814 /hungrymonkey.gi/

Looking for gi or restaurant ideas? Look no further...

Find what you need 24/7! The Gibraltar Telephone Directory

www.gibyellow.gi

print | web | mobile

29 City Mill Lane, Gibraltar +350 200 72470 / info@littleenglish.eu


clubs & activities Arts & Crafts Cross Stitch Club: John Mackintosh Hall, 1st Floor, Mon 6-8pm, fee £1. Gibraltar Arts & Crafts Association: Children: Mon&Fri 12.30-2pm, Mon-Fri 3.45-5.15pm Adults: Wed 5.45-7.15, Sat 10.30 to 12.30, Tel: 20073865 email: gibartsandcrafts@hotmail.com Knit and Natter Group: Tues 11am-3pm, Thurs 5.30-7.30pm, at Arts & Crafts Shop, Casemates balcony. Free to join and refreshments provided. Tel: 20073865. The Arts Centre: Prince Edward’s Road, Art classes for children and adults. For more info call Tel: 200 79788. The Fine Arts Association Gallery: At Casemates. Open 10am-2pm, 3-6pm Mon-Fri, Sat 11am-1pm. The Gibraltar Decorative and Fine Arts Society: Affiliated to UK NADFAS meets third Wed of the month at 6.30pm at Eliott Hotel - lecturers & experts from the UK talk on Art etc. Contact: Chairman Claus Olesen 200 02024 claus.olesen@sghambros.com. Membership Ian Le Breton 200 76173 ilebreton@SovereignGroup.com Board Games Calpe Chess Club & Junior Club: meets in Studio 1, John Mackintosh Hall Thursday, Juniors: 5p.m. - 7 p.m. / Tuesday & Thursday 7p.m. - 10:30 The Gibraltar Scrabble Club: Meets on Tuesdays at 3pm. Tel: Vin 20073660 or Roy 20075995. All welcome. The Subbuteo Club: Meets in Charles Hunt Room, John Mackintosh Hall. Dance Adult Dance Classes: Wed evenings at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre from 7-8.30pm. Contact Dilip on 200 78714. Art in Movement Centre: Hip-hop/Break Dance, Contemporary Dance, Pilates, Capoeira, Acrobatics, Street Kids & Tods, Modern Dance. Performance and Film opportunities. Judo & Jujitsu Classes: Tue/ Thur with Sensei Conroy. All ages. Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. www. artinmovement.net FB: Art In Movement A.I.M, tel 54025041 or 54007457 Ballet, Modern Theatre, Contemporary & Hip-hop: weekly at Danza Academy. Training from 3 years to Adult Advanced. 68/2 Prince Edward’s Rd Tel: 54027111. Bellydance Classes, all levels, Tue 8-9pm at the Ocean Village Gym (non–members welcome). Contact 54005593. DSA Old & Modern Sequence Dancing: Sessions at Central Hall Fri 8.30pm, beginners 8pm. Tel: 200 78901 or tony@ gibraltar.gi Everybody welcome. Modern & Latin American Sequence Dancing: Mon at Catholic Community Centre 8pm. Tel. Andrew 200 78901. Modern, Contemporary, Lyrical, Flexibility, Hip Hop & Dance Theatre: Classes weekly at Urban Dance Studio, 2 Jumpers Bastion. Tel: Yalta 54012212 or Jolene 54015125. Rockkickers Linedance Club: Governor’s Meadow 1st School. www.rockkickers.com Salsa Gibraltar Salsa: Tues at Laguna Social Club, Laguna Estate. Beginners 7-8.30pm. Intermediates 8.30-10pm. Tel: Mike 54472000 or info@salsagibraltar.com Zumba Classes at Urban Dance: Jumpers Bastion, with certified instructor Tyron Walker. Tel: 20063959 or 54012212 or Twitter: @UrbanDanceGib History & Heritage The Gibraltar Heritage Trust: Main Guard, 13 John Mackintosh Sq. Tel: 200 42844. The Gibraltar Classic Vehicle Association: Dedicated to the preservation of Rock’s transport/motoring heritage. Assists members in restoration / maintenance of classic vehicles. New members welcome. Tel: 200 44643. Garrison Library Tours: at 11am on Fri, duration 1h 50mins. Tel: 20077418. History Alive: Historical re-enactment parade. Main Street up to Casemates Square every Sat at 12 noon. Music Gibraltar National Choir and Gibraltar Junior National Choir: Rehearses at the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Tel: 54831000. The Calpe Band: Mon & Wed. For musicians of brass/woodwind instruments of all standards/ages/abilities 7-9pm. Tel:

90

54017070 or thecalpeband@gmail.com Jazz Nights: Thurs at 9pm at O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel. Tel: 200 70500. Outdoor Activities The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award Gibraltar: Exciting self-development programme for young people worldwide equipping them with life skills to make a difference to themselves, their communities and the world. Contact: Award House, North Mole Road, PO Box: 1260. mjpizza@ gibtelecom.net, www.thedukes.gi. Social Clubs The Rotary Club of Gibraltar meets the Rock Hotel, 7pm Tuesday evenings. Guests welcome. For contact or info www.rotaryclubgibraltar.com Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes: (Gibraltar Province) meets RAOB Club, 72/9 Prince Edward’s Road - Provincial Grand Lodge, Thu/month, 7.30pm. William Tilley 2371, Thurs 8.30pm. Buena Vista 9975, monthly, Social Lodge. www.akearn1.wix. com/raob-gibraltar, william.tilley.lodge@ hotmail.co.uk, Clive, tel: 58008074 Special Interest Clubs & Societies Creative Writers Group: meets up on Tuesday mornings at 10.30 in O’Reilley’s Irish Bar and it is free to attend. Tel: Carla 54006696. Gibraltar Book Club: For info Tel: Parissa 54022808. Gibraltar Horticultural Society: meets 1st Thurs of month 6pm, J.M. Hall. Spring Flower Show, slide shows, flower arrangement demos, outings to garden centres, annual Alameda Gardens tour. All welcome. Gibraltar Philosophical Society: devoted to intellectually stimulating debate. Frequent lectures and seminars on a range of topics. Tel: 54008426 or Facebook: facebook.com/gibphilosophy Gibraltar Photographic Society: Meets on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. Wellington Front. Induction courses, talks, discussions, competitions etc. For details contact the secretary on, leslinares@gibtelecom.net Harley Davidson Owners’ Club: www.hdcgib.com Lions Club of Gibraltar: Meets 2nd and 4th Wed of the month at 50 Line Wall Road. www.lionsclubofgibraltar.com St John’s Ambulance: Adult Volunteers Training Sessions from 8-10pm on Tues. Tel: 200 77390 or training@stjohn.gi The Royal British Legion: For info or membership contact the Branch Secretary 20074604 or write to PO Box 332. UN Association of Gibraltar: PO Box 599, 22a Main Street. Tel: 200 52108. Sports Supporters Clubs Tottenham Hotspur Supporters Club: Meets at Star Bar, Parliament Lane, when Spurs games are televised - call prior to matches to check game is televised. Great food for a lunch if KO is early or an early supper if the game is later. Gibraltar Arsenal Supporters Club: Meets match days upstairs at Time Out Café, Eurotowers. Gooners of all ages welcome. For info/news visit www.GibGooners.com Tel: 54010681 (Bill) or 54164000 (John). Gibraltar Hammers: Meets on match days at the Victoria Stadium Bar, Bayside Road. All league games are shown live. All West Ham supporters and their families are welcome. For details visit www.gibraltarhammers.com or gibraltarhammers@hotmail.com Sports & Fitness Artistic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Artistic Gymnastics Association. Tel: Angela 200 70611 or Sally 200 74661. Athletics: Gibraltar Amateur Athletics Association holds competitions through year for juniors, adults and veterans. Two main clubs (Calpeans 200 71807, Lourdians 200 75180) training sessions at Victoria Stadium. Badminton: Recreational badminton weekdays at Victoria Stadium (Tel: 200 78409 for allocations). Gibraltar Badminton Association (affiliated to BWF& BE) junior club/tournaments, senior leagues/ recreational. www.badmintongibraltar.com Ballet Barre Fitness: Adults on Wed 10am & Fri 6pm at The Arts Centre. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Basketball: Gibraltar Amateur Basketball Association (affiliated FIBA) leagues/ training

for minis, passarelle, cadets, seniors and adults at a variety of levels. Tel: John 200 77253, Randy 200 40727. Boxing: Gibraltar Amateur Boxing Association (member IABA) gym on Rosia Rd. Over 13s welcome. Tuition with ex-pro boxer Ernest Victory. Tel: 56382000 or 20042788. Cheerleading: Gibraltar Cheerleading Association, girls and boys of all ages. Cheerleading and street cheer/hip-hop at Victoria Stadium. Recreational / competitive levels. Tel: 58008338. Canoeing: Gibraltar Canoeing Association. Tel: Nigel 200 52917 or Arturo 54025033. Cricket: Gibraltar Cricket, National Governing Body & Associate Member of ICC. Governs International & Domestic Men’s, Women’s, Boys’ & Girls’ cricket- league & cup competitions and in-school coaching. www.gibraltarcricket.com, info@gibcricket. com, Twitter: @Gibraltar_Crick Cycling: Gibraltar Cycling Association various cycling tours. Darts: Gibraltar Darts Association (full member of WDF & affiliate of BDO). We cater for men, ladies & youth who take part in leagues, competitions and a youth academy for the correct development of the sport. Tel: Darren 54027171 Secretary, Alex 54021672 Youth Rep, Justin 54022622 President. Email: info@ gibraltardarts.com Football: Gibraltar Football Association leagues/competitions for all ages OctoberMay. Futsal in summer, Victoria Stadium. Tel: 20042941 www.gibraltarfa.com Gaelic Football Club (Irish sport): Males any age welcome. Get fit, play sport, meet new friends, travel around Spain/Europe and play an exciting and competitive sport. Training every Wed on the MOD pitch on Devil’s Tower Road at 7pm. Andalucia League with Seville and Marbella to play matches home and away monthly. Visit www.gibraltargaels. com or secretary.gibraltar.europe@gaa.ie Hockey: Gibraltar Hockey Association (members FIH & EHF) high standard competitions/training for adults/juniors. Tel: Eric 200 74156 or Peter 200 72730 for info. Iaido: teaches the Japanese sword (Katana), classes every week. www.iaidogibraltar.com Ice Skating: Gibraltar Rock Stars Figure Skating Club lessons every Tuesday evening & Saturday morning, all levels including adults. Contact grsfsc@gmail.com or 58700000 Iwa Dojo, Kendo & Jujitsu: Classes every week, for kids/adults. Tel: 54529000 www. iwadojo.com or dbocarisa@iwadojo.com Judo and Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Budokai Judo Association UKMAF recognised instructors for all ages and levels at Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. Tel: Charlie 20043319. Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Ju-jitsu Academy training and grading for juniors/seniors held during the evening at 4 North Jumpers Bastion. Tel: 54011007. Karate-do Shotokai: Gibraltar Karate-do Shotokai Association - Karate training for junior & seniors at Clubhouse, Shotokai karate centre, 41H Town Range. Monday: 9:30 p.m. & Wednesday 9:45 p.m. Karate: Shotokan karate midday Mon beginners, other students 8.30pm. Thurs 8.30pm. In town at temporary dojo or privately by arrangement. Contact Frankie 54038127 or info@fhmedia.co.uk. Motorboat Racing: Gibraltar Motorboat Racing Association Tel: Wayne 200 75211. Muay Thai and Muay Boran Club: Tues & Thur at Boyd’s Kings Bastion Leisure Centre at 6:30pm, Tel: John – 54024707 FB: Gibraltar Muay Thai Netball: Gibraltar Netball Association (affiliated FENA & IFNA) competitions through year, senior/junior leagues. Tel: 20041874. Petanque: Gibraltar Petanque Association. New members welcome. Tel: 54002652. Pilates: Intermediate Pilates: Tues & Fri 9.30am, beginners Pilates: Fri 10.50am at the Shotokai Centre, 41H Town Range. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Gibraltar Pool Association: (Member of the EBA) home and away league played on Thurs throughout the season, various tournaments played on a yearly basis both nationally and internationally, Tel: 56925000 gibpool@ gibtelecom.net, www.gib8ball.com

Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Rhythmic Gymnastics Association runs sessions from 4 years of age, weekday evenings. Tel: 56000772 or Sally 200 74661. Rugby: Gibraltar Rugby caters for all ages from 4 years old to veterans (over 35’s). It organises competitions and sessions for Juniors; 4 x Senior Clubs; Veterans team; Touch Rugby and a Referees Society. Email admin@gibraltarrfu. com or visit www.gibraltarrfu.com Sailing: Gibraltar Yachting Association junior/ senior competitive programme (April - Oct) Tel: Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club at 200 78897. Shooting: Gibraltar Shooting Federation. Rifle, Europa Point Range (Stephanie 54020760); Clay pigeon, East Side (Harry 200 74354); Pistol, near Royal Naval Hospital (Louis 54095000). Snooker: Members of European Billiards & Snooker Association - facilities at Jumpers Bastion with 3 tables. Professional coaching for juniors/seniors. Organised leagues/ tournaments and participation in international competitions. Tel: 56262000 / 54000068, or info@gibraltarsnooker.com Squash: Gibraltar Squash Association, Squash Centre, South Pavilion Road (members WSF & ESF). Adult and junior tournaments and coaching. Tel: 200 44922. Sub-Aqua: Gibraltar Sub-Aqua Association taster dives for over 14s, tuition from local clubs. Voluntary sports clubs: Noah’s Dive Club and 888s Dive Club. Tel: 54991000. Commercial sports diving schools available. Time - Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.. Telephone, Jenssen Ellul - 54027122 Swimming: Gibraltar Amateur Swimming Association (member FINA & LEN) opens its pool for leisure swimming. Junior lessons, squad for committed swimmers, water polo. Pool open Mon&Thurs: 7-10am, 12.30-4pm. Tue, Wed, Fri: 7-10am, 12:30-5pm. Sat: 3-5pm. Sun: closed. Mon to Fri from 5-6pm groups training. 6-7.30 squad training. Mon, Wed, Fri 7.30-8.30 swimming joggers, Tues & Thurs 7:30-8:30 junior Water polo. Mon, Tues & Thurs 8:30-10pm Adult water polo. Tel: 200 72869. Table Tennis: Gibraltar Table Tennis Association training and playing sessions, Victoria Stadium, Tues 6-10pm and Thurs 8-11pm with coaching and league competition. Tel: 56070000 or 20060720. Taekwondo: Gibraltar Taekwondo Association classes/gradings Tel: Mari 20044142 or www. gibraltartaekwondo.org Tai Chi: Tai Chi for children and adults. MonThur 6.30-8pm at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre and Sat 9am-1pm at the Yoga Centre, 33 Town Range. Tel: Dilip 200 78714. Tennis: Gibraltar Tennis Association, Sandpits Tennis Club. Junior development programme. Courses for adults, leagues and competitions. Tel: Louis 200 77035. Ten-Pin Bowling: At King’s Bowl in the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre every day. Gibraltar Ten Pin Bowling (members FIQ & WTBA) leagues, training for juniors and squad. Tel: 200 52442. Triathlon: Hercules Triathlon Club organises swimming, running and cycling training sessions and competes regularly in Andalucia and Internationally. Contact chris.walker@york. gi or Facebook “Hercules Triathlon Club” Volleyball: Gibraltar Volleyball Association training, indoor leagues, beach volleyball competition, 3 v 3 competition, juniors and seniors. Tel: 54001973 or 54885000. Yoga: Integral Yoga Centre runs a full programme of classes from Mon-Fri at 33 Town Range. Tel: 200 41389. All welcome. Theatrical Groups Gibraltar Amateur Drama Association: Meet at Ince’s Hall Theatre Complex, 310 Main Street. Tel: 20042237. Trafalgar Theatre Group: Meets 2nd Wed of month, Garrison Library 8pm. All welcome.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JJUNE 2019


information

CRUISE SCHEDULE JUNE 2019 ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY

Sun 02 Jun 19, 08:00

CRYSTAL SERENITY

18:00 American

Crystal Cruises

1080

Tue 04 Jun 19, 00:30

HARMONY V

13:30 American

Variety Cruises

50

Tue 04 Jun 19, 11:00

INDEPENDENCE OF THE SEAS

17:00 British

Royal Caribbean International

3600

Sun 09 Jun 19, 09:00

STAR PRIDE

18:00 American

Windstar Cruises

212

Mon 10 Jun 19, 07:00

EMERALD PRINCESS

17:00 American/British

Princess Cruises

3082

Mon 10 Jun 19, 08:00

AURORA

14:00 British

P&O

1874

Wed 12 Jun 19, 11:00

EXPLORER OF THE SEAS

16:00 International

Royal Caribbean International

3114

Wed 12 Jun 19, 14:00

HARMONY V

06:00 American

Variety Cruises

Thu 13 Jun 19, 08:00

VENTURA

14:00 British

P&O

3096

Fri 14 Jun 19, 08:00

MARELLA DREAM

18:00 British

Thomson Cruises

1506

Sat 15 Jun 19, 13:00

KONINGSDAM

23:55 American

Holland America

3152

Tue 18 Jun 19, 00:30

HARMONY V

13:30 American

Variety Cruises

50

Tue 18 Jun 19, 11:00

INDEPENDENCE OF THE SEAS

16:00 British

Royal Caribbean International

3600

Thu 20 Jun 19, 08:00

SEADREAM I

22:00 American

Seadream Yacht Club

112

Mon 24 Jun 19, 08:00

SEADREAM I

22:00 American

Seadream Yacht Club

112

Tue 25 Jun 19, 10:00

HARMONY V

23:55 American

Variety Cruises

50

Wed 26 Jun 19, 08:00

BRITANNIA

14:00 British

P&O

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

50

4324

91


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE JUNE 2019 DAY

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

92

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

18:25

BA2663

19:15

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

10:15

BA2663

11:05

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

10:50

EZY2246

11:30

Luton

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:00

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:35

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:05

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:05

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

18:40

BA2663

19:35

Gatwick

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

20:00

AT991

20:40

Tangier

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gawick

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE JUNE 2019 DAY

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:30

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:30

BA2663

21:40

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:45

EZY8902

12:15

Gatwick

BA492

British Aiways

Heathrow

14:20

BA493

15:20

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:20

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

20:00

EZY2246

20:40

Luton

BA2662

British Aiways

Gatwick

20:05

BA2663

20:55

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

09:45

EZY6300

10:15

Bristol

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EAZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Aiways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

20:00

AT991

20:40

Tangier

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:20

BA2663

21:45

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

This schedule is correct at time of print. For up to date details and changes visit www.gibraltarairport.gi GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

93


coffee time CROSSWORD 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

ACROSS

DOWN

1. See 12

1. Vassal; Belgian city (5)

8. Not the norm (7)

2. Greek island (5)

9. Like a mournful poem (7)

3. Translated a second time (13)

10. Glowing (7)

9

4. Greek mathematician (6)

11. Throw out (5) 10

11

13

15

17 18

19

6. US dinner jacket (6)

15. First course in Italian restaurants (9)

14

16

5. Looking to this? Cliff Richard movie (6,7)

13. Bed cover filled with duck feathers (9)

12

20

21 22 23 24

7. Part of flour insoluble; not part of a healthy diet (6)

18. Old West Indian cricket captain; first name of actor, father of Jeff and Beau (5)

12 & 1 ac. British author of mainly spy novels (4,2,5)

21. Tree-lined avenue in Spanish speaking countries (7)

14. Suspicious of (4)

22. Film broadcast online (7)

16. Where leaves are brewed (3,3)

15. Middle Eastern language (6)

23. Middle Eastern citizen (7)

17. Derived from various parts of Eastern Europe (6)

24. Caribbean islands; alligator type reptiles (7)

& YOU COULD WIN

9

Either SNAP and SEND your completed crossword to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com or RETURN TO THE CLIPPER by 20 th June.

9

E

N

L

I

S

T

4

N

T

E

T

U

T

8

3

4

O

I T

5

N

S

Y

T

10

6

7

T

A

R

T

E

L

I

M

M O

R

A

L

T

A

G

A

I

N

G

T

U

T

P

T

I

T

L

T

D

T

I

M

A

R

I

A

T

V

I

A

D

U

A

T

T

T

S

T

E

T

T

T

C

I

N

E

M

T

T

11

May crossword answers.

2

13

C

14

12

O N

S

T

R

A

16

T

R

T

T

T

T

T

18

W

H

I

T

L

O

W T

I

T

G

T

E

T

I

A

R

A

T

T

M

T

S

T

E

I

S

T

S

S

22

T

C 24

H

94

19

20. Trysts; palm tree fruits (5)

SUDOKU

lunch for two at

1

19. Ex-President of USA (5)

15

20

B

L

21

A

C 14

T

S

I

T

I

T

T

T

A

S

U

B

J

E

C

T

E

T

T

T

E

D

I

T

O

R

23

T 24

T

T 25

E

7

2

4

Ian Petfield

2

6

1

3 4

9 1

17

K

1

5

8

T

D T

6

THE WINNER IS:

Y

C

1

7

3

7

8

5

6 8

1 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


CHESS COLUMN BY GRANDMASTER RAY KEENE OBE The Masters Chess Tournament in Gibraltar, from humble beginnings, has grown to become established as a major event in the annual global chess calendar. Indeed, the members of the Association of Chess Professionals (ACP) regularly vote Gibraltar as the world’s best open tournament. This is based on excellent prize money, attractive seasonal weather and a social scene enhanced by the tournament organisers’ determination to encourage female participation. For the 2018 competition, held, as usual, at The Caleta Hotel, the first prize in the Masters section was a magnificent £25,000 while the prize for the top female participant (who, of course, was also eligible to aspire to the £25,000 jackpot) was a princely £15,000. White: Jan-Krzysztof Duda Black: Hikaru Nakamura Gibraltar Masters 2018 Sicilian Defence 1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 g6 6 Be3 Bg7 7 f3 0-0 8 Qd2 Nc6 9 0-0-0 d5

The chief factor which adds excitement to the Dragon variation of the Sicilian Defence is the opportunity which exists for the players to castle on opposite wings and target their opposing kings. 10 Qe1 e5 11 Nxc6 bxc6 12 exd5 Nxd5 13 Bc4 Be6 14 Kb1 Rb8 The most common move in this variation. 14....Re8 is also possible. 15 Ne4 Qc7 16 Bc5 Rfd8 The deployment adopted by Nakamura allows Black to defend the weakened d6-square. 17 g4 h6 18 h4 f5 19 gxf5 gxf5 20 Ng3 Qf7 21 Bb3 Rd7 22 Ne2 White switches into defensive posture, while more aggressive is 22 Qa5. 22 ... Rbd8 23 h5 Kh7 24 Qa5 Nf4 The USA grandmaster and Olympiad gold Medallist is prepared to compromise his kingside pawns in order to blast open the diagonal a1-h8 for his fire breathing Dragon bishop. 25 Rxd7 Rxd7 26 Nxf4 exf4 27 Qe1 Bd5 28 Bb4 c5 Black wants to increase the pressure with 28 ... Qf6 but this is currently neutralised by 29 Bc3. The point of the text is to deflect the white bishop.

32 b3 Qd5 33 Ba3 Qd4 34 c3 Qd3+ 35 Kb2 f3 36 Bc5 Failing to an attractively geometric tactic. The last chance to defend was 36 Rh2, when Black continues 36 ... a5, depriving White of the resource Bb4, when White will have great difficulty defending against the numerous threats, as the c3-square is so vulnerable. 36 ... f2! 37 Bxf2 Re7 38 Qxe7 This loses, but there was by now no defence against 38 ... Re2+. 38 ... Qxc3+ 39 Ka3 Qa5 checkmate

PUZZLE Black to play. This position is from Saduakassova-Narayanan, Gibraltar 2018. How did Black gain a decisive material adantage?

29 Bxd5 White is cracking under the pressure. Correct is 29 Bxc5 Qf6 30 c3 Bxf3 31 Rg1, when resistance is still possible. 29 ... Qxd5 30 Ba3 Qxf3 31 Bxc5 Rb7 Now the Black army is converging on b2, and White’s situation has become acutely perilous. Answer on page 88 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

95


kid's korner THE MAZE Can you get the PIG to the MUD? Try and find the easiest way to the mud using your finger. Don't get lost on the way!

WORD WHEEL Archery has a long history. The first bow and arrow are thought to date back around 10,000 years. Originally archery was used for combat and hunting. Today archery is a sport. It has been an Olympic event on and off since 1900.

CAN YOU SPOT THE DIFFERENCE?

This archery themed word wheel is made from a 9 letter Archery themed word. Try and find that word, then make as many words of any length as you can from these letters. You can only use each letter once, and each word must include the letter R.

96

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019


Intro..... BY

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JUNE 2019

97


1.25%

interest per annum

Have you thought about opening a savings account with a higher rate of interest? Our Higher Interest Savings Account will allow you to deposit cash at anytime and make withdrawals during the first full calendar week in December, March, June and September of every year

Let us help you build up your savings If interested please phone us on 200 13900

traditional banking with a modern feel gibintbank

@gibintbank

www.gibintbank.gi | +350 (200) 13900 | Gibraltar International Bank Ltd, PO Box 1375, Ince’s House, 310 Main Street, Gibraltar GX11 1AA Gibraltar International Bank Limited is authorised and regulated by the Gibraltar Financial Services Commission. Company Registration Number 109679


news

Communions and Confirmations Spacious, elegant surroundings your celebration deserves.

3 Europa Road, Gibraltar Events: +350 200 73000/events@rockhotel.gi www.rockhotelgibraltar.com


Profile for Rock Publishing Ltd

The Gibraltar Magazine June 2019  

June marks the 50th anniversary of the border closure in 1969 under Franco’s regime. It was a move of untellable consequences to those livin...

The Gibraltar Magazine June 2019  

June marks the 50th anniversary of the border closure in 1969 under Franco’s regime. It was a move of untellable consequences to those livin...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded