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AUTUMN 2014

£5

PROPERTY The BEST country estates on the market

INVESTMENT

The top Investment Books from those who know

BEHIND THE HEDGE

The Square Mile’s Most Powerful Gamblers

THE

SHOOTING

SPECIAL FROM THE TOP SHOOTS TO TIPS ON PERFECTING PARTRIDGE

POLITICS

THE KINGS OF SWING

THE MEN WHO REALLY WIN THE ELECTIONS

Freddie FOX

THE ACTING DYNASTY CONTINUES

“MY DAD IS MY HERO, BUT I CAN BE DIFFERENT. I CAN DO MORE.” ISSN 2052-4285

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Damian Lewis, Regent’s Park 2014

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V I E W T H E F I L M AT: W W W. G I E V E S A N D H AW K E S. C O M

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What is true style? It’s a question that, as editor of The Gentleman’s Journal, I often find myself asking. It’s a question that I see as being not only subjective, but physical and emotional. Furthermore, when you start to think deeply about the subject, you discover that there are more components of style than the human brain can process. Elements such as manners, dress, where you holiday, hobbies, what you drink, where you work and so on. We all come from very different backgrounds, however we are all able to cultivate our own style. In my view this is a marvellous thing, it inspires ambition to better ourselves and generally makes the world a more interesting place, plus the simple fact that stylish people are easier on the eye and a well-mannered man is immeasurably better company. While some folks may disagree with me, I have my own view on style and I like to think it runs throughout this issue of The Gentleman’s Journal. First and foremost, I believe style starts with manners, as the saying goes “manners maketh man”. If a man has no manners, he has no foundations to build upon. After manners, taking pride in your appearance is essential. By this, I don’t mean that you should spend inconsiderately on expensive clothes, rather you should have the ability to look after yourself and exude confidence. Lastly, it’s the capacity to be understated or, in other words, avoid being a show-off. I saw a good example of this last point recently, when I spied one of Britain’s best known billionaires getting out of a rather drab Ford Focus estate, at first I thought; “not a Bentley or a Rolls, but a Ford?” But it quickly dawned on me that this was a man of such confidence and such self-belief that he has no need to show the world what he’s achieved. Such a man is, in my view, a paragon of pure, understated style. It’s clear to those clued up on fashion that garish displays of wealth and opulence are no longer in vogue. There are the odd few who frequent areas such as Knightsbridge who have clearly missed the memo, but the message remains clear; it’s not cool, stylish or polite to show off. Maybe it was the recession or maybe it’s just a shift in society, who knows?

Brands are noticing this too, the watch industry are producing some damn good-looking timepieces at the moment inspired by classic and discreet designs (pg.52). While in the men’s fashion industry, it’s all about the quality of the material, the shape and the fit - in fact, you’ll be hard-pushed to find a brand name or logo in sight these days (pg.36). In the automotive industry, there’s something quite stylish about driving an Audi estate that’s as fast as an Italian super car (pg.74), and when it comes to yachts, sailing has always been more stylish than motoring, just look at Kennedy and Agnelli (pg.76).

HACKETT.COM

EDITOR’S Letter

ON THE COVER: FREDDIE FOX

AUTUMN 2014

PROPERTY The BEST country estates on the market

INVESTMENT

The top Investment Books from those who know

BEHIND THE HEDGE

The Square Mile’s Most Powerful Gamblers

THE

SHOOTING

SPECIAL FROM THE TOP SHOOTS TO TIPS ON PERFECTING PARTRIDGE

POLITICS

THE KINGS OF SWING

THE MEN WHO REALLY WIN THE ELECTIONS

Freddie FOX

THE ACTING DYNASTY CONTINUES

“MY DAD IS MY HERO, BUT I CAN BE DIFFERENT. I CAN DO MORE.” Autumn 2014

1

Style is, in my view, something you can learn by yourself, however it helps to have a mentor. I enjoyed reading a great interview with Freddie Fox (pg.22) who is the next generation of the great Fox acting dynasty. His father Edward Fox remains a style icon to this day and, judging by our cover, Freddie is an equally well-polished man. They are individuals that possess manners and confidence in equal measure, whilst still being consummate professionals. Granted, Freddie is still quite some way from matching his father’s achievements but with a string of films to his name, including his upcoming release ‘The Riot Club’, he is fast developing a name of his own and I think we will be seeing a lot more of the fantastic Freddie Fox. Whatever your personal style, it’s clear that we have returned to the beautiful days of the gentleman, more an idea to aspire to than a person to behold. “A gentleman is a thing which I cannot define,” said Anthony Trollope, and there’s a lot of truth in that. I don’t think there is one person I could name as a perfect gentleman, there are many I could describe as gentlemen, but the perfect one? There is no such thing. This is because it’s something that you can never actually achieve, but something you have to continuously strive for. And while it’s hard to define a gentleman, it’s the desire to be one that bestows true style. As Kings James I once observed; “I can make a Lord, but only God can make a gentleman.”

HARRY JARMAN

“A LWAY S O F F E R A L A D Y Y O U R S E AT ” Jeremy’s Rule No. 3 for living a better life

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contents THE GENTLEMAN’S JOURNAL 2014

AUTUMN ISSUE

ON THE COVER

022 - FREDDIE FOX

060 - BUSINESS: THE MEN BEHIND THE FUNDS 064 - POLITICS: THE NEW KINGS OF SPIN

123 - THE SHOOTING SPECIAL

054 - WANT LIST - A. LANGE & SOHNE

150 - HOUSES: SPORTING ESTATES

057 - MONTBLANC – THE RETURN OF THE MAISON

098 - ART: EAST MEETS WEST Why the East are coming to West to buy art

146.

100 - OBJECTS OF DESIRE 5 unique objects that deserve a place in your home 114 - FOOD: GAME, SET & SERVE Valentine Warner talks us through perfecting game cooking 123 - THE SHOOTING SPECIAL Everything from etiquette and dressing the part to the best shoots in the country 148 - HORSES: THE RACING REVIEW

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140 - A MUTLEY CREW 6 of the finest Gun Dog breeds will be fighting it out for bragging rights on shooting estates 154 - PROPERTY: TOWN HOUSES Finding the very best in London’s perfectly formed town houses on the market 161 - THE DIARY The people, the places, the parties

STYLE & GROOMING

030 - SAVILE ROW & THE ART OF THE BESPOKE SUIT We speak to a few of our favourite tailors from the iconic London street about house styles and perfecting bespoke

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050 - A SENSE OF AUTUMN A selection of the finest fragrances for men this Autumn

108 - INVESTMENT BOOKS

096 - LEADING LADY – IRINA SHAYK Supermodel Irina Shayk dazzles in the latest Twin Set campaign

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036 - CALEDONIAN DREAMING Autumnal hues and shearling jackets take centre stage in the Scottish highlands at Dell Estate, Whitebridge

052 - THE ART OF TIME Understated is the new bling, and these elegant under the sleeve watches hit all the right notes

FEATURES

034 - PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD The Parisian fashion house release the most stylish shoes to entrée the world of golf

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170 - A FEW OF MY FAVOURITE THINGS – MICHAEL KORS Fashion designer Micheal Kors talks through a few of his favourite things, from his preferred vodka to his love of beaches

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36.

BOYS TOYS

070 - KING OF THE OFF – ROAD Rory Smith reviews the new Range Rover 072 - POWER TRIP The most anticipated car of the year is put through its paces 074 - AUDI RS6 076 - YACHTS – SAILING THE CARIBBEAN Clear blue waters and white sandy beaches are beckoning 102 - BACHELOR’S ESSENTIALS The most stylish bachelor pad essentials that every man should own

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104 - 5 THINGS THAT WILL BE PART OF EVERYDAY LIFE IN 2030 Max Mueller takes us into the future and speculates what will be part of our everyday life in 2030

TRAVEL

080 - THE MALDIVES Whether you are after romance, extreme sports or the ultimate luxury, the Maldives really does have it all 086 - SWITZERLAND – SKIING IN STYLE Ski in style this season with the most luxurious swiss escapes 092 - HOTEL CRILLON LE BRAVE, PROVENCE Contributor Emma Corbett talks us through her heavenly stay at Hotel Crillon Le Brave

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CONTRIBUTORS MAX MUELLER Max is a London-based freelance journalist whose predominant interest is science and technology. He has written for the BBC and Esquire Magazine as well as for the trade press in the UK and in his native Germany. He recently wrote a cover story for Esquire Middle East which explored the environmental consequences of cloud seeding in the region. In this issue Max predicts the technology that will change our lives between now and 2030, making a few bold predictions in doing so.

LUC COIFFAIT Hailing from Newscasle, Luc is a young fashion photographer based in London and was the man behind the camera for our cover shoot with actor Freddie Fox. What Luc may lack in age he certainly makes up for in credentials, already counting I-D, Volt, Wonderland and GQ China amongst his impressive client list. His approach is an extremely personal and honest view on portraits and fashion and his laid back attitude on set certainly brings a calming element to the world of fashion.

VALENTINE WARNER The acclaimed chef Valentine Warner (of What to Eat Now) fame started his professional life as an artist after studying at Bedales and Byam Shaw. He talks about how he tries to retain aestheticism within his cooking and how provincialism in cuisine is something to be proud of. Valentine also talks movingly about his culinary relationship with his father as well as providing advice for those men who are unprepared to give cooking a go. “Get on with it,” he says “and then you’ll realise how approachable it is...”

CLAIRE ZAMBUNI Between a love for North London’s art and music, an education in fine tailoring, and an affinity for country sports, Claire Zambuni embraces all aspects of fine culture. She is just as at home hunting in the wilderness of Lapland as she is on a yoga retreat in the Balearic Islands, or admiring the craftsmanship of Savile Row. Her love of brands led her to launch Zambuni PR, now considered a top agency in the luxury sector.  Although highly devoted to her business, Claire manages to find time to devote to her writing, whether it be on the beach or on the side of a mountain.

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THE GENTLEMAN’S JOURNAL

Harry Jarman Editor-In-Chief Tina Blackmore Finance Director

Holly Butler PA To Editor-In-Chief

Digby Warde-Aldam Associate Editor

Holly Macnaghten Fashion Editor

Tara Ghazanfar Art Director

Charlie Gardiner - Hill Online Editor

Milo Dickinson Art Editor

Charlie Thomas Features Editor

Guy De Vito Sub-Editor

Rory Smith Motoring Editor

Billy Jenks Legal Editor

Amanda Berwick Finance

Jessie Brant Fashion Assistant

Nina Hooft Graafland Advertising Manager

Vincent Lim Editorial Assistant

Contributing Editors Matt Roberts Freddy Van Zevenbergen Robert Sheffield Katie Readman Tanya Rose Mark Osborne George Askew Valentine Warner Robert Dubsky Andrew Michael Contributing Photographers Adam Fussell Luc Coiffait Luisa Whitton Gareth Williams Callum Teggin For editorial enquiries please e-mail: editorial@thegentlemansjournal.co.uk For advertising enquiries please e-mail: advertising@thegentlemansjournal.co.uk Subscriptions are available by e-mailing: subscriptions@thegentlemansjournal.co.uk

THE GENTLEMAN’S JOURNAL LIMITED 45 CLARGES STREET MAYFAIR LONDON W1J 7EP The Gentleman's Journal Limited cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts and photographs. While every care is taken, prices and details are subject to change and The Gentleman's Journal Limited take no responsibility for omissions or errors. We reserve the right to publish and edit any letters. All rights reserved.

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All photos from Instagram @thegentsjournal

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MY DAD IS MY HERO, BUT I CAN BE DIFFERENT. I CAN DO MORE.

FREDDIE FOX

FREDDIE FOX MIGHT BE DESCENDED FROM ACTING ROYALTY, BUT HIS ASCENDANCY IS HIS OWN. INSPIRED BY MAVERICK HEROES, SHROUDED IN FAMILY LEGACY AND WITH HIS POLITICALLY EXPLOSIVE FILM ‘THE RIOT CLUB’ COMING OUT LATER THIS YEAR, THE BOY IS GETTING HIS FIRST TASTE OF SUCCESS. THE MAN WANTS MORE. BY CHARLIE GARDINER-HILL PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUC COIFFAIT STYLED BY HOLLY MACNAGHTEN HAIR & GROOMING BY DANNY DEFREITAS

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Jacket, Hackett, £650 hackett.com Shirt, Hardy Amies, £125 hardyamies.com Trousers, Hackett, £225 hackett.com Slippers, Louis Leeman, £515 louisleemanparis.com Autumn 2014

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You’d have to be impossibly open-minded, or a hermit, not to have some preconceptions about the much-lauded son of the patriarch of British acting. Freddie Fox is after all, Edward Fox’s son. But the man himself is not the boy you’d expect. He walks into the quiet bar of the Manchester hotel that he’s been living in for the past three months, with a Mancunian saunter and an accent to match. He has undergone a Tom Hardyesque transformation of voice (and body) for his latest role as a Manchester-born nymphomaniac in Russell T. Davies upcoming Channel 4 series ‘Cucumber’, and his speech is thick with “sweet’earts” as he jokes with Lo, his favourite waitress. Once she’s finished bringing him bowls of prunes, berries and chia seeds for breakfast, his parting line, “we’re rockin’ darlin’”, seems too much, but Lo doesn’t seem to think so. Nonetheless, there’s something unnerving about Fox’s Mancunian chatter, you don’t feel as if you’re talking to him, and it becomes clear that, like so many actors, he might find it easier to hide behind his characters, than be amongst strangers. But once we find something he’s passionate about, the accent quickly fades, he drops out of character and he’s a changed man. The real deal. It turns out what he’s passionate about is Italian coffee. “The only place you have to have coffee, the only place you should make an absolute exception,” he says, trying to convince a lifelong tea addict, “is Italy. It doesn’t taste like coffee. It’s thick and fresh, it’s not like chewing on a piece of wood, which is what I think most coffee tastes like.” It’s not just the coffee though, he hasn’t been able to escape the maelstrom this summer and, although he knows he will be busy next year, “because, I will just make sure I am”, he also needs to get away. Where? “Other than Dorset, Italy is where my heart is. I’m going to go down to the South, to Puglia, in the heel of Italy.” He says Puglia with a punchy Italian pronunciation as authentic as it is effortless, and laments their recent olive blight with similar feeling.

IT’S NOT A BACCHIC DEBAUCHED CLUB DESIGNED TO DESTROY THINGS, THEY WERE THERE TO HAVE A GREAT TIME WITH THEIR MATES. Tuxedo, Ralph Lauren, £795, ralphlauren.com Bowtie, Ralph Lauren, £85, ralphlauren.com Shirt, Ralph Lauren, £135, ralphlauren.com Slippers, Louis Leeman, £525, louisleemanparis.com

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The area produces a third of Italy’s olives, which, as he delicately puts it, is “a lot of fucking olives, 18,000 tons a year.” It’s actually over 11 million tonnes, but it’s the therapeutic qualities of the region that he’s interested in. “I’m going to go down there to some of those beautiful coastal towns, I think to just refill, you know, empty the cup and refill it again.” Just not, they’ll be hoping, with olives. It’s not just thoughts of coffee, olives and nymphomaniacs that have been keeping Fox busy of late, he stars in the silver screen adaptation of Laura Wade’s politically explosive play ‘POSH’, directed by Lone Sherfig and rebranded as ‘The Riot Club’. For those who’ve been living under a rock and missed the media frenzy that followed the film’s slating, it centres on the annual dinner of an aristocratically exclusive, hedonistic and secretive Oxford dining society, as one of the members says of admission, “if you have to ask, you’re probably not the right sort of chap”. It’s a darkly comic and emotionally charged film that sees antagonist Alistair Ryle (Sam Claflin) whip the boy’s entrenched class prejudice up into a violent frenzied climax. And it’s not just membership of the Bullingdon-esque club that’s exclusive, the cast reads like a Buzzfeed listicle of the crème de la crème of young British actors; heartthrobs Douglas Booth, Max

Irons and Sam Claflin sabre Dom Perignon and snort cocaine with young breakthroughs Olly Alexander, Ben Schnetzer and Sam Reid. As Fox puts it “every young British actor wanted to be in that film…a few people would read me saying that and go ‘what a dick, I didn’t want to do that’, but a lot of people went in for those parts.” In the close and notoriously competitive acting fraternity, his words might not be popular but they ring true, Fox himself is not immune. Robert Pattinson was rumoured to have been the first pick for his role and he first auditioned for Sam Claflin’s part – which begs the question; how did he end up cast as James Leighton-Masters, the President of the Club? There’ll be plenty of stunted young actors, who didn’t get a part, viciously whispering that his surname opened the door. It’s a suggestion that Fox would be used to, but it’s an insult not worth the envy it’s said with. To suggest that the film’s director, Lone Sherfig, the critically acclaimed and highly respected mind behind Oscarnominated An Education and a leader of the Dogme95 movement, would give him a leg-up would be ignorant, and insulting. Fox is humble and quick to acknowledge that Claflin was better for the lead, and he’s right, the Hunger Games star delivers an outstanding, if slightly unhinged, performance. He clearly doesn’t feel the need to justify his casting, and rightly so. Instead, he talks openly about the connection he made with Lone, how it was not so much his undeniable talent that won him the role but his leadership. “I mean, I fixed paintballing for half the cast before we started. I think that energy and enthusiasm, doing it all for one and one for all, is something that Lone picked up on. She saw a natural ebullience, sense of fun and camaraderie in me, that made her think I’d be a good President.” What’s more, she saw it without having to see him read for the part. “I went into the audition room expecting to have to audition and she said, ‘No, we’re just going to talk’. I thought that was brilliant, she showed me the mood board for the film and then asked me a question I have never been asked before or since; ‘how do you like to be directed?’” Fox appreciated her trust, in his opinion, “her great strength as a director is her ability to trust her performers”, and he repaid it generously. Although he doesn’t give much away, you can see he’s bursting with pride when he tells me what she said to him after they’d shot the film; “I’m just so grateful to you for bringing everybody together.” When Laura Wade first released the script for POSH, she insisted to the baying newspapermen that it was set in a world of metaphor and bore no relation to real-life characters, but it would be hard to say the same of the film. That it plays on themes of class warfare and exploits the British public’s taste for aristocratic scandal is undeniable. The fact that it is being released within ten days of the Labour and Conservative party conferences is at worst, a politically motivated attack, at best, shameless self-promotion. Fox is less sceptical. For him, the characters presented theatrical challenges that meant they couldn’t be a reflection of an individual like George Osborne or a snobbish friend from school. “I thought what would I do if I was drunk, had all my mates around me, had a bit too much coke and desperately didn’t want to be found out. It had to be drawn from within, because if you take it too much from without, you start to judge your character. And that was a lot of

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people’s trouble from the beginning.” He admits that the characters are “the most extreme version of what the press would call snotty, snobbish toffs”, but also says they didn’t at any point, “imagine what Boris Johnson would have been like when he was in the Buller.” Having said that, thoughts of ‘The Buller’ weren’t entirely forgotten. “I spoke to ex-Buller members who said, ‘we never thought how much it was going to cost but actually we had a great time, we did have fun.’ And I think that is what we all wanted to get across in the film, it’s not a Bacchic debauched club designed to destroy things, they were there to have a great time with their mates.” But, in reality, the film explores darker, less friendly and more violent undertones because, Fox says, “it’s not about an image of those Etonian Bullers, but about the ideology of a sociopath.” Of course, the difficult thing about sociopaths is that they are disarmingly charming. Indeed, Fox recognises that before their “heinous” unveiling, which includes a “horrible” scene where the landlord is generously waterboarded with £20 notes and champagne, the characters are likeable, and even endearing to the audience. An attitude that smacks of the public’s fond feelings towards Boris Johnson, a charismatic and endearing master of disguise who has, his critics say, yet to be unveiled. If the film were to be a political attack aimed at anyone, it would have to be at Boris, especially given its timing. The release is pitched perfectly to disrupt his first attempt at a controversial move back into Parliament to serve jointly as a Member of Parliament and Mayor of London. Such speculation would be doused by plenty of difficult questions. Who would want to make such an attack? What control would they have over the film? And how would Freddie Fox have any knowledge of such backstage politics?

Robe, Derek Rose, £728 derek-rose.com Watch, Breitling breitling.com/en

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As it turns out, Fox has been in a unique position to unwittingly observe the political manoeuvring around the film, thanks in large part to his late godfather. One of Fox’s early role models, the much-loved Sir John Mortimer QC CBE fleetingly inspired him to become a barrister, before he died in 2009. “I loved him because he was a great storyteller, a great writer and he was a great raconteur.” It was at the late barrister’s wife’s lunch party, that the recently cast Freddie Fox bumped into David Cameron. “You know, the producer [of the Riot Club] is one of David Cameron’s best mates, they roomed together. I was actually at one of Jonny Mortimer’s wife’s lunch parties just before we started filming [The Riot Club] and I had finished a play that David Cameron had been to see. Then I met him by pure chance at this lunch party in Oxfordshire, in his

constituency and he came up to me and said, ‘well done, I thought your play was great. What are you doing next?’ I told him I was doing this film called POSH [the name was later changed] and he knew about it. He just laughed and said, ‘oh god, I know exactly who that is, that’s bloody Peter Czernin, I know that’s Pete.’ Pete, as it happens, was David Cameron’s first flatmate and is set to inherit swathes of London, as the heir to his mother’s £1.5bn property fortune. Cameron’s ‘Call me, Dave’ campaign saw their public relationship disappear from view, while Czernin has been busy carving himself a successful career in the movie business, producing, amongst others, ‘In Bruges’. It would be highly speculative to suggest that Cameron and Czernin will use the film as a political vehicle to attack the seemingly unassailable Boris Johnson, especially given that Cameron would more than likely be caught in the crossfire. But it’s a cause for speculation nonetheless. Fox’s take on any political impact the film might have is, on the other hand, more sanguine and far more likely. “Imagine a bunch of rugby players were in a pub in Bristol, and they got a private room, were sick everywhere and knocked some shit over, the only difference is that the Bristol lads wouldn’t have been able to go, ‘here you are mate, here’s 50k,’ and…they’re probably not going to be Prime Minister. The ability to do it is the same, it’s the being able to excuse it with money that is, in my opinion, the disgusting thing… and I think yes, they have chosen the timing for maximum publicity, but I don’t think to Joe Bloggs on the street, it’s going to make any difference to the way they vote.” Boris Johnson isn’t the only person who bears a resemblance to a character in The Riot Club. Fox himself has a knack of picking characters with whom he has uncanny similarities. Rather obviously, his character, ‘Freddie’, in Cucumber is his name sake but, more subtly, in The Riot Club, the privileged heir to Britain’s acting throne can intrinsically relate to James Leighton-Masters, a young man equally as keen as Freddie to carve his own path. There is a particularly poignant moment in the film, when Fox is whipped into a frenzy by Sam Claflin’s superb portrayal of sociopathic ringleader Alistair Ryle. As Ryle tells the table that their achievements will always be wrongly and jealously attributed to their privileged background, Fox slams his fist on the table and in a visceral flash of anger screams “yes, I fucking worked for that!” He’s the first to admit that it’s a frustration he can sometimes feel with his career. He even helped Lone Scherfig to construct his character’s arc, tapping into experiences from his own career. “There is a connection and I do use it and those moments when people endlessly talk about my family heritage, I feel like going ‘FUCK OFF, just talk to me about how I have done things that are

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not like them [his family].’” He’s refreshingly open about the perks and pitfalls of being one of the Fox clan. “I got an agent before I went to drama school because they took me on, basically as a favour to my Mum,” he admits, “at the same time, I’ve seen the very worst things about acting. I’ve lived with the hardest bits about being an actor, parents being unemployed for years at a time, but I have that lingo.” Although he’s spent Christmas with Emma Thompson and Derek Jacobi since he was 6, he has had to work harder to defy people’s expectations (and perhaps hopes) that he will be “too posh to do it. I have to make sure, as I’m doing now, to absolutely nail everything.” As we enter deeply personal (and previously uncharted waters), his words are sincere and tellingly honest. It is sad, but incredibly touching, hearing the ravenously ambitious actor talk about his parents in a professional light. “I suppose the one thing that having parents who are high achievers in my profession has given me…is the desire not to be better or to overreach them, because I couldn’t be a better actor than my Dad, he’s my hero…” Despite the sentimentality, Fox has found a way to differentiate himself. “I think I can do different things, I think I can probably do more things. I want to be a producer; I want to be a writer.” It’s unsurprising then that Fox’s career has been unpredictable by design; he says that his breakthrough role as Marilyn in Worried about The Boy was “an unusual place to start”, but that he “worked very hard at the beginning to get good roles that people wouldn’t expect me to get. Like this [Cucumber], like Marilyn, like Shadowline.” Nonetheless, these days Fox is able to clearly separate the professional and the personal. “I’d love to be as respected as my Dad, but I will never be bigger or better than him. It’s not a source of drive or regret; it’s just a fact. That’s his thing and this is mine. At the same time, I never want to be distanced from him or my family, I’m very proud of them and I love them.” That maturity is something that he largely attributes to his parents. “My parents never made me feel that I was subject to their legacy. In every decision he’s ever made with me professionally, my father has always been absolutely selfless… they even tried to discourage me from acting in the beginning.” It’s a good thing they didn’t succeed.

first time in the spring, what struck me most was how beautiful everybody was. It seemed illegal to be ugly.” “Everybody is trying to conform to this alpha six-pack rippling thing but the majority of people are not like that. So you end up being cast very narrowly and trying to conform to basically, a very boring stereotype. Boring, boring people who go to the gym far too much.” It’s obvious that his baptism of fire into the British national press has made him a man unafraid of the truth, a rare thing in the smokes and mirrors film industry. “Hollywood are looking for something different, it would be nice if they had bad teeth, or it would be nice if they had something different and quirky, or something different and English people represent quirk and difference to them [Hollywood].” All this will be sobering reading for the likes of Zac Efron, and Fox revels in it. “Look at an actor, someone that I respect enormously, someone like Donal Gleeson, one of my contemporaries. He’s nailing it, he’s getting every part under the sun and he doesn’t look anything like Zac Efron.”

I WENT TO LOS ANGELES FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THE SPRING, WHAT STRUCK ME MOST WAS HOW BEAUTIFUL EVERYBODY WAS. IT SEEMED ILLEGAL TO BE UGLY

As a boy, a young Freddie Fox plastered the walls of his room with posters of celebrity icons, but today, it’s not Hollywood stardom that motivates him but something more personal. “I want to be known and celebrated for what I do, I want to be respected as an actor in my own right outside of my family name, I want to be someone totally unique with my own flavour and have all the opportunities that being better known and being brilliant gives you. Those things are certainly very deeply in the centre of my raison d’etre.” And he’s a man who lives by his creed. He’s hired a “Persian warrior” of a personal trainer who, along with a chia seed and kale led diet, is helping him to achieve the kind of physical aesthetic he’s looking for. “I’ve always wanted something that was a bit Mick Jagger meets Brad Pitt in Thelma and Louise.” He meditates and practices yoga every morning. He wants to play Romeo, he wants to do it soon. He says he’d live on chia seeds for a year, if he could play a Bond villain or, he whispers, maybe even Bond. And I believe him. But despite his commitment to physical fitness he despairs over Hollywood’s aesthetic obsession. “I went to Los Angeles for the

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NORTHAMPTON ENGLAND MAKERS OF FINE SHOES SINCE 1879

Donal Gleeson is an unusual choice of role model. But it’s quickly become obvious that Fox is an original in the making. Another of our cover stars, Steve McQueen, may not have believed in “all that phoney hero stuff ” but Fox sees the truth, a word he’s keen on, in the men he admires. His heroes are men like Daniel Day Lewis, “he doesn’t give fuck what the outside world thinks of him, he’s just going to do what he’s going to do”. And the legendary Australian cricketer Keith Miller, “he lived it from the inside out, not from the outside in. He was just a guy with a great deal of talent, a lot of ambition and real charisma.” And, of course, his Dad, “these guys, they don’t try to be anything but themselves.” He talks about them with a fierce ambition and deep respect; he doesn’t worship these men, like teenagers bow to Beyonce, but he studies them and

learns from them. In everything he says, it’s clear he’s a maverick at heart, even his attitude to style. “My aim in my image and public life is to have my own style. Not one given to me by Dolce and Gabbana, one that I’ve created that suits me. I think that’s quite classic. Quite Gregory Peck. Quite Edward Fox.” It strikes you that Fox’s visceral passion for his profession isn’t superficial, naiive or over-enthusiastic. He’s got a hunger and a drive to explore the depths of things, to understand the inner workings of his characters and the world around him. And once you break past his cool, calm exterior, you sense an obsessive, a buccaneer. Maybe even a great. Freddie is, after all, a millennial, not satisfied with making it in the world, but thirsty to change it. Brought up on the speeches of Barack Obama, not the tragedy of Willy Loman. But these are early days. Fox knows that the biggest challenge for him still lies ahead, in continuing to grow as a man and as an actor, and securing a breakthrough role. He turns 26 next year. He knows what he has to do; “it’s a combination of self-discipline, natural talent and the ability not to lose focus. Or as T.S. Elliot puts it ‘be distracted from distraction, by distraction.’” Whether he can do it, is anybody’s guess. But my money’s on him. Photographed by Luc Coiffait,Styled by Holly Macnaghten Assistant styling by Teresa Eberle, Grooming by Danny Defreitas www.dannydefreitas.com using Dr Hauschka skincare & Label.M Professional haircare.

STYLE: HARROGATE MATERIAL: TAN SCOTCH GRAIN

LONDON

JERMYN STREET BURLINGTON ARCADE KNIGHTSBRIDGE ROYAL EXCHANGE CANARY WHARF

BIRMINGHAM COLMORE ROW

NEW YORK 7 WEST 56TH STREET

CROCKETTANDJONES.COM

BRUSSELS RUE DE NAMUR

PARIS

CHAUVEAU LAGARDE BOULEVARD RASPAIL BON MARCHÉ

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SAVILE ROW & THE ART OF THE BESPOKE SUIT Is there anything more luxurious than knowing you own the only one in the world? From a priceless piece of art, to a classic car no longer in manufacture, there will always be something intrinsically special about knowing you are the only one in possession of such a piece. In a time where throw-away trends and inexpensive clothing are infinitely available, the inclination for exclusivity and individualism are further intensified. Enter: Savile Row and the art of the bespoke suit.

RICHARD JAMES

HISTORY OF THE HOUSE They started off in the smallest premises on Savile Row in 1992 and now occupy the largest, as well as having a second, devoted bespoke tailoring shop. Their philosophy has always been to produce classic, refined clothing of the highest quality and push the boundaries through design, colour and cut. They were considered anti-establishment, but now called the New Establishment and are credited with having done much to turn Savile Row into the vibrant, international centre of men’s fashion and tailoring that it now is. . THE KEY TO THE PERFECT BESPOKE SUIT Approximately ten weeks work aside, that it reflects something of the character of its owner. That is what really makes it unique, which is the essence of bespoke. SIGNATURE HOUSE STYLE What has become known as ‘modern classic’ tailoring: one or two-button single breasted suits with slightly longer, more waisted jackets, incorporating deep side vents and a slightly higher armhole for a strikingly slim, definitive silhouette. FAMOUS FACES THAT HAVE WORN RICHARD JAMES They don’t mention all of them, by any means, but Mark Ronson, Sir Elton John, Hugh Grant, Sir Tom Jones… THE ONE RULE OR PIECE OF ADVICE WHEN HAVING A BESPOKE SUIT MADE Give some thought to what you want style-wise and, importantly, what you want the suit for. We are very happy to advise, but the final decision rests with you, which is how we ensure you really make the suit your own.

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THE ONE STOP STREET FOR ANY DISCERNING GENTLEMAN.

Savile Row, named after the wife of the 3rd Earl of Burlington, is a name synonymous with mens tailoring and bespoke - so called because when customers chose their cloth it was said to “be spoken for” – fashions. It would be sacrilegious to speak of Savile Row without mentioning the patriarch of this famous street Henry Poole & Co., the tailors who are famous for their work for King Edward VII, (amongst a host of other Royal Warrants) who are still stationed hereto this day. With so many masters of their craft located within the same street, we turn to a few of our favourites to find out who they’ve dressed, and their secrets to obtaining the perfect bespoke suit.

HARDY AMIES

HUNTSMAN

HENRY POOLE & CO

HISTORY OF THE HOUSE Henry Poole was the first tailor on Savile Row and the inventor of the tuxedo. Henry Poole founded his eponymous atelier in 1806 and the business moved to the row in 1846, following his death. A favourite among the aristocracy, the tailor holds an incredible 40 Royal Warrants. SIGNATURE HOUSE STYLE Originally specialising in military tailoring, Henry Poole is now famed for creating the short evening jacket for the Prince of Wales. Henry Poole prides itself on being the most flexible tailor on Savile Row and the least adherent to a house style. FAMOUS FACES THAT HAVE WORN HENRY POOLE Winston Churchill is amongst its customers, and has been issued a staggering list of Warrants, from The Emperor Napoleon II in 1858 to HM Queen Elizabeth II in 1976. Churchill wearing suit by Henry Poole

HISTORY OF THE HOUSE Elegant, modern, effortless: Hardy Amies was a pioneer of British menswear working with his tailors from his house on Savile Row from the 40s onwards. He served as a SOE (Secret Operations Executive) during the second world war where he had his uniform tailored from the house at No.14 Savile Row. Today the spirit of Hardy’s modern approach to menswear lives on and can be seen in the handwriting of the bespoke offer; it concerns itself with an effortless sense of style… hence the unstructured shoulder and signature ‘relaxed’ patch pocket jacketing. THE KEY TO THE PERFECT BESPOKE SUIT The understanding between the cutter and the customer. The cutter’s intrinsic ability to interpret the aspiration of the customer and translate that into the cut, and ultimately the fit of the suit. SIGNATURE HOUSE STYLE The unstructured shoulder. FAMOUS FACES THAT HAVE WORN HARDY AMIES Historically, David Hockney, Ronald Reagan and the 1966 England World Cup winning team. THE ONE RULE OR PIECE OF ADVICE WHEN HAVING A BESPOKE SUIT MADE Trust in the eye of your tailor.

HISTORY OF THE HOUSE Founded in 1849 by Henry Huntsman. The firm has been based in Mayfair since its inception, moving to Savile Row in 1921. Historically a bespoke house, the firm introduced Ready to Wear tailoring to the brand in the 1980s. Roubi L’Roubi joined the company as Creative Director and Owner in 2014 and continues to drive both the bespoke and ready to wear sides of the business forward. THE KEY TO THE PERFECT BESPOKE SUIT Good quality cloth, perfect balance, ease of movement and an elegant silhouette. SIGNATURE HOUSE STYLE Our signature style is a single breasted one button coat inspired by military and equestrian tailoring with a flattering and subtly longer skirt. FAMOUS FACES THAT HAVE WORN HUNTSMAN Winston Churchill, King Edward VII, Queen Victoria, Gregory Peck, Douglas Fairbanks Jnr, Ian Flemming, Gianni Agnelli. THE ONE RULE OR PIECE OF ADVICE WHEN HAVING A BESPOKE SUIT MADE Relax during your fitting so as your cutter can best observe your natural stance and create your suit around that. Keep cloth classic and you will have a suit that will last you forever. Image of Gregory Peck wearing Huntsman - Everett Collection/REX

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GIEVES & HAWKES RICHARD ANDERSON

HISTORY OF THE HOUSE Founded in March 2001 by Richard Anderson former director and head cutter of Huntsman’s and Brian Lishak, former managing director of Huntsman’s Savile Row. Dedicated to making the highest quality, most sartorially elegant clothing in the world. THE KEY TO THE PERFECT BESPOKE SUIT The key is in transforming the man. Accentuating the better parts and hiding the less favourable aspects of his figure. Quote from customer “my friends tell me your clothes make me look 20 years younger”. SIGNATURE HOUSE STYLE Our house style is a long lean outline featuring neat, natural shoulders. Cut high under armhole with well defined waist slim tapered sleeves and trousers to give customer taller, slimmer silhouette. FAMOUS FACES THAT HAVE WORN RICHARD ANDERSON Bryan Ferry, Simon Cowell, Benicio del Toro, to name but a few. THE ONE RULE OR PIECE OF ADVICE WHEN HAVING A BESPOKE SUIT MADE Choose a design and colour that suits you, look for as much quality handwork you can find and be advised by your bespoke tailor.

HISTORY OF THE HOUSE Gieves & Hawkes started out as two separate houses, Hawkes founded in 1771 and Gieves founded in 1784. Both supplied the British military and were honoured by a Royal Warrant from George III in 1809; the company has held a Warrant for services to the Sovereign ever since. In 1912, No.1 Savile Row, formerly the Royal Geographic Society, became our home and we have been serving our illustrious clients and those seeking the best mens style from this location for over 100 years. THE KEY TO THE PERFECT BESPOKE SUIT Perfection is in the eye and experience of the wearer, so is hard to define; however for us, where the cutter and client achieve a level of refinement and peerless quality in the finished suit that delight and excite the client, we’re pretty close to perfection. Fit is key and the resulting suit becomes a reflection of the clients personal style. SIGNATURE HOUSE STYLE A bespoke suit should by definition reflect the preferences, posture and habit of the client so we do not dictate a House Style as such. Our suits are defined by the exquisite craftsmanship and 100+ hours of work that goes into each one.  Signature Savile Row details such as a roped shoulder and high arm holes tend to be favoured by clients as they are more flattering and define the silhouette. FAMOUS FACES THAT HAVE WORN GIEVES & HAWKES They are noted for their discretion when it comes to clients. Historic clients include the Duke of Wellington, Admiral Lord Nelson, Sir Winston Churchill, Charlie Chaplin, Ian Fleming, and members of the Royal Family since George III. Today, they are honoured that Royal and noteworthy patrons continue to demand the very best from them, but it is very important that they are as committed to serving and delighting the gentleman who has saved up his whole life to acquire one suit on his retirement or for a special occasion as they are for whom bespoke is an everyday experience. THE ONE RULE OR PIECE OF ADVICE WHEN HAVING A BESPOKE SUIT MADE First and foremost, take time to get to know your Cutter as he or she will be the person who ultimately forms the shape that your suit will take.  The tailor is the person who makes the garment and hand stitches it together from the pieces cut, by hand, from the pattern made by the cutter. Spending some time together will ensure that the cutter really understands what you want and how your suit will fit into your lifestyle.

BY HOLLY MACNAGHTEN

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STYLE

PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD “You cannot be elegant if you are not comfortable and well shod” Berluti is a name synonymous with style, elegance and unparalleled craftsmanship. Founded by the Italian shoemaker Alessandro Berluti, the brand is renowned for their understanding of the mastery of footwear, consistently producing beautiful shoes for the well-shod gentleman since its conception in 1895. So it goes without saying that their recent entry into the world of sporting shoes will be no exception. They say a pair of shoes says a lot about a man and this latest offering from Berluti really says it all - so get ready to put your best foot forward on the green this season with the introduction of the ’Swing’, their first ever ready-to-wear golf shoe.

from which to build the perfect golf swing. Its innovative outsole combines technical rubber with leather inserts, and is outfitted with precision-engineered spikes for first-rate traction on the fairway. In typical Berluti fashion, the spikes can be  removed with a special key and replaced with flat ones allowing you to step from fairway to clubhouse without raising an eyebrow.   

Having previously created bespoke designs for the gentleman who skis, hikes, drives, cycles and plays polo, it seems only natural that they should offer the same such service for the gentleman who golfs. As G. Bruce Boyer once said, “real luxury is understanding quality, and having the time to enjoy it,” and it is with this in mind that the beauty of the ’Swing’ really comes into its own. They have the ability to make you forget that you are even wearing them, allowing yourself the freedom to concentrate on Additional details that will have lovers of the sport the game in play, whilst looking the part. heading to their nearest Berluti maison in a flash, More akin to the fancy footwear of a dashing include a shock absorbent foam-lined insole and gent than a mere sporting shoe, the Berluti house a lightweight carbon insert for improved strength ethos is echoed in every detail and function - and stability. The kangaroo leather of the upper displaying the brand’s classicism and technical is also backed with a breathable waterproof virtuosity throughout. With over a century of membrane, while a fine layer of foam, inserted expertise under their belt, the making of the between the upper and the lining, provides extra ’Swing’ sees the creation of a completely new cushioning. shoe last (named St Andrews, in honour of the    Scottish town that is the sport’s spiritual home). With all the technical details and elegant style The upper is made from Kangaroo leather due notes combined, it’s hard to resist this luxurious to its resilience and suppleness and comes in a addition to the world of golfing attire, so two-tone palette of osso and gold or vermillion let Berluti’s ‘Swing’ take you from course to clubhouse in sartorial splendour. and indigo denim.    Style aside, the technicalities of the ‘Swing’ BY HOLLY MACNAGHTEN certainly do not disappoint. As any keen golfer will tell you, the perfect pair of golf shoes should  The ‘Swing’ golf shoe is available both  stabilise your feet and allow one a solid base from £1980 at berluti.com

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CALEDONIAN DREAMING AMID THE PREPOSSESSING LANDSCAPE OF THE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS IN DELL ESTATE, WHITEBRIDGE, WE SEE THE EARTHY TONES OF AUTUMN ENVELOP US IN SHEARLING JACKETS AND BILLOWING OVERCOATS.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ADAM FUSSELL AND STYLED BY HOLLY MACNAGHTEN

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Jacket, £650, Trousers £295, Waistcoat, £250, all Thomas Pink, thomaspink.com Shirt, Turnbull And Asser, £165, turnbullandasser.co.uk Coat, Roberto Cavalli, £5225, robertocavalli.com Grooming: Vitalumiere Loose Powder foundation SPF 15, Le Lift Serum and Le Lift Creme Yeux Correcteur Perfection

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Jacket, Aquascutum, £1650 and Jumper, Aquascutum, £275, aquascutum.co.uk, Trousers, Roberto Cavalli, £465, robertocavalli.com. Grooming: Hydra Beauty Serum, Crayon Sourcils Sculpting Eyebrow Pencil in Brun Naturel Correcteur Perfection

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Jacket, £495, Jumper, £175 Shirt, £95, hardyamies.com Trousers, £225, all Hardy Amies, hardyamies.com, Shoes, Gieves and Hawkes, £450, gievesandhawkes.com. Grooming: Hydra Beauty Serum, Hydra Beauty Nutrition Lip Care, Le Blanc de Chanel Multi-Use Illuminating Base

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Jacket, Gieves and Hawkes, £495, gievesandhawkes.com. Jumper, Gieves and Hawkes, £145, gievesandhawkes.com. Shirt, Gieves and Hawkes, £145, gievesandhawkes.com. Trousers, Richard James, £275, richardjames.co.uk.Shoes, Grenson, £450, grenson.co.uk, Grooming: Hydra Beauty Serum, Hydra Beauty Nutrition Protective Cream, Correcteur Perfection, Crayon Sourcils Eyebrow Pencil in Brun Naturel

Coat, Ralph Lauren, ralphlauren.co.uk. Trousers, Berluti, £560, berluti.com, Shirt, Berluti, £395, berluti.com Grooming: Le Lift Serum, Le Lift Creme Riche, Correcteur Perfection, Crayon Sourcils Sculpting Eyebrow Pencil in Brun Naturel

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Jacket, Berluti, £5,100, berluti.com. Trousers, Ralph Lauren, £125, ralphlauren.co.uk. Shirt, Hackett, £115, hackett.com Grooming: Le Lift Serum, Le Lift Creme Yeux, Le Lift Creme Riche, Le Blanc de Chanel Multi-Use Illuminating Base

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Jacket, Dunhill, £4880, dunhill.co.uk. Jumper, Ralph Lauren, £370, ralphlauren.co.uk. Trousers, Sand, £149, sand.dk

Jacket, Sand, £439, sand.dk. Shirt, Duchamp, £115, duchamplondon.com. Trousers, Duchamp, £150, duchamplondon.com, Grooming: Sublimage L’Essence, Le Blanc de Chanel Multi-Use Illuminating Base, Crayon Sourcils Sculpting Eyebrow Pencil in Brun Naturel

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Jacket, Dunhill, £1990, dunhill.co.uk. Jumper, Dunhill, £495, dunhill.co.uk. Trousers, Sand, £149, sand.dk. Boots, Ralph Lauren, ralphlauren.co.uk

Coat, Berluti, £4,550, berluti.com. Trousers, Roberto Cavalli, £465, robertocavalli.com, Shirt, Hackett, £115, hackett.com.

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Photographer: Adam Fussell Stylist & Creative Director: Holly Macnaghten Stylists Assistant: David Martin Photographers Assistant: Brogan Loftus Hair & Grooming: Danny Defreitas using Chanel Le Lift Serum and A/W 2014 Model: Jan at SUPA With special thanks to Jeremy Finnis for the use of Dell Estate - dellestate.com

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Autumn 2014

Welcome to the smart way to shave in the digital age.

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A SENSE

OF AUTUMN

S

imilar to that crisp­w hite dress shirt, or those bench­m ade brogues, a well c­ hosen fragrance is an essential purchase. It’s a further opportunity to express ourselves and reflect our mood on any given day but, like clothing, it should change with the seasons. For autumn, a number of exciting new scents have surfaced; from Floris’ seductive Honey Oud ­to Penhaligon’s zesty Bayolea. The classics are more prevalent than ever though, and this season we’re particularly tempted by Kiehl’s timeless Original Musk and Estee Lauder’s sensual Intuition for Men. Whatever your taste though, you’ll be able to find your new signature scent right here.

INDULGE IN THE MUSKY SCENTS OF THIS SEASONS MOST DESIRABLE FRAGRANCES’ FOR MEN PHOTOGRAPHY & SET DESIGN BY GARETH WILLIAMS & LUISA WHITTON ART DIRECTION BY HOLLY MACNAGHTEN

JO MALONE Wood Sage and Sea Salt 100ml – £82.00, jomalone.co.uk

VIKTOR ROLF CLINIQUE Spicebomb 50ml – £48.00, Chemistry 100ml - £47.00, viktor-rolf.com clinique.co.uk

EMPORIO ARMANI 75ml - £45.00, armanibeauty.co.uk

KIEHL’S Original Musk 50ml £39.50, kiehls.co.uk

LAUDER Intuition For Men 100ml £52.00, esteelauder.co.uk FLORIS Honey Oud 100ml – £160, harrods.com

PENHALIGON’S LONDON Bayolea 100ml - £85.00, penhaligons.com

ACQUA DI PARMA Leather 100ml - £160.00, uk.acquadiparma.com

YVES SAINT LAURENT L’homme Sport 60ml - £50.00, yslbeauty.co.uk

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THE ART PHOTOGRAPHY & SET DESIGN BY GARETH WILLIAMS & LUISA WHITTON ART DIRECTION BY HOLLY MACNAGHTEN

OF TIME

There is a new silent trend in the watch world and one that seems here to stay. They say the best thing to happen to fine horology was making mechanical watches a luxury rather than a necessity. This however was not a conscious decision of the watchmakers, but one that was forced upon them by the commercialisation of quartz movements in the 1980s. Overnight, many skilled watchmakers went out of business due to the cheaper and arguably more reliable quartz watch that dominated the market. Today, the watch industry has bounced back and is stronger than ever before. Since the 1980s, mechanical watchmaking has become a piece of art and luxury rather than something that simply tells the time. For a while up to the economic crisis of 2008 though, it was all about bling, and new brands arrived with bigger cases than ever before, using precious metals and stones in abundance. It was the time when it was all “look at me and see how fabulously rich I am”.

BAUME & MERCIER CLIFTON 10059 Clifton 10059, 39mm, automatic. Satin-finished 18K red gold case and sub satin-finished anthracite dial £4, 500, baume-et-mercier.co.uk

VACHERON CONSTANTIN ULTRAFINE 1955 18K pink gold with transparent sapphire crystal case-back £22, 850, vacheron-constantin.com

PIAGET ALTIPLANO In white gold with a 40mm case and sapphire crystal case back with Black alligator leather strap - £18,600, piaget.com

IWC PORTOFINO CHRONOGRAPH 18ct gold £11,450, IWC Boutique in Harrods

PARMIGIANI FLEURIER TONDA 1950 rose gold case, grained white dial, Hermes alligator strap – £13, 500, parmigiani.ch

PATEK PHILIPPE GRAND COMPLICATIONS REF. 5140J-001 £59, 800.00, wempe.com

Now though there is a new horology trend that is quite the opposite of “bling”. Now it’s all about understated style and elegance. It’s about the timepieces that may not catch the eye at first but, as the saying goes, “those who know know”. Watches are like cars; they say a lot about your personality. Take an Aston Martin versus a Lamborghini. Yes the Lamborghini is louder, faster and will turn more heads, but the majority of the time (unknown to the occupant inside), the Lamborghini driver is more likely to be called a show-off rather than a stylish gentleman. The Aston on the other hand (by this I mean one that hasn’t been modified or driven at stupidly high revs through Knightsbridge), is understated in comparison, boasting much more style and grace. This trend looks here to stay for some time, and watch brands are looking to the past for design inspiration. The result: a whole host of new watches that offer more style and timeless design, the latter being of utmost importance when investing in a new timepiece. We have chosen 6 of our favourites.

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STYLE

THE A.LANGE & SOHNE LANGE 1 TIME ZONE “COMO EDITION” “To build the world’s finest watches” A. Lange & Sohne is arguably Germany’s premier luxury brand, with a history dating back to 1845 when Ferdinand A. Lange laid the foundations for Saxony’s watchmaking industry. However, it has not all been plain sailing. After the Second World War, the company was nationalised and it was only in 1990 that the founder’s great-grandson, watch industry legend Walter Lange, relaunched the brand. Since then, they have grown to become one of the most revered watchmakers in the world. There are many things that make this company so special, from the fact they only produces a few thousand wristwatches a year to their astonishing development of almost 50 manufacture movements. They are particularly renowned for the lavish decorations of these calibers though, which are all assembled by hand. One of their many wristwatches that has made a notable impact is the Lange 1. It features the first outsized date the brand ever made, and was the first watch A. Lange & Sohne produced after they established their new factory. Its unmistakable dial arrangements and classic style give it a unique, yet timeless design. Inside the watch lies the L901.0 manufacture movement, whose three-quarter plate makes it an incomparable feat of micro-engineering. To match the discreet elegance of the brand, each year A. Lange & Sohne partner with the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, which sits on the spectacular banks of Lake Como. Here, once a year, gathers a collection of some of the world’s most beautiful classic cars as well as a handful of dedicated collectors. The affair is globally recognised as one of the most prestigious automotive events in the world, with only 50 machines able to participate. Some of the cars are one-offs and they are judged on categories such as restoration work, design, beauty and individuality. For A. Lange & Sohne it is the ideal partnership, as they share the values of classical design and unrivalled attention to detail that are both synonymous with the event. As part of their continued partnership each year, the winner of the prestigious “Best of Show” category receives a one-of-a-kind A. Lange & Sohne timepiece, and this year, the recipient was gifted the very special Lange 1 Time Zone “Como Edition”. The timepiece boasts a beautiful hand-engraved case back displaying the coat of arms of the competition, and Como itself is featured on the dial, representing the Central European Time on the rotatable city ring. But, unfortunately, unless you have one of the world’s rarest classic cars in your garage, you will likely never have the chance to touch this unique piece, let alone own it. Instead, we’ll just have to settle for the ‘standard’ Lange 1 Time Zone, pictured here. And that’s just fine by us.

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MONTBLANC THE RETURN OF THE MAISON The word luxury is continuously being redefined, not by the brands but by us, the consumers. There was a time in the past where it was not uncommon for brands to portray their history as being from one place, yet manufacture their products in a completely different country. Whilst this is still often the case, there is definitely a continuing shift as consumers become more educated and ethically aware. In the past there were two reasons why we brought a product: brand name and price. Today however, whilst they unfortunately may not be as prevalent as the previous two, ethics and traceability are continuing to grow in swaying consumer’s purchasing power. Another factor that’s a cause for concern with brands is continuous growth, which normally means adding product ranges. This growth is often fraught with danger as it is so easy to dilute the brand’s heritage. One such company that’s conducting a masterclass in how to do this successfully though, is Montblanc.

Next up was the leather collection, and an area of the market that is continuing to grow especially on the menswear side, as no longer is the humble briefcase enough. For many it would have been easy to redesign an old collection by adding a twist, however, under the renowned eye of CEO, Jerome Lambert, they went back to the drawing board and not only to produce something different, but to create a product that truly has the edge over its rivals. Montblanc’s new Extreme Collection is just this, using a leather that has been specially created to be the most durable on the market, boasting properties such as scratch, fire and water resistance. The collection not only cements the brand’s reputation as a true maison, but has also introduced a leather range, which to my knowledge is the toughest on the market. This is a good thing too as, like Montblanc’s writing instruments and watches, it will prove to be a thoroughly worthy investment. BY HARRY JARMAN

About six months ago if someone turned to me and said the words “Montblanc”, I would either have thought of a mountain in France, or a pen. The latter being the world famous writing instrument company, which has become renowned for producing some of the finest pens on the planet. Today, pulling out a Montblanc pen to sign a document says more about you than you may think. I remember as a child climbing on to my father’s desk to find his black enamelled Meisterstuck fountain pen. Not knowing anything about the craftsmanship at this young age, I remember being fixated on the way you had to unscrew the pen to open it, and the weight, which alone oozed quality. With such an iconic status, I was shocked to discover that Montblanc also made watches, leather pieces and even jewellery. I remembered wondering if the same attention to detail went into these products as it did with the writing instruments, or if it was simply another way of increasing revenues by leveraging the brand’s name and reputation, which its writing instruments have so rightly gained. Very few luxury brands become true ‘maisons’ in every sense of the word. Many try and only few succeed. Montblanc it seems is on the way to becoming a true maison though, by putting the same amount of time, craftsmanship and technological prowess in to all of its products. At the beginning of the year they launched a range of timepieces at SIHH in Geneva, the highlight in my view being the Meisterstuck Heritage Collection. This collection was inspired by their world famous pens, whilst being manufactured by Minerva, the renowned watchmakers in Villeret, Switzerland. It was hailed as a great success, even by the most traditional of watch journalists.

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Montblanc Extreme Rucksack £555

Montblanc Extreme Time Walker Extreme Chronograph £4,300

Montblanc Extreme Wallet all available at montblanc.com

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STYLE

WATCHES IN THE NEWS TUDOR RETURNS This September marks the return of the affordable Rolex. On September 19th, Tudor will launch and become available in 102 outlets throughout the UK. Tudor, which is owned by Rolex is likely to cause a stir in the watch world with a strong PR and Marketing campaign, as well as a great product range. With prices ranging from £1,500-£4,500, the brand is aiming at the likes of TAG Heuer, Longines and Omega, all of whom already have strongholds in this market segment.

demand for classic vintage Tudors from collectors, which, in turn has also resulted in a demand for new products. Out of the new range our top pick would have to be the Tudor Heritage Black Bay seen here. Its classic and timeless design remains distinctive enough to ensure that it has its own unique character. Tudor Heritage Black Bay in blue £2,120 tudorwatch.com

Tudor was originally started back in 1926, although the actual brand name Tudor SA was created 20 years later by Rolex founder Hans Wilsdorf. The aim was, having already successfully launched Rolex back in 1908, to create a more affordable alternative. This was made clear in the advertising, which showed motorbikes and builders, and was generally aimed at a completely different audience to that of Rolex. In the 1950s, Tudor launched the Oyster Prince range with great success and this was quickly followed by the Submariner range. The Tudor Oysterdate Chronograph came later, in the 1970s. The brand quickly became known for the toughness and reliability of its watches, which was reflected in the creation of the shield symbol in the 1960s.

AD

Despite its early success, the Tudor name became virtually redundant in the 1990s and began to exit the majority of markets, including the US. However last year saw its successful US return, fuelled by a strong and renewed

BREGUET BOND STREET REOPENS Originally opened in 2002, this summer saw the reopening of Breguet’s Bond Street boutique, following an extensive expansion and refurbishment. The new boutique measures 190 square metres and is now impressively spread out over no less than four floors. Each floor is truly impressive, from the show room to the third floor VIP lounge, all of which can be accessed by a glass lift. For Breguet, which was founded in 1775, the boutique represents a new concept of advance design, features such as the ellipse on the ceiling reproduces the oval shape of the A-L Breguet by Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, in 1810, which now lends its names to Breguet’s leading women’s collection. For us, Breguet is a brand which continues to represent the best of fine watch making and remains one of the most prestigious brands in the world, classically understated and only worn by a select few. It is, in every sense of the word, a gentleman’s watch brand. breguet.com

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75 LOWER SLOANE STREET, CHELSEA, LONDON WWW.OLIVERBROWN.ORG.UK

COUNTRY & SHOOTING • TAILORING • EVENINGWEAR • MORNINGWEAR

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THE MEN BEHIND THE FUNDS BY EDWIN SMITH IN 1949, WHEN ALFRED WINSLOW JONES DREAMT UP THE HEDGE FUND, HE COULD NEVER HAVE IMAGINED THE FINANCIAL PHENOMENON IT WAS TO BECOME. TODAY, THE INDUSTRY IS WORTH OVER £2.6TRILLION, REMAINS LARGELY UNREGULATED AND PLAYS HOST TO OUTRAGEOUS CULTS OF PERSONALITY WHOSE PAY PACKETS MAKE GOLDMAN SACHS EXECUTIVES LOOK LIKE KIDS IN A SWEATSHOP.

Pierre Lagrange

“In most parts of finance, 90% of the success of your career rests on something that you have no control over,” says Lars Kroijer, author of Money Mavericks: Confessions of a Hedge Fund Manager. “So much of it is down to the movement of the economy and the markets. But the beauty of hedge funds is that you can make that go away.” Primarily, that’s because hedge funds are less encumbered by regulation than other types of financial organisation. The founder of what has become recognised as the first ever hedge fund, Alfred Winslow Jones, spotted that there was money to be made from creating a ‘long-short’ equity fund that went short on overvalued stocks (essentially betting on them to lose value) and going long on equities that were likely to increase in value. That way, even in a falling market, it was possible to see good returns. Winslow Jones, a financial journalist, also borrowed money to invest. But since this and the practice of shorting was illegal for conventional funds, his was established as a limited partnership. That was in 1949, but today the financial services industry has moved on – and what constitutes ‘a hedge fund’ is a less clear, partly because funds invest in a much wider range of asset classes – including commodity, currency, distressed and credit. A modern-day hedgie that I speak to jokes that the best definition of a hedge fund he has heard is: “a fee structure – with an investment idea attached as a secondary thought.” When we meet in his company’s discreet central London offices, he also asks to remain anonymous, so he’s referred to here as ‘Michael Jones’. “But,” he adds, “the fee structure might actually be the best way to define a hedge fund. The classic model is ‘two and 20’.” This means that a hedge fund typically takes a 2% fee for looking after an investor’s money. Then, on top of that, it takes a further 20% of any gains that are made as a result of its management of the fund and the investments that are made. It’s widely acknowledged that these fees are high, so ‘hedgies’ are under pressure to prove their worth by making indexbeating gains, but it’s easy to see how the profits for successful organisations and the people who run them can get rather big, rather quickly. The 25 top-earning hedge fund managers in the world last year made a combined total of $21bn – enough to make the $23m pay packet of Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein look like peanuts in comparison.

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Michael Hintze

THERE ARE STILL SOME “ROCK STARS” WHOM EVERYBODY IN THE INDUSTRY KNOWS. Emmanuel Roman

In the UK, a good chunk (5%) of the Sunday Times Rich List (of the 1,000 richest people in the country) is accounted for by people who made their money through hedge funds. The highest ranked this year was Alan Howard, who is thought to be worth £1.6bn. Some ‘hedgies’ profited from the global financial meltdown. The most notable being John Paulson, who used credit default swaps to bet against sub-prime mortgage lenders in the US. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, he was personally paid almost $4bn in 2007, while his firm made $15bn. Some individual funds within the firm ended up with a six-fold return on investment. The move itself was, of course, a oncein-a-lifetime win for Paulson, but the fact that a select group of already wealthy financiers got richer from a series of events that caused untold misery for millions was not good PR. It’s perhaps a reaction to this sort of story, as well as the general maturation of an industry that was once synonymous with the risk-taking ‘Masters of the Universe’, that hedge funds have now come to be regarded as less flashy than they once were. But the New York Times recently suggested that, somewhat ironically, this more conservative ethos might be the very thing that is powering the sector’s prodigious growth. According to a recent report by McKinsey, the global alternate investment market (which also includes real estate, commodities and private equity firms) is now worth $7.2 trillion, and hedge funds are the fastest growing part of it, swelling from $1.4 trillion in 2008 to be worth $2.6 trillion at the end of last year.

According to Jones, another part of the picture may be that the rise of ‘quants’ (funds that rely heavily on code, computer power and algorithms to make investment decisions) and the increasing prevalence of technology has lessened the importance of the type of fund managers who would attract investment in their funds through sheer “cult of personality”. However, he adds, there are still some “rock stars” whom everybody in the industry knows. One is Raffaele Costa. Now the founder and CEO of his own firm, Tyndaris, the Sicilian made his name as deputy global head of sales at Man Group, but also thanks to his nautical alter ego, “Captain Magic” – a masked, piratical figure who held court on Costa’s ostentatiously appointed yacht, Sea Force One. Jones also mentions an ex-CIA operative who has helped his employer to determine whether people presenting financial statements are telling the whole truth (“they raise a lot of money, actually”). Other well-known figures in London include Frenchman Emmanuel ‘Manny’ Roman, who became CEO of Man Group last year, and Belgian, Pierre Lagrange. The latter, a founding partner of GLG, set tongues wagging when he left his wife and three children in a record-setting £160 million separation. He later moved in with his boyfriend, Sudaneseborn fashion designer Roubi L’Roubi, and the pair now own the country pursuits clothing label Huntsman. Australianborn Sir Michael Hintze is also widely recognised, but cuts a more traditional, establishment figure. His patronage of the arts (his fund CQS sponsors the Old Vic theatre and he donated £2m to the National Gallery, where a room now bears his name) has led to speculation that he might be in line to receive a peerage.

George Soros

But among all the different personalities and reputations, is there something that the most successful hedge fund managers tend to have in common? “They have all been willing to trust their gut,” says Maneet Ahuja, who had in-depth meetings with Pierre Lagrange, John Paulson and nine other stars of the publicity-shy industry when researching her book, Alpha Masters: Unlocking the Genius of the World’s Top Hedge Funds. “And they make big bets, even when the market thinks they are wrong.”

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Some people might add that the capacity to work hard is essential – Randall Dillard, for example, the managing director and chief investment officer at Liongate Capital Management, a fund of hedge funds, said earlier this year that young financiers working a 60-hour week were “not even in the game.” But Lars Kroijer isn’t so convinced. “The hours are not longer than other parts of finance. If you wanted to work long hours, you’d be better off working for an investment bank – Morgan Stanley or somewhere like that. If you want genuine masochism, that’s where it’s at.” Stress, on the other hand, is a different matter. “The reason it’s so stressful is the marketplace,” says Kroijer. “The market prices are the score sheet and it is everchanging, so you can go from being very, very rich to very, very poor in a short space of time. That can happen in venture capital or as an investment banker, but it takes a lot longer.” And Kroijer should know. His fund, Holte Capital, lost $10 million on one August day in 2007.  “If you take the world’s top 20 hedge fund managers – I’ve met about 10 of them – they’re genuinely very curious about the world around them. They care a lot about investing and some are almost professorial – nerdy types in the corner. Others are aggressive types: ‘I’ll stick a fork in you, if you don’t do what I say.’ The really successful ones will be good at motivating a team around them, because really big hedge fund managers don’t do all the investments themselves. But I don’t think there’s even a consistency about how they do that. Some are known as really intolerable people to work with, but just pay people a stonking fortune. So it’s not any one thing.” But in the end, Kroijer says, you can find a common thread. The most successful people are “very smart and very hungry.”  “It’s a beautiful meritocracy,” he adds. “Even at a young age, real talent will probably be discovered quickly, [in hedge funds] you don’t have to first be beaten with a stick by someone at Goldman Sachs for 15 years. Having had many friends who have [been through that], it’s no fun at all.” What’s more, Kroijer says, the people who make the most money tend not to be motivated by money alone. “By and large they do it because they love the work and they find it really interesting – they could be a tenth as rich and still afford all their nice houses and nice cars, so they’re not doing it for that reason anymore. But the whole Playboy bunnies and helicopters thing is a myth more than reality. I’ve been around the industry a long time and I haven’t seen any of it.” But maybe he just wasn’t looking in the right place. When I ask Michael Jones about the excess that many outsiders associate with the industry, he says that things have calmed down since what one might describe as its pre-crash heyday. “Back then, you would hear stories about the sales guys asking for brown envelopes. What they were used for – bribes, hookers, drugs – I don’t know. Today it’s different, although the banks still have parties for hedge funds pretty much every night. You could do it all the time if you wanted to. But we were never as bad as the brokers – sending private jets for people to go to Ibiza for the weekend and that sort of thing. Although...” He breaks off for a second. “I can remember some pretty good weekends.” But with that, comes my cue to leave. It’s time for him to go back to work.

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Fencote

www.herring.co.uk Autumn 2014

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POLITICS

THE NEW

K INGS

OF SPIN 'MEET THE MEN WHO DECIDE HOW YOU VOTE'

BY DIGBY WARDE-ALDAM

‘I was never the likely candidate for this campaign...this is your victory,’ Barack Obama declared when the result of the 2008 Presidential Election was announced. His campaign had been brilliant, mobilising thousands of supporters and millions of voters to achieve what had previously been thought impossible: installing a black president in the White House. Several months before, this time in London, Boris Johnson had made a similarly gushing victory speech. His election as mayor did not have the historical significance of Obama’s triumph, to be sure, but it was nonetheless a benchmark in British politics. Johnson, a scandalridden Tory, had been chosen as leader of an overwhelmingly leftwing city. The victors of 2008 (and indeed in 2012) were charismatic gamechangers. But neither election was won on personal charm alone. The real credit belonged to their campaign managers, both of whom relied upon military discipline and relentless propaganda to make it happen. In Washington, the man responsible for dictating Obama’s strategy was called David Axelrod, a New York-born former journalist. In London, micro-managing Boris’s campaign was a fifty-something Australian named Lynton Crosby. These men represented a new breed of political figure: The International Super Consultant.

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Fast forward to August 2014, and the campaign for next year’s UK General Election is already underway. Overseeing the Conservative Party’s bid for the majority that eluded them four years ago is the very same Lynton Crosby, reportedly working full time for £500,000. Not to be outdone, Labour have stumped up £300,000 for the services of David Axelrod. The Liberal Democrats, too, have brought in a crack strategist, the 41-year old South African consultant Ryan Coetzee. Gossip suggests that they are paying him £100,000 directly out of the public purse. One hopes that his services are worth the taxpayers’ money. Whatever their respective pay grades, this election will surely be remembered as a battleground between the world’s most famous spin doctors. The super strategists are now amongst the most powerful political figures in the world. But who are they? And how did they become so important? Political consultancy has existed, in some form or other, for as long as politics itself. Even Alexander the Great required the advice of Aristotle. But the story of the super-strategists really begins in Washington in 1992. At that time, the President of the United States was George HW Bush, the man who had been in charge when the Cold War finally ended, and as if that weren’t enough, had won a ‘Hot’ war too.

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Operation Desert Storm had, in military terms at least, been a stunning victory. Saddam Hussein’s army – then one of the largest and most impressive in the world – had been annihilated in a matter of weeks. And George Bush was not slow to take the credit. On account of this, he expected that Autumn’s presidential election to be a pushover. But what he hadn’t realised was that America had changed since the Soviet threat had disappeared. Americans were no longer losing sleep over the fear of nuclear apocalypse. No, what concerned them now was not defence spending but the economy, which had taken a dramatic nosedive since Bush entered office in 1988. Besides this, a new generation of voters were fed up with Cold Warriors like Bush senior. Their colloquial language and tolerant attitudes were entirely at odds with the pompous, black and white vision he offered. Bush’s opponent, Bill Clinton, understood this only too well. His chief strategist James Carville organised a campaign ‘war room’ of advisors to come up with tactics that would appeal directly to the centre ground. Carville’s team minted slogans for the campaign that have since become iconic (‘It’s the economy, stupid’ was their unofficial motto) and rather than positioning Clinton as a distant, heroic figure, painted a picture of him as a ‘normal guy,’ with the same concerns as everyone else. This was beyond ideology or economic questions – this was about personality. The Democratic strategists also made much of Clinton’s family and personal charm, and when George Bush refused to participate in a TV debate, the game was up. In the spring of 1992, Clinton was polling at just 25%; when the election finally came, he took 43% of the vote, ousting the Republicans from power for the rest of the decade. ‘Political expertise and knowledge come from America and are copied around the world,’ UCL’s Dr. Chrysa Lamprinakou tells me, and Clinton’s victory was no exception. When Tony Blair began his campaign for the 1997 election, he was all too aware of this. He and his strategy team (advised by the very same James Carville) copied the Democrats’ strategy move-for-move. He exposed his family to the public eye, talked to the electorate in a conversational manner and imposed his face on Labour Party manifestos. Personality politics was now a British concern, too. (Between 2006 and 2010, David Cameron would ape many of the personal touches Blair had used on his path to power.) For a brief period, it looked as though the politicians had had their cake and eaten it. But the politicians found they no longer had any separation between public and private life. The consultants used this as a way of making themselves indispensable; in effect, they came to dictate both. If a politician had to make an appearance, the spin doctors would dictate not only the points in

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David Cameron and Barack Obama

THE TORIES PAINTED TONY BLAIR AS A BOGEYMAN, TURNING HIS OWN CULT OF PERSONALITY ON ITS HEAD.

Ed Milliband

their speeches, but the clothes they wore, the jokes they made, and ultimately the vision they espoused. Everything was now mediated through the experts. The first warning that Personality Politics had become a malign Frankenstein’s Monster came from Frankenstein himself: Bill Clinton. When his affair with Monica Lewinsky was exposed in 1998, the family-man image and ‘normal’ personal life he had exploited to win two elections were suddenly fair game for his Republican opponents. Clinton narrowly survived a Senate vote calling for his impeachment, but character assassination had become a political tool. This was a far more potent form of spin: negative campaigning. One man who understood this was Lynton Crosby, now in charge of winning the election for the Tory party. In the 1996 Australian elections, the Liberal Party’s John Howard won a crushing victory. Crosby was one of the masterminds behind the campaign – and he would go on to win a further three general elections for the incumbent. Crosby’s strategy was notable for its ‘scare tactics’: that is, identifying an issue that worried the electorate and cranking up the fear factor. Even in the cut-throat world of Australian politics, Crosby’s methods raised eyebrows; in the 2001 Australian federal election, the Liberal Party claimed that a boat-load of Afghan asylum seekers had blackmailed their way onto Australian soil by threatening to drown their children. The story shocked Australia, and strengthened Howard’s antiimmigration campaign. It was also a complete fiction. A senate enquiry conducted after the election found the story to be almost entirely fabricated. It was to become one of the darkest chapters in the Liberal party’s history. But in London, the Tory party had watched Crosby’s successes with interest. When they hired him to run their 2005 election campaign (which Crosby reportedly considered ‘unwinnable’) he bought his brand of negative campaigning to Westminster. Rather than depicting the Labour party as a unit, the Tories painted Tony Blair as a bogeyman, turning his own cult of personality on its head. They also focussed their campaign on a perceived fear of mass immigration. Crosby was right. The Tories did not win the election, but he had shown them how to fight one. It took simple messages, big subjects, tireless polling and rigorous discipline. This was how he got Boris Johnson into office and, broadly speaking, it was also how Axelrod won the vote for Obama.

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POLITICS These key rules aside, Axelrod and Crosby’s strategies couldn’t be more different. The former is known for using a message of hope; the latter tends to play on peoples’ fears. Axelrod exploits the positive aspects of his client’s personality; Crosby has a sixth sense for digging up dirt on his opponents, while keeping his own side as anonymous as possible – as was so crushingly demonstrated when his team uncovered Ken Livingstone’s irregular tax records in 2012. The result of the upcoming 2015 general election may well be decided on personality politics – and there can be no doubt that it’s a priority for both Crosby and Axelrod. Crosby has the unenviable task of convincing Conservative voters that David Cameron is a strong leader – in essence, that he is in control of his party. Several highprofile resignations and the almost weekly backbench rebellions have suggested this may not be the case. Axelrod, meanwhile, is tasked with making Ed Miliband appeal to voters. Even for the man who turned Barack Obama into a liberal icon, this may be a bridge too far. For all his intelligence, the Labour leader’s public image leaves a lot to be desired. In any case, neither strategist can really be said to have the upper hand. The politicians’ reliance on the likes of Crosby and Axelrod is yet more acute due to the way in which they themselves have changed. “In the past, people who became politicians had usually had a career doing something else,” Dr. Lamprinakou tells me, “it was a kind of public service.” This began to change in the 1980s though and a political life became a career choice – one in which youth made all the difference. (It is worth noting that all of the ‘personality politicians’ mentioned in this article were significantly younger than the rivals they defeated in the polls.) This means that fewer and fewer politicians have experience in any other walk of life, and require the expertise of outsiders. It also means

David Axelrod

that consultants now exist at every level of politics. But, as Dr Lamprinakou affirms, there is nothing manifestly worse about this situation than what came before: “there has never been a ‘Golden Age’ of British Politics,” she tells me. It is also true that the super-strategists are unlikely to fall out of fashion. Politics, like everything else, has become globalized. Yet the super-consultants, influential though they are, cannot ultimately be the arbiters of power. Crosby and Axelrod are no Gods – they still have to work with the politicians. What happens next, then, will be up to us, next May.

INTRODUCING

THE CHAPAR LOVE CLOTHES HATE SHOPPING

Dr Chrysa Lamprinakou is a Research Associate and Teaching Fellow in British Politics at University College London. She is also a founder of Parliamentary Candidates UK, an investigation into the make-up of Parliament. You can find its free public resource at: http://parliamentarycandidates.org

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WWW.THECHAPAR.COM

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POWER

PRICE ENGINE ACCELERATION POWER TOP SPEED WEIGHT

KING OF THE

OFF-ROAD RORY FH SMITH

When the first Range Rover rolled off the production line in 1970 it featured vinyl seats and a crude plastic dashboard. Marketed as “A Car For All Reasons,” the original Range Rover’s interior could even be hosed down after a rough day on the farm. Clearly, ‘luxury’ was yet to feature in Land Rover’s vocabulary. Now, 44 years later, the Range Rover brand has become synonymous with automotive refinement and all-round capability – a world apart from the utilitarian rational that shaped its initial existence. Today, fronting the much-expanded line up is the Range Rover long-wheelbase Autobiography: a supercharged V8 limousine with a penchant for getting mucky. For those in the market for luxury limousines, first impressions really do count and Land Rover clearly understand this. In its long-wheelbase guise, the Range Rover serves up kerb presence in spades. When first introduced to the slab-sided luxo-barge, the car’s proportions suggested it was designed to impress outsiders as much as it exalts those encased inside; it’s a car of gargantuan proportions, even

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against the imposing backdrop of the Scottish Highlands. The long-wheelbase is stretched a further 200mm in length than the standard-wheelbase Range Rover and, as a result, it honours its rear occupants with an extra 186mm of legroom – an all-important detail considering the majority of buyers will prefer to spend time in the backseat. Careful not to make the already sizable Range Rover unruly, Land Rover have added the extra length by extending the bodyshell before the rear wheels meaning the Range’s carefully considered styling remains intact. Rolling on 21” rims as standard, the sheer size of the long-wheelbase absorbs the larger wheels, ensuring it doesn’t look like it belongs in the background of a Dr Dre music video. Even the optional 22” rims don’t look out of place, however, if you opt for either the ‘Gloss Black’ or ‘Diamond Turned’ finishes, you may find the likes of Justin Bieber asking you for a lift home.

not just the statement it makes on the outside but, more importantly, what it can offer on the inside. Buyers of the long-wheelbase will demand a car that caters for their every need, from business to social occasions, and a functional, comfortable and exquisitely appointed interior is essential for those at the top of their game. Luckily, the Range Rover doesn’t disappoint. In the rear, standard bench seating or sumptuous split-seat individual chairs can be selected, both of which recline up to 17 degrees – eight degrees further than the standard-wheelbase Range Rover. The latter split-seat option boasts an impressive, divisive centre console and massage lumbar for those wanting a touch of ‘TLC’ on the go. For the chauffeured, the split-seat set up is the one to opt for, which, when combined with the standard, rear-mounted 10.2” entertainment systems and multi-adjustable seats, offers a passenger experience that many first-class airline cabins would fall short of. Owing to its added ride-height, the Range Rover offers a commanding view from the cabin. The standard-fit panoramic glass roof makes the interior feel spacious and airy, while the privacy blinds offer protection from the prying paparazzi, should (unlike me) that prove a problem. If the Range’s interior is let down by anything, it’s the over-use of plastics, particularly on the centre console, which taints the overall feel and is something Mercedes S-Class owners wouldn’t (and don’t) put up with. Should the occasion arise where you’re required to get behind the wheel, then rest assured, the Range Rover makes for an entertaining drive despite its bulk. On the open road, the 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol engine produces 503bhp and is capable of delivering a colossal

105,830 5000C, V8, PETROL 0 - 60MPH IN 5.5SEC 503BHP 140 MPH 2413KG

amount of power to all four wheels through a smooth and sophisticated transmission. Being transported to 62mph in 5.5 seconds and on to a top speed of 140mph, while being gently massaged by the winged leather seats makes for an extraordinary experience. It offers sporting performance, matches the comfort of your favourite armchair and it’s exactly how you want a premium SUV to feel. Around town, the long-wheelbase is surprisingly supple but is still too large to fit into most parking spaces meaning it can be a handful on narrow city backstreets. But it’s off the beaten track where the Range Rover really differentiates itself from the competition. Reassuringly, in this environment, you notice that elements of the original, functional deign brief are still present, albeit hidden under swathes of leather. Despite suffering a puncture in the most testing of environments - the Scottish Highlands the long-wheelbase could, on the whole, negotiate terrain in a way that no other luxury limousine could even begin to comprehend. The added weight and length means the long-wheelbase is more prone to creaks and tremors than a standard-wheelbase Range Rover, but it takes some hard driving to reveal this. Given the price tag of £106,000 and the astonishing levels of automotive opulence, the long-wheelbase Range Rover serves up good value for money, and offers something that no other car in the limousine class can match: off-road driving ability. For a car that started life 44 years ago as a functional farming accessory, Land Rover has developed a vehicle that can compete against the automotive aristocracy of Mercedes, Jaguar and even Bentley while remaining true to its original intentions. That, in itself, is reason enough to buy one.

As with any luxury limousine, the secret to its success is

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POWER

TRIP

“The most anticipated car of the year is put through its paces.” BY HARRY JARMAN What is it, well it’s Jaguars next big thing. Some are calling it the new e-type whilst others say it’s Jaguars answer to Aston Martin. What we can say is that Jaguar is well and truly back and living by the same rules which it made its name with in the first place. Unless you have been living in a hole for the last 6 months you wouldn’t of escaped the huge advertising campaign around this car, from the Super Bowl advert, bill boards, magazine and newspapers, “good to be bad” has been everywhere. It’s clear from this that Jaguar have high hopes for this car and so far the gamble seems to be paying off. Take one look at this car and you can’t help but be won over by it. The back is stunning and you can definitely see essence of the e-type’s design influence. From the front, the wide, open mouthed grill, shark like gills and sweeping bonnet lines can’t fail to impress. Little touches like the bonnet opening from the windscreen are subtle nods to

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the old e-type. Inside the interior is impressive with sports seats and the stitched finish gives a real sense of quality, it’s exactly what you would expect from the Jaguar Land Rover. The cabin is snug, with a low driving position and a long view over the bonnet, the result is a feeling of total control and agility. There are three models in the range, the standard F-Type Coupe, the F-Type S and the top of the range F-Type R. We test drove the F-Type S which we are inclined to argue that the S model is the one to go for. With a 3.0 Litre V6 380 Supercharge engine it has a top speed of 171mph and 0-60mph of 4.8 seconds. Many are saying this is the best of the bunch and we are inclined to agree. Whilst it may not have the power of the 5.0 V8 R, with a lighter engine we think the S has a better power to weight ratio resulting in lighter steering around the corners. When you push the start button you can instantly tell that

this is a refined engine with an excited burble coming out of the stunning twin centrally mounted exhausts, however the excited child calms itself to a more subtle murmur. What I like about this engine is it seems to have two sides to it, one that you can live with everyday, yes it’s a 3.0 litre V6 which although Jaguar claim does 31 mpg, we experience a 8mpg lower, however this is still good from a car of this performance. The second side is I guess what Jaguar call the “bad” side. Slip the car into dynamic mode and shift the gears into sport and you have a different car all together, the engine gives sounds of beautiful burbles and exhaust pops at the tap of the acceleration, the sound when pushed is really special. The car has a really balanced and nimble feel to it. In conclusion, there are not many if any bad points to this car. It is beautiful and really beautiful at that, the drive is great and engine nose sublime, the best thing of all though is the price, at £60,250 it’s £24,750 less than the F-Type R and less then most its rivals in this performance category. Jaguar have done exactly what they did with the e-type all those years ago when they made the great Enzo Ferrari jealous. They have made an affordable sports car that competes and in many cases beats its more expensive rivals. “It good to be bad”? Jaguar you have been oh so very good.

PRICE ENGINE TRANSMISSION POWER TOP SPEED 0-60

60K + 3.0 LITRE V6 EIGHT-SPEED AUTOMATIC REAR WELL DRIVE 335BHP 171 MPH 4.8SECS

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AUDI

RS6

“The power house estate may look deceptive from the exterior, however under the bonnet it’s unnatural in every way.” BY HARRY JARMAN The powerhouse estate may appear deceptively ordinary from the exterior however, under the bonnet it’s unnatural in every way. In 2002 Audi launched the first RS6 and, since then, it continues to have car enthusiasts talking. To the untrained eye it might just seem like a normal prestige estate however to those in the know, this is no normal car: this is the Audi RS6. Firstly the discreetness has always been part of its charm, not just because the understated style is just damn cool - it’s also the stunned face of the driver when you zoom past them on the motorway that wins your heart. Under the bonnet of the latest Audi RS6 Avant lies a 4.0 litre V8, producing 552bhp which was proceeded by a larger

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5.0 litre V10 that produced 572bhp. Despite the noticeable decrease in power, the latest model is actually faster - and by faster we mean a 0-60mph of 3.7 seconds faster. Now, before I carry on, please remember that this is an estate car. You can take the kids to school and comfortably fit a large dog in the boot, this sort of acceleration simply shouldn’t be physically possible… but it is. When you go above 4,000rpm the acceleration is mind-blowing and will never fail to put a smile on your face.

for that, then you might as well add a grotesque spoiler on to the roof, and no, that would not look cool.

and the engine revs increase and the ride electronically firms up, offering refinement that is hard to beat.

The 21 inch alloy wheels ensure that - whilst it doesn’t corner like a R8 - it certainly has plenty of grip. This combined with the air suspension provides a firm, but comfortable ride.

You can’t help but love this car and I would even put it in my dream top-ten garage. To live with this everyday, in terms of driving, would be a delight. Simply put, very few motors can offer practicality paired with this level of power. When it comes to running costs however, expect to be at the fuel pump more often than you’d like and, with high CO2 emissions to also contend with, tax bills aren’t cheap. This being said, when you are roaring down a straight Roman road in Gloucestershire, with your foot to the floor, who cares.

In the interior you can certainly tell that this is a performance machine; giveaways include the thick, flat bottom steering wheel and black ‘valcona’ leather sports seats. The dashboard also seems lower which, in return, creates a sportier driving feel. When it comes to technology, you can of course expect the usual Audi high standards. When driving there are two sides to this car: the A6 estate and then the RS6 powerhouse. Slip the gear stick into sport

PRICE ENGINE TRANSMISSION POWER TOP SPEED 0-60

75K + 4.0 LITRE V8 AWD 552BHP 189 MPH 3.9SECS

Some will say that it’s lacking the muffled, growling sound when idling along, however I think that this is the whole point of the RS6. It’s the car that is meant to surprise. So who cares, when your going 15mph, that it’s not desperately trying to turn the heads of passers by. If you were buying it

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SARISSA

POWER

YACHTS

SAILING THE CARIBBEAN This Winter some may choose trendy Verbier, some may opt for traditional Scotland, however those craving warm clear blue waters and white sandy beaches then a yacht charter in the Caribbean is the only place to go. It has to be said that chartering a yacht during the Caribbean season might not give you the same kudos as renting a yacht on the Riviera during August, but it offers pleasures that the Mediterranean cannot match. Firstly there are no crowds, meaning total privacy and good winds mean it’s ideal for sailing. Islands such as St Barts, Antigua and St Maarten are the favourite yachting hangouts, however those wanting further exclusion can head to the likes of The Bahamas or The Virgin Islands. With regards to activities the Caribbean is all about taking it easy, however those wanting to party head to St Barts and join the likes of Roman Abramovich, Jay Z and Beyonce for New Year’s Eve. For those of you who want a bit of exercise then scuba driving and kite surfing are thoroughly recommended. With beautiful secluded coves and ultimate privacy, chartering in the Caribbean is a totally unique experience. Below we have choose our favourite sailing yachts available for charter this Winter, ranging from the impressive Maltese Falcon to the incredibly fast Nomad IV.

MALTESE FALCON

This yacht is often described as “incredible” and quite rightly so. Measuring 88 metres, she is able to get up to speeds of 20 knots. For a sailing yacht she has unrivalled space both on the exterior and in the interior. With such things as an outdoor cinema and enough toys to keep an army entertained, chartering Maltese Falcon is a once in a lifetime experience.

PRICE LENGTH

LENGTH CREW

€115,000 + VAT + APA 42.60M 6

CRUISING SPEED

10

GUESTS

10

BUILDER BUILT TENDER AND TOYS

VITTERS 2011 WATER SKIS WAKEBOARD DONUTS AND KITE BOARDING

PTARMIGAN

Ptarmigan is proof that practice makes perfect. She is the seventh Swan 82S to be built and like all her pedigree she combines both comfort and performance perfectly. For her size she is surprisingly responsive and gives outstanding performance. Her low profile and streamlined design really creates a stunning exterior. Inside, the interior is both spacious and elegant and a fine representation of Swan design. You won’t find better for the money.

PRICE LENGTH

$40,000 PER WEEK + APA 24.90M 4

16

CRUISING SPEED

7

12

GUESTS

7

CRUISING SPEED GUESTS

TENDER AND TOYS

PRICE

CREW

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88M

CREW

BUILDER

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€385,000 PER WEEK + APA

This is the largest composite sloop built in the Netherlands. With its sleek styling it’s sure to turn heads everywhere you cruise. In our view it’s the perfect combination of performance, luxury, adventure and pleasure.

PERINI NAVI 2006 JET SKIIS 2 TENDERS KNEEBOARDS WATER SKIS

BUILDER BUILT TENDER AND TOYS

NAUTOR’S SWAN 2012 1 TENDER 2 WAKE BOARDS 2 INFLATABLE PADDLE BOARDS INFLATABLE KAYAK

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POWER

NOMAD IV

For the thrill seekers among you, Nomad IV is one of the fastest sailing yachts in the world and whilst with this speed you expect to compromise on the comfort, Nomad IV has a stylish modern interior throughout with accommodation for 12 guests.

PRICE LENGTH CREW

€65,000 PER WEEK + APA 30.48M 4

CRUISING SPEED

10

GUESTS

12

BUILDER BUILT TENDER AND TOYS

MAXI DOLPHIN, ITALY 2013 1 TENDER 1 JET SKI 2 X 3 SAILING DINGHIES 2 DOUBLE INFLATABLE KAYAKS

An intelligent and practical guide to superyacht law A global law firm with more than 20 years experience in the superyacht sector. We advise on all stages in the process – from financing a yacht and drafting contracts, to guidance on design and build requirements.

All yachts are available to charter through Yacht Masters, Contact them on +44 (0)207 099 0941 or e-mail Broker Hemmo Bloemers at hemmo@yachtmasters.com

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For your copy of The Guide, or for any other superyacht legal advice, please contact John Leonida at superyachtlaw@clydeco.com, T: +44 (0)20 7876 5000 or please visit www.guidetosuperyachtlaw.com

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TRAVEL

Maldives

IT’S NO SECRET THAT THE MALDIVES IS THE GO-TO DESTINATION FOR STUNNING WHITE BEACHES, AZURE WATERS AND A HEALTHY DOSE OF LUXURY, BUT FINDING THE RIGHT HOTEL TO SUIT YOUR WANTS AND NEEDS CAN PROVIDE A MINEFIELD OF CHOICES. FEAR NOT, HOWEVER, AS WE PICK OUT A FEW OF THE BEST SPOTS, ALL WITH YOU IN MIND.

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FOR THE THRILL-SEEKERS Adrenaline junkies are advised to try their hand at the latest thrill-seeking technology; Flyboarding is the ultimate water sports experience! Simply strap on your fly board, power up and you’re off! Powerful water jets allow you to zoom in and out of the water, you can hover meters above the surface and get your heart pounding as you fly above the beautiful waves of the Indian Ocean.

Best for ACTIVITIES

Travelbag (www.travelbag.co.uk, 0845 543 6615) offers seven nights at the 5* The Sun Siyam Iru Fushi staying on a fullboard basis from £1,659 including flights with Turkish Airlines from London Gatwick and seaplane transfers. Book by 20th September for selected travel dates until 12th December 2014 and save up to £360 per person.

THE SUN SIYAM IRU FUSHI A paradise beach resort located in the Noonu Atoll Maldives, The Sun Siyam Iru Fushi features 11 bar and restaurant choices, a 20room tropical spa and a range of activities for all visitors. From the adrenaline junkie to the chilled out explorer, making it THE resort to visit for activity holidays.

FOR RELAXATION ACTIVITIES…

FOR SOMETHING A LITTLE MORE ENERGETIC

For those looking for a more traditional 5* luxury approach to activities, relax and indulge at The Spa. It offers a myriad of treatments, many incorporating the island’s traditional therapies. The Spa ensures a complete spa experience that the whole family can enjoy and includes a Male Spa Menu and Sweet Pea Spa for kids!

If sunbathing isn’t for you or your fancy seeing a little more of the islands, there are some incredible activities available. Try to explore the Noonu Atoll - either by yourself, or join one of the island’s nature experts for a guided walk through 52 acres of island landscape, where you will be introduced to rare indigenous fauna and flora.

Take in the sunset or relax with a glass of champagne to enjoy the most magical time of the day on a sunset cruise. Observe dolphins dance and play in in their natural habitat, whilst admiring the breathtaking sunset as it dips below the horizon of a glistening Indian Ocean.

The beauty of the Maldives isn’t limited the beaches, take a plunge below the waves and explore a whole new world. Experience a snorkelling safari, where you can revel in the beauty of the Maldivian underwater world - or take a dive and explore pristine turquoise lagoons and plentiful reefs surrounding the island. Underwater scooters are also available in the resort to enhance the diving experience, allowing you to explore the beautiful underwater scenery without getting tired. For a truly unique experience try a Reethi Faru Kayak Adventure. Take to the seas in a jaw dropping glass-bottomed kayak made for 2 (or one!) Take in marine life and islands in your own time without ever getting wet.

Enjoy a gourmet dinner specially prepared by your personal chef which can be consumed anywhere on the island with destination dining. Select a beautiful beach next to the crystal clear ocean waters or an intimate supper by the water on one of the private jetties boasting panoramic views. For those looking for a more cultural angle to their paradise escape, explore the local community; visit a local fruit farm or discover the origins of a local villager’s recipe used in the restaurant’s kitchens. Use your time on the island to broaden your horizons and experience the vibrancy and friendliness of local Maldivian culture.

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Niyama is the resort that turned the traditional Maldives offering on its head as it allows guests to do far more than just lie on a beach. Niyama is a destination for couples, friends or families that want to stay active on holiday and experience Per Aquum’s completely unique philosophy. Niyama offers a plethora of options to get guests active and incite a sense of discovery, stimulation and fun. This exciting concept is, of course, coupled with the natural beauty and tranquillity of the Maldives, so those who just want to sit back, chill out and relax can do so in style.

sunbathing decks are just some of the features on offer in one or more of the 7 room categories of Niyama. Lime Spa offers appointments 24 hours a day and there are a range of ‘After Dark’ massages, perfect for those who are looking to induce sleep. There are eight treatment rooms; two overlook the lush vegetation while six overlook the lagoon.

Niyama trail-blazed the nightclub scene by opening the world’s first underwater spa, Subsix. Subsix is a one-of-a-kind venue, located 500 meters offshore and six meters below the surface of the Indian Ocean. The signature restaurant; Edge appears to float on the surface of the Indian Ocean and is also located 500 metres offshore with 360 degree views of the sunset from the unique cocktail lounge, under a Later this year the distinguished style blogger, Irma is launching conical-shaped roof. Irma’s World at Niyama and its sister Maldives property, Huvafen Fushi, from the 18th to the 23rd October 2014 and Niyama from Activities include; game simulators, yoga, tai chi, muay tai boxing the 23rd to the 28th October 2014). Irma will be giving tips to guests and Zumba. There’s the option to kick up heels at Subsix and dance and drawing portraits in her distinct style. She will also be creating a the night away - or simply take a load off and watch the sunset from series of twelve postcards, four from each property, and an ‘Irma’s Fahrenheit rooftop bar. Dining options are similarly tempting… Guide To...’ for each one too! Try Tribal for a modern day campsite dining experience with hot rock grills, asados and open flames. Delight in the in-room popcorn A trip to Niyama is one that won’t be forgotten. markers and the a la carte menu from Deli-In where you will find ice creams, cheeses, olives, cold cuts and wines all pre-stocked in each www.peraquumimages.com – you can register for your own personal log in. studio and pavillion. ITC Luxury Travel (01244 355 527; www.itcluxurytravel.co.uk) has prices from Secluded beach views, fibre optic lit private pools, 24 hour butler £2,065 per person based on 2 adults sharing a beach Studio for 7 nights on half board service, the latest in entertainment technology and expansive private basis including return economy class flights and seaplane transfers.

Best for SUPREME LUXURY NIYAMA

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Best for ROMANCE

Per Aquum is notable for its Dream Calendar partnerships where they invite a creative person to showcase their work at its properties to display the creative synergies that they share. This year saw the welcoming of Andreas Francke at Niyama, who displayed the world’s first underwater art exhibition with his inimitable ‘Phantasy Fairytale’ theme.

PARK HYATT Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa is an exclusive, luxury hideaway set on a tropical island in the North Huvadhoo Atoll, 400km south of Malé, 56km north of the Equator. Secluded, serene and sculpted by impeccable style and design, the Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa is the ultimate destination for couples looking for a romantic escape. Located in the Indian Ocean’s pristine and undisturbed Gaafu Alifu Atoll, the retreat is a couples’ paradise; already inspired several proposals from enamoured holiday-makers staying in one of their 86 secluded villas. One Lothario took this even further by capitalising on the impressive diving on offer and proposed underwater, amongst the brightly coloured reefs and surrounded by crystal waters. For those looking for some added touches to the fantasy-world of island life - with its Champagne sands, idyllic privacy and contemporary design - the luxury resort offers a host of romantic packages to help guests make the most of their unforgettable time on Hadahaa. These include Bathtime Experiences, a heightened experience where guests can enjoy a selection of canapés delivered to villas on request, along with signature bath salts from the Vidhun Spa. The Private Dining experiences range from a candle-lit dinner on the soft sands of the beach at sunset, to one on a majestic starlit

terrace or a private table perched upon a floating lagoon. For an island ceremony, honeymooners, or anyone looking to renew their vows in one of the most romantic destinations on earth, a two-day island blessing and celebration can also be tailored on request. For guests who wish to experience two days of unparalleled luxury and enchantment according to their time and schedule, the new Journey to Romance offering at Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa is an unforgettable way to unwind and cherish time together in a completely unique fashion. Couples can enjoy a leisurely private island picnic followed by a deep relaxation massage in the privacy of their villa, completed by an aromatic bath whilst enjoying fresh fruit and crisp champagne. Western & Oriental (Tel: 020 3588 6030, ) offers a 7 night package to Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa from £3,605.00 per person for 2 adults sharing a Park Villa including Pure Hadahaa Premium All Inclusive package, 5 dives and return economy class flights with Emirates from London Gatwick, domestic flights and transfers. Based on travelAug- Sep 2014. For travel Oct - 20 Dec 2014, prices start from £4,135.00 per person. Saving up to £760 per person

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Switzerland SKIING IN STYLE

IN SEARCH OF THE PERFECT PLACE TO STAY WHILE SKIING IN SWITZERLAND? THEN LOOK NO FURTHER. THE ALIPINA GSTAAD AND THE CHEDI ANDERMATT ARE THE EMBODIMENT OF STYLE. FROM ‘SKI BUTLERS’ TO FINE DINING, THESE ARE TWO OF THE MOST LUXURIOUS PLACES TO COME BACK TO AFTER A HARD DAYS SKIING.

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THE ALPINA GSTAAD Since it opened its doors in December 2012, The Alpina Gstaad has arguably become the most exclusive luxury hotel to open in Gstaad for 100 years. With fifty-six rooms and suites, including the one-of-kind Panorama Suite, the Hotel boasts unparalleled views of Oberbort and the Swiss Alps, offering a modern - yet distinctive Swiss alpine guest experience which is both warm and discerning. In terms of accommodation, The Alpina Gstaad is second to none. All of the rooms boast a private terrace overlooking majestic mountains and the picturesque village of Gstaad. As the only one of its kind in the world, the ‘Panorama Suite’ epitomises the ideal of Alpine luxury. The 400m² duplex apartment has three bedrooms over two floors and centres on a spacious main living room area adorned with a grand fireplace and floor-to-ceiling chimney piece. A grand staircase leads up to the top floor of the suite, where the skylights frame the mountain peaks perfectly, presenting guests with their own private spa, jacuzzi, fitness and massage area. With a wide range of dining options from Japanese restaurant MEGU (the first European outpost of the acclaimed restaurant), to the traditional Swiss Stübli and the Michelin-starred Sommet, guests are not short of choice. Executive Chef, Marcus G. Lindner supervises each of the three exceptional restaurants, ensuring they use the finest ingredients - from Oscietra caviar to shabu shabu. In addition to the award-winning restaurants, the Hotel offers the Six Senses Spa; a sanctuary of peace and wellbeing. The Spa was inspired by Far Eastern traditions and draws its energy from the heart of the Bernese Oberland, offering world-renowned treatments designed to indulge the senses. This year has seen the Six Senses Spa continue to push the boundaries of wellness with the launch of signature Mountain Detox programmes including Mindful Leadership retreats and Sophrology, hosted by experts who can assist guests with their personal development by teaching them how to control their emotions and tackle anxiety.

Beyond the luxury hotel experience offered by The Alpina Gstaad, the area is of course naturally great for skiing. With 21 ski lifts, 18 chair lifts, 6 gondolas and 4 aerial tramways, visitors have access to 150 miles of pristine alpine slopes for skiing, snowboarding, sledging and winter hiking. The Hotel’s in-house ski rental shop makes it simple for guests to rent gear, whilst the concierge is delighted to help with ski pass purchase and any other assistance guests may need. Rates at The Alpina Gstaad start from CHF 350 (£230) per room per night based on two people sharing a Deluxe room, including breakfast and single use access to the Spa. To discover more, visit www.thealpinagstaad.ch or call +41 33 888 98 88.

The six day Mindful Leadership Retreat with Christian Kurmman (designed for executives and managers at all levels) deepens exploration mediation and the hallmarks of leadership excellence. Former executive Christian Kurmann learnt ancient meditation techniques at a Buddhist mountain monastery and a remote mountain refuge in Ladakh, before developing the retreat which incorporates these practices into daily life to restore inner balance in order to make a positive impact on working life. Sophrology is a structured method designed to produce optimal health and well-being. It consists of a series of easy-to-do physical and mental exercises that, when practiced regularly, lead to a healthy, relaxed body and a calm, alert mind. Passionate about personal development, Christian Turkier, who runs the retreat, offers mental coaching programmes for individuals and groups as well as topranking athletes. Relaxation, life coaching and tailored sessions focusing on the likes of insomnia, allergies and headaches are all explored in this retreat.

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THE CHEDI ANDERMATT For the keen skier who arrives and wants to hit the slopes straight away, The Chedi Andermatt is the perfect location. To make life easier for guests, the hotel has ski butlers (sports butlers during summer months) to ensure that your equipment is ready upon arrival, your route for the day is laid out to suit what you are looking for and, because nobody likes cold ski boots, the Ski Butler will make sure your boots are pre-warmed. With your skis ready and the shuttle bus right on the Hotel’s doorstep there’s nothing to delay you from hitting the slopes straight away. For those that think a day in the mountains is more about the après ski than the snow, relaxing in the Cigar and Wine library of The Chedi Andermatt is the perfect place to while away an evening. Of course, for those with tired legs and cold faces from a day spent outdoors, there are always the cosy lounges to relax in; doze in front of the fire and contemplate the 5 metre high cheese cellar which beckons. Gastronomy is a key highlight at The Chedi Andermatt. The Restaurant showcases four open atelier kitchens specialising Western and Asian Cuisine whilst the highly anticipated Japanese Restaurant by Hide Yamamoto serves authentic dishes prepared at a tempura and sushi bar right before your eyes.

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The Swiss mountain air is sure to invigorate the senses and at The Chedi Andermatt guests can relax and rejuvenate amidst the rugged beauty of the Swiss Alps. The Spa at The Chedi Andermatt covers 2,400 square metres and is based on a holistic spa and health concept, which aims to improve and focus on guests’ health and bring both mind and body into harmony with nature and the environment. Winding down with a swim in the outdoor pool, followed by a soothing Oriental treatment in one of the ten spa suites is the perfect way to relax. Designed by renowned designer Jean Michel-Gathy of Denniston Architects Ltd, The Chedi Andermatt reflects the natural landscape of the Swiss Alps combined with contemporary Asian nuances. For those seeking an ultra luxury experience, the newly opened Furka Suite; a top floor, 330 square metre suite overlooking the spectacular Saint-Gotthard Massif mountain range with its own private spa is the epitome of Swiss Luxury. Room rates start from 1,200 CHF/ night Inc. taxes and fees for a Deluxe Suite.

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HOTEL CRILLON LE BRAVE, PROVENCE

SURROUNDED BY LAVENDER FIELDS, LEAFY VINEYARDS, OLIVE GROVES, CHERRY ORCHARDS AND COVETED TRUFFLE FARMS, STRETCHING AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE, HOTEL CRILLON LE BRAVE IS IDEALLY LOCATED IN THE SHADOW OF MONT VENTOUX, BUT PERCHED ON TOP OF A TINY, SLEEPY VILLAGE, CATCHING THE BEST OF THE PROVENÇAL SUNSHINE. IT’S EASY TO SEE WHY THESE WERE THE SCENES THAT INSPIRED THE BRUSHSTROKES OF CÉZANNE AND VAN GOGH THROUGHOUT THEIR ARTISTIC CAREERS. BY EMMA CORBETT

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Mini-Spa. Tucked away by the pool you’ll find a small relaxing, candle-lit retreat lined with an assortment of authentic aromatherapy products made by Provence Santé. The healing body massage (£85 for 60 minutes & £v45 for 30 minutes) will see softly-spoken therapist Kirsty stretch, knead and restore you from head-to-toe, relieving tension in all your muscles accompanied by soothing aromas. If you are like me, you might even fall asleep. Back inside the walls of Crillon le Brave, restaurant Jérôme Blanchet is at the heart of Hotel Crillon le Brave’s culinary offering. Guests can choose to sit either on the main terraces or in the vaulted dining room and choose from two principal menus, the four-course Menu de Saison or the seven-course Menu du Chef tasting menu; à la carte dining is also possible. Dishes include sea bass carpaccio marinated with espelette pepper, crispy povencal small snails and French caviar, which could be followed by roasted turbot with glazed lobster butter, polenta and bisque flavoured with cognac. Black chocolate brownie, whipped cream and salted caramel butter with cocoa sorbet and green Sichuan pepper is one of the tempting desserts – delicious! Another dining option is Bistrot 40K, which serves up the best quality seasonal produce sourced within 40 kilometres of the hotel. A favourite dish includes Ventoux pork rib glazed with lavender honey and flat parsley green beans. True to its promise, the menu changes daily. Cue for you to gorge yourself silly.

Dating back as far as the 17th century, the hotel’s seven honeystone buildings form a serene, picturesque settlement that feels like a small hamlet in itself. Crillon le Brave is a boutique hotel, hosting 34 rooms and suites, a terrace, bar, two restaurants, a heated outdoor pool, mini-spa and an authentic boules court, all enjoying panoramic views of Provence. Located a short 25 miles from Avignon and within easy reach of Marseilles it is a dream to travel to, but still retains the feeling of remoteness you want when escaping the stressful buzz of your day-to-day life back home. People come to Provence to relax, soak up the sunshine, fine dine on regional produce and get out and about in the countryside. Hotel Crillon le Brave is the perfect refuge for all these things. It’s incredibly peaceful and calm at all times, even when the sounds of jazz and blues emerge from the visiting band three evenings a week. Guests meander through discreet passageways and footpaths connecting the many areas of the hotel to discover yet another gateway, rose-garden or stunning view. Sunny seclusion is easy to find. Leisurely intermittent laughs can be heard rising from the pool accompanied by the murmur of people ordering bottles of Rhône Valley wine from the bar, while the occasional clink of cutlery rings from the terrace as groups savour the Menu Déjeuner. All in all, distractions and interruptions are effortlessly kept at bay.

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The history of the hotel adds intrigue to your experience. Once part of a prosperous hillside settlement, abandoned after World War II, Swiss and American second-homers snapped up the handsome buildings in the 1970s, and Robin and Judy Hutson (of Hotel du Vin and The Pig) have since turned the houses into a fetching luxury retreat. Its past comes alive in the old church bells that ring above your suite. Cobbled streets and shuttered houses wind down from the hotel to the base of the village, which takes a leisurely 20 minutes to explore. Bedrooms and suites, ranging from Junior to Master are scattered throughout the hotel, like homes from home. All of the rooms are large, decorated with tiled terracotta floors and dressed with antique wooden-framed beds. Little touches, such as vases of lavender and ornamental mirrors add something special; while flat-screen satellite TVs (on request), Bose Wave systems with iPod docks and imaginatively well-stocked mini-bars make them fit for the modern traveller. Duck-egg blue, pastel grey and creamy yellow hues and crisp white sheets add a fresh seaside feel. In the bathrooms, large marble baths wait to be filled and Frette white robes hang alongside lavender scented L’Occitane ointments and oils. I hear La Tour (Room 33) is the most spectacular suite, with twin bathtubs, a tower-top terrace and an arched window overlooking the olive groves and vineyards. Families or large groups can occupy La Sousto, a small two-bedroom house on the premises. The hotel has also announced the opening of two new super deluxe suites; stunning additions decorated in vivid local colours that epitomise the landscape. Down in the main area of the hotel, a wall of roses guides you to La Grange, where a buffet breakfast, loaded with local cheeses, meats and pastries can be enjoyed followed by lunch later in the day on the terrace. In-between these, guests can lounge by the heated pool, try their hand at boule or enjoy a game of tennis. Bicycles are available to hire and top tips for the best routes are provided by the hotel. If you’ve got access to a car then venture further afield and explore the magnificent Dentelles de Montmirail or the trendy Lubéron. Take an hour away from the Provençal heat to indulge in the hotel’s

Of course, the Reboul wine cellar, houses an extensive offering, with over 600 references, mainly from the surrounding vineyards across the Rhône Valley and Provence. Choose from includes excellent local Ventoux vintages to some of the finest old bottles of Châteauneufdu-Pape, and further afield, Côte Rôtie, as well other other gems from the north. The hotel is well-connected with artisans across Provence, including maître fromager Madame Claudine Vigier who owns a local cheese shop in Carpentras - worth a visit for its Le Cachat du Ventoux, a strong, creamy mix of goat’s cheese and marc de Provence made

to her grandfather’s recipe, or La Fourme des Dentelles de Montmirail, a blue cheese injected with Muscat de Beaumes de Venise, Vigier’s own recipe. You can also savour a selection of her cheeses at the hotel. Should you prefer something sweeter, other local friends include nougatiers, Pierre et Philippe Silvain in St.Didier, who also work to their grandmother’s famed recipe. Talk about provenance playing out in Provence! Exploratory and action-hungry types can get involved in a range of special events taking place this autumn, including a Truffle and Wine weekend in October which will give you the chance to try your hand at hunting for the region’s very own diamond, the black truffle, with a local ‘trufficulteur extraordinaire.’ Next up you’ll taste a variety of grape juices at one of Châteauneuf-du-Pape’s finest wine estates, followed by a truffle cooking demonstration with Jérôme Blanchet, during which you’ll learn how to rustle up his signature truffle dish, Duck foie gras pot au feu with black truffle potato gnocchi. The region is a gold mine for cycling enthusiasts who can set their sights on conquering Mont Ventoux, otherwise known as “Géant de Provence” and described as ‘the toughest climb on the Tour de France.’ Both pro and recreational riders will enjoy the hotel’s Cycling Weekend in October which sets out to guide you through some of Provence’s most scenic and famed cycle routes, looping you round the Gorge de la Nesque, the Dentelles de Montmirail and, of course, Mont Ventoux. Top this off with two complimentary spa treatments and cheese tasting with Provence’s best fromagère, Claudine Vigier, as well as a trip to l’Isle sur la Sorgue. Prices are from £970/£770 for single occupancy and £1,370/£1,088 for two people sharing a Superior room including dinner and breakfast. Nightly rates at Crillon le Brave are available from €290/£240 per room per night for two people sharing including breakfast. To book, email reservations@crillonlebrave.com, or telephone +33 (04) 90 65 61 61; www.crillonlebrave.com HOW TO GET THERE: British Airways offers a seven-night fly-drive to Marseille from £199 per person in October and November and from £239 per person in July and August. Prices include return British Airways flights from London Heathrow, Avis Inclusive car hire for the duration, based on two sharing. Visit ba.com/marseille or call 0844 493 0758

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LEADING LADY

IRINA SHAYK Superstar model, talented actress and respected charity worker. Irina Shayk is really quite something. She’s been setting the fashion world alight as of late but she comes from a humble background, having grown up in the small town of Salavat in central Russia. Her mother was a piano teacher and her father a coal miner and, having to cope with little means, she led a life far removed from the glamorous jetset lifestyle she lives today. Irina didn’t intend on becoming a model, at first at least. Having studied marketing at school for a number of years, she dreamt of becoming a teacher of literature but, in a way that was entirely inevitable, her beauty opened doors that would eventually lead to a modelling career in the highly lucrative fashion industry. Indeed, her older sister persuaded her to join her at a beauty school but it became quite apparent quite quickly, that the young miss Shayk should be the subject rather than the beautician. She was discovered by a local talent agent, won a beauty contest (naturally) and her career snowballed from there. 

Her big break came in 2007 when she became the face of Italian clothing label, Intimissimi. This allowed the planet to see her otherworldly physique, which of course spawned a number of future underwear campaigns for the young Russian. Now, her modelling CV reads like a who’s who in the fashion world, as she’s worked with brands such as Armani, Givenchy and La Perla; magazines Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, GQ and the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue; and photographers Mario Testino, Bruce Weber, Mariano Vivanco and many more. It seems though, that the Russian beauty is only just beginning her ascent to superstardom. Moving away from the catwalks and editorial campaigns, she is lending her beauty to the silver screen, having starred alongside Dwayne Johnson in the recent re-imagining of Hercules. Famed for her sultry gaze, bright blue eyes and assured demeanour, Shayk made a confident debut appearance which, if her seemingly never-ending talent is anything to go by, will be the first of many more to come.  By Charlie Thomas

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CULTURE

EAST

MEETS

WEST

ARE ASIAN COLLECTORS TURNING TO WESTERN ART? With the rapid growth in Chinese economic fortunes since the 1980’s, coupled with the rise of the East as a competitor to challenge the traditional dominance of the West, many onlookers in the Western art world have speculated that this shift could increase the demise of traditional collecting. Why would Eastern collectors show any interest in European Old Master paintings and sculpture, French furniture and Impressionist pictures, Renaissance manuscripts or Roman antiquities, when their own cultures often have an abundance of beautiful artefacts? As the wealth of the west declined the pool of potentially interested parties, educated in European history, would dwindle dramatically and sever markets that are already under intense pressure from the dramatic rise of interest and investment in contemporary art. However, there are signs the divide between Eastern and Western tastes are not so marked that they cannot be bridged. Interest in, bidding for, and buying major pieces of non-contemporary Western art by Chinese and other Eastern buyers, is on the rise. In May a Chinese buyer purchased Monet’s 1907 Waterlillies for $27 million at Christie’s New York, whilst at Sotheby’s in 2012 a Canaletto View of the Churches of the Redentore and San Giacomo, Venice was sold to a Chinese buyer for $5.7 million. Finally, at Christie’s Exceptional sale in July, the purchase of the late sixteenth century Florentine bronze Rape of a Sabine by Giambologna for £3.66 million (one of the highlights of the 2014 summer season) was widely believed to be by a new Asian collector. These are just a few high-profile examples that have become common knowledge. There is no doubt that Eastern collectors, particularly the Chinese, are increasing their might in the art market. China now has a reported 152 billionaires, along with thousands of middling superrich, and the lead players in the Western art world have optimistically and aggressively moved in, hoping to gain a slice of the exponential growth of the Asian market. Until now, this growth has almost wholly been in the Chinese antiques and contemporary sectors, but some Chinese collectors are expanding their tastes. In 2013 Sotheby’s announced that the number of mainland Chinese collectors bidding on non-Chinese artworks had risen by 54% since 2010, with $378m spent by 530 successful bidders over the period. At Christie’s in the first half of 2014, sales to clients in Asia grew to 28% of overall activity, despite uncertainty at home affecting an 8% decrease in sales in Asia. This suggests that the Chinese are getting more active in the global market. This is a natural progression. As the Chinese economy has left the straightjacket of communism, constitutional changes enacted in 2004 and 2007 have increased the ability of citizens to own and purchase private property. All of a sudden the Chinese people have been exposed to the benefits of consumerism, having been outlawed from such participation for so long. There has since been an understandable appetite for the consumption of goods, similar to what was seen in Russia after the fall of Soviet communism. As wealthy Chinese citizens have travelled and sent children to study abroad, their interests have widened accordingly. The dominant enterprises in the Western art world are in a strong position to capitalise on the effects of globalisation and

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the liberalisation of the Chinese economy. In recent years both Sotheby’s and Christie’s have made a move into mainland China, with Christie’s becoming the first Western auction house to operate in China without a local partner. Clever marketing has transformed several major Western artists into luxury brands; a Picasso or a Monet becoming as much of a status symbol as a Rolex or a Sunseeker.

Of course, as with the Japanese involvement in the Impressionist market, much of this speculation rests on future economic performance. The future of the Chinese economy is seemingly more secure than the Japanese economy in the 1990s and 2000s, despite demographical problems, a potential overheating in the real estate market and systematic risks within the banking system. Stability is crucially important to the art market as, when trouble rises, art is still seen more as a luxury than an investment safe-house. Anyone who witnessed the complete disconnect between the top of the art market and the 2008 financial crash would understandably think that in this new age of the global super rich, the price of blue chip art will continue to rise even in the face of international unrest. However, problems at home are likely to stall any risky investment in markets that potential buyers are not fully submersed in. It is important for all involved in the Western antiques and art trade to participate fairly and transparently, so as to slowly install genuine confidence, rather than chase a fast buck they may hope is looming. BY MILO DICKINSON

The auction houses have also striven to push art forward as an alternative investment vehicle. This has been a large driver of the contemporary art market in which spiralling prices have asserted confidence in art as an asset - but has not allayed critics who claim that the market is overstepping and susceptible to volatility. The best way to ensure steady growth but avoid market overheating and a confidence-sapping downturn is to encourage discernment amongst collectors. That Chinese buyers of Western art are largely interested in the blue-chip names is to be expected in a culture that has only recently been exposed to Western art. In the 1980’s the booming Japanese economy, fuelled by their real estate market, saw an excess of capital which many collectors plunged into Impressionist paintings, creating a huge boom for the market and world record prices. These Japanese collectors were reassured that Impressionist paintings would hold their value and they believed that, as the artists they were collecting (Monet, Renoir, Van Gogh etc) were universally recognisable and critically acclaimed, their works would always be highly sought after. However there was a lack of discernment, with collectors bidding highly on paintings by the top names even if the picture itself was unexceptional. When the Japanese real estate market came crashing down, so too did the value of their Impressionist paintings, as Japanese money had largely propped up auction prices. Early signs suggest that Chinese collectors are more discriminating. Assisted by the quick and easy research afforded by the internet, they are keen to identify the difference between what is good, ordinary and extraordinary in the market. Many of these new buyers are unlikely to be collectors in the traditional sense, but rather focused on the highest quality art cross-category. With a few exceptions, they are simply interested in the best and they have displayed a very strong ability to master technical expertise and therefore avoid serious errors of judgement in a complex, knowledge based market. It is abundantly clear that this interest is principally in the upper end of the market. We should avoid the rush to proclaim a new order, as there is unlikely to be many Eastern buyers of a mid-range Spanish painting for example. These middle and lower markets are, as a general rule, stagnating as the professional classes in the Western world face a less affluent future in relative terms. This is not to mention the interest in antiques waning and losing out to the tastes for contemporary art and minimalism in interior design. As a result there is little movement in the market which puts off new buyers who are looking to purchase with an eye for investment. Therefore it is only those who own or sell the finest or most commercial works that will benefit, strengthening the hold of those with the deepest pockets on the market.

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3

CULTURE

1

Price on Request Available from: +353 1 454 1143 www.osullivanantiques.com

GEORGIAN MAHOGANY ENGLISH DECANTER HOLDER The refinement of Georgian taste and fashion is reflected in this exquisite mahogany decanter holder presented by O’Sullivan antiques. With individual compartments that can comfortably accommodate the six glass decanters, the holder is both convenient for the home and as a handy drinks portmanteau, small enough to transport whilst also being very durable. The holder has a height and width of 30 cm, with a depth of 25 cm making it an elegant presentation piece, with practical utility, that won’t take up too much space. The brass handles ensure that the holder is easy to move and its inconspicuous design will endear it to any room in the house. For those who are passionate about antiques and libation, this decanter holder is an ideal accessory.

Price: £9,500 Available from: 020 7499 7411 www.mallettantiques.com

A PAIR OF CUT GLASS DECANTERS This pair of cut glass decanters presented by Mallett Antiques are in very fine condition and are attributed to Thomas Webb, an exceptional English glassmaker of the 19th century who, with the company he founded, Thomas Webb & Sons was responsible for much of the best glasswork of the era. The decanters, complete with their original stoppers, have been made with hobnail and diamond cut decoration resulting in a vivid, crystalline finish. At 38 centimetres high, and with a width of 17.5 centimetres at their widest, these are small, delicate decanters ideal for storing claret and other dark reds. This exceptional pair of antique decanters would be ideal for wine-lovers and are also exceptional display items. A unique creation by one of the greatest glassworkers of his age, these refined decanters are both ornamental and practical.  

IAN FLEMING’S THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN Neither Fleming or his novels need an introduction, they have delighted millions across the globe and have been turned into one of the highest grossing film franchises in history. Despite the popularity of James Bond, few can claim to own a first edition, first impression 007 novel, as proffered by Peter Harrington Rare Books. 

OBJECTS of

This octavo hardback is in excellent condition, complete with its original dust jacket. The cover design is quintessentially 60’s and features the eponymous golden gun lying on a table, attracting the attention of flies. In The Man with the Golden Gun, the dangerous assassin Francisco Scaramanga proves to be Bond’s most formidable adversary yet and they play a dangerous cat-and-mouse-game in Jamaica. Suffice it to say, this is a brilliant opportunity to own one of Fleming’s most popular novels in a stylish, first edition hardback.

DESIR E ANCIENT GOLD COIN FROM LAMPSAKOS, MYSIA This brilliantly preserved Ancient Greek gold coin or ‘stater’ is offered for sale by Kallos, a Mayfair gallery specialising in ancient artefacts. The coin was probably minted in the ancient Greek city of Lampsakos in the provide of Mysia (modern day Turkey) around 350/340 BC. The obverse side of the coin depicts Zeus wearing a laurel wreath, while the reverse depicts Pegasus mid-flight. The coin was made exceptionally well for coins of this type and was made by a single clean strike by a master of the craft. Weighing just 8.46 grams, this ancient coin is certainly an intimate addition to a home but will surely be coveted by classicists and those with a passion and interest in the ancient world. This is a rare opportunity to purchase a object with fascinating provenience; a coin that was used in transactions a staggering 2000 years ago.

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2 5

Price on Request Available from: 020 7493 0806 www.kallosgallery.com

Price on Request Available from: 0207 629 1144 www.sladmore.com

4

Price: £425.00 Available from: 0207 591 0220 www.peterharrington.co.uk

CHARGING RHINO BY MARK CORETH Mark Coreth is one of the world’s most recognised sculptors in bronze and specialises in modelling wild animals in animated states. Drawing from an idyllic childhood spent in Kenya, Coreth has a particular passion for animals from the African savannah. Coreth is a self-taught artist who regularly exhibits in London, Paris and New York and his passion for sculpting the animal in motion has earned him plaudits and commissions from around the world. Charging Rhino is typical of his work; a black rhinoceros, perhaps disturbed while foraging in the scrub has impulsively charged in order to scare off any intruder encroaching on his territory.  Despite the size of the piece, (height 30cm, length 80cm, depth 25cm) it maintains a colossal presence and would make a magnificent addition to any drawing room. Charging Rhino is cast in bronze, and is being sold in an edition of 9 by Sladmore Gallery. 

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BACHELOR’S

ESSENTIALS AQUARIUM ARCHITECTURE Do you dream of having shoals of fish swimming in your living room? Do you like the idea of watching freshwater pufferfish bobbing about in your office? Thanks to Aquarium Architecture, no space is too difficult to install a unique aquarium in. For those who decide that an aquarium would make a suitable addition to their home or office, a consultation is easily arranged and the wide variety of bespoke services, ensure that no two aquariums will ever be the same. Every single component of the tank is up for discussion; colour, lighting, plants, coral and (of course) fish can be customised to individual preference. All consultations include the inputs of interior designers, engineers and architects to ensure safety and practicality as well as luxury. Aquarium Architecture is a company to investigate for those who are passionate about marine life.

THE STRIETMAN ES3

BLACKHAWK COFFEE TABLE JUMBO BY TIMOTHY OULTON

Espresso may be Italian, but the people who have perfected it appear to be Dutch. The ES3 espresso machine is striking in its simplicity and yet produces the highest quality espresso coffee. The ES3 is produced in Holland on a small-scale production line. Each machine is carefully tested before it is considered sale-worthy and each machine receives expert attention to ensure it will produce espresso of the highest standard.

Furniture inspired by military aircraft? It may not seem the most obvious stylistic inspiration - and then you reflect upon the detail and craftsmanship used in aeronautics... It suddenly makes sense. The Blackhawk Coffee Table Jumbo by Timothy Oulton is an awe inspiring piece; bringing the excitement of contemporary - and WWII era - aviation to your living room. The curved edges and unique drawer handles are inspired by the design of the famous Black Hawk helicopter, while the multi-riveted, interlocking aluminium panels conjure up nostalgia for the Spitfire fighter plane. The metal is treated in five different stages and the result is a worn, distressed effect - reminiscent of weather-beaten aircraft. The Blackhawk Coffee Table Jumbo is available in two finishes; Blackhawk black and Spitfire silver.

True to the Italian origins of espresso, the ES3 maintains a lever system that first originated in Italy in the 1950’s. The system involves the user physically drawing a lever down, in order to press the water through the coffee - resulting in a perfect espresso. The Strietman ES3 espresso machine holds up to 350 ml of water that it automatically heats to perfect temperature. It is designed to be wall mounted, ensuring that it does not take up too much room in your kitchen or office. The ES3 is an essential buy for coffee lovers.

TRAFALGAR COCKTAIL BOX BY DAVID LINLEY Linley has long been a byword for luxury and quality and so admirers of the brand will no doubt be excited by the brands most recent foray into bijou cocktail paraphernalia. The Trafalgar Cocktail Box is small, unobtrusive and elegant making it easily transportable. The Trafalgar Cocktail Box opens from the centre revealing a wide assortment of gadgets, glasses and essential tools for the keen mixologist. It includes: a cocktail shaker, a mirror (with recipes etched into its surface), a bottle opener, swizzle stick, spirit measure, four coasters, four sterling silver olive sticks, four martini glasses + four shot glasses, a chopping board and a knife. The dyed and patterned charcoal veneer is exquisitely offset by mother of pearl bubbles and makes The Trafalgar Cocktail Box not just a handy cocktail set - but a graceful piece of furniture that would improve any living space.

BUSTER & PUNCH - HERO LIGHT The HERO Light by Buster and Punch is one of the most unique and outstanding lights available in the luxury market. Pitched as something to save us from ‘the bland grasp of minimalism’ the HERO light is different to any light, lamp or chandelier that you will have ever seen. Inspired by traditional blacksmithing, the HERO light is made from hand forged bronzed gun metal, solid knurled brass soaked in olive oil and matte rubber detailing. The HERO can be hung in the round - or through the centre - creating very different atmospheres. Two individual styles of lighting are created from one single light resulting in unparalleled versatility. The light pendants are distinctly vintage, and yet the way the bulbs (either cabochon or teardrop) are lit is positively futuristic. The HERO by Buster and Punch is another success story for the innovating interiors company.

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5

THE SAFE $10,000 CAR

THINGS THAT WILL BE PART OF EVERYDAY LIFE IN

2030

2

If you grew up in the 1970s your expectations of future technology would have stemmed from two sources: Star Trek and Tomorrow’s World. Like me, you’ll be astonished and disappointed in equal measure by the inaccuracy of the predictions. Some have come true way earlier than the programme makers imagined (Kirk’s clamshell communicator was outmoded 10 years ago) and others - such as the dead-cert flying car revolution - are likely to always remain ‘five years away’. Having tracked a number of tech pioneers to the borders of uncharted gizmo territory, TGJ presents its own predictions for five amazing technologies that will become commonplace by 2030 - sadly, with no anti-grav skateboard in sight.

LITHIUM-AIR BATTERIES

1

The lithium-ion battery is the much-maligned workhorse of the mobile economy. The design has now reached its limits and current models have already violated Moore’s law by not doubling their capacity every two years - a problem all too familiar to phone users routinely bereft of juice after only nine risible hours’ of completing Facebook quizzes. The buzzword in energy storage is lithium-air. For techies, the concept uses the oxidation of lithium at the battery’s anode and reduction of oxygen at the cathode to induce a current. The key here is energy density, or how much electric charge can be crammed into a battery’s volume. Lithium-ion’s limit lies somewhere around the 700 Watts-per-litre mark whereas lithium-air could hold up to 15 times that value - imagine only having to charge that pesky iPhone once a fortnight. But Michael Thackeray, a senior scientist at the US government’s Argonne National Laboratory thinks some serious materials research is needed for the idea to succeed. “On

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the scientific side we’re facing huge problems if we can’t find a non-flammable electrolyte for what is essentially an air electrode - we know that if you recharge lithium it becomes highly volatile. So it’s going to be at least a decade or two before we get close to the market.” Our prediction: Lithium-air batteries will become state-of-the art by 2030 for large applications like plug-in hybrid cars, and for storing intermittent energy from wind farms. But for mobile devices expect simpler solutions like lithium-sulphur or solid-state batteries. Despite their five-fold increase over today’s lithium-ion variety, you’ll still have to charge your phone every night, owing to a host of new power-hungry functions.

Surely, this already exists, you will object. Should you have the great misfortune of suffering a head-on collision at 40mph, the five-star safety rating of your budget car will prevent you from sustaining more than a few cuts, bruises or whiplash, right? Wrong - if you happen to live in certain parts of Asia or South America.

In 2012, a scandal broke when the Latin American branch of global safety authority NCAP revealed that some of the largest car makers used inferior steel and cheap spot welding in local factories. Manufacturers also offered airbags and anti-lock brakes only as optional - and expensive - extras, resulting in lowly one-star safety ratings in otherwise identical models - and certain death in said crash.

Experts like Matthew Avery of Bedfordshire-based accident researchers Thatcham think that active safety systems like brake override and lane departure warnings are the way forward. “Active systems are a low-cost option with high benefit - manufacturers will be likely to introduce those rather than putting expensive passive safety equipment into vehicles in emerging countries,” he says. Not everyone agrees. Rolf Bergmann is the Head of Global Safety Affairs at Volkswagen. “Before we consider active systems, we need to look at basic safety measures, such as fitting cars with airbags and educating vehicle users to wear seat belts and drive sensibly - in many emerging markets, driver mentality is in its infancy,” he says.

Our prediction: Old habits die the hardest - this goes for car makers cutting corners as well as drivers who refuse to buckle up. True, by 2030 even the cheapest vehicles will have some form of active safety equipment like radar-assisted braking and blind spot detection. But it’ll take longer still before casualty rates will fall to anywhere near First World levels. “When we see a robot diagnose and fix itself, we need to sit up and take note. When it starts to self-replicate, that’s going to be huge. The question people need to ask themselves is - when do machines become aware of who they are?”

OLEDs

3

A recent semiconductor development, the Organic Light Emitting Diode has the potential to bring a twinkle to lighting designer’s eyes. “OLEDs produce a fascinating, very natural light - a surface light,” says Christian May, Head of Lighting and Flexible Integration at the Fraunhofer Research Institute in Dresden. “We are using thin layers of organic materials which are vapour-deposited onto carriers like glass, polymer or metal foils.” Despite horrendous production costs, Audi has recently fitted a prototype with OLED tail lights which uses thousands of

the diodes to create a ‘swarming’ effect to replace conventional signalling. Our prediction: By 2030, the technology will make up most of the rear, interior and instrument lighting in all but the cheapest cars. But prices will stay high enough to prevent OLEDs from becoming commonplace in homes and public buildings.

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RONALD PHILLIPS

ROBOT MANSERVANTS

4

FINE ANTIQUE ENGLISH FURNITURE

Honda recognised the appeal of the humanoid robot with the creation of ASIMO in 2000. Its latest incarnation dates back to 2011 and is lighter, faster and more intelligent. According to the company, however, it is still ‘years away’ from its original purpose as a an affordable personal assistant for the sick and elderly. A far more formidable proposition is Boston Dynamics’s range of anthropomorphic robots. Whereas ASIMO offers handshakes and carries tea trays, PETMAN and ATLAS were designed to explore terrain, test chemical protection suits for the US military, run on a treadmill, do push-ups and even sweat. Rocky Avvento, a Senior Fellow at Boston Dynamics’ design partners Lockheed Martin outlines his vision for robotic independence: “When we see a robot diagnose and fix itself, we need to sit up and take note. When it starts to self-replicate, that’s going to be huge. The question people need to ask themselves is - when do machines become aware of who they are?” Our prediction: Prototypes of humanoid combat robots exist today and few Western soldiers will die on the battlefield in 2030. The robotic household help, in turn, will exist as an expensive novelty for the super-rich but won’t have replaced its more widely available and much cheaper human counterpart.

3D PRINTERS Ever since Cody Wilson delighted the US gun lobby with publicly available blueprints for his home-made ‘Liberator’ pistol, 3d printing has become au courant. It’s a fair bet that in the future most households with at least one teenage occupant will sport a domestic 3d printer alongside the obligatory 3d scanner, and that 3d design files will push music and film out of the online piracy spotlight. Perhaps less well known but equally likely to succeed is a relatively recent concept - 3d silicone printing. The world’s first fully working prototype was the perhaps unsurprising - product of the UK’s Men in Sheds culture (albeit being conceived by men with industrial design degrees in high-tech sheds). Steve Roberts is one of the co-founders of Sheffield-based Fripp Design who have patented the technology. “We are the first company on the planet that can print in silicone in this way. We’ve had some major film studios interested and our design has massive implications for the medical market, in the area of orthotics, prosthetics and wound care. We’ve also had enquiries from sex toy manufacturers,” he says.

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Our prediction: In 2030, no bedroom will be complete without a 3d silicone printer, if only to add a personal touch to all that socially networked cyber sex paraphernalia.

A PAIR OF GEORGE II GILTWOOD MIRRORS ATTRIBUTED TO BENJAMIN GOODISON

BY MAX MUELLER

26 BRUTON STREET, LONDON W1J 6QL +44 (0)207 493 2341 ADVICE @ RONALDPHILLIPS.CO.UK RONALDPHILLIPSANTIQUES.COM

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8

INVESTMENT BOOKS

1 2 3 4

“Think and Grow Rich” (1937) by Napoleon Hill

“One Up On Wall Street: How to use what you already know to make money in the market” by Peter Lynch

“The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons For Corporate America” (1997) by Warren Buffett

“Rich Dad, Poor Dad” (2000) by Robert Kiyosaki

5

“The Alchemy of Finance” by George Soros

6

“A Random Walk Down Wall Street (10th edition)” by Burton G. Malkiel

7

“The Intelligent Investor” (1949) by Benjamin Graham

8

“Flash Boys” by Michael Lewis

READING AN INVESTMENT BOOK AT AN EARLY AGE REALLY CAN EFFECT THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. WARREN BUFFETT HAS ALWAYS GIVEN CREDIT TO “THE INTELLIGENT INVESTOR” BY BEN GRAHAM SAYING IT WAS THE BEGINNING OF HIS INVESTMENT CAREER. IT’S TRUE THAT THESE GUIDES CAN ONLY ACT AS JUST THAT, GUIDES, HOWEVER WE HAVE ASSEMBLED A LIST RECOMMENDED BY THE PROS THEMSELVES. READ THESE WITH DILIGENCE AND IT WILL GIVE YOU THE FOUNDATIONS TO BECOME A GREAT INVESTOR AND MAYBE EVEN THE NEXT WARREN BUFFETT.

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DRINK

THE

ULTIMATE

MARTINI TUCKED AWAY IN A ROMANTICALLY COBBLED COURT YARD OFF ST JAMES’ LIES A SECRET THAT EVERY SEASONED MARTINI DRINKER SHOULD, AND PROBABLY DOES, KNOW ABOUT: DUKE’S – THE WORST KEPT SECRET IN THE WORLD OF FINE DRINKING. CROWNED THE KING OF THE MARTINI, DUKE’S BAR IS, IN OUR EYES, THE ONLY PLACE TO HEAD FOR THE ULTIMATE MARTINI. THE LEGENDARY BAR IS INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED FOR ITS FAMOUS TIPPLES AND PERSONALISED COCKTAILS. REPUTEDLY FREQUENTED BY JAMES BOND AUTHOR IAN FLEMING HIMSELF, THE BAR IS SAID TO BE THE INSPIRATION FOR THE ICONIC LINE, ‘SHAKEN, NOT STIRRED’. SO LET YOUR SENSES INDULGE IN THE CRISP GLASS, WHAT’S INSIDE IT, AND THAT SPINE-CHILLING FIRST SIP.

INGREDIENTS 3 oz. No 3 Gin 0.33 oz Dry Vermouth Garnish: Lemon Peel Glass: Martini

METHOD Chill the Gin, Vermouth and a Martini glass in the freezer Place two drops of extra dry Vermouth in the frozen cocktail glass Pour approximately 3 jiggers of frozen gin over the Vermouth and gently stir Take a slice of fresh lemon peel: Pinch to release lemon oil on to the surface of the cocktail Rub the lemon peel around the rim of the cocktail glass Drop gently into the drink

dukes.com

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DRINK

WINE BORDEAUX STILL REIGNS SUPREME

“ ”

IN WINE, THERE IS TRUTH.

BORDEAUX IS WITHOUT DOUBT THE MOST RENOWNED VARIETY OF WINE IN THE WORLD AND DESPITE CHALLENGES BY NUMEROUS NEW WORLD COUNTERPARTS, BORDEAUX REMAINS VERY MUCH AT THE CENTRE OF THE FINE WINE WORLD. OTHERWISE KNOW AS CLARET, SOME OF THE MOST FAMOUS BORDEAUX NAMES INCLUDE THE LIKES OF LAFITE-ROTHSCHILD, MARGAUX, LATOUR, HAUT-BRION AND MOUTON ROTHSCHILD. MORE FAMED FOR ITS RED WINES, WITH THIS ACCOUNTING FOR 88% OF BORDEAUX WINES, THE CLIMATE AND CONDITIONS ARE SAID TO BE IDEAL FOR PRODUCING LONG LASTING WINES. THE AREA ITSELF COVERS A VAST REGION OF 120,000 HECTARES OF VINEYARDS, CONSISTING OF 10,000 WINE PRODUCERS AND A HUGE 57 DIFFERENT APPELLATION D’ORIGINE CONTRÔLÉE (AOC). WITH SO MANY OPTIONS IT CAN SOMETIMES SEEM QUITE DAUNTING, HOWEVER WE’VE DONE THE LEGWORK FOR YOU, CHOOSING 4 OF OUR FAVOURITES THIS AUTUMN.

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Château Batailley 2007 (Pauillac), £33.00 majestic.com Château Haut-Bages Averous 2006 (Pauillac), £30.00 majestic.com Ségla 2006 (Margaux), £30.00 majestic.com Domaine de Chevalier Rouge, Grand Cru Classé Pessac Léognan, 2009 £56.46, Justerini & Brooks, justerinis.com

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FOOD

GAME, SET & SERVE AS IT’S A ‘SHOOTING SPECIAL’, THIS ISSUE THE GENTLEMAN’S JOURNAL CAUGHT UP WITH CHEF VALENTINE WARNER TO DISCUSS HIS ENTRY INTO COOKING, HIS GREATEST INFLUENCES, HIS LOVE OF ART AND THE PRESERVATION OF NATURE.

head and feet left on) in a Bordelaise sauce. I found lampreys in the market last year. In short, cooking according to ‘locality’ and what’s at hand is very liberating. On cookbooks, “think of cook books as guidelines, so don’t drive to the supermarket because you maybe missing one minor ingredient.”

So much more than just a celebrity chef, Valentine Warner has an unrivalled flair for seasonal offerings and the preservation of the Great British landscape. From the skies of Scotland to the lakes of Scandinavia, Valentine’s passion for delving into the deepest corners of natures’ kitchen is enough to make even the most urban-rooted gentleman reach for a rod and set about on his own voyage of discovery for the tastebuds.

Claiming both his Mother and Father to be his greatest influences, when asked who, real, imaginary, mythical or fictional that he could cook for? He poignantly tells us it would be his father. “I miss my father terribly, so I’d like to cook for him, we’d probably have an enormous Plat de Fruits de Mer (which was something I only ever really ate with him when we were alone together) and we’d have it with a good bottle of white Burgundy.”

Having studied fine art at the reputable Byam Shaw it was only natural that the TV chef, and former Bedales pupil, Valentine Warner became a rather successful portrait painter prior to venturing into the world of food. Warner agrees that his formal art training certainly plays into his cooking, who not only finds himself illustrating his own cook books, but is also “never happier than when surrounded by paper, scissors  a big box of Caran d’Ache pencils, listening to music at 1:30 in the morning”. That said however, when asked if he was meticulous about the way his food looked, he refreshingly tells us that, “food, ultimately, has to taste nice. Not all food looks pretty. Take a Middle Eastern plate of Broad Beans that have been stewed to death, the reason that they taste so good is because they’ve been stewed until they go grey, but they’re still delicious. If something happens to look pretty too, well that’s a delightful bonus!”

With the shooting season in full swing, we asked the talented chef the key to cooking game. “My favourite birds”, he tells us, “are woodcock, snipe, Teal and mallard, but they’re often overcooked, over roasted, so I’d tell everyone to cook them less” - Sounds simple enough to us.

Valentine’s philosophy to cooking is to understand where you are, very much a provincial cook himself, he insists we discover what that place is best known for and how, maybe even through a historical understanding of where we are, we can make the best of our cooking. Citing as an example, “If I’m in a part in a part of Bordeaux where I’ll find great wine and tomatoes, I might be tempted to cook one of those fabulous market chickens (with the

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On the subject of Venison, Valentine agrees that it seems to be caught in a time warp, “often deemed as something solely for winter, but in fact you can eat it all the way through the year.” With six types of deer in the UK, there is always going to be one in season, so Warner suggests that if the autumn is still hot, why not think about a venison salad rather than it always being under a pastry crust, or on top of sloppy mashed potato? He’d like to see clearer labelling of different deer rather than the generic ‘venison’ which can be confusing Warner’s final words of advice to men who are afraid to get into the kitchen, are these: “Disaster is as important as success. Sometimes you can’t know how to get something right unless you’ve got it wrong. What’s the point of being scared about things. Get on with it and then you’ll realise how approachable it is. Cook and enjoy it.” Solid advice indeed. So, gentleman, all that’s left is to feast your eyes on these wonderful game recipes from the man who knows best.

INGREDIENTS 150g very fatty pork belly (weight once rind has been removed), roughly chopped 2 young rabbits (or 1 large adult rabbit if young ones are not available), liver, kidneys and heart reserved if possible, or 6 rabbit portions 50g butter, softened, plus extra for greasing 1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 8 large sage leaves, finely shredded 3 tablespoons medium sherry flaked sea salt and black pepper a grating of nutmeg 10 pickled walnuts, well drained, sliced into coins 3 tablespoons finely chopped curly-leaf parsley 300g rindless unsmoked streaky bacon rashers hot buttered toast, to serve

“DON’T BECOME A SLAVE TO A RECIPE & COOK WITH LOVE”

RABBIT & PICKLED WALNUT TERRINE SERVES 6

METHOD Put the pork belly in a food processor and blitz to to a mediumsmooth consistency (too smooth and the texture becomes dull). Put the rabbit on a board and remove as much of the meat as possible from the bone with a small, sharp knife – you should have around 450g. Put it (and the liver, kidneys and heart, if using) in a food processor with the chopped pork belly. Blend to medium-smooth again.  Flop the mixture into a large bowl. Preheat the oven to 160°C fan/180°C/Gas 4.  Melt the butter in a frying pan and cook the onion and garlic with the shredded sage over a medium–low heat until the onion is soft.  Add the sherry and cook until it has evaporated.  Tip the onion mixture into the meat and stir together with a generous amount of salt, lots of black pepper and the nutmeg.  Slice the pickled walnuts and toss them very gently with the chopped parsley. Line a 1.2-litre terrine, pudding basin or ovenproof dish with three or four sheets of cling film, leaving some overhanging the edge. 

Stretch each rasher of bacon on a board with the back of a knife to really flatten it out. Now use them to line the terrine or dish, allowing the rashers to overlap slightly and leaving an overhang along the outside of the terrine.  Put a third of the rabbit mixture into the terrine dish and then pave with half the walnuts, laying the discs flat-side down and side by side. Build up with another third of the rabbit, then the rest of the walnuts and finally rabbit again.  Use the overhanging bacon to cover the terrine, working from one side to the other alternately, down the length of the dish. Cover with the overhanging cling film and a lid, or tight-fitting foil. Put the terrine in a small roasting tin. Add around 2cm of justboiled water to the tin and carefully place it in the centre of the oven.  Bake for 35–40 minutes.  The terrine is ready when a clean metal skewer inserted into the centre and left for the count of 10 feels very warm – but not hot – when pressed against your lip.

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FOOD

VENISON SALAD

CRAYFISH WITH HAZELNUT & PASTIS BUTTER

SERVES 2

SERVES 2-4

INGREDIENTS 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves 1½ teaspoons flaked sea salt, plus extra for seasoning 400g roe or fallow deer strip loin, trimmed of silvery sinew Sunflower oil, for frying For the dressing 20g unsalted butter 5 canned anchovies, drained 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce or Henderson’s relish 2 tablespoons of the juice from a jar of pickled walnuts 1 teaspoon English mustard juice of 1 orange 1 teaspoon soft brown sugar ground black pepper

For the salad 10 whole fresh chives 1 tablespoon fresh tarragon leaves A few leaves of fresh lovage (optional) 2 big handfuls of pea shoots Walnut oil, for dressing A little fresh lemon juice 4 cornichons, very finely diced 3 pickled walnuts, thinly sliced 1 medium banana (long) shallot, very finely sliced 6 hot French Breakfast radishes, cut in quarters lengthways A little grated fresh horseradish (optional)

black pepper and allow the dressing to cool in a bowl. When ready to serve, cut the chives in half and chuck them into a bowl with the herb leaves and pea shoots. Dress with a little walnut oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Thinly slice the venison and lay it on a large plate. Scatter with a little crunchy sea salt. Flick over the venison with the walnut oil, thumb not totally covering the opening.

When the meat is done, rest it on a board where it will relax and Sprinkle over the cornichons, pickled walnuts and shallot and place become tender. Reserve any juices that run from the meat. the radishes here and there in a random sort of way. Loosely arrange the pea shoots and herb salad over the meat, allowing them to fall While the meat is resting, make the dressing. Heat the butter in the freely and look buoyant. pan used to cook the meat. Drop in the anchovies and very gently sauté them for around 5 minutes, until totally disintegrated. Pour in Drizzle with the dressing, then grate over the horseradish lightly, if the Worcestershire sauce or Henderson’s relish and add the pickled using, and serve immediately. walnut liquor, mustard, orange juice, reserved meat juices and sugar. Gently reduce until the dressing is just syrupy. Add a good grind of

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INGREDIENTS A large handful of picked parsley leaves 1 big ripped handful of slightly stale, good rustic bread 30 signal crayfish lemon wedges, to serve 125g butter, cut into small cubes

2 good garlic cloves, peeled a good splash of pastis a large handful of shelled hazelnuts large-flaked sea salt and a big grind of black pepper 1 lemon

METHOD

METHOD Get a frying pan nice and hot over a medium heat. Chop the thyme leaves with the sea salt. Season the venison fillet all over with this then rub the meat with a little sunflower oil and fry, turning the venison when need be so it has good deep colouring all around. Turn down the heat, add a little more oil to the pan and continue to fry the fillet, turning often, for approximately 8 minutes. Times will vary, as a roe loin is smaller than that of the fallow. Sizzling should be heard at all times, but not so fierce as to burn the meat or thyme. The loin should be cooked to very pink.

This recipe requires live crayfish that must be dispatched. If you are the squeamish type, I wouldn’t read beyond this point. This recipe works well with langoustines and would feed five.

Turn the oven to its grill setting. This manoeuvre will kill the crayfish instantly. Pick it up, holding the Grate the lemon zest on the medium-fine holes. Wash the parsley tail end. In the centre of the actual tail, take the middle piece and leaves, drying them thoroughly. gently twist it between your thumb and forefinger. Pull away as you twist and Chop by hand as finely as you can.  In a food processor, break the stale bread into medium-fine crumbs, not dust. Add all the remaining stuffing ingredients (except for the parsley) to the breadcrumbs and blend until thoroughly combined. If it forms into a lump, remove the lid and break it up a little with a spoon. When all is blended well, add the parsley and blend once more. Don’t try to chop the parsley in the processor, as it will take on a chlorophyll taste. Once chopped with a knife, when put in the blender the blades will not be able to chop it further. Take each crayfish, holding it behind the front claws. It cannot nip you when held in this way. Hold it down on the table and put the tip of a long, sharp knife into the centre of its head. Push = crunch = dead. 

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INTERVIEW

BUBBA WATSON Bubba Watson does things his own way. A consummate professional, he has always dreamed of succeeding on the golf course and, having won his second Masters title earlier this year, it’s fair to say he’s done his fair share of that. His modest upbringing is always apparent too, in both his humility and sense of humour, which is evident in his famous bright pink driver as well as his entertaining post-match interviews, which keep everyone on their toes. In a world full of highly talented sports stars, Bubba stands out. He’s about as far removed from the politically correct, PR drip-fed drones as is humanly possible as he sheds character and sweats emotion. Here, we talk to him about his love for golf, what it means to be a father and his personal style away from the course.

What were the major challenges of being a self-taught golfer? It must have been incredibly difficult, having only had one lesson in your lifetime.

On the contrary, I have always loved the challenge of figuring things out myself. It was always first and foremost a game to me and it was fun to be creative and figure it out myself.  My approach has worked for me, but that doesn’t mean that is the best way for everyone else, we all have to find the best path for ourselves.

Is there a particular reason why you didn’t take golf lessons growing up? I loved doing it myself

Who were your major golfing heroes/inspirations as a youngster? My favorite golfer of all time has always been Payne Stewart

You won your second Masters title earlier this year. Was that the proudest moment of your golfing career?

Getting my PGA Tour card was a very proud moment, because you know you have a job. My two green jackets are definitely up there as well.

Has becoming a father changed the way you approach the sport of golf ?

Being a father and a husband is more important to me than golf. Golf is just a game, my wife and my son mean the world to me and they don’t care whether I play good or bad, they still love me. 

You’ve long been associated with Richard Mille watches. What was it that attracted you to the brand? Richard Mille watches are incredible. I love the way they seem to continue to do the impossible.  I think Richard Mille watches are more like art than just a watch.

How involved were you with the development of your signature timepiece, the RM 38-01?

Richard Mille is the creator and he obviously knows much better than me what can and what can’t be done. But we have talked quite a bit about the watch and I have given him some input on colors and looks.

How would you describe your dress sense off the golf course?

I wear Oakley clothes. I think the Oakley style fits me perfectly.  I love colors and I love the fit.  I swing the club at high speeds so the clothes need to feel loose yet fit tight.

You strike me as someone who takes your responsibility as a role model very seriously. Do you have any non-sporting role models that you look up to, in terms of how they present themselves? My role model growing up was always my dad. I still think of my dad as my role model. 

You do a lot of year-round charity work. Is this something you wish to develop further after your career as a professional golfer?

Giving back is a passion of mine. I now have established the BUBBA WATSON FOUNDATION, our goal is to help out especially kids in need but we also do work in other areas. I hope that I will be able to continue to give back even when I am no longer Bubba Watson the golfer.

And if you weren’t a professional golfer, what kind of career do you think you’d be in?

I am not sure. I always wanted to become a professional golfer but as a kid I was pretty good at other sports so who knows maybe I could have become a baseball player or a basketball player. Bubba Watson is an ambassador for watch brand Richard Mille and is wearing the RM 38-01 G-Sensor

By Charlie Thomas

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INTERVIEW

STUART BROAD A MORNING WITH CRICKET ROYALTY After a disappointing ICC World Twenty20 in Bangladesh, where England finished second from bottom in their group, Stuart Broad inspired the national team to bounce back with some breathtaking performances against India. Over coffee at Dukes Hotel in Mayfair, Holly Macnaghten and Broady discussed the high and lows of the game, saving a man from jumping off Sydney Bridge and his mother’s cooking. What characteristics do you think it takes to be a captain of a team? I’ve always been a believer that it’s your performance on the field first and foremost that counts - and then guys will follow you. So it’s key when you’ve become a captain, to not think too much about off the field stuff. The main thing is to make sure that your performance is good and strong enough. I learnt that from Martin Johnston (as I’ve always been a Tigers fan and a rugby fan). He always said of leadership that he wanted ‘to be the first one to throw a punch in the game, and lead the guys out in that way.’ You have to have an honest side and give your team belief in their own ability that they can do the best, that they can do anything. Cricket is 80% mental, 20% technical so if you do believe you can do things, then you usually can.

so she was the one driving me to all the practices, ferrying me around the country for the games. I’d be in the backyard and she’d be throwing tennis balls around the garden so she was really the one who fuelled my enjoyment of the game, but most importantly I was very lucky, I never had pushy parents. My mum enjoys cricket but she doesn’t know the depths of it. I’d get into the car after a game and she’s say ‘Did you enjoy it?’ Rather than ‘Why did you hit that shot? Why did you drop that catch? Why did you do that?’ It was always about having fun and enjoying the game, and I’ve taken that mentality into my professional career, whether we win, lose or if I’ve had a bad day. You try to make sure that you keep yourself on an even keel. You can’t let your lows get you too down or your highs too high - that was something mum instilled in me.

Do you play any pranks on each other? Actually it’s our management staff who tend to play the pranks, as we tend to be out on the field most of the time. We have a very cheeky masseuse, he’s a 45-year-old man but he acts like a little kid, so he goes around gluing people’s shoes to the floor! Not ideal when you’ve just got off the field and go to put your shoes on! And, back when we were allowed to have mobiles in the changing rooms, we saw what we thought was the masseuse’s Blackberry on the physio table, so we superglued it to the table. But then it rang and my teammate Mark Saxby realised he’d glued his own phone to the table. It came back to bite him. He also always carries a big monkey mask around with him and hides in cupboards to jump out at people going for a drink halfway through a game. Childish but funny.

How do you mentally prepare for games? Well obviously we have psychologists who travel around with us, but essentially it’s completely down to you. You know your routines, you know your ways, my confidence comes from my training, so I’ll always feel more nervous if I don’t feel like I’ve trained well in the week leading up to a game. Most cricketers have different techniques for preparing. Some go quiet and retreat into their own heads, some go wild in the nets and try to hit loads and loads of balls! For me? I’ve always had this imagining technique; so the night before a game I’ll imagine the sort of bowl in my mind that I’m going to do on the day. So going into Australia, I knew I’d get a lot of boos, so I’d sit for ten minutes, with my eyes closed and I’d imagine the atmosphere, imagine the aggression and myself bowling, but I was lucky because my dad played for England and he always used to tell me that.

And your sister? Do you bicker like siblings? No I’m quite lucky again. She does all the performance analysis for the sides and at the end of a day’s play, if we want any statistical data that maybe tells us how many balls we’ve put into a specific area, she can do that and pass it onto the relevant coaches. But I think there would be more tension if she came over to me at the end of a day and said ‘You didn’t bowl very well.’ It’s good to have her around, and on tour we have around 280 nights in hotels, so it’s good to have a family member around to go out for a coffee with and chill.

And can you talk me through the incident on the bridge in Australia? I’d been at a Barmy Army function, they’d raised a lot of money for The Broad Appeal - the charity I’m involved with - so I went along to say a few thank yous with Matt Prior. We were walking back at about half 11 across the footbridge in Darling Harbour and there was a young fella stood up on the railings. From a distance we thought he was just messing around, but then Matt’s wife said ‘Hang on a minute. Why has he just thrown his shoes off?’ Then he was throwing things and as we got closer we saw that he was hysterical. We were first on the scene so we started to talk to him, he was saying that he just wanted to finish it all. Then a security guard arrived, but at that moment he bent his knees as if preparing to throw himself off. Matt was quite close to him and managed to close-line him off the top and hold him down. We called the police but they took about an hour so we chatted to him and calmed him down. He was only 23\24. I’d have to put a lot of praise onto Matt though - he was brilliant in that scenario.

If it hadn’t been for your father, do you think you’d still be doing what you’re doing? To be honest it was all to do with my mum. My parents split when I was three or four,

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On that note, how do you deal with being away from friends and family for such long periods of time? The key to being away from home for a long time is to make your hotel like your home. It can be tiny little things - so I take my own tea bags, and I take a pillow spray, so every bed I sleep in smells the same. Just little things that remind me of home and every hotel room can begin to look the same. And we’re lucky, we travel with 15 other players, many of whom are really good friends.

What do you get up to when at home? Lie on my sofa. I love coming home and

catching up with friends and family, as we do go missing for three or four months at a time. But I love being out-and-about in Nottingham - I’ve just bought a new place there - going to watch Nottingham Forest play, and, as we are always away in hot weather, I enjoy getting a big coat on and going for a walk in the countryside, but I must admit that when I’m at home, I do like to just close the gate and enjoy being there. I know it’s easy for people to take that for granted but as we’re away for so long, home becomes a very special place. I’m a bit of a home boy to be honest. What is your favourite ground to play on? Lords, just because of all the history. The atmosphere is always good and it’s just the home of cricket, and Trent Bridge because my whole family can come and watch. My granddad has been an avid follower, he’s about to turn 96, and one of my proudest memories was after I got a fifer at Lords and I remember looking up to the pavilion and seeing him proud as punch. He tries to come to every game and mum’s a school teacher, so she can come to quite a few games post July. What are you most proud of ? The three Ashes wins were incredible, but I’d have to say that reaching number one as a Test side would take the top spot, because that was an accumulation of three years hard graft. A massive achievement we reached as a team, it was an incredible effort. Other highlights include the 20/20 win in Barbados and winning at Lords with Notts at the end of last year. We had a oneday trophy final and you could sense the whole city was enjoying being in their first final for 20 odd years. I don’t get to play with them a huge amount, but to help them win that and take the final wicket was an amazing thing to be part of. As a tall man (6’6”) are there certain brands or tailors you have to use? Tailored suits seem to be the way forward for me, but I can be quite a casual dresser.

Certainly for chilling at home and going out in Nottingham - then I’m a hoodies and jeans man, but because we train everyday in tracksuits, it’s nice to get into a suit and go out for good dinners and stuff like that. There’s no real middle ground with me, I’m either smart or lounging around. How has the spotlight affected you? Certainly when there’s been cricket on I get recognised more. Plus, being 6’6” tall, people usually say: ‘Wow, he’s tall. Oh wait, I recognise him from somewhere.’ And then last year with the Ashes cricket was a bit of a talking point, so going to restaurants you get recognised more. I think we cricketers have a

Essentials for travelling? Tea bags, pillow spray, Molton Brown shower gel, Xbox. Playing on your iPod at the moment? I‘ve been listening to the Bastille album (Bad Blood). I like ‘Of The Night’, I think I’m a bit behind the times... We sing one of their songs when we win. Do you have music on in the changing room? Yes, that’s a good one to raise the mood, and then upbeat music to ensure we go onto the field in good spirits. Role model? Beckham. I know it’s a bog-standard answer, but he’s dealt with a lot over the years and always comes out well. Batsman you dread? Used to be Ricky Ponting, but you’re trained to go up against the best in the world so you’ve got to look forward to it. Test v 20/20? Test is my favourite as it’s a true test of your skill and character, but we need to keeping pushing for it to remain number one - as the money in 20/20 may lead to it being overtaken.

nice balance though - we don’t get nearly as much attention as footballers, but there are people who recognise us without the constant hassle. As I started playing for England when I was 19, I got used to the attention from an early age, and you have to get used to the highs and lows that come with it. When you’ve played well, people let you know but when you’ve not had a great run, people also ask: ‘What the hell was that yesterday?’ I’m quite relaxed with that sort of thing. On the whole, people in England are pretty good. Australia, less so.

Stuart Broad is a cricket ambassador for Investec. The specialist bank and asset manager are title sponsors of test cricket in England visit investec.co.uk/cricket or @investeccricket

Quick fire questions, get ready... Favourite place to eat? My mum’s kitchen.

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The

SHOOTING

SPECIAL C

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Adapted from a Holland & Holland catalogue produced between 1910-1912

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D

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LONDON

LLAN

LAN

still making the world’s finest sporting guns and rifles

33 Bruton Street, London, W1J 6HH | www.hollandandholland.com | +44 (0)20 7499 4411

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SHOOTING

THE GUIDE SHOOTING ETIQUETTE BY HENRY JAMES

beating on a shoot where one of the guns after the last drive gave the beating team a large bottle of whisky, it is thoughts like this that, whilst not necessary, show your gratitude to your fellow countrymen. When you part way at the end of the day, never leave early especially before the last drive. You may have a long journey ahead of you, however this is no excuse and you will be considered rude and ungrateful if you do. Once you are back at your own home the first thing you should do after cleaning you gun is write a thank you letter telling your host of your enjoyment of the day and thanking him for his kind generosity.

SHOOT RULES For those of you who are regular shots, this article is not meant to undermine your intelligence but help those first timers who as you know all to well are about to enter the world of unwritten rules and obstacles waiting to trip them up. From basic shooting safety, to what to wear and what not to say, this guide is meant to help them get through the day unscathed. When it comes to safety it is advised before going on any game shoot to have a series of lessons, this will not only mean that you will far increase your chances of hitting something, but it also allows you to put in the practices of gun safety. Most of gun safety is based on common sense, however I have known some of the most experienced shots fall fowl at some point during their shooting careers. I myself like many young boys learning to shoot was made to learn a poem called “A fathers advice” and only then was I allowed to pick up a shotgun. This poem has been passed down from generation to generation and for good reason too, in all but a few verses it acts as a guide for all. These rules are there to protect you, as they will ensure you and your other fellow guests enjoy the day to the fullest. The social rules, however are not as clear cut as the safety rules, however they are just as important as they will also allow you to quickly determine what type of so called countryman your fellow guests are. Firstly there is the invitation, where you should remember two words “respond” and “quickly”. It is by no small feat to lay on a shoot and therefore you should show the courtesy to respond quickly and in the most gracious way. Shooting is not a flashy sport and those who try to out do fellow guests by bragging and having all the latest gear will most definitely not be invited again. With regards to what to wear it’s best to get help with this from someone who knows. Remember there is no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothes, the important thing is to stay dry. A basic shooting wardrobe should consist of: shooting breeks, country checked shirt, tie, shooting socks, garters, jumper, tweed or waxed jacket, Hunter

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boots, flat cap, shooting scarves, shooting gloves, a cartridges bag, ear protection and waterproof trousers. Sometimes there are those who count the number of birds which they shoot against the ratio of cartridges shot, such individuals are to be avoided. Even worse are the guests who have just bought a brand new gun and start telling guests how much they spent on it, bragging about how much you have made or spent is a no go. Remember that many of your fellow guests would have been handed down their pair of Purdey’s, Holland & Holland’s or Boss’s and if you think they devalue like a car, think again as they will most likely be worth more than the Italian gun you just bought. Remember to leave plenty of time to get there, some shoots will be in obscure locations with little to no mobile reception. If you haven’t been there before it’s best to do some research the night before. Your host will not be impressed if they have to delay the start of the day, however if you do arrive late, don’t expect your host or the other guests to still be there. Lunch is normally in the middle of the day with one or two drives after, however it is also common to “shoot through” allowing the guests to really enjoy a long lunch. Don’t expect a six course Michelin star meal as it is normal for just a simple pie with some good Claret, some shoots on the other hand have much more formal lunches, although it has to be said that this tends to be on the more commercial days. At the end of each drive it is common courtesy to help other guests to pick up their birds and congratulate them on their shooting. There is no better feeling than to receive praise for a high pheasant so always remember to return the compliment to others when they do too. At the end of the day you are required to tip the keeper and your loader. Tipping can often be a minefield, however remember to do this discreetly, if unsure of the amount for the gamekeeper ask a fellow gun (again discreetly), with regards to your loader, this is left to your discretion, however putting a large number of pink notes in his hands and then telling your fellow guns how much you have tipped is strongly advised against. I was once

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Never point your gun at anyone or anything but the sky or ground – even if it’s unloaded. It is essential for beginners to take lessons at a shooting school; safe gun handling will then become instinctive. Ask your shoot’s host if you can bring a mentor, such as a shooting instructor. If invited on a shoot, it is perfectly acceptable to borrow a gun. Always keep your phone off.

Know the local rules and obey them. If you ever accidentally drop your gun on the ground barrel first, ensure it is completely clean before shooting it. Keep your gun in a sleeve when you are not on your peg. Always carry the gun broken over your arm; always break your gun before handing to someone else or crossing a stile; bring the stock to meet the barrels after loading, not vice versa.

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Never shoot for low birds unless you are on a grouse moor. It is deeply unsporting to shoot anything at close range. High birds are for experts only. Birds that are over100 feet are hard to shoot and you risk injuring, rather than killing them. Always make sure there is sky behind a bird when you shoot. Never shoot a quarry that is nearer your neighbour. Always have enough cartridges, never run out.

Never be anything less than friendly with the beaters. Remember where your birds fall to help the pickers find them. Tip your gamekeeper well – ask about the going rate. Don’t brag about your bag.

HOW TO BE A COUNTRY HOUSE GUEST CONFIRM TIMES of arrival and departure in advance and turn up on time (not late, not early). TAKE A PRESENT with you: some wine, flowers, something seasonally gastronomic. LET YOUR HOST KNOW of any genuine food intolerances in advance. COME EQUIPPED: bring appropriate shoes; if it looks wet, bring wellies and waterproofs. MAKE YOUR OWN BED and at least attempt to wash-up after yourself. YOU’RE NOT IN THE CITY anymore: don’t spend hours leaning out of windows trying to get a phone signal. DRESS ACCORDING to the grandeur of the house. A country cottage won’t require black tie, but a stately home just might. TELL GOOD STORIES but don’t bang on about yourself and your marvellous city life.

EMBRACE THE PETS. The countryside is all about animals, you’ve just got to accept it. If bringing your own dog, ask permission first. KNOW WHEN TO LEAVE. As the expression goes, ‘visitors, like fish, stink in three days’. KNOW THE CODE: ‘stay for lunch on Sunday’ means ‘leave soon afterwards’. IF YOU’VE LEFT something behind, be careful how soon you turn back. You don’t want to catch your host celebrating your departure. NEVER CALL ANYTHING quaint, backwards or inefficient. Remember you aren’t in the big smoke. WRITE A NOTE of thanks within a day. Taken From ‘The Debrett’s Guide For The Modern Gentleman’

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SHOOTING

PERFECTING PARTRIDGE RENOWNED SHOOTING INSTRUCTOR IAN COLEY SHARES HIS TOP TIPS ON PARTRIDGE SHOOTING

PREPARATION IS EVERYTHING As soon as the first invitation lands at your door, the first thing to do is get your guns serviced by a certified gunsmith. If you arrive on the first day without checking if everything is in working order then you run the risk of your gun failing at some stage in the day, especially older English side-by-sides. At this stage I would also think about taking a shooting lesson with a qualified instructor at a shooting school, they will be able to pick up any bad habits from last season and you’ll be able to get your eye in before the season opens. MY TOP TIP: If you have a gun dog also bear in mind they also won’t be used to the whistle or retrieving , so throw some dummies and work on basic commands so you are both ready for the big day. THE EVENING BEFORE Whilst it’s easy to get caught up in the excitement the evening before your first day, especially if you’re staying over with the shoot party, get organised the day before, so you are completely ready for the shoot in the morning. I always have a checklist of what I need to take with me as there is normally something I forget!

CARTRIDGES Whether you’re shooting a side-by-side or over-and-under, my preference would be a 28 - 30 gram cartridge 6 or 7 shot for 12 bore, or 24 – 28 gram 6 or 7 shot for 20 bore. For 99% of partridges this will be sufficient in bringing a clean kill. Respect the shoot and always use a fibre or felt wad.

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ON PEG Be quiet as soon as you get to the drive, you can chat with fellow guns after the whistle. When you arrive at your peg, always check where your neighbours and picker-ups are. This is especially important in steeper valleys – make sure all the angles are safe; lead can carry a great distance.

ABOUT IAN COLEY

At the end of the day it is important to see the keeper, speak with them about the enjoyable day you’ve had and a particular drive you liked the most. Remember they have worked very hard over the previous 6 months to make the day possible and they should be respected for this. If you aren’t sure on how much to tip, speak with the host or shoot captain and they will advise you on the proper form. Always take a brace of bird where possible, it is vital to the future of our sport that we all eat what we shoot.

The name ‘Coley’ is renowned in the shooting world, whether in reference to Game or Clay Shooting. Six times Olympic coach, Ian first shot for Great Britain in 1971, and since then has represented the country on over 200 occasions – either as a shooter, coach or team manager. In 2012, Ian was awarded an MBE for his services to the sport. Ian is widely recognised as one of the world’s top game shots and currently runs one of the UK’s largest Sporting Agencies, offering clients quality driven game shooting both here and abroad.

Most importantly enjoy the day, remember how lucky you are to be there and make an effort to speak to everyone involved – from beaters to keepers, and the chefs making your lunch – they are all part of making it a memorable day.

PAY ATTENTION So often the speech at the start of the day is like the safety briefing on an aeroplane – you’ve heard it all before and you don’t pay much attention. Then you’ll find yourself asking during the day; how we are numbering, is there a whistle to finish, or how many drives are there? It is crucial, especially on partridge, that you listen and be respectful to the morning speech. If shooting pigeons isn’t mentioned, remember to ask as early pigeon shooting can ruin months of hard work.

CLOSE OF PLAY

MOUNTING AND FOOTWORK As in any sport, confidence is key. Be positive when your pick up a bird and take the shot early, do not focus on a second bird until the first has folded. Remember your lead hand and use this to drive at the bird, keeping your head well on your stock throughout the shot is vital for consistent shooting. Footwork is also a crucial part of the shot – step into the shot you’re going to take, focus on the bird – I cannot over emphasise how important this is to a clean kill.

PICKING UP It is important on any game day to pick up what is around your peg and dispatch anything quickly and respectfully. Too many times guns walk away at the end of the drive without considering what they’ve shot. It is also important to talk to the picker-ups about pricked birds that have gone further on and engage with them about the drive, they are a vital cog in the makeup of a day in the field.

THE SHOT Once you are ‘locked on’ to the bird try to maintain the line of bird. It is not always about lead - especially with partridge, birds tend to be missed above or below the line. Be instinctive with the shot as timing is everything, follow through and don’t lose focus, remember confidence is everything.

RESPECT YOUR NEIGHBOURS During these early days there tends to be a surplus of sporting birds, so be selective and most importantly shoot birds that give you pleasure. But most importantly be respectful for your neighbour, it’s always better to leave a bird for them as there will always be plenty of birds for you to shoot at.

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SHOOTING

KIT

IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO STEP ONTO THE FIELD THIS SEASON, THEN DO IT IN STYLE. WE HAVE SELECTED THE VERY BEST IN SHOOTING ATTIRE FOR THE SEASON AHEAD, NOT ONLY DOES IT LOOK GREAT BUT IT HAS ALL BEEN DESIGNED WITH THE SPORT IN MIND. FROM LIGHT-WEIGHT BREATHABLE TWEEDS TO THE MOST TECHNICALLY SOUND BOOTS, WE HAVE YOU COVERED.

Hat, £70, Purdey, purdey.com. Jacket, £795, Holland & Holland, hollandandholland.com. Shirt, Bernard Weatherall, rayward.co.uk. Tie, £135, Purdey, purdey.com. Jumper, £69 Oliver Brown, oliverbrown.org.uk. Scarf, £140, Purdey, purdey.com. Breeks, £450, Holland & Holland, hollandandholland.com. Socks, £157.50, Oliver Brown, oliverbrown.org.uk.

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Vest, Ray Ward, £445, rayward.co.uk. Shirt, Bernard Weatherill, rayward.co.uk. Jacket, £855, Ray Ward, rayward.co.uk. Tie, £110, Holland & Holland, hollandandholland.com. Breeks, £415, Ray Ward, rayward.co.uk. Socks, £125, Purdey, purdey.com. Boots,£200, Hunter, hunter-boot.com. Hip flask, £70, Purdey, purdey.com. Hat, £75 Bernard Weatherill, rayward.co.uk.

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Jacket, £475, Purdey, purdey.com. Gloves, £225, Purdey, purdey.com. Shirt, £110, Purdey, purdey.com. Breeks,£195, Purdey, purdey.com. Boots, £285, Hunter, hunter-boot.com. Jumper, £550, Purdey, purdey.com. Hat, £75 Ray Ward, rayward.co.uk. Tie, £75, Ray Ward, rayward.co.uk. Socks, £140, Purdey, purdey.com.

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Breeks, £395, Oliver Brown, oliverbrown.org.uk. Jumper, £69, Oliver Brown, oliverbrown.org.uk. Jacket,£395, Oliver Brown, oliverbrown.org.uk. Shirt, £65, Oliver Brown, oliverbrown.org.uk. Tie, £75, Ray Ward, rayward.co.uk. Socks, £55, Ray Ward, rayward.co.uk. Boots, £300, Hunter, hunter-boot.com.

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The TOP SHOOTS 2014 COMPILED BY HARRY JARMAN

Now in its third year, The Gentleman’s Journal’s top shoot list is fast becoming the definitive annual ranking of the country’s best shoots for those who know. With over 100 of the UK’s top shots every year casting their vote, it’s the only shoot list which can be called truly democratic. A special mention must go to the following, who have all generously imparted their knowledge and wisdom: William Asprey, Ian Coley, Rob Fenwick, William Tyrwhitt-Drake, Charles Hambro, Simon Ford, Lord Margadale, Simon Rood, Mark Osbourne, Edward Darbishire and Phil Burtt, without whom compiling such a list would not be possible. This year to spice things up further we have added new categories, crowning individual shoots which excel in their field; namely grouse, partridge and pheasant. The main list is in no particular order and represents the best shooting not only in the UK, but in the world. From far and wide, we have included grey partridge shoots and fast grouse lines to pheasant shooting estates who play the Dambusters theme tune on the line. Variety, gentlemen, is the spice of life. BEST GROUSE MOORS

BEST PARTRIDGE SHOOTS

BEST PHEASANT SHOOTS

BEST SHOOT LUNCH

Muggleswick East Allenheads Gunnerside

Holkham Arundel Linhope Prescombe

Castle Hill Brigands Garrowby Dumbleton

Badminton East Allenheads Lambton

Honourable Mention: Peppering (Grey Partridge)

Honourable Mention: Alnwick

Honourable Mention: Bolton Abbey

Honourable Mention: Petworth Park

BEST HOSTS SIMON FORD The successful Gloucestershire based businessman is delightful company, never takes himself too seriously and is known for cracking open the fizz after the last drive. E.J Churchill’s Rob Fenwick comments “I just can’t remember actually leaving one of his parties”.

JEREMY HERRMANN We are not surprised to see Jeremy on the best host list. It is one thing to own a grouse moor, but quite another thing altogether to own two of the world’s best. East Allenheads has received praise from all sides this year, not just for its shooting but also for the noteworthy lunch.

JAMIE LEE Lee runs stand out shoots both at Rushmoor and Guy Richie’s Ashcome. Ashcome is well-known when it comes to entertaining and past guests have credited Jamie with impeccable hosting skills that are reportedly on par with his shooting. Which, given that he is one of the top shots in the country, is quite a compliment.

MOST ENTERTAINING GUESTS Those individuals who never fail to entertain, often have fellow guests in stitches, are courteous, tell the best stories and shoot pretty well too. Sir Chris Evans Guy Rasch Sir David Tang

Nick Fortescue & James Campbell-Gray (together) Willie Carson John Ward

MOST ENJOYABLE OVERNIGHT STAY The general consensus was that this was too hard to pin point, so we decided to go with Simon Rood’s answer, “as long as there’s a good crowd, good food and lots of red wine it always turns into a cracking night.” We concur.

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manufacturers of best guns Fine selection of guns available All repair work undertaken

For all enquiries please contact Roy Lyu Boss & Co Gunmakers Ltd, Richmond, Surrey Tel: 020 7493 1127 Fax: 020 8605 3684

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THE 30

TOP SHOOTS ASHCOMBE, WILTSHIRE/ DORSET BORDER From Ashcombe’s history as a ruin rescued by Cecil Beaton in the ‘30s to Guy Ritchie’s Georgian gift, this estate is 1,000 acres of unspoilt undulating terrain. It’s best loved by most for its very, yes, very, challenging partridge and pheasant and its wonderful collection of chalky valleys that are feared by even the boldest of guns. The Museum at Farnham offers rustic but great accommodation and has a gastropub underneath. Lunch during the days is held in the Orangery, a beautiful respite from the winter weather. Contact Roxtons ALNWICK, NORTHUMBERLAND This estate is owned by the Duke and Duchess of the county. The former is a keen shot, averaging over 100 days each year, and is among the elite owners who are committed to encouraging wild game. The main shoot covers 5,000 acres of Hulne Park and is always a quality bag. However, there are a few days a year (four double) that are let to shoot outside the park, where the bag can be astonishingly varied. The team here pride themselves on offering a bespoke service, resulting in many return visitors. Contact: Alnwick Estate office Tel: 01665 510777

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BERELEIGH, HAMPSHIRE A very well established estate, boasting both mature woods and beautifully crafted newer plating. Bereleigh is spread over the Meon Valley, with some unrivalled vistas. The shoot is run with clockwork like precision and has a very high-end family feel. The Georgian House accommodates most parties, and both owner Bill and his wife Philippa are expert entertainers. The dining hall and billiard room have proven to be especially good fun and the shooting is seriously top draw. Our winning drive is “Mascombe Bottom”, a natural dip in the chalk down and the summer location to the infamous “Lobster Shoot”. Contact: Bill Tyrwhitt-Drake Tel: 01730 823486 info@bereleigh.com ABBOTSBURY, DORSET This pheasant shoot can easily be ranked as one of the top shoots in the South of England. Its relatively low number of shoot days mean that the condition of the land and the birds is always impeccable. The landscape of Abbotsbury is quite something: you can expect to be met with awesome views down onto the Swannery and the Sun sparkling over the sea. Something not even a record bag can outdo. The skyline here is quite simply exceptional, and the birds are guaranteed to be aiming for the clouds, even with strong coastal winds.

ANGMERING, SUSSEX The archetypal model of a shoot that is very well run by the host, Nigel Clutton, who is a master of his land and knows every line like the back of his hand. Which is just as well, considering the crescent shapes and high points reaching above the underlying land. The 6,000 acre shoot was constructed by Nigel and Colin Cowdrey, open steep combes and agricultural land make for the perfect shooting topography. They’ve mastered tea, nibbles and lunch – and an enjoyable assortment of beverages too. We envy Nigel’s knowledge and skills as much as those who get to shoot here. Contact: Nigel Clutton Tel: 01903 882220

BELVOIR CASTLE, RUTLAND Headkeeper Tim Rolfe and Shoot Captain Phil Burtt are making a bee-line for the title of the best shoot in England. And we’d say they’re not far off. This 16,000 acre state is owned by the Duke of Rutland. For parties who wish to stay in the castle, you can be privy to a private tour, exemplary food and a good night’s sleep before attempting to draw the biggest bag yet. Contact: Megan Turner Tel: 01476 871004 CASTLE HILL, DEVON The shoot is rated among the best, not only against others in Exmoor but nationally. It’s too often said that each shoot has the highest bird, but there’s no argument when it comes to Castle Hill. The expertise of its Headkeeper Brian Mitchell is fundamental to rearing sky-high pheasants. We spoke to a few shots who have yet to find faster examples. There’s some stunning salmon and trout fishing here too, as well as an impressive house. Its an all-in-one and one for the bucket list. DRUMLANRIG ON THE QUEENSBURY ESTATE This belongs to the Duke of Buccleuch, and offers huge variety of shooting in magnificent scenery, with 25 drives covering 15,000 acres. Pheasant days range from double gun driven days to wakedup shooting with dogs or hawks. The recent addition of partridges is now very highly rated by people in the know. There’s also 25,000 acres of heather moorland for first class grouse. An estate which has it all. Buccleuch Sporting Office Tel: 01848 600415

ARUNDEL, SUSSEX This is a shoot sprawled out over two estates in the South Downs National Park. The woodlands here house one of the most ambitious conservation projects we know of, and the Duke of Norfolk and his team have won Purdey awards for their efforts to re-establish a wild grey partridge population. It’s incredibly successful at achieving record bags too. Contact: Peter Knight, Estate Manager Tel: 01903 883400 BOLTON ABBEY, YORKSHIRE If there were a poster boy for the rare synergy of tradition and quality that is so often associated with Yorkshire shoots, it would be Bolton Abbey. With only a brace of days a week on average throughout the season, the Devonshire family strives to provide the highest quality shoots with a low-key feel. This 30,000 acre estate in Wharfedale is predominantly moorland, providing zipping grouse. The drive of the day is often given to Low Gill, with a remarkably idyllic backdrop of the aqueduct at Howgill, and the youthful conifer plantation provides some late but soaring pheasant. This memorable shoot in White Rose country is made better by the lunch provided by The Devonshire Arms, recent winner of top 100 restaurant in the UK. Oh, and one more thing: the ruins of a 12th century priory in the grounds are always a crowdpleaser. CHARGOT, DEVON Talk about tailor-made topography. Chargot, on the edge of Exmoor, was made for partridge and pheasant shooting. We can’t prepare you for the extensive number of bottomless valleys that hit you here, nothing will, but ask around and you’ll hear some incredible stories. The day’s shooting starts in the shoot lodge, at the centre of the estate. There’s a choice of five accommodations: we suggest the Tarr Farm Inn, the perfectionist’s pub. Contact email: will@bettwshall.com Tel: 01686 650828

DUMBLETON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE On our list for the second year running, Dumbleton, whilst not a commercial shoot, has certainly gained a reputation as one of the best pheasant shoots in the country. And those who know it, keep it quiet to ensure it remains this way. The estate has been owned by banking family the Hambros for over 50 years. With its deep valleys it makes for some of the most unforgiving drives known to man (or at least Englishmen). One renowned shot said he ranked it on par with Castle Hill for this specific reason. If you’re lucky enough to shoot here, the drive after lunch is the one to watch out for, called “The Warren”, it’s a beautiful long and deep valley which produces some seriously high birds and requires an expert’s eye. No doubt it’s saved for last for this very reason and if shot well, there is no better way to finish a day. A real gem, only experienced by a fortunate few, who are now all committed fans.

FACCOMBE, HAMPSHIRE This is undoubtedly one of the closest quality shoots to London and, given that proximity, the privacy of the estate is remarkable. The house is set behind a high wall in a secluded location for those wanting to seek some time out from the City. The rugged landscape of undulating hills is ideal for both pheasant and partridge shooting. The estate used to be owned by the late Brigadier Tim Landon, who took an interest in green energy: the 650 acre estate runs off wind turbines. However, this does not disturb the beauty of the area, nor the well-kept drives.

HOLKHAM, NORFOLK 300 years of Earls of Leicester, all of whom have added to the planting here, means you can be among some of the oldest woodland in England. There’s also a lake, otherwise known as a sanctuary, that isnit shot but is admired by all. The 10,000 acres of land here on the North Norfolk coast is spoiling; it was a favourite shoot of King Edward VII, a real gentleman. For a break in a Palladian mansion, a memorable day’s shooting and perhaps a stroll on the never-ending beach, or some owl spotting, this is the place. Tel: 01328 710227 www.holkham.co.uk

EAST ALLENHEADS, NORTHUMBERLAND If we had to pick one shoot that got a unanimous committee vote this year, East Allenheads would be it. Some even say it’s now on par with Muggleswick for continuing to have record years, either way, this is one of the best grouse moors in the country. Praise must go to the remarkable team of Herrmann and Colmer, as well as award-winning gamekeeper Alan Edwards, whose management has brought enormous bags coupled with conservation grades. Guests have the choice to stay nearby in Langley Castle or at Slaley Hall – either will be more than satisfactory, as will the lunches.

FONTHILL, WILTSHIRE A civilised shoot owned by the charming Lord Margadale and a wonderful example of Capability Brown landscaping. The distant views here really are works of art, but you can also experience some of the trickiest pheasant, and flutters of partridge, within the 10,000 acres of this sporting estate. The hospitality is rated second to none: lunch is in the Gamekeeper’s Cottage and partiers stay in nearby accommodation at Howard’s House Hotel. A beautifully classic English shoot – they even pluck your pheasants for you. Tel: 01747 820246 email: mail@fonthill.co.uk

LINHOPE, CHEVIOT HILLS A shoot that has had some thoughtful investment. Located near Alnwick, owner James Percy has given this estate much precious time, putting it firmly on the map for partridge shooting. More recently, James has seen a huge increase in the number of grouse, and, to the admiration of many, he continues to be one of the country’s best shots, especially with this bird. If you’re lucky enough to shoot here, and even more privileged to be rewarded with his advice, listen carefully. www.willliampowellsporting. com

ENCOMBE, DORSET A shooting estate perched right on the sea, so it would be silly to mention the obvious. The views are mesmerising. As is the Georgian house built by John Pitt in 1734: his famous open-plan layout is now home to James and Arabella Gaggero. Encombe is not as well known as it should be, and if there’s one drive worth visiting, it’s in the “Golden Bowl” a quintessential English valley, secluded amidst established woodland. A naturally brilliant shooting experience and one that seems to be getting quite the reputation.

GARROWBY, YORKSHIRE This estate, located in the midst of Yorkshire’s glacial terrain, plays on its natural valleys with a mixture of woody slopes and open land of cover crop. In fact, the estate includes the top point in the Yorkshire Wolds. This extreme range forms a challenging day’s shot, even for the locals who were bred into the elite of high pheasant experts. If you find yourself alongside them, be sure to watch and learn, and consider yourself extremely lucky. The 13,500-acre estate is owned by Lord Halifax and rarely opens a day for let. When they do, it’s a golden game ticket. MOLLAND, DEVON Molland is synonymous with highflying birds on Exmoor. Split into two beats, West and East, you will be inundated with birds purely due to the abundance of drives. This estate is part of Bettws Hall owned by Mrs Throckmorton. Molland and totals 5,000 acres, it features a handful of drives rated in the top ten and “Inkwell” is known for its especially exhilarating pheasant drives. Watch out for the stag and red deer though, they run wild here. www.bettwshall.com MUGGLESWICK, CO. DURHAM This is the property of Jeremy Herrmann, who is an inspiration to most countrymen. The shoot is famed for its red grouse, abundant on this magical moor. We spoke to a few people who frequent this shoot and they all spoke warmly of the owner. It’s also worth mentioning that if you’re a keen fly fishermen you’ll be right at home here. www.williampowellcountry.com

GUNNERSIDE, NORTH YORKSHIRE Another of Yorkshire’s great grouse moors. This isolated shoot is a haven for throwing yourself into the sport and really is a pinnacle of grouse shooting, extending to over 30,000 acres. Be prepared for exhaustingly breathtaking landscapes and drives that will have you digging deep. The ultimate combination of fast, low birds and high, slow drives. MATTERLEY, HAMPSHIRE Set in some wonderful Hampshire valley’s, Matterley returns to our list this year and quite rightly so. It’s a fantastic pheasant shoot with some pretty good partridge too. The estate includes the impressive Cheesefoot Head, with its huge Punchbowl that produces some challenging birds. On the other side of the estate, in an area known as Hampage, there is some great woodland which produces some evasive woodcock. The estate is owned by Peveril Bruce, who inherited it from the late Commander (Henry) Bruce, however we now hear that Peveril’s son Otto has expertly taken over as shoot captain. The final player in this family affair is Minna who puts on a great lunch. Simon Rood is a big fan, as am I, as it is hard to find a better shoot this close to London. Contact: philip@bradenproperty.co.uk Tel: 01256 896 444

SALPERTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE A new addition to the list this year and a renowned partridge shoot. The estate has impressive and secluded valleys with the drives being well known in shooting circles, favourites include Big 60 and Great Hill. The birds fly high and fast off the steep banks offering some great, if challenging, shooting, it’s not one for the faint-hearted. With regards to hospitality, the estate provides the complete package, serving lunch in a particularly notable converted shoot lodge. This is a first class shoot that deserves its hard won place on this list. Contact Ian Coley, Tel: 01242 870391, e-mail: ian@coley.co.uk

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PRESCOMBE, WILTSHIRE This is a shoot run with a joie de vivre that knows well the power of fine wines. Stephen Thomas is the man responsible for both. With over 40 years of experience, and having learnt from his father at a young age, he has made a true success of the shoot. Situated between Salisbury and Shaftesbury, expect outstanding views over 30 varying drives. The 3,000 acres of land may not be as extensive as others, but for the partridges it’s easily one of the best. Fantastic woodland too, with first class beating. Contact stephen@ prescombesporting.com STOWELL PARK, GLOUCESTERSHIRE An incredibly private estate, with a total of 6,000 acres dedicated to both agriculture and sporting activities. The house and land have been owned by the Vestey family since 1921. Its glorious setting in the Cotswold hills means the acres are a perfect combination of arable land, grassland and woodland. And if you’re expecting deep valleys, you won’t be disappointed: some of the highest birds and the quickest drives can be found here. A shoot regarded highly among those who have a plethora of knowledge. CAERHAYS, CORNWALL This flourishing rural community, on the south Cornwall coast, has shooting firmly rooted at its heart. The estate of Caerhays Castle is run by the infamous Charles Williams. The shoot is among 120 acres with drives in a variety of locations – some with spectacular sea views, others on the edge of the exotic woodland created by Williams himself. William’s wife led the conversion of the old rectory into luxury accommodation complete with personal chef: “The Vean”, as it known, sleeps 8. This shoot runs 80 days a year, rearing the traditional Kansas pheasant. The most talked-about drive boasts views of the castle, designed by Nash in 1807, a stunning listed building flanked by deep valleys.

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THE LAKES, EXMOOR One of four additions to the list, The Lakes is owned by clothing tycoon Richard Caring and is one of only two shoots on our list which is not commercial (the other being Dumbleton, Gloucestershire). For those of you who don’t know who Richard Caring is, he was once reported to supply 70% of all clothing sold on the high street, and today he is the proud owner of some of London’s most prestigious restaurants. He is not a man who likes to do things by halves and The Lakes is no exception. Firstly, there is the shoot lodge called Pixton which has been opulently renovated. Secondly, there is the food which, given that your host owns the likes of Scott’s, turns out to be more sophisticated than a slab of cottage pie; think grilled seafood, fillet steak and even sushi. And lastly, but certainly not least, there is the shooting, which has been described as some of the most challenging in the country and higher even than Devon. The last drive, from which the shoot takes its namesake, is truly unique as guns shoot from pontoons with birds coming extremely fast over the tops of the trees. Rumour (soon to be legend) has it, that Caring has installed speakers at the end of the pontoons, from which he blasts the ‘Dambuster’s March’ while you empty your barrels. Need we say anymore. WRACCLEFORD, DORSET Set in the unspoilt deep chalk valleys of Dorset, this estate has been a destination shoot for those seeking the thrill of high partridge and pheasant. Owned by the Pope brewing family for generations and now run by Oliver Pope, the shoot has developed hand in hand with conservation over the past century, and it offers beautiful views over Hardy country towards the sea at Lulworth Cove. Shooting parties can stay in the main house where the hospitality and catering is said to be of a very high standard. This is a great shoot in a relaxed environment, but one that is said to have a long waiting list. Contact: info@waccleford.co.uk

BRIGANDS, SNOWDONIA Brigands is an immersive experience, as you find yourself surrounded by untouched nature on the border of the Snowdonia National Park. Its valleys (created by what are better described as mountains, not hills) are cunningly covered by harsh crop, creating fast flushes of birds. The scenery is best enjoyed with top-ups of champagne and sloe gin. Luckily, both are routine here. A very fine drive features a waterfall backdrop, and has been crafted by nature as a testing ground, a mix of fast, slow, low, high birds, take your pick. Contact Gwyn and Ann Evans of the Bettws Hall Shooting Group.

WWW . THE GENTLEMANS JOURNAL . COM .

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And despite the impeccable service, the hardest choice you will have to make is not what wood or engraving you want, but which of ‘The Holy Trinity’ is the one for you?

THE HOLY TRINITY

HOLLAND & HOLLAND Holland & Holland was founded by Harris Holland in 1835, who was joined by his cousin, Henry, in 1861. By 1883, Holland & Holland was winning all the categories in The Field magazine’s rifle trials and setting new standards of excellence, and their famous ‘royal’ brand name was patented in 1885. Holland & Holland were acquired by luxury goods brand, Chanel, in 1989 and today they continue to produce some of the finest guns with a strong emphasis on sporting clothing. Their flagship store is located in London’s Mayfair on Bruton Street. hollandandholland.com

THE STORY OF THREE BRITISH GUNSMITHS WHO CONTINUE TO REIGN SUPREME

Boss & Co.

Holland & Holland

A BOSS GUN, BLOODY BEAUTIFUL, BUT TOO BLOODY EXPENSIVE.

KING GEORGE VI In the shooting world the saying “the Holy Trinity” is, unfortunately, not a religious reference, but more of a testament to three of the greatest gunmakers in the world; Holland & Holland, Purdey and Boss & Co. Whilst there are others who produce some fine guns, none have quite the reputation of these three. There are many reasons for this, from their long history and strong heritage, to their innovations and the sheer quality of the guns that they produce. The industry has faced tough times during the last century, but these three names have survived, and continue to receive plenty of orders from all corners of the globe. This is a testament to an enduring demand for the finest quality goods. To give you an idea of just how tough the last century has been, at the beginning of the 1900s there were nearly 100 gunmakers in Britain, but today only a few remain, due to thriving overseas competition.    Although gunmakers in countries such as Italy produce cheaper alternatives to the British made guns, at the top end, the likes of Purdey, Holland & Holland and Boss & Co still reign supreme. They all represent true luxury, in every sense of the word, offering a bespoke service and unrivalled attention to detail.

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BOSS & Co. Many makers of fine English shotguns claim to trace their ancestry back a considerable number of years, but Boss & Co can lay claim to be one of the longest established, dating back to 1773 when William Boss began his gun making apprenticeship in Birmingham. In the late 18th century William Boss moved to London to work for Joseph Manton, and William’s son Thomas Boss (1790 - 1857) followed in his father’s footsteps to serve his apprenticeship under the great master himself. Completing his apprenticeship in 1812, Thomas Boss set out to only produce the very highest quality of gun and this policy of perfection continues to the this day with Boss & Co being the “builders of only the best guns.” bossguns.com PURDEY James Purdey was established in London in 1814, the year before the battle of Waterloo, and has always been at the forefront of technological innovation. It was granted its first Royal Warrant in 1868 by The Prince of Wales, later to become King Edward VII. Typical of Purdey’s foresight and business acumen was the purchase of James Woodward & Sons in 1949, the gunmaker knew that Woodward had the original patent for the first ‘over and under’ shotguns, and knew they could improve upon the design. Like their great rivals, Holland & Holland, Purdey are now owned by a luxury goods company, Richemont, and operate from the historic Audley house in Mayfair.  purdey.com

Purdey

The guns that these three produce are not just weapons of sport, but works of art, with each gun typically taking between 600-1000 hours to craft. They are developed in a similar fashion to Savile Row’s bespoke suits, with customers being able to order a gun detailing their specifications to the smallest detail. Each gun goes through five processes, passing through the hallowed hands of expert craftsmen, including the Barrel Maker, Actioner, Stocker, Engraver and lastly, the Finisher. When it comes to having a bespoke shotgun made, the personalised service is second to none. Clients can choose the wood for the stock of their gun and make it their own by specifying personalised engraving. When you buy a gun from one of these three you become part of an exclusive club and while every keen shot will have their personal or family favourite, few would argue with the contention that they produce equally outstanding shotguns. But it’s not all about you, when you buy a gun from the Holy Trinity; you buy a heritage, an heirloom and a legacy, which can be passed down the generations for years to come.

Boss & Co. Boss & Co.

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SHOOTING

A MUTLEY crew THIS SEASON, THE 6 FINEST GUN DOG BREEDS WILL BE FIGHTING IT OUT FOR BRAGGING RIGHTS ON SHOOTING ESTATES ACROSS THE COUNTRY. HERE’S OUR GUIDE TO THE COATS TO LOOK OUT FOR ON THE LINE.

THE LABRADOR Known for their exceptionally ‘soft mouths’ and admirable temperament, Labradors have proven to be an exceptionally popular gundog breed, and family dog, in the past 100 years. Contrary to their popular image as a ‘traditionally British dog’, Labradors are believed to have originated from the St John’s breed in Newfoundland where they assisted fishermen in collecting caught fish, and were only officially recognised as a breed in England in 1916. It’s no wonder then, given their maritime retrieval roots, that they are famous for their love of water and retrieving. Strong in build, dependable on the peg and highly intelligent, their reputation as a top gun dog has been built upon their ability to build close and loving relationships with their owners. Like many gundog breeds, Labradors have recently risen to fame as ‘soldiers’, serving on the frontline in the Middle East, with some of them even being mentioned in dispatches and winning posthumous honours popularly known as the canine ‘Victoria’s Cross’. They continue to prove themselves as, arguably, the quintessential dog to have on the line under fire.

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THE GERMAN SHORT-HAIRED POINTER

Known as a versatile all-purpose gundog. German Shorthaired Pointers (referred to as GSPs by those in the know) are untiringly energetic and a hunting dog by nature. Protective, clever, eager and (crucially) willing to please, their stand out attribute is their keen perseverant nose and initiative when flushing game. An efficient, precise and dedicated worker, it’s only their happy-go-lucky nature which sets them apart from any comparisons with Germanic stereotypes. Unfortunately, they are not as populous as other breeds featured on this list as they became very rare in WWII and had to be rebuilt from a limited gene pool after the war ended.

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THE ITALIAN SPINONE

An untrained eye could easily mistake a recently groomed Italian Spinone with a German Shorthaired Pointer, in fact, they often do. But they couldn’t be more different, the patient, calm and fearless nature of this breed is in contrast to the carefree energy of their look-a-likes the German Shorthaired Pointer. Although legend has it that they have ancient roots that can be traced back to 500BC, it is more likely that they are descended from Italian hounds and French Griffons. Despite this, they did not achieve championship status until 1994 and are relative newcomers to the annals of gundog history. That hasn’t stopped them gaining considerable popularity and a reputation for versatility and dogged determination in the field, especially in rough woodland or marshes. They might not be an oftseen gundog on the shooting estates of England but they deserve their place on this list.

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THE ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIEL

Although they could be called the ‘king’ of the Spaniels, all of the English hunting spaniel breeds are their descendants, English Springer Spaniels have also experienced presidential success across the pond, one was once owned by George W. Bush. They are known as an even-tempered, friendly, and exceptionally sociable dog that makes a great companion for children especially given their smaller build and gentle nature. Their intelligence and notable skill set makes them a top gundog, a reputation that has century old roots back to Rivington Sam, an English Springer Spaniel crowned the first English Field Champion in 1914 and is still considered one of the foundation sires for modern field lines.

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THE GOLDEN RETRIEVER Charming, devoted and self-assured, this lovable breed has become prolifically popular as a family dog in the last twenty years. They are often prized for their gorgeous golden coat and have a long aristocratic history, originally bred by Lord Tweedmouth in the Scottish Highlands in the late 1800s, who crossed the original yellow Flat-Coated Retriever with the now extinct Tweed Water Spaniel. But they’re not just a pretty coat, Golden Retrievers are highly valued as service dogs and have proven themselves immensely intelligent; able to sense epileptic seizures, diabetic attacks and heart attacks through minute alterations in odour or movement. With such remarkable service skills their hunting prowess seems somewhat trivial, nonetheless they make for highly versatile gun dogs both in the water and on land.

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THE COCKER SPANIEL The Cocker Spaniel is part of the Spaniel family and shows similar traits to the Springer Spaniel. Cocker Spaniels are energetic gun dogs known for their ability to work in difficult terrain, whether sodden wet or bone dry. The name “Cocker” comes from woodcocks, a game bird the dogs were famous for flushing with particular success. Their reputation for flushing is complemented by a gentle mouth and enthusiastic attitude to retrieval. Their natural humility and loyalty has garnered them considerable fame as companions to Presidents and Princes. Richard Nixon owned one and Kate Middleton and Prince William own a Cocker by the name of ‘Lupo’.

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FLAT RACING REVIEW

BY ANDREW MICHAEL

A middle-distance queen, a king miler, and the emergence of a new name on the star stallion roster are just three of the hallmarks so far in a fascinating 2014 turf flat racing season.

shock to punters (she started at odds of 2/9!) but she remains on course for the Qatar Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe in October (see Looking ahead, below).

Kingman’s ability to produce an electrifying burst of speed mid-race, as demonstrated in both the St James’s Palace Stakes at Royal Ascot and the Sussex Stakes at Glorious Goodwood, which has set him on course to Every queen needs her king or, in the case be ranked as one of the very best milers of Add to that an unlikely comeback from one of this season, her Kingman. Although the recent seasons. of the sport’s most successful jockeys and there’s every chance that the year will go down in the annals as a truly memorable one for the sport of kings.

failed to add to his 2,000 Guineas success.

season. A parting of the ways in 2012 between Godolphin and its long-time That said, this season’s Guineas remains premier race pilot Frankie Dettori means something of a landmark both for Night of the stable now calls upon the services of a Thunder’s trainer, Richard Hannon junior, band of top jockeys on a race-by-race basis. and winning jockey Kieren Fallon.  Fallon is one of the ‘go to’ names at the top Over the winter, Hannon formally took of their list. With 15 victories in the famous over the control of the successful Herridge royal blue silks already this season, it’s a and Everleigh racing stables that his father, good bet that the pairing will team up for also called Richard, had built up in Wiltshire even more success before the season is out. over the past 43 years. Especially with a whole host of important juvenile (two-year-old) races yet to be run Not only did this year’s Guineas provide such as the Dewhurst Stakes at Newmarket Hannon junior with a first Classic in his own and the Racing Post Trophy at Doncaster; both Group One contests where Godolphin can usually call on large reserves of young equine firepower.   Looking ahead Autumn marks the end of the flat turf season in the UK and Ireland but there are still several mouth-watering contests to savour before the curtain finally comes down. For gents of a turfiest persuasion, Europe’s two classiest remaining meetings both take place in October.

‘Ladies first’ is the tried and trusted refrain of many a gent so let’s start this halfterm review with Taghrooda, a filly who has already run up a brace of Group One successes this summer and has a good chance of converting an already impressive season into something even more spectacular later in the autumn.

LONGCHAMP, PARIS 4 & 5 OCTOBER 2014 Large crowds at French race meetings are the exception rather than the rule, but Qatar Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe weekend attracts racegoers from both sides of the Channel in their thousands to the Bois de Boulogne for two days of top class racing.

Trained by John Gosden and owned by Sheikh Hamdan al Maktoum, Taghrooda went into many a shrewdie’s notebook following her eye-catching win in the Pretty Polly Stakes at Newmarket’s Guineas meeting in May. This race is traditionally a decent trial for the Oaks, the middledistance Classic for fillies run at Epsom the day before the Derby. Sure enough Taghrooda’s early season promise was confirmed in the Oaks when she won the Investec sponsored contest with a threeand-a-quarter length victory over Tarfasha in June. Domination of an Oaks field is all well and good. But the form book has been littered down the years with fillies who have looked world beaters at Epsom only for subsequent efforts to tail off dramatically in the remainder of their racing careers. Not Taghrooda, however. Her scintillating win in the King George & Queen Elizabeth Stakes at Ascot in July was a performance from right out of the top drawer. Guided to victory by jockey Paul Hanagan, her victory was all the more noteworthy given that the last filly to win this middle-distance all-aged summer highlight was Pawneese back in 1976.

Aiden O’Brien-trained Australia completed a superb English and Irish Derby double in the summer and then added the Juddmonte International Stakes at the Ebor meeting, it’s Kingman who arguably just shades the description of the year’s most exciting three-year-old colt.

Kingman started the year with a lofty reputation having been ante post favourite for the 2,000 Guineas over the winter. However, it was the 40/1 outsider Night of Thunder who prevailed in the season’s first Classic at Newmarket in May, with Kingman beaten half a length and Australia a head further away back in third.

The son of Invincible Spirit, another Her half-length defeat by Tapestry in the inmate at John Gosden’s powerhouse Since the Guineas, Kingman and Australia Yorkshire Oaks at York’s prestigious Ebor Clarehaven stable, racked up a sequence of have landed seven Group One races meeting in August was something of a four Group One wins over the summer. It’s between them while Night of Thunder has

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name (his father chalked up four during his career and was champion trainer five times), but it also marked jockey Kieren Fallon’s return to racing’s top table following a period where his continued participation in the sport seemed increasingly unlikely.

Take the German-trained Sea The Moon, for example, who is also to the fore in the 2014 Arc betting, having demolished the German Derby field at Hamburg back in July. If the ground comes up soft at Longchamp in October Sea The Moon is definitely one for the shortlist, especially if his trainer, Markus King, can again secure the services of jockey Christophe Soumillon who rode the colt to victory in Hamburg. From the home team, Avenir Certain is a relatively unfashionably bred filly but that doesn’t prevent her from running fast having won the French versions of both the 1,000 Guineas (Poule D’Essai Des Pouliches) and the Oaks (Prix de Diane) this year. She remains unbeaten going into the Arc and would also be a beneficiary of the all-important weight pull enjoyed by three-year-old fillies in this race. For a more exotic wager, don’t dismiss the chances of a Japanese-trained winner of the Arc. Having gone agonisingly close twice before, Japanese trainers are desperate to land Europe’s richest race and could be three-handed in the contest this year in the shape of Just A Way, Gold Ship and Harp Star. prixarcdetriomphe.com

ASCOT 18 OCTOBER 2014 QIPCO British Champions Day at Ascot is a spectacular day’s racing which helps to bring down the curtain on the domestic flat season and features a seven-race card With a prize fund worth about £4.2 million, with an eye-popping £3.75 million in prize the Group One ‘Arc’ run over 12 furlongs money up for grabs. (2,400m) is Europe’s richest horse race of the season and attracts a truly global field.  To find the winners of the day’s pair of showcase races, the 10-furlong Champion To find the winner of this year’s Arc it could Stakes and the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes be a sensible policy to side with the ladies. run over a mile, it’s sensible to swerve Race conditions mean that three-year-old horses which ran at the Arc weekend just a fillies enjoy a useful weight pull with their fortnight earlier. rivals, a factor they’ve put to good use in this contest down the years. That’s definitely Australia would be a tough nut to crack if a plus for Taghrooda who will be looking he shows up for the Champion Stakes after to round off her season in style after her his impressive win over the same trip in the shock defeat at York.  International Stakes at York in August.

If Taghrooda adds an Arc to her CV not only would her value as a future broodmare rocket, but she’d be emulating her sire, Sea The Stars, who won the race in 2009. Sea The Stars was a marvellous racehorse and, although it’s still early days in his stud In addition to this year’s Classic win (his career, his progeny including his first crop sixteenth in total) the six-time former of three-year-olds are already doing him champion jockey Fallon has also struck proud. up a successful relationship with Sheikh Mohammed’s Godolphin operation this

In the QEII, meanwhile, look out for Kingman who is due to run next in this race. He will likely start as a scalding hot odds-on favourite, but a win could seal his place as racehorse of the year; a fitting end to a terrific season all round. britishchampionsseries.com/fixtures/qipco-britishchampions-day.html

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PROPERTY

COUNTRY ESTATES PROPERTY ON THE MARKET – CHARMING ELEGANCE AND COUNTRYSIDE LIFESTYLE LIVING

KINGSTONE LISLE PARK OXFORDSHIRE ACREAGE: 1021 GUIDE PRICE: £22,000,000 AGENT: STRUTT & PARKER TEL: 0207 629 7282

This stunning Grade II listed Georgian house is at the very heart of a magical 1021 acre estate which hosts an excellent high Pheasant and Partridge shoot, taking full advantage of the diverse terrain. The beautiful formal gardens lead onto a series of 3 engrossing lakes, walled garden, swimming pool, tennis court, paddocks and parkland. Sitting at the end of an immaculate gravelled drive, the Kingstone Lisle House houses 15 bedrooms, a billiard room and extensive cellars whilst the grounds of the estate play host to the game larder, a private golf course and four additional properties; Gate Lodge, Laundry Cottage Gardener’s Cottage and Stable House. THE ABBOTSWOOD ESTATE GLOUCESTERSHIRE ACREAGE: 774 GUIDE PRICE: £30,000,000 AGENT: KNIGHT FRANK TEL: 01285 659771 What can only be described as a quintessential Cotswold gem, this house and estate are nestled in the heart of England’s most beautiful rolling countryside. Boasting stunning parkland, lakes and Sir Edward Lutyen’s renowned formal gardens, Abbotswood Grade II listed main house is the perfect setting for those that wish to entertain with a certain level of privacy, the house can only be seen from inside the estate and any of the 11 farmhouses and cottages. River Dikler, running through the estate, offers wild brown trout fishing for the country gentleman, whilst surrounding land is dedicated to organic farming. Knight Frank also list the potential for pheasant and partridge shooting – music to any keen shot’s ears. ISFIELD PLACE EAST SUSSEX ACREAGE: 312 GUIDE PRICE: £8,950,000 AGENT: STRUTT & PARKER TEL: 0207 629 7282

Kingston Lisle Park

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Just 55 miles south of London and 16 miles north of the south coast, Isfield Place benefits from complete privacy and security, for many, only found in this type of idyllic rural setting. Unarguably stunning in its 312 acre setting, the estate is protected by its own land, with no public rights of way near the house or gardens. Formal gardens surround the 8 bedroom manor house, whilst the billiard room, and gun and rod room lead out onto a croquet lawn, tennis court and swimming pool. The estate is supported by farm buildings, 2 cottages and a staff flat, as well as a pair of semi-detached cottages in the village of Isfield itself.

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PROPERTY

POULTON PRIORY CIRENCESTER, GLOUCESTERSHIRE ACREAGE: 159 GUIDE PRICE: (PRICE ON APPLICATION) AGENT: KNIGHT FRANK TEL: 01285 659771

Priory’s modernised interior and extensively refurbished exterior are immaculate, with an outdoor swimming pool and tennis court giving way to manicured formal lawns and private parkland. The house is centred on over 150 acres and has potential for future conversions, with the former squash court waiting for a 2 bedroom cottage to materialise (plans have even been drawn up). Few houses are so well laid out; airy reception rooms, high ceilings and galleried landings let the light flood in. With an impressive Master bedroom suite, further 8 expansive bedrooms and a three bedroom Gate Lodge, your guests would be more than accommodated for and the London contingent are less than an hour away.

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GASTON GRANGE BENTWORTH, HAMPSHIRE ACREAGE: 198 GUIDE PRICE: £11,000,000 AGENT: STRUTT & PARKER TEL: 0207 629 7282

An immaculately refurbished family house in a peaceful setting, Gaston Grange boasts beautiful views and gardens, and the long carriage drive dramatically leads up to the main house. The property enjoys a swimming pool, guest cottage, 2 flats, stabling and manège. Extensive paddocks, park, arable and woodland surround the main house giving a sense of privacy and security. The estate has been painstakingly refurbished and the outcome is completely stunning, although the modernisation has been lengthy the vision has been ultimately achieved.

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An immaculate and very large two bedroom duplex apartment with a private garden in Mayfair village.

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TOWN HOUSES PROPERTY ON THE MARKET – CITY COMFORTS AND CONTEMPORARY LUXURIES

HILL STREET MAYFAIR, LONDON GUIDE PRICE – £22,500,000 AGENT: WETHERELL TEL: 020 7493 6935

From the exterior Hill Street is a stunning townhouse, yet the interior currently houses a substantial freehold comprising of 3 principle DWIGHT HOUSE apartments as well as a small studio and additional 1 bedroom flat. FULHAM, LONDON Leaving the future owners multiple arrangement offers, the house is GUIDE PRICE – £3,250,000 beautifully dressed with antiques and period furniture ideal for the AGENT: STRUTT & PARKER character and period of the property. The first of the three main TEL: 020 7731 7100 apartments is set over two floors, with generous bedroom suites the apartment also comes with an unusual benefit of a small indoor swimming pool. The second houses a good sized private roof terrace, A unique Grade II listed Georgian house, this property has been whilst the final of the three principle flats consists of a large drawing beautifully restored to maximise both light and storage as well as the historic nature of the building. The semi-detached house benefits room, leading on to another roof terrace. from 6 well-sized bedrooms, 3 reception rooms and an ample basement, plenty of room for a family to have their own space in this Fulham abode. This home also benefits from the transport and shopping facilities of the local area, including Putney Bridge and Parsons Green. another great feature is it’s proximity to open spaces with Bishops Park and Hurlingham Park just a stones throw away.

Hill Street

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36 SOUTH STREET MAYFAIR, LONDON GUIDE PRICE – £9,400,000 AGENT: WETHERELL TEL: 020 7493 6935

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This Grade II listed Georgian five bedroom house provides a living space in the heart of Mayfair, dubbed the “artist’s house”, this house has had notable artisans occupying it over the decades. Picturesque and rich in character, the rear of the house opens onto a beautiful 0.25 acre “secret garden”, a hidden, leafy oasis in the heart of London’s West End. The property blends classic contemporary design with period details, the house has two reception rooms, drawing room, media room and sauna. This home also has a nifty parking space in a secure underground car park just 100 yards away from the property.

CADOGAN STREET CHELSEA, LONDON GUIDE PRICE – £4,875,000 AGENT: STRUTT & PARKER TEL: 020 7225 3866

This superb five bedroom family house has been reconfigured and now extends to 2,786 square feet, to include a new basement level with impressive volume and ceiling height, and plenty of natural light for modern day living. It is stylishly designed with an extremely practical open plan living space leading out from beautiful concertina doors – perfect for large gatherings. It’s location is enviable as a short walk conjoins bustling streets and the calm needed for family life Cadogan Street runs between Sloane Avenue and Cadogan Gardens, just moments away from the facilities of nearby Kings Road and Sloane Square.

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THE DIRECTORY

SPANNER & WINGNUT SIMON WRIGHT

LONGTHORNE GUNS

Simon Wright offers a complete bespoke service, personally making your jewellery in platinum and gold using the finest diamonds and gemstones. An appointment involves viewing stones, a short tour of the workshop and a sit down design session - all in his Clerkenwell studio workshop. Simon’s technique combines traditional handmade metalsmithing with high tech CAD design software, 3D printing and laser welding. By appointment only. http://www.sw-jewellery.com 020 7490 0665 simon@sw-jewellery.com

Manufactured completely in England, Longthorne Gunmakers Hesketh Deluxe shotgun has the precision of a Swiss watch and is a true side lock over and under 12 bore with 3” chambers. As with all their guns it is also proofed for ‘Magnum steel’. This innovative British gun maker utilises 21st Century technology combined with traditional methodology with which to manufacture their guns from high specification steels and are renowned for their low felt recoil/low muzzle flip qualities as well as their strength, tailored to their Client requirements this has to be a winning combination. www.longthorneguns.com 01772 811215 admin@longthorneguns.com

Anneka Moore studied for a Jewellery Design bachelors at Central St. Martins before embarking on an adventure through the fashion industry, finally ending up with her bold and beautiful jewellery brand; Spanner & Wingnut. Anneka draws inspiration from her beloved London, all things couture and the elegant shapes in nature. Her style tends to veer towards androgyny and clean, smooth, reflected edges. This combined with traditional manufacturing techniques, precious metals and gemstones, promises to deliver wearable, luxurious and highly aesthetic jewellery. www.pannerandwingnut.com/ 07979 746740 info@spannerandwingnut.com

PULLMAN EDITIONS PULLMAN EDITIONS designs and publishes original, exclusive limited-edition posters which capture the enduring appeal of Art Deco. Their posters are newly-commissioned artworks featuring winter sports in the French and Swiss Alps, summer resorts around the world and the world’s greatest historic automobiles. Stylish, affordable Art Deco for the discerning gentleman. All £395 each. www.pullmaneditions.com 020 7730 0547 info@pullmaneditions.com

TRAVELTEQ Travelteq, know for their high quality laptop bags, are all about smart traveling. Your iPhone case, credit cards, and hotel key will be at hand with the new Travelteq iPhone case! What makes the case distinctive is that the iPhone’s slim shape will not be lost as a result of the multifunctional case. The Florentine Vachetta leather appears as a skin on the iPhone, though that is not the only beauty of this product. Even though the case is so thin, it still has an extra function in addition to protection; within the case is a compartment, which can hold your credit card, hotel key, or business card. www.travelteq.com

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TANNER & OAK Tanner & Oak is fast becoming a favourite amongst those who appreciate British products. Their exquisite range of high-end leather accessories, from satchels and bags to smaller accessories such as hip flasks and wallets are artfully designed and made. Tanner & Oak have scoured the country to find the very best that Britain has to offer ensuring that every element of the product, including Somerset leather and Yorkshire fabric, is from the UK. When they say ‘Made in England’ they really mean it. The products have a classic feel about them with a quirky twist - a true English product for any true gentleman. www.tannerandoak.com 01993 812466 info@tannerandoak.com

ALBION SPORTING Albion Sporting, based in Walsall, West Midlands, presents an exquisite range of luxury leather shooting accessories comprising of leather Gun Slips, Cartridge Bags, Cartridge Magazine Cases and accessories. The perfect way to compliment a day in the field. Individually handmade in their factory, Albion Sporting specialises in bespoke manufacturing and customisation where only the finest full grain leathers, pure British wool linings and solid brass fittings are hand selected - ensuring consistency and exceptional quality. A truly British affair from design to luxury manufacture recognised for their ‘anything is possible’ approach and made to measure service. www.albionsporting.co.uk 01952 691431 sales@albionsporting.co.uk

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Center - Peter Wetherell Right - Jake Parkinson - Smith

William Matthews and Tanya Ling

James Norton and Morgan Watkins Oliver Cheshire and Jack Guinness

MASTERPIECE Masterpiece London is renowned the world over, and is often considered one of the finest art fairs on the planet. The main event of London’s summer art season, it takes place annually in the heart of the city offering eager art fans the chance to experience, as well as purchase, some of the finest creations around. This year the fair once again took place on the South Grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea, and to mark the occasion, The Gentleman’s Journal teamed up with Gieves and Hawkes to throw a spectacular closing party.

Jemima Cadbury Johann Pillai and Hemmo Bloemers

Jack Fox, Ed Speleers and Morgan Watkins

Of course, it wouldn’t be a party without food, and irresistible canapés were on offer by Urban Caprice, including salmon sashimi, which was a particular favourite of the guests. Speaking of guests, VIPs from the world of art and high fashion were present including Nazy Vassegh and Jason Basmajian as well as Patrick Wu and Gautier Chen from Esquire China. A truly glamorous affair, the closing party allowed guests uninterrupted access to some of the most sought-after pieces of art in the world, making it a highly memorable event for all involved.  Revellers at Masterpiece

Luke Newberry Sophie Kennedy Clark

AQUASCUTUM LAUNCH PARTY Is there a brand more distinctly British than Aquascutum? Established in 1851, they were attributed with inventing the world’s first waterproof wool as well as the trench coat, which is now a British icon in its own right. This all makes sense given that the name ‘Aquascutum’ is Latin for ‘water shield’. A brand with this kind of history would be forgiven for taking a step back and letting their heritage do the selling. But not Aquascutum.

Ian Stallard, Jason Basmajian, Nazy Vassegh and Patrick Fredrickson

Patrick Wu, Jason Basmajian and Gautier Chen.

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The opening of their Jermyn Street store is their sixth in London alone, and marks a huge step forward for the brand, given the iconic menswear surroundings of St James’ and beyond. To celebrate the opening, Aquascutum partnered with The Gentleman’s Journal for the launch party, which saw a number of high profile actors, models and socialites descend upon the brand new Jermyn Street venue, trench coats and all.

Sydne Martin and Rory Smith

Emily Bryant, Octavia Tidswell-Norrish and Samantha Dobbie

Robert Konjic

Alistair Guy and Guest

Actors Luke Newberry, James Norton and Jack Fox were in attendance as well as models Jack Guinness, Gemma Chan and Oliver Cheshire, all of whom enjoyed suitably British sparkling wine by Nyetimber as well as delicious summer cocktails courtesy of Chase Vodka. The Gentleman’s Journal summer issue cover star, Ed Speleers was even spotted getting in on the action, posing for the nation’s press before heading inside to explore the newly opened store, which boasts an enviable location on the corner of Jermyn Street.

Natt Weller, Gemma Chan and Jack Guinness

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Rollo Grandy, Charles Agar, Freddie Meade & Bertie Carron Brown

Pixie Lott, Gok Wan and Oliver Cheshire

Tom Cruise

POLO AT BLENHEIM PALACE A quintessentially British affair, the CLA Game Fair celebrates our great countryside with a number of exciting events, and this year took place within  the stunning grounds of Blenheim Palace. Essentially a sporting event, a number of field sports are showcased including shooting, fishing, falconry, field archery, horse and hound and more. It really is a spectacle for all the family. 

George Meade Lorna Hollings & the Chase Team Ella Catliff

Upping the ante this year, The Gentleman’s Journal hosted an exclusive polo match, which saw the competition levels rise dramatically. The TGJ team was made up of George and Freddie Meade, Lord Sutherland and Archie Rutland and, after galloping to a well-deserved victory, they received prizes including Hunter Wellington boots, Gieves and Hawkes shirts and Floris grooming products. The biggest reward of all though came in the form of a game feast and evening drinks reception, courtesy of Nyetimber sparkling wines and Chase vodka.

GLORIOUS GOODWOOD Ascot may have the heritage, but Glorious Goodwood has the glamour. Arguably the most important racing event on the social calendar, Glorious Goodwood takes over Lord March’s West Sussex estate for five days annually, offering racing fans more chances than ever to enjoy plenty of exciting action, both on and off the track. The racing provides a thrilling main event, and with illustrious races such as The Sussex Stakes and The Betfred Mile on offer, it’s not hard to see why. These races, and others taking place throughout the week, provide a platform for horses and jockeys to really make a name for themselves, such is the importance and heated competition that ensues. Big name winners this year included Kingman, who won the Sussex Stakes, Red Avenger, winning the Betfred Mile and Missunited, who won the Langtry Stakes on what was to be her final race. 

Chris Dewbury and Family

Will Tobin, Archie Rutland, George Sunderland, George Meade, Freddie Meade & Harry Davis

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Of course being such a high profile event, Glorious Goodwood attracts plenty of celebrities, with big name stars from all over the world attending in their droves. Hollywood actor Tom Cruise garnered plenty of attention on Ladies Day as did exEngland footballer Michael Owen, whose horse Brown Panther raced and finished third in the Goodwood Cup. Elsewhere, the likes of Beverley Knight, Gok Wan, Vivienne Westwood, Edie Cambell and Pixie Lott looked to be loving their time at Glorious Goodwood, which is set to be even better next time around.

George Sunderland, Will Tobin, Camilla Thorp, David Tollemache & Archie Rutland

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Monica Lewinsky and Heather Kerzner

Clive Owen

MASTERPIECE MARIE CURIE PARTY Taking place as part of the prestigious Masterpiece Art Fair, the Marie Curie Party managed to raise over £900,000 for the cancer charity of the same name. The Royal Hospital Chelsea was filled up to the brim with monumental artworks as part of the fair, the likes of which drew collectors and aficionados alike to the West London destination. The Marie Curie Party though, which was held on 30th June, attracted more than just art connoisseurs. Hosted by Marie Curie Cancer Care ambassador Heather Kerzner, royalty and celebrities alike flocked to the home of the Chelsea Pensioners, including Princess Beatrice, Rachel Hunter, Monica Lewinsky, Yasmin LeBon, and none other than Hollywood actor Clive Owen. 

Laurent and Carine Feniou

GOODWOOD FOS CARTIER STYLE ET LUXE

Mr & Mrs Marcus Wareing

Princess Beatrice of York

Each and every year the Festival of Speed takes over the regal grounds of Lord March’s Goodwood Estate, and it just gets better every time. Numerous automotive escapades take place throughout the four-day affair, but one that stands out above the rest is the Cartier Style et Luxe concours d’elegance. A competition focussing on the unique beauty of automotive design, the Style et Luxe sees a diverse panel of famous names come together to judge the world’s rarest cars in a total of seven categories. An event of this calibre wouldn’t be complete without a celebrity-filled garden party however, and this is exactly what Cartier delivered.  Making perfect use of the private lawn in front of Goodwood House, Cartier created an idyllic environment which allowed guests to enjoy a champagne and Pimms reception as a Tornado fighter jet carved through the sky above. The stars soon started filtering in with big names including Lewis Hamilton, Rowan Atkinson, James Martin, Sir Jackie Stewart, Sir Christopher Hoy and of course, Lord and Lady March. Guests were then ushered through into the main marquee, where a buffet of biblical proportions awaited. A plated starter of chargrilled asparagus and radicchio with burrata, pine nuts and pomegranate was served, alongside a seasonal selection of vegetables and cooked meat from the Goodwood Estate.

Nani Malat and Jean-David Malat

Entertainment on the evening was provided by Gideon Reeling Theatre Company and Robin Harris’ London Dixie Jazz Bands, who thrilled guests in between silent and live auctions that helped to raise the huge sum of money.

This year’s Festival of Speed was, as always, a must-attend event on the automotive calendar and the Cartier Style de Luxe was the icing on the cake. We’re already counting the days until next year. Sally Gunnell and Arnaud M Bamberger

Amber and Yasmin Le Bon

Princess Beatrice of York with Marie Curie nurses

Heather Kerzner with the Chelsea Pensioners

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Joanthan Yeo and Sally Gunnell

Arnaud M Bamberger, Rowan Atkinson and Carla Bamberger

The Countess of March and the Earl of March

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AUDI INTERNATIONAL POLO DAY The Audi International Polo day is widely considered to be one of the biggest and most crucial polo events of the season. Taking place at the Guards Polo Club in Egham, Audi England faced off against Equus & Co Argentina in front of a passionate crowd who lapped up the action under the scorching summer sun. Argentina defeated the home side, which was made up of burgeoning stars Luke Tomlinson, Mark Tomlinson, James Beim and Ollie Cudmore, but this didn’t dampen what was an incredible day that was enjoyed by all.  Charles, Prince of Wales was present to gift the winners their trophy, and as he did so, half of Britain’s young acting talent looked on. Man of the moment Eddie Redmayne and talented screen-star Dominic Cooper looked dapper in their tailored get-ups, but they were overshadowed by the stunning Gemma Arterton and her figure-hugging orange dress. Other celebrities on the day included supermodel Edie Campbell, retired rugby player Matt Dawson and actors Luke Treadaway, Thandie Newton and Roxanne Pallett.

Luke Pasqualino and Peter Poli

Matt Dawson and Carolin Hauskeller

Luke Treadaway, Gemma Arterton, Thandie Newton and Eddie Redmayne

NYETIMBER, BRITISH AND ORIGINAL

For over twenty five years Nyetimber has had a single aim: to make the finest English sparkling wine, one to rival the very best in the world, including Champagne. A true pioneer, Nyetimber was the very first producer of English sparkling wine to craft wines made exclusively from the three celebrated varieties found in Champagne: Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay. In 1988, Nyetimber planted its first vines In west sussex and today, the House is regarded internationally as a producer of exceptional sparkling wines. Owner Eric Heerema and winemaker Cherie Spriggs are committed to producing wines of a Grande Marque standard.

Hannah Bagshawe and Eddie Redmayne

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India Sinclair and Luke Treadaway

Jade Williams

www.nyetimber.com

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A F E W O F M Y FAV O U R I T E T H I N G S

MICHAEL KORS

TGJ: What is your most treasured possession? MK: My Grandfather’s wedding ring. I never take it off.

TGJ: What can’t you live without? MK: The sun.

TGJ: Where is your favourite city in the world? MK: New York.

TGJ: What possession would you save from a burning fire? MK: My two cats—Bunny and Viola.

TGJ: Where do you go to relax? MK: Anywhere with a beach. Right now, I love Big Sur,

Phuket and Capri.

TGJ: Where, real or imagined, historical or

mythological, would you most like to visit?

TGJ: What’s your favourite piece in your wardrobe? MK: My aviators. The way other men change their tie

everyday, I change my aviators.

MK: I’d love to spend a weekend on the Christina—

TGJ: What do you take with you when travelling? MK: A black cashmere knit, Tod’s crocodile driving

TGJ: What is your favourite restaurant and what do

TGJ: Where do you go for inspiration? MK: Anywhere that combines the beauty of nature and

Aristotle Onassis’s yacht—with Jackie O. and Elizabeth Taylor.

loafers, my ipad and beats [By DR.DRE] Headphones.

you order when there?

luxury service.

pizza at Aurora in Capri.

TGJ: What era, trend or style will you always love? MK: I’ve always been inspired by the jet setters of the

MK: I love the steak at Peter Luger in New York and the

Time flies, spend it wisely.

TGJ: What’s your drink of choice? MK: Ketel One on the rocks.

60s and 70s—the Jackie Kennedy, Robert Redford and Steve Mcqueens of the world.

Our history in transporting time critical donor organs Europewide and patients in need of treatment globally provides the foundation to who we are and what we offer - a trusted, discrete and dependable private air charter service.

TGJ: Where do you go to celebrate? MK: Somewhere with a beach. For me, there’s nothing

TGJ: Who are your favourite other designers? MK: From the past: Halston, Yves Saint Laurent and

We treat our private charter clients’ flights with the same level of importance, combining access to luxury aircraft for business or pleasure, with a level of service that is second to none.

better than a day at the beach with friends and no cell phones in sight.

Azzadine Alaia. And recently I’ve been liking Dion Lee.

22 Grafton Street, Mayfair, London, W1S4EX United Kingdom

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T: +44 (0) 207 060 9320 | E: journey@flightserveuk.com | flightserveuk.com

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THE GENTLEMAN’S JOURNAL AU T U M N I S S U E

COMING SOON Blancpain Boutique opening on New Bond Street

WW W.T H E GE NT L EMA NS J OU R N A L .C O.U K

©Photograph: Masa Ushioda, « Reaching out », Fifty Fathoms Edition 2009

My work is to capture time: a split second of a moment, when the animal expresses emotion and my picture interprets this precious time as art.

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Profile for The Gentleman's Journal

The Gentleman's Journal - Autumn 2014  

The Gentleman's Journal - Autumn 2014  

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