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Issue 09 | 2018

+ TOURISM MONTH INITIATIVES What SA is Doing to Promote Tourism Locally

+ AN EDUCATION IN EVENTS

The QualiямБcations Needed for Success in Business Events

+ 8 STEPS TO A WINNING BID BOOK A Vital and Strategic Component of a Successful Bid


“ An evening sundowner enjoyed with friends Savouring the scents of the African bush Earth soaked in the warmth of the golden sun The sheer vastness of its open landscape The soundless padding of elephants moving on by A gentle melody of bird song Connect with yourself

It's good to be alive…”

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, Northern KwaZulu-Natal

Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife’s diverse protected areas and natural sanctuaries allow you to explore our unique big-game wildlife areas, as well as numerous cultural, historical, wetland, alpine and marine treasures with a wide range of accommodation facilities and guest activities on offer.

Hiking, biking, fishing, game-viewing or just relaxing …it’s yours for the asking.

Make your Reservation Now!

T: +27(0) 33 845 1000

E: bookings@kznwildlife.com Web: www.kznwildlife.com


CONTENTS

www.theevent.co.za

02.

01

SAACI Congress 2018 Highlights

05.

Conscious Conferencing at Spier

THE GAUTRAIN Ideal for business travel across Johannesburg and beyond, the Gautrain connects SA’s economic nucleus.

07.

Marginal Tourism Growth in 2017

08.

SpaceOps 2020 Comes To Cape Town

EIGHT WAYS TO WIN A BID The Event explores what key elements are necessary for inclusion in a winning bid book.

10.

Tourism Month Initiatives

11.

Africa Halal Week Launched

12.

It’s Reliable, It’s Futuristic, It’s The Gautrain

14.

How to Win a Bid in Eight Ways

EVENT EDUCATION What qualifications does one need to succeed in SA’s business-events industry? Natasha Skoryk reports.

20.

An Education in Events

24.

Business Events Made Easy: Kruger Park

26.

Business Events Made Easy: Rwanda

BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY: RWANDA The ‘Land of a Thousand Hills’ is a modern, forward-thinking destination with a booming meetings sector.

28.

Events to Diarise

30.

Associations News

32.

Directory of Advertisers


02

NEWS

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SAACI CONGRESS 2018 Under the theme “It Takes a Village�, the SAACI Congress brought together professionals from a variety of conference industry sectors including conference and event organisers, events management companies, service providers and industry stakeholders.


Local Excellence Global Appeal

So much more than merely a multi-purpose conference and exhibition destination, the iconic Cape Town International Convention Centre combines flexible venues, impeccable service, cutting-edge technology and the finest global cuisine to transform your event into an extraordinary experience. So, whether your attendees are from around the world, or around the corner, give them the world-class experience they deserve with the uniquely African flair they desire, at the CTICC. For more information, or to book your event, exhibition or convention at CTICC, call +27 21 410 5000, email sales@cticc.co.za or visit www.cticc.co.za.


04

JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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HOW TO UP THE

CONFERENCE ANTE Anyone worth their salt in the conference and exhibitions industry will tell you that the notion of added value comes standard in this game. This is the hygiene factor as opposed to a nice-tohave. Having said that, there is always room for growth and there are certainly ways for event organisers to up the ante. Craig Newman, CEO at the Johannesburg Expo Centre, believes that the role of data has fast become a crucial tool in any event organiser’s arsenal.

I

f you really want to talk about a value proposition then start with your technology offering, says Newman. “As event organisers, we should be constantly looking, almost on the hunt for ways to improve our IT hardware and software offerings. As a starting point, we should interrogate whether our data collection approach is a solid one and offering real value to our customers” Newman is adamant that the collection of data and use there-after remains an untapped benefit for both exhibitors and delegates. “We have the opportunity to facilitate a yearlong dialogue with our stakeholders that extends far beyond a two day conference or exhibit. This type of sustained communication is what makes good business practice superior and its well within our remit.” More untapped opportunity lies in how we marry the conference and exhibitions industry with South Africa’s emerging small business and plethora of dynamic entrepreneurs. Of course this is not as simple as it seems, given the level of

experience and service that has come to be expected by event organisers and goers, but we do need to address how we facilitate joint ventures down the line. “This is a necessary conversation to have as this type of collaboration is crucial for the economy and while it requires dialogue on the way forward so as not to detract from South Africa’s burgeoning event industry, it is certainly possible.” To go back to the basics, when it comes to planning a conference or exhibition, nothing sets you up for success more than the research. If you want your event to be worth exhibitors’ or delegates’ time, leave them feeling inspired and keep them coming back; then mapping directly to

For this and more on the world of events, stay tuned to: Facebook: @jhbexpocentre1 Twitter: @jhbexpocentre1 Website: expocentre.co.za

their agenda is essential. “It’s easy to pay lip service to the research too, so interrogate your decisions.” Whether it is securing a subject matter expert or deciding on meaningful giveaways, understanding the conference topic and the needs of your delegates is critical. The truth is that we are already in this business to add value. We already plan exhibitions and conferences with painstaking detail and precision every day so as to offer target industries meaningful and unforgettable experiences. We need to evolve from being perceived as a value add industry to an indispensable partner in the South African business, leisure and entertainment landscape.


SPOTLIGHT

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05

CONSCIOUS CONFERENCING Sustainability, green living and ‘conscious’ eventing are buzzwords on the tips of every industry leader’s tongue. The Event looks at a case study of a business doing it right.

L

et’s face it: responsible tourism is not the most glamorous part of tourism,” manager of the African Responsible Tourism Awards, Sadia Nanabhay, said at Africa’s Travel Indaba in May. However, Spier in the Western Cape appears to be challenging that notion, by building a brand centred holistically around conscious consumerism. At Spier, the long-term goal is a selfsufficient and responsible future. As part of this important commitment, a solar power system was installed in 2017 on the Spier Conference Centre roof. The system generates electricity from the sun and offsets approximately 40% of the Conference Centre’s annual power usage. When electricity demand in the Centre is low and generation is high, the excess power is used by other buildings on the estate. Not only is solar generated power less expensive than energy from the grid, it also substantially reduces Spier’s carbon footprint. The solar energy generated by Spier in one year is 50.8 metric tonnes of CO2 savings; this is the equivalent of 24.58 tonnes of coal that doesn’t need

be burnt in a coal-fired power station. This relatively recent addition was the third and largest solar PV system to be installed at Spier by RenEnergy, Spier’s energy partner (which is based permanently on the estate). Justin Hawes of the Event Greening Forum has only praise for the estate’s efforts. “Spier has a Water From Air™ machine. It draws in air, condenses it into water and purifies it so it is drinkable. This one machine can generate as much as 45 000 litres of water a month,” he says. This is especially crucial given the water scarcity in the Western Cape – and indicates how ‘conscious eventing’ includes innovative solutions to present problems. In other structural implementations, 100% of Spier’s black and grey wastewater is recycled by an ecofriendly treatment plant. The treated water is then re-used in toilets and for irrigation. The farm’s solid waste is recycled and measured – with only 1% currently being sent to landfill (99% is recycled on the farm). In addition,

Riverdeck Conference area; images courtesy of Spier

The Manor House organic waste is composted and used on the farm. Other green initiatives include energy-efficient lighting, filtered tap water bottled in reusable glass bottles, notepads made from recycled paper and pens made from 100% recycled newspaper. Delegates and conference hosts might be pleased to discover that leftover stationery can be donated to surrounding schools. “Making a positive impact on our environment is embedded into the way we do business,” says Joep Schoof, Spier’s General Manager. “Our conferencing venues are enabling the businesses and delegates we host to make a difference too.” As indicated above, Spier’s Conscious Conference package therefore includes a wide number of environmental and social components, supporting their sustainable business ethos. The Conscious Conference Package enables hosts to join the estate in supporting local industry, fair trade and our commitment to a sustainable planet. And they gurantee that hosts and delegates will have a great experience in the process!


06

MADEX / MARKEX

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MADEX AND MARKEX 2018 Building the branding conversation.

T

he second annual Madex show, the ultimate marketing, advertising, design, social media and all that good stuff expo, recently provided solutions to the challenges faced by marketers across all industries, helping to breathe life into stale campaigns and put a shine on new strategies. Co-located with Markex, Africa’s premier promotional product event, now in its 31st year, the two expos delivered the A to Z of marketing, covering all things below- and above-the-line. In combination, Madex and Markex 2018 attracted almost 6 000 visitors, drawing in thousands of promotional product resellers, as well as representatives from the advertising, publishing, events planning, PR, packaging, technology, hospitality, industrial, financial services, and entertainment sectors, to name a few. “Once again, we saw massive interest in our two seminar theatres, The Fundamentals, which targeted those starting the climb up the marketing ladder, and The Marketing Academy, aimed at honing the talents of those more senior professionals,” says Nick Sarnadas, Portfolio Director and event organiser at Specialised Exhibitions Montgomery. “Many of our more than 50 content sessions were filled to capacity. Included presentations by John Vlismas, Jodene Shaer, Femi Adebanji, Chantelle BooysenFourie, and Mike Sharman, as well as many others. This serves to underscore the fact that local marketers are hungry for expert content, which we believe is a major drawcard for Madex and Markex attendees.”

“A panel discussion on using promotional products during tough economic times drew in a sizeable audience. This discussion was hosted by veteran journalist, radio host and television presenter Jeremy Maggs, and featured experts from Markex headline partner Barron, a corporate and promotional products company, Specialised Exhibitions Montgomery, and life insurance provider Yalu.” In addition to the on-point sessions run within the seminar theatres, viewers were treated to a sneak peak of the winning South African entries of the Cannes Young Lions competition 2018, as well as South Africa’s Best Liked ads of 2017 by Kantar Millward Brown. Looking at attendee statistics, Madex 2018 saw 84 international visitors, from African countries including Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Of the expo’s total audience, 40% were between the ages of 25 and 34, 26% were aged 35 to 44, and more than half held senior management positions. Furthermore, 86% of the visitors are in positions to make or influence purchasing decisions. From a Markex 2018 perspective, over 50% of visitors were between the ages of 25 and 44, 45% were senior management, and 93% make or influence purchasing decisions. There were 2 230 Trade Only attendees, 33% were firsttime visitors to the show, and 240 arrived from beyond South Africa’s borders, including 15 African countries. “Our social media platforms, both before and during the shows, highlighted

the fact that these channels are critical for engagement with Madex visitors in particular,” Sarnadas explains. “Thanks to our attendees sharing their experiences at the show, #Madex2018 trended three times over the two-day show. We also welcomed eight ‘influencers’, who played a critical role in our extended reach.” Madex and Markex 2018 featured an interactive exhibition floor, showcasing more than 100 exhibitors covering an array of marketing offerings, from corporate gifting and branded goods, to a variety of value-adding services. “We also received fantastic support from the industry’s associations, including MASA (the Marketing Association of South Africa), PRISA (the Public Relations Institute of Southern Africa), SAFREA (the South African Freelancers’ Association), EXSA (the Exhibition Association of Southern Africa) and AAXO (The Association of African Exhibition Organisers),” adds Sarnadas. “In fact, we celebrated Global Exhibitions Day (#GED18) on the first show day in conjunction with AAXO and EXSA, launching the first Exhibition Games competition. “With a New Product Display dedicated to the hottest promo products for viewing, fun additional features for the shows included a Doodle Wall, which was filled with people’s thought and artistry at the end of each show day,” he concludes. Madex and Markex 2019 is set to take place on 5 and 6 June 2019 at the Sandton Convention Centre. Visit www.madex.co.za or www.markex.co.za for more information or to book your exhibition space!

Contact details: Lebogang Motswaledi | 011 835 1565 info@markex.co.za | www.markex.co.za Natasha Heiberg | 010 003 3083 info@madex.co.za | www.madex.co.za


NEWS

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07

MARGINAL TOURISM GROWTH IN 2017 Foreign tourism has seen a slight rise in numbers after significant growth in 2016. The Event looks at last year’s percentages for both South African and international travel.

© Jason Briscoe (via Unsplash)

© Agustin Diaz (via Unsplash)

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

© Sebastien Gabriel (via Unsplash)

F

oreign tourism rose 2.4% in 2017, building on its 12.8% increase in 2016. During the past two years, the number of foreign overnight visitors to South Africa rose by a cumulative 1.39 million. The gain in 2017 was particularly impressive as it was achieved without any boost from a weak rand, making it less expensive to travel to South Africa. This also took place at the same time as the lifting of visa requirements in China and India in 2016, which made it much easier for people from those countries to visit South Africa. After jumping 38.0% in 2016, visitors from China fell 17.0% in 2017. Travellers from India rose a modest 2.7% in 2017, well below the 21.7% increase recorded in 2016. In both cases, the incremental benefits from the lifting of visa requirements were largely realised in 2016.

Paris, France

Durban, South Africa

Latin America recorded the largest increase in 2017 with a 59.3% gain, principally fuelled by a 74.7% rise in the number of visitors from Brazil. On the strength of double-digit gains from France and Germany, the number of visitors from Europe rose 7.6% in 2017. North America rose 7.8%, and the Middle East increased 4.4%. The decline in China led to a 1.9% decrease for all of Asia Pacific, while visitors from Africa were essentially flat following an 11.2% increase in 2016. The growth from the various non-African markets resulted in an overall 7.2% increase in foreign visitor numbers from outside of Africa. Of the top ten non-African countries, Brazil, France and Germany recorded the largest increases. The number of visitors from Canada, the United States, the Netherlands and Australia posted mid-tohigh single digit increases, while the United Kingdom held steady and China declined. Of foreign visitors coming to South Africa from African countries in 2017, the largest number came from Zimbabwe at 2 million, followed by Lesotho at 1.8 million and Mozambique at 1.3 million. As for visitors from Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries, Lesotho,

Swaziland, Namibia, Zambia, Tanzania and Seychelles each recorded declines in 2017, with Seychelles falling by 16.0%. Angola rebounded in 2017 with a 13.1% increase, while Malawi posted the largest gains at 13.6%. Overall, increases barely exceeded decreases, and the total number of visitors from the SADC countries edged up 1.0%. It turns out that the SADC countries accounts for the only region in Africa that recorded increases in visitors to South Africa in 2017. Visits from East and Central Africa fell 2.4% in 2017, with Uganda, Eritrea, Somalia, Chad and Djibouti being the only countries from that area to register gains. Kenya, the leading source of visitors to South Africa, fell 1.3% in 2017. Visitors from West Africa were down 14.1%, the steepest decline in numbers from any of the African regions. Nigeria, the largest source of visitors to South Africa from that area, plummeted 22.4% in 2017, accounting for most of the decrease. Collectively, visits from the remaining countries in West Africa rose 3.2%. A plunging exchange rate – the naira fell 40% against the rand – and a weak economy accounted for the large drop in visits from Nigeria.


08

NEWS

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Artist’s impression of MeerKAT in the Karoo region, part of the Square Kilometre Array, the world’s largest radio telescope © SKA Organisation

A plenary session at SpaceOps 2016 © SpaceOps

SPACEOPS 2020

COMES TO CAPE TOWN The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) in partnership with the Cape Town & Western Cape Convention Bureau has won the bid to host the SpaceOps 2020 conference.

T

he conference will bring together over 600 global space specialists at the Cape Town International Convention Centre, with an estimated economic impact of R11 520 000. This could not come at a better time, with the new MeerKAT radio telescope launched in the Northern Cape in mid-July. Thanks to significant investments made by the Department of Science and Technology in satellite and telescope projects, the local space tech ecosystem is growing. Not only is this forecast to boost infrastructure development and the economy, but will also enhance the ranks of science and engineering graduates in the country. Congratulating the bidding team, Wesgro CEO Tim Harris commented: “The Western Cape has been at the forefront of South African Space tech for many years:

the tracking station established by NASA at Hartebeeshoek received the first images of Mars in 1965; the first miniaturised satellite designed and manufactured in South Africa was completed at Stellenbosch University in 1999; and more recently SANSA has allocated funds to Denel Spaceteq to develop the EO-Sat1 - a high resolution multispectral imaging satellite which will be used for a variety of urban management processes. We applaud the efforts of the team in convincing delegates that the Mother City should play host to a conference of this calibre.” The team accompanied the local organising committee to SpaceOps 2018, held in France during June, to promote the destination and entice delegates to register for the 2020 conference. “SANSA is proud to bring the illustrious Space Operations 2020 conference to South Africa for the first time on the African continent and to host it in

the beautiful Mother city, Cape Town.” Tiaan Strydom, the Chairperson of the local organising committee, said. Western Cape Minister of Economic Opportunities, Alan Winde said, “The Western Cape prides itself on its innovation and technology, so we are pleased that we will be welcoming over 600 of the world’s top space specialists to Cape Town. Securing this conference will also boost our tourism sector, helping to grow our economy and create more jobs in line with our Project Khulisa goals.” Head of the Cape Town and Western Cape Convention Bureau, Corne Koch, added: “We are delighted to have assisted in winning the bid for this important conference. South Africa is set to lead in Africa in space technology and we’re proud for Cape Town to contribute in this way.” The bid was further made possible with support from the South Africa National Convention Bureau.


IMEX AMERICA

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09

IMEX AMERICA 2018: EXPANDED & EXPERIENTIAL

Experiential innovations, learnings, industry trends and new exhibitors are among the hundreds of reasons to attend IMEX America, taking place 16-18 October 2018.

Memorable Masterclass A new partnership with C2 International, the ground-breaking leader in business conferences, will bring a huge dose of creativity and excitement to the show. Following an enthusiastic response at IMEX in Frankfurt, C2 will be presenting their exciting and innovative Learning Labs at IMEX America, as well as a Thursday morning, open-to all, collaborative session.

More exhibitors and opportunities to do global business Driving business success remains at the heart of IMEX, with over 3 300 destinations, venues and suppliers from 130-plus countries under one roof. IMEX America has moved into a larger hall to accommodate new and expanded exhibitors. Many exhibitors are increasing the size of their booths including DMI Hotels, Croatian National Tourist Board, Mexico, and Royal Caribbean International.

Powerful and personalised: education for all In line with tradition, the show kicks off on October 15, Smart Monday - a full day of complimentary, cutting-edge professional development powered by MPI. Additionally, an Association Leadership Forum, created by ASAE exclusively for association leaders and an Executive Meeting Forum dedicated to senior corporate executives with a focus on SMM program management, procurement leadership or meetings management are also on offer. Once again IMEX America 2018 will live out its mission to ‘educate,

innovate and help all its clients to make powerful connections with the right people’ through easy-access professional development each day of the show. The Inspiration Hub will be the central point of focus for hundreds of sessions on hot topics including security, sustainability, creativity, innovation, technology, experiential events and legacy.

Recognising personal impact and legacy Various aspects of legacy will be covered throughout the programme - political, personal, environmental, CSR and social impact or knowledge legacy all designed to help planners produce more engaging, topical events with longer-lasting positive outcomes. “As always, we’re committed to putting on a great show – one that ignites fresh thinking, explores new trends and

encourages people to connect and do business easily,” says Carina Bauer, CEO of the IMEX Group. “In a fast-changing world, we believe that coming together in the same place to see, hear and talk commerce - and to understand the wider forces shaping our industry - is fundamental to business success.”

IMEX America takes place October 16 – 18 at the Sands Expo and Convention Centre at The Venetian | The Palazzo in Las Vegas, preceded by Smart Monday, powered by MPI, on October 15. Registration is free.

LEGACY: WHAT’S YOURS GO


10

SPOTLIGHT

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Water Lodge – Pumba Game Reserve, Eastern Cape

Images courtesy of Eastern Cape Tourism Board

TOURISM MONTH 2018 The Event rounds up some of the Tourism Month initiatives around the country, which have been planned for September 2018.

O

rganised by the UN World Tourism Organisation, World Tourism Day offers countries around the world the opportunity to promote the tourism sector. This year’s theme is “Tourism and the Digital Transformation.” It is intended to explore the opportunities provided to tourism by technological advances including big data, artificial intelligence and digital platforms. South African Tourism Month is celebrated annually in September with the aim of encouraging South Africans to explore their own country. It also provides the tourism industry with an opportunity for a sustained, heightened month-long focus on the importance of domestic tourism to the economy.

Tourism Public Lecture – 18 September 2018 – Walter Sisulu University, Umtata, Eastern Cape The Department of Tourism in partnership with the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Eastern Cape Parks and Tourism Agency, and Walter Sisulu University will host the annual tourism public lecture on the 18th of September 2018 at Walter Sisulu University. Per the UN’s chosen theme, the title of this forthcoming lecture is: “Tourism and the Digital Transformation.”

The lecture will focus on how digital transformation is affecting the demand and supply of tourism services and products, with special focus on small, medium and micro enterprises. The lecture will also touch on opportunities provided to tourism, by technological advances including artificial intelligence and digital platforms. The UNWTO considers digital transformation, innovation as part of the solution to the challenge of responding to continued growth of a sustainable tourism sector. Visit www.tourism.gov.za

South African National Parks Week – 10-14 September 2018 – Most SA National Parks South African National Parks (SANParks) will be hosting its 13th annual SA National Parks Week from 10 to 14 September 2018. This initiative, in partnership with Total South Africa and FNB, is in line with SANParks vision statement of ‘A sustainable National Park System Connecting Society’. Day visitors, especially people from the local communities, will be granted free access to most of the 21 national parks. Free access to the parks will not include free access to accommodation facilities and other tourist activities. Visit www.sanparks.org

The Great Experience Spring 18 – 6-8 September – Venda, Limpopo #TGEspring18 promises guests a weekend filled with differentiated experiences. These include a tour across what is regarded as the most majestic and beautiful forest in the Limpopo region (the Thathe Vondo sacred forest excursion), followed by lunch at the Tshivhase Tea Estate. A Spirit Art Garden Cultural Art Exhibition Market will also be toured where guests will be sampling unique cultural products including local drinks, food and clothing. A boat cruise in the Nandnoni Dam and dinner “under the stars” at Kalahari Waterfront promises to be a memorable experience. This will all be topped with a VIP access pass to the popular Royal Heritage Festival where an exclusive TGE marquee will be set-up for the guests including refreshments and entertainment and local delicacies for lunch. This celebration of Limpopo cultural vibrancy and appreciation for the beautiful province also provides an exceptional opportunity to uplift the Venda community and build social cohesion through the various opportunities for the community. Visit www.golimpopo.com


NEWS

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11

AFRICA HALAL WEEK LAUNCHED

The inaugural Africa Halal Week was launched in August this year and is scheduled to take place from 15-17 October in Cape Town.

I

n early August the Western Cape Province, the City of Cape Town, Wesgro and other supporting partners officially announced the launch of the inaugural Africa Halal Week 2018, scheduled to take place between 15 -17 October. The event will foster business links and conversations, and highlight opportunities spanning across sectors such as tourism, trade, investment, banking, film and media promotion, fashion, cuisine and more. Key events include a Halal products and services exhibition with business matchmaking, export market

access seminars, a Modest Fashion Forum Market, a one-day investment conference, a tourism conference, and info on the Western Cape as a Muslimfriendly film and media destination. To date, 40 international buyers, CEOs and key opinion leaders operating in the global halal industry will be participating in Africa Halal Week. “We’ve grown the Halal Market by over R900-million since 2015,” Minister of Economic Opportunities, Alan Winde, said. “Under Project Khulisa, the Western Cape alone is responsible for exporting over R10-billion in Halal products. We look

African Halal Week launch. forward to nurturing this already lucrative market to see it expand even further within the province, creating much-needed jobs and boosting the Cape’s economy.”

SA EXPRESS

RESUMES FLIGHTS SA Express been cleared by authorities and can take to the skies again.

S

outh African Tourism CEO Sisa Ntshona has welcomed the news that SA Express has been cleared by authorities and can resume flights once again. The airline was temporarily grounded in May this year, but has since received all the necessary certificates in order to offer normal services. “This is good news for the tourism industry and for the business traveller,” says Ntshona. “SA Express provides domestic and regional air access routes, which is vital for the industry.” “We did feel the void when the airline was temporarily grounded, but

I am confident that the issues have been sorted out and that the airline will strive for excellence when it resumes its flights next week,” he added. SA Express connects Cape Town and Walvis Bay, Johannesburg and Walvis Bay, Johannesburg and Gaborone, and Johannesburg and Lubumbashi. It also offers flights between Cape Town and Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Hoedspruit, and Johannesburg and Kimberly. SA Express passengers are now able to book flights immediately on www.flyexpress.aero.

The airline was temporarily grounded in May this year, but has since received all the necessary certificates in order to offer normal services. This is good news for the tourism industry and for the business traveller.


THINK EASE.

THINK EFFICIENCY The reliable, futuristic Gautrain is connecting South Africa’s economic nucleus and guaranteeing that residents and visitors alike get wherever they need to go in style and on time.

P

icture the following scene: you’re fresh off the red-eye, and making your way through O.R. Tambo International Airport – the busiest airport in Africa, handling over 20 million passengers every year. You have to get to a meeting in Pretoria, or perhaps in another, distant part of Joburg. There’s very little time, and Gauteng’s traffic is notorious. Prior to the launch of the Gautrain in 2012, you would have been required to brave that traffic in a rental car or taxi cab. Since then, however, you would only need to head up an escalator, swipe your way through turnstiles using your pre-paid Gautrain card and board the futuristic-looking train before you. You’ll sit back on one of the large, comfortable seats and relax until

you arrive at your destination. The train from O.R. Tambo has three stops, where connecting trains can take passengers on to other destinations. The first of these stops at Marlboro and the second at Sandton; those heading to a meeting at the latter can travel directly to their end-point. If you are to disembark at Marlboro, you can travel on to Pretoria or head in the opposite direction (to Rosebank and Park). The service runs efficiently and with an appealing regularity; the Gautrain does not adhere to ‘Africa Time’. Trains depart at intervals of 10 minutes during peak hours and 20 minutes during off-peak times. On weekends and public holidays, passengers will have to wait 30 minutes in between departures. In order to ensure passengers’ comfort,

Gautrain has evolved past simply offering a rapid rail service. Comfortable busses also run to and from each of the stations (except O.R. Tambo), at intervals of 20 minutes at off-peak times and 12 minutes during rush hours. While these busses can be used independently of the train, visitors making use of both networks receive considerable discounts on ‘tagging in’ to the latter stations using their cards. The combination of quality bus and train services ensure visitors to Gauteng – especially those primarily focused on business rather than leisure – can do away with cars almost entirely, especially if they stay in a hotel that is close to the route. Aside from lowering the costs of one’s trip and decreasing one’s carbon footprint,


the Gautrain and attached busses offer a reliability that beloved ride-share services Uber and Taxify fail to deliver in Gauteng. In fact, when you order an Uber outside a Gautrain station, the app immediately tells you to go to a specific pick-up point – one that has been deemed ‘safe’ by drivers and the corporate – and which is usually a little way away from the station. These points have been selected to avoid intimidation from metered taxi cab drivers, who tend to position themselves at the pick-up points near the station itself. Uber’s woes in Gauteng started several years ago, when metered taxi cab drivers felt they were being threatened and priced out of the industry by the arrival of the rideshare application. Some felt the government had given preference to Uber and its newer competitor Taxify, over the established metered taxi firms. The metered taxi drivers responded with violence – and Uber and Taxify drivers retaliated. The war culminated in the death of 21-year-old Siyabonga Langelihle Ngcobo, earlier in 2018. While the above is undoubtedly a horrific tragedy, there are no easy solutions to the longstanding rivalry for visitors. Uber and Taxify offer cheaper solutions which are easy to track via the application. On the other hand, many Uber and Taxify have failed to obtain full operating licenses – traffic police impounded 190 such vehicles at Sandton and O.R. Tambo Gautrain stations – and are thus driving illegally. Metered taxis, being a more established industry,

Images courtesy of the Gautrain Management Agency generally have their licenses in order. For short visits, particularly of a business nature, relying fully on the Gautrain network (both bus and train), and overnighting close to the route can be a way to avoid delving into this prolonged local drama. At the end of the day, while the service is not very cheap – it costs around R50 to travel between stations on one route, and a little more if you’re heading to or from the airport – it offers reliability, safety and comfort. Additionally, when compared to car rental prices and taxi fares, the service is actually priced well. Locals have noticed this too. “Passenger demand for the Gautrain has exceeded projections, especially in the peak periods and has resulted in overcrowding and stifled

demand. It is therefore necessary to procure more trains and invest in the system so that these trains can run efficiently over the next 10 years,” said Ismail Vadi, the Gauteng MEC for Roads and Transport, during his budget vote in June 2018. As such, there are plans in place to expand the system quite dramatically in the next few years, and R1.9-billion of the budget has been allocated to ensuring this expansion takes place. So next time you land in O.R. Tambo, do not waste any of your precious time battling through to car rental stores or navigating the complex local politics of pick-up points. Rather journey up that escalator, swipe your Gautrain card, and travel to your hotel, meeting or appointment without any unnecessary worries occupying your mind.

Q ON FIRST

Q on First

LARGEST PLENARY

MEETING ROOMS

GUEST ROOMS

48

2

13

Q on First 1km from Rosebank Central just off Jan Smuts in Parktown North offer tailor-made conferencing in a relaxed atmosphere. Our Executive Boardroom caters for 8 delegates | The Bentley room caters for up to 48 delegates | Several breakaway rooms. Meals are catered for by our in-house chef, and we discuss your special needs meetings. Our return corporate clients loves our relaxed venue, and say this is good for productive meetings. t: +27 11 447 5767 e: stay@qonfirst.co.za www.qonfirst.co.za

AUDITORIUM

CINEMA STYLE

COCKTAIL STYLE

SCHOOLROOM

U-SHAPE

CLOSEST STATION: ROSEBANK


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FEATURE

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8 WAYS TO WIN A BID What are the key elements to include in a winning bid book? The Event investigates.

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any PCOs prefer to avoid bidding and tap into existing networks. In part, this may be due to the hassle attached to putting together a full bid; a bid book should be over 50 pages long! It can be intimidating to think through all of the elements required for such a document. While we have sought to unpack the process, unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to constructing a bid book. Still, certain aspects should be thought of, well in advance of the bid book being sent in. Below, we outline some of these key sections.

But it also pays to be bold; in 2013, the Cape Craft and Design Institute approached the Arterial Network directly for an endorsement letter to host the 3rd Creative Economy Conference and 4th Arterial Network Biennial Conference. Having secured this endorsement from the host organisation, and placed it strategically early in the bid book would naturally have given them a massive advantage over their competitors. In terms of designing this section, don’t try and get too funky: the letters should be

displayed on their original letterheads with signatures in place, to lend an air of gravitas.

Bid Application Document Naturally, no organising committee will look at your bid book unless it includes the information they requested. But while filling out an application form can seem procedural and boring, great bid books go beyond the expected, and provide supplementary information to prospective clients. For instance, where an application

Design & Layout

Starting a bid book off with endorsements from government and private alliances and organisations can greatly increase the credibility of your proposal. Demonstrating a willingness from government to support the event can influence organisers’ decisions.

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Endorsement Letters

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While this might seem entirely obvious to event organisers, first impressions matter – especially in the world of bid books. Ensure that your book’s design is clean and consistent. Source high-quality, high-resolution images to sell your services and your chosen destination. Ideally, you could include original imagery, but even high-quality stock photography can allow the organisers to envision your destination. Furthermore, ensure that your layout makes logical sense. A table of contents should clearly delineate where organisers can expect to find the various components of your bid book, but you can go beyond that and think of ways to improve the reader experience. For instance, while application documents often demand the inclusion of a budget and/or request detailed programme outlines, these can break up the flow of your narrative-driven bid book if placed directly after the applications. Instead, you can include them as Addenda, allowing the readers to flip towards them when it’s time.


FEATURE

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© Estee Janssens via Unsplash

The idea is that a reader should be able to perfectly picture the conference after reading your bid book – and any visual cues to assist that process are going to be appreciated.

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readers to visualise the way the conference will play out. If you’re asked to include a list of accommodation venues, mention the walking distances to and from the plenary venue or other key venues in the area. Where an answer requires a comprehensive document, rather than merely text or images, feel free to move that to a separate Addendum.

Location Map

document asks for details of past experiences, be daring and include written testimonials from past happy clients. State your career highlights and your experience across the businessevents industry – anything that might impress a potential committee. For example, if you have published articles, chapters or books on the businessevents sector, you can mention those. They might not be directly relevant, but clearly demonstrate that you are respected within your industry, and that you have the credibility to pull off an event of the scale required. Answers to motivation and experience questions should be at least a page, but preferably a little longer. They should cover both the key facts – including the endorsements secured, as discussed above – and exciting opportunities for

further developments. Don’t be afraid to mention the potential for investments or investors, and the ways this event can continue to resonate in the destination (and beyond) long after it has ended. Still, while it is useful to go big (within reason), be as specific as possible in providing comprehensive answers. If an application document requests a list of possible venues, give a rundown of every possibility in that area, and provide descriptions for any major option. Feel free to give extra details, such as founding date, design and architectural characteristics of the space or interesting historical details. For instance, if you’re proposing the Cape Town City Hall as a plenary venue, you might like to mention the fact that it was the venue for Nelson Mandela’s first speech after his release from prison! All this information allows

Including a map – which has been annotated or tagged to include key locations – can further assist visualisation. It might be wise to have several maps in the document: one for meeting venues, another for accommodation, and a final one for social and hospitality venues. It might be helpful to include images where possible as well, and feel free to give links to additional information about each place. After all, the idea is that a reader should be able to perfectly picture the conference after reading your bid book – and any visual cues to assist that process are going to be appreciated…

Programme Outline Provide a detailed provisional programme outline for the conference. Do not include “To be Confirmed” sessions – rather make confident decisions regarding what each day will include. Include a proposed time of day for plenaries, breakaways, workshops and social events. The programme does not have to include specific times for each event throughout the day (dividing it into morning, afternoon and evening should suffice).


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FEATURE

Budget Your preliminary budget should be as detailed as possible. As with the programme, the budget is not set in stone at this stage of the process, but demonstrating a functional understanding of how the finances of the conference will work is going to work in your favour. Include both proposed income sources (such as donations and registration fees – and again be specific, give your proposed registration fee break down) and estimated expenses. For a three-day conference, you should have around four pages of expenses! When it comes to detailing expenses, ensure that you have every day broken down into its various components. This ensures that a reader can see that you’ve linked your motivations and programme to the budget; it demonstrates to the reader that you are confident and competent. Try and give as many details and specifics as possible, so that the committee can see that you have thought this through. It might seem silly to include the cost of flipchart paper or the costs involved in stocking water coolers. But it is those minor details that can secure your bid! The motto for building your provisional budget should be that no expense is too small, and no source of proposed income is too big.

© Ezra Comeau via Unsplash

Give potential times for registration; times for registration can be specific in order to ensure accessibility and venues work for the conference. In all, the programme should paint a clear picture, so that any reader can picture the events that will happen on any given day. It is natural to expect changes as the programme is slowly filled out with keynote speakers, various other guests, and as the venues come together. Therefore, some of your proposed events could, effectively, still be in the “To Be Confirmed” stage of planning. If you mention hosting a Gala Dinner on the last night, but end up moving it to an earlier day after the planning gets going and venue can no longer accommodate that, nobody will cancel your contract! Having a programme filled with “To Be Confirmed” events, however, is likely to cause the committee not to take your bid seriously. It is vital to allow your readers to have a holistic understanding of what every day of your conference needs to include – to demonstrate that it fits their vision and needs.

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Lay the budget out into a standard financial table; do not try and format this section of your bid book in a narrative way (and this is one time when images are utterly irrelevant). Your budget should simply communicate all the aspects you’ve thought about when it came to picturing this conference – and inspire trust and confidence in the reader.

Location Motivation When it comes to motivating your location choice, there are plenty of things to consider. It is wise to include relevant quantitative rankings. These could be taken from the ICCA Rankings or the BestCities Partners Ranking. You could also look at the number of meetings and conferences hosted in the destination, and provide this information. This can demonstrate to the reader that the city knows how to handle itself when it comes to hosting business events. If you are bidding to host your event in a destination that isn’t widely acclaimed, gloss over the quantitative rankings, and focus on the pros in a narrative form. You can always find a couple of rankings that your destination did well in, and including these can show that you’ve done your research and that there are requisite facilities for hosting the event. Include widely spoken languages in this section. South Africa is appealing to international conferences due to how widely spoken English is; if your proposed venues can provide staff who speak other major languages, this is worth mentioning. You can also talk about climate, which greatly affects destination choice.

Accessibility to the destination can be mentioned here: does the destination have an international airport? If yes, provide a map that shows the destinations that fly direct to that part of the world. You can also add a table that shows all the flights and airlines servicing it. If no, what are the alternative arrangements that could be put in place? Give details and sell your location. Provide visa information for international delegates. On that same note, it is useful to include exchange rates to major currencies, and helpful to provide a basic table which includes the estimated costs of common consumables. Provide any other helpful, if basic, information. For instance, many international committees might have concerns around communicable and tropical diseases in Africa – put their minds at ease and provide hard facts. Internationals might also be concerned around safety in Africa. Again, provide facts that counter their perceptions and ensure they feel comfortable coming here. Finally, this is the section of your bid book where you can sell all the other appealing aspects of your proposed destination. What is it known for? What are the possible incentive trips and excursions that can happen in the area? What are some of the must-see tourist hotspots? You can provide maps of the region (not just of conferencerelated locations, as was discussed above) and additional images to ensure that your reader is utterly convinced that you are offering them the idyllic space for their event. This should be a lengthy section of your book; expect to fill 15 or so pages with information about and images of your proposed location.

Professional Destination Support South Africa, in particular, is a leader in conferencing. Include information about the convention bureaus and other support organisations. You can provide further information about alliances and the quality of venues and service providers in the destination. In conclusion, building a bid book is not an easy task. Break it down into small chunks, and tackle each oneby-one. At the end of the day, putting together a winning bid book can not only ensure a massive career boost, but provide your destination the opportunity to add to its knowledge economies.


JSE

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CONFERENCING IN STYLE The JSE She Invests Arena took place at the JSE in the heart of Sandton’s business hub on Saturday, 4 August 2018, accommodating 430 delegates and 123 exhibitors. Traditional African drummers welcomed guests and created excitement and energy leading into the full day conference.

JSE FACT FILE Venues • Atrium (includes bar and entertainment area – 180 pax) • Auditorium (145 pax) • Executive dining room (22 pax) • Meeting/breakaway rooms (20 pax each)

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he event ran from three areas within the JSE venue; the 145 fixed seated Auditorium, the Atrium and the open Foyer. The advanced technical capabilities of the venue permitted for live streaming of the programme between the Auditorium and Foyer, ensuring delegates did not miss a thing. The notable JSE Foyer and Atrium were turned into open exhibition areas with 3x3m stands for exhibitors to talk about their products and services, as well as lifestyle areas for some experiential marketers to treat delegates. Access to the venue’s high-speed wifi allowed for exhibitors to capture leads efficiently and delighted delegates, who easily shared their JSE She Invests

experience on social media. Guests could unwind in the Mowana Spa relaxation zone, have a craft beer from Sharpville Breweries or let loose and learn how to dance in a traditional African style. Waiters roamed the venue serving a delicious menu and beverages throughout the day, and the JSE registration desk was turned into a tempting wine bar to entice guests. Registration was smoothrunning, and parking was available on site for exhibitors, speakers and delegates who parked in the adjacent underground parkade. Overall, the event was a great success and well received by attendees. Book your event at the JSE and let us turn your vision into a reality.

Services • Set-up • Standard AV • Optional extras (wide range of tech) • Webinars • Road shows • Market opens • Videography • Value-added products (e.g. videos) for results presentations • Wallboard advertising • Free-standing touch screen • Catering Contact Tel: (011) 520 7131 Email: companyservices@jse.co.za Web: www.jse.co.za


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JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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RAND SHOW READY

FOR EVEN MORE EXHIBITORS FOR 2019 CELEBRATORY EVENT Over 90% of 2018 exhibitors will return for the 125th annual festival.

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he 2019 edition of the Rand Show is going to be the biggest in the event’s 125 year history, if exhibitor bookings are anything to go by. Space in the show’s revitalised halls is flying off the proverbial shelves, and 90% of 2018’s 260 exhibitors have already said that they’re coming back to Johannesburg’s most exciting lifestyle show. “Our sales team is already well ahead of their projections, thanks to an early bird special we’re offering. Many exhibitors have secured premium space and there are still great opportunities for brands that want to take advantage of this great platform,” says Craig Newman, CEO of the Johannesburg Expo Centre, which owns the rights to the Rand Show. Those who have already signed up reflect the show’s appeal to diverse exhibitors and visitors. Singer Sewing Machines, one of the Show’s longest-standing exhibitors, has already secured the premium space its customers from across the country expect it to have, while Gauteng Vehicle Auctioneers will bring some of the best deals for dads and anyone else looking for a new set of wheels. “Reconfiguring and updating the Rand Show’s halls has meant that we’ve got space for 400 exhibitors for the 125th anniversary edition of the event, which we are confident will attract even more

Updating the Rand Show’s halls has meant that we’ve got space for 400 exhibitors for the 125th anniversary edition of the event, which we are confident will attract even more visitors. visitors than the 200,000 who came to see, experience and shop at the 2018 show. We are planning a number of new, exciting events and activations for Rand Show 2019, which will be announced to consumers as they are confirmed,” Newman says. “We’ve done a lot a work to ensure that the Rand Show appeals to wider range of exhibitors and visitors, and is relevant to immediate trade and significant sales, rather than for awareness and brand building,” he says. Originally staged at the Old Wanderers Cricket Grounds in 1894 as an agricultural expo, the Rand Show has moved to several new venues and embraced various themes over the years to establish itself as a highlight on the social and commercial calendar in Johannesburg. “As we engage with visitors and exhibitors,

we will continue to refine and update the way we present the various experiences,” Newman says. “A streamlined layout will make it easier for visitors to engage in more fun and meaningful ways with each brand, so that trade is facilitated seamlessly.”

F For this and more on the world of events, stay tuned to: Facebook: @jhbexpocentre1 Twitter: @jhbexpocentre1 Website: expocentre.co.za


CONGRATULATIONS TO EVERYONE WHO MADE THE PECKING ORDER #Loeries2018 Visit loeries.com for the full list of #LOERIES2018winners.

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FEATURE

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AN EDUCATION IN EVENTS Natasha Skoryk investigates the kinds of qualifications South African events professionals require in order to succeed in the business-events industry.

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believe a broad based BComm qualification with focus on project management or small enterprise development would give you a very good start in the industry,” says JP Van Schalkwyk, a professional congress organiser (PCO) and owner of both Up a Tone Events and Loft at Nine. This is a standard view in the industry – that the broader an education and training, the better the person will be prepared for the always changing and often challenging industry. If a full BComm – Van Schalkwyk suggests one focused on tourism – won’t work for you, he suggests looking at colleges that offer shorter courses. But at the end of the day, many skills will only be learned on

the job. “Much of this industry can be learned with internships at various MICE enterprises as well as reading relevant blogs and articles,” adds Van Schalkwyk. Having a broad understanding of the industry is vital. “There are many aspects in the Event Management career and not everyone might want to specialise in all of them,” says Chris Prieto, of Chris Prieto, CMP Event Management & Consultancy. “However, the more specialised the better chances one has of succeeding in their career, taking into consideration the amount of people that have now decided to follow this path.” Still, it is hard to boil down what an event planner needs to know in a line or two. “A good Event Manager must

be knowledgeable about everything to do with the type of event that he or she wants to do,” says Prieto. That can include financial planning and financial management, as well as project planning and management. “If there is entertainment, he or she must be able to talk knowledgably about it; AV is important because there is rarely an event that doesn’t utilise some sort of equipment; F&B is essential; site management is important; decor is important; protocol and etiquette will often be needed at certain events; being able to deal with the clients, venue staff and suppliers in a smooth and professional way is very important, and so on.”

© Nesa By Makers via Unsplash


FEATURE

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© Maxime Bhm via Unsplash

A good Event Manager must be knowledgeable about everything to do with the type of event that he or she wants to do. If there is entertainment, he or she must be able to talk knowledgably about it; AV is important because there is rarely an event that doesn’t utilise some sort of equipment.

There is, naturally, no course that can teach that wide an array of skills to the requisite level required by clients, so learning is bound to continue happening on the job. Still, while this laissez-fair attitude to certification and method of training has sufficed in the past in South Africa, as the industry becomes increasingly globalised, it may be time to consider additional international accreditations. “Although many Event Managers are qualified and knowledgeable, they must realise that not everyone is 100% knowledgeable about all domains included in the CMP International Standards (CMP-IS),” says Prieto, who served as the regional representative in South Africa for the Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) certification. This qualification was created by the Convention Industry Council in America (known presently as the Events Industry Council – abbreviated as the EIC) in 1985. Its purpose was to standardise expectations from both event managers and their clients; it ensures professionals across the world

perform in a uniform, professional and credible way. “The CMP certification is recognised all over the world and CMPs are often chosen over other candidates when applying for jobs,” says Prieto. This is because it’s well known internationally, at least, that anyone certified as a CMP is highly experienced, knowledgeable and professional. And this translates directly to financial gain: “In recent salary surveys, it was established that CMPs earn up to 10% more than their non-certified colleagues.” Why is this accreditation so indemand by clients? Prieto explains: “To become a CMP you cannot just write the exam. The process is done in two parts; first the candidate must complete an application form that will check and ensure that the person is eligible (suitably qualified to take the exam) and only once the application is approved by the EIC the candidate can then book and write the exam.” This eligibility encompasses both experience and education – one cannot become a CMP fresh out of high school. It is a certification bequeathed upon experienced professionals.

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Eligibility Requirements for the CMP Exam To qualify to sit for the CMP, you must provide proof of both experience and education. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE – CHOOSE 1 OF 3 OPTIONS Option 1: 36 months of experience • Thirty-six (36) total months of full-time work experience in the meeting, event, exhibition, hospitality and tourism industry. The 36 months must have taken place in the past five years but they do not have to be consecutive months. • A resume or CV with your application. The experience you list on your resume should demonstrate meeting management responsibilities or your role in contributing to the planning, execution and results of meetings. Option 2: 24 months of experience and an industry degree • Associates’ degree (or higher) in the hospitality/tourism/ event management field. • A resume or CV with your application. The experience you list on your resume should demonstrate meeting management responsibilities or your role in contributing to the planning, execution and results of meetings. • Both the degree and the 24 months of experience must have taken place in the past five years but they do not have to be consecutive months. Option 3: 36 months as an educational instructor • Full-time instructor of meeting, event, exhibition, hospitality or tourism management at an educational institution or university programme. • 36 months of full-time experience in academia. • Official course outline and syllabus that proves full-time teaching at an educational institution or university programme.


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CONTINUING EDUCATION – CHOOSE 1 of 2 OPTIONS

Option 2: Industry Internship This option is typically used by those who have chosen Option 2 in the Experience section of the application. The internship must have • Taken place in the past five years. • Included a minimum of 200 hours of work experience with a professional organisation through an accredited educational institution or university. For more information visit www.eventscouncil.org

“The candidate has one year from the date of acceptance to book and write the exam,” Prieto continues. “The processes have deadlines that are strictly followed by the EIC. Exams take place during a 10-day testing period throughout the year and are administered by Prometric, EIC’s authorised testing agency which has testing centres all over the world.” Studying for the exam is a process in and of itself. “Anyone wanting to become a CMP must show determination and preparing for the exam takes time and commitment,” warns Prieto. “The first step to be properly prepared for the exam is to download the CMP-IS and go through it to see in which areas the candidate is weaker and then concentrate on studying those areas. The other advantage of downloading the CMP-IS is that there you will find the weight of the different domains and the percentage each one will have on your exam. There are also online courses and webinars that can assist with the preparation for the exam. As part of your study kit you will be issued with handbooks from which most exam questions originate.” In short, while the tools are all easily available, one must not underestimate the importance of preparation – even from the most experienced of professionals. Passing the exam does not guarantee a lifetime membership to the exclusive

© Logan Isbell via Unsplash

Option 1: 25 clock hours of educational activities • Completed in the past five years. • Face-to-face conferences, webinars (both live and on-demand), classes and individual sessions. • Learning objectives must relate to one of the 9 domains in the CMP International Standards (CMP-IS), but it is not required that you have education activities in all 9 domain areas. • Effective January 1, 2016, continuing education requirements for the CMP exam have been modified. Of the 25 clock hours needed for eligibility, 20% (5 hours) may be non-industry-specific general education IF the learning objective of the activity relates to one of the 9 domains in the CMP International Standards (e.g.,project management, marketing or financial management). • Non-industry-specific continuing education must be reported on the application on a session-bysession basis and appropriate session description and documentation of attendance uploaded as outlined in the CMP Certification Handbook. • Unless pre-approved through the Preferred Provider Programme, all continuing education is reported on a session-bysession basis and documentation uploaded as outlined in the CMP Certification Handbook.

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No matter how small your event might be or how little budget your client might have, always treat it like the most important one! Your small client of today might become your biggest bread winner of tomorrow!

club. “A CMP has to be re-certified every five years. In order to re-certify, the CMP must have a minimum of clock hours as well as other requirements,” says Prieto. “Clock hours have replaced what were formally known as Continued Education Units (CEUs) and are basically the direct amount of hours that the candidate has spent attending sessions and must have in order to be eligible to write the exam or to re-certify.” To attain re-certification, the candidate might be required to produce evidence of a particular number of years of


FEATURE

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23 © Baim Hanif via Unsplash

experience in the industry plus additional clock hours. “These clock hours can be obtained in various ways, like education, written papers, and so forth, which all have to be certified in accordance with the different domains of the CMP-IS.” Even if you are not actively pursuing CMP certification – though, as Prieto points out, there are clear benefits to it – continuing professional development is crucial for a successful career. “I try to submerge myself in the industry as much as possible. There are many workshops,

site visits and trade shows that you can attend,” says Van Schalkwyk. He has not chosen to pursue CMP certification, although he has heard about the process. “Depending on what area you work in the MICE industry there might be some value in it but I don’t see the use for it as a PCO. I think your reputation and history carries much more weight,” he says. Clearly, though, that does not mean giving up on growing and learning within the industry. What other advice does Van Schalkwyk have for burgeoning PCOs?

© Green Chameleon via Unsplash

© Raw Pixel via Unsplash

“I personally believe that relationships is the best way to help you in any career,” he says. “You can aid this buy doing some life courses, improving your vocabulary, writing and professional curtesy. Doing courses that aid you in speaking in front of people will help you sell your services and make your sales better in the future. Educating yourself on how to work with people will sometimes be more beneficial then another degree or diploma.” In many ways, Prieto also reiterates this idea. “Remember that this industry is all about reputation, so do not ever allow anything to compromise your reputation,” she says. What advice does she have for event managers who are just starting out? “My advice is that no matter how small your event might be or how little budget your client might have, always treat it like the most important one! Your small client of today might become your biggest bread winner of tomorrow! Be passionate about what you do. If you don’t feel the passion, don’t do it! And keep yourself up to date with the industry. There are new things being created and happening every day and make sure that you know about them! Be ethical in your entire events value chain and treat everybody with equal respect.” At the end of the day, a CMP certification may bolster your income and bring in new international clients – but “people skills” and a commitment to one’s reputation are what will maintain them going forward.


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BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

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Protea Hotel Kruger Gate Pool © Hamish Niven Photography

Protea Hotel Kruger Gate Outdoor Dining Area

KRUGER PARK Why not expertly combine incentive travel with your next meeting or business event, by hosting it in the Kruger National Park?

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he Kruger National Park covers a massive area, of around 19 485km2, and spans two provinces. The South African National Parks (SANParks) adopted an explicit commercialisation strategy in 2001, and since then have launched a number of conferencing venues within the borders of its various reserves. In the Kruger, there are seven SANParks managed venues. Additionally, a number of private lodges and hotels offer superb conferencing and meeting facilities. Whether you choose to host your event at one of the SANParks’ managed venues, or at a private facility, your delegates can expect an incomparable and wholly unforgettable experience – which is guaranteed to combine business with pleasure!

by road via the Paul Kruger Gate. The conference centre is marketed primarily to local business sector. The centre offers AV facilities, a translation booth, a PA system and branded conference pads and pens. www.sanparks.org/ parks/kruger/groups/conferences.php

Centre can cater for up to 300 seated delegates. The attached luxury guest house can accommodate 506 guests. Mopani is well-equipped, and offers excellent facilities – both in terms of business eventing and for accommodation purposes. It consists of one main hall and three breakaway rooms, which can be used in a range of configurations. www.sanparks.org/ parks/kruger/groups/conferences.php

Mopani Conference Centre Another conferencing centre managed by SANParks, Mopani Conference

Nombolo Mdhluli Conference Centre Venue

Theatre

U-Shape

Classroom

Banquet

Cocktail

Ndlopfu

750

250

500

560

600

Ingwe, Ndau, Mhelembe & Nari

80

30

32

60

80

Ingwe & Mhelembe

160

57

64

120

120

Ndau & Nari

160

57

64

96

160

Foyer

-

-

-

96

300

Key Venues Mopani Conference Centre

Nombolo Mdhluli Conference Centre Managed by SANParks, this state-of-theart facility consists of a main hall and four breakaway rooms. It is located in the heart of Skukuza rest camp and is accessible

Venue

Theatre

Classroom

U-Shape

Board Room

Banquet

Main Hall

300

118

50

-

150

Breakaway Room 1

21

12

6

8

-

Breakaway Room 2

30

16

10

8

-

Breakaway Room 3

45

16

10

18

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BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

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Protea Hotel Kruger Gate Venue

Theatre

Classroom

U-Shape

Reception

Banquet

Hubya

200

144

140

120

120

Bandla 1

72

45

27

50

32

Bandla 2

72

45

27

50

32

Bandla Combined

154

105

36

120

64

Exhibition Centre

220

200

57

180

130

Protea Hotel Kruger Gate Family Room © Chris Fourie-Lipman

Protea Hotel Kruger Gate The four-star Protea Hotel Kruger Gate offers three conference rooms than can seat up to 255 delegates. The hotel offers superb conferencing facilities – in the form of up-to-the-minute business and meeting equipment – as well as a range of in-house services, world-class catering, flexible arrangements, and one of the most beautiful settings in the world. www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/ mqpkg-protea-hotel-kruger-gate Ingwenyama Conference & Sport Resort Ingwenyama is situated outside the park itself, but within a short driving distance. It is a sought-after destination for those looking to escape city life, and is perfect for conferencing and incentive trips. Its conferencing facilities are excellent, and can accommodate anywhere between 15 and 1 000 delegates. Conference packages include a dedicated conference host, catering, AV equipment use, highspeed internet and access to the resort’s business services. www.ingwenyama.co.za

Currency and Exchange Rate South African Rands (ZAR)

US Dollar (USD)

Euro (EUR)

Chinese Yuan (CNY)

50

3.62

3.13

23.97

Disclaimer: These figures relate to June 2018, but are subject to change.

Incentive Travel Products The Kruger National Park is one of South Africa’s leading incentive destinations; offering incomparable opportunities to view wildlife. With over 147 species of mammal, the Park is home to more animals than any other on the continent. These include the famed Big 5. Guided safaris (both during the daytime and at night) and walking tours can be arranged. Birders will be kept occupied with specialised trails and hikes. Additionally, lodges in the area offer fantastic gourmet cuisine and spas – ensuring the wildlife incentive trip is capped off in style.

Climate The Kruger National Park is located in a summer (October to April) rainfall area. Though it rarely rains all day, visitors should expect afternoon thundershowers. Summers are hot and often balmy, with temperatures ranging between 18°C and 40°C, with the average around 32°C. Winters are warm and mild, with temperatures ranging between 10°C and 29°C.

Access The closest major airport to Kruger Park is Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport (MQP) in Mpumalanga. Connecting flights are available between here and O.R. Tambo International. There also commercial flights available to Hoedspruit (for the central and northern sections of the park) or Phalaborwa (for the northern section of the park). Chartered flights are available to Skukuza Airport inside the park and to some of the more upmarket lodges’ private airstrips. Alternatively, the drive from Johannesburg to Kruger National Park takes between 3½ and 4½ hours.

Contacts South Africa National Convention Bureau Headquarters: Bojanala House, 90 Protea Road, Chislehurston, Johannesburg Telephone: +27 11 895 3000 Email: travel@southafrica.net Website: www.southafrica. net/gl/en/business South African National Parks Headquarters: 643 Leyds Street, Muckleneuk, Pretoria Telephone: +27 12 426 5000 Email: traveltrade@sanparks.org Website: www.sanparks.org

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BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

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RWANDA Having been identified by government as a priority growth area, the MICE sector in Rwanda is booming. Here are some of the reasons to host your next business event in the “Land of a Thousand Hills”.

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ur conference tourism strategy is bearing fruit,” said Rwandan President Paul Kagame in his 2017 State of the Nation Address. Growing the business-event sector is a priority for the country, and the Rwanda Convention Bureau has been competently spearheading the development of this industry, and can provide invaluable support to burgeoning international organisers. Rwanda has hosted the following high-profile events in the last few years, such as the Youth Connect Africa in July 2017, Transform Africa Summit in May 2017, the African Nations Championship in January 2016, World Economic Forum on Africa in May 2016, 27th African Union Summit in July 2016, the Global African Investment Summit in September 2016, and the 84th Interpol General Assembly in November 2015. The infrastructure, clearly, is there and an attitude of service-delivery is as well. Moreover, Rwanda offers a moderate climate, a favourable exchange rate and plenty of incentive travel options.

Key Venues Kigali Convention Centre The leading, award-winning meetings and conferencing venue in the region, the KCC is a massive, state-of-the-art complex, adjacent to and managed by Radisson Blu Hotel. The convention centre has 18 venues which can accommodate up to 5 000 delegates, and six restaurants and bars on-site. Each venue features retractable walls, high ceilings and high-quality AV equipment. Catering is handled in-house and standards of professional excellence are adhered to. www.kigalicc.com

Kigali Convention Centre, courtesy of Rwanda Convention Bureau Hôtel des Mille Collines Venue

Theatre

U-Shape

Cocktail

Classroom

Kivu Ballroom

300

150

180

250

Kivu 1

100

60

80

80

Kivu 2

70

40

50

60

Karisimbi Meeting Room

25

16

20

22

Muhungwe Meeting Room

25

16

20

22

Venue

Theatre

Classroom

Banquet

Cocktail

Virunga

2 400

1 850

1 850

2 150

Kigali Conference and Exhibition Village

Akagera

2 200

1 500

1 500

1 750

Kivu

2 000

1 300

1 300

1 500

Urukari

200

200

200

280

Kigali

840

530

530

625

Hôtel des Mille Collines Arguably the most famous hotel in Rwanda – having featured in Hollywood movie Hotel Rwanda – this four-star hotel is situated Nyungwe Forest Chimpanzee


BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

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right in the heart of Kigali’s CBD, making it ideal for conferencing solutions. Its conferencing facilities are located on the top floor of the building, allowing for stunning views, and can accommodate up to 300 delegates theatre-style. Catering is handled in-house, and the hotel offers phenomenal technical equipment. www.millecollines.rw Kigali Conference and Exhibition Village This massive, tented event facility can cater up to 10 000 delegates at a time, with individual venues accommodating anywhere between 10 and 3 200 participants. It is located in the city centre, and has previously hosted the World Economic Forum on Africa. Lake Kivu Serena Hotel For a more unusual experience, consider the luxurious Lake Kivu Serena Hotel. Perched on the banks of this astonishing Great Lake, it offers conferencing and meeting solutions for groups of up to 200 delegates. The tech facilities are superb, with an interactive business centre, AV facilities and fast WiFi. The hotel also offers incentive packages through its in-house planning team and provides translation/ interpretation services if required. www.serenahotels.com/serenalakekivu

Incentive Travel Products Rwanda is the perfect destination for wildlife lovers; its famed Volcanoes National Park, is home to mountain gorillas, chimpanzees, colobus monkeys, giraffes, elephants and golden monkeys. In fact, the country is home to over 150 species of wildlife, and over 700 species of birds. However, the endangered mountain gorillas are arguably the country’s biggest draw-card, with tracking tours through the mountains readily available. The Volcanoes National Park is home to six active volcanoes, and three extinct ones – ensuring an unforgettable experience. Although Rwanda is land-locked, the shores of Lake Kivu (Africa’s sixthlargest lake) can be enjoyed by anyone looking for relaxing, water-based activities. Whether you’re looking to go on a boat tour, kayak, fish, or simply pay a round of beach volleyball in a scenic environment, Lake Kivu delivers. Finally, tea and coffee plantation tours are available. These offer beautiful vistas, while allowing for delicious tastings of the produce.

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Lake Kivu Serena Hotel Venue

Banquet

Theatre

Classroom

Boardroom

U-Shape

Hollow Square

Ballroom

100

200

120

60

60

80

Meeting-1

-

30

20

15

15

20

Meeting-2

-

30

20

16

15

20

Meeting-3

-

15

12

8

8

12

Climate

Access Rwanda’s biggest airport is Kigali International Airport (KGL). Additionally, there are a number of smaller airports in the Eastern, Northern, Eastern and Southern Provinces of Rwanda. These smaller airports can accommodate chartered flights. Commercial flights from Amsterdam, Brussels, Dubai, Gatwick and Istanbul – as well as from the major South African airports – regularly fly into Kigali.

Rwanda has a tropical climate, but due to its high altitudes, the temperatures tend to be more moderate than those of other equatorial countries. Temperatures in Kigali, for instance, range between 12 °C and 27 °C. There are two rainy seasons, accounting for annual rainfall of 1 000mm, separated by a short dry season characterised by sunshine and light clouds. The first rainy season is from January to April and the second from October to the middle of December.

The following airlines service KGL: • • • • • • • •

Brussels Airlines Coastal Aviation (charter) Ethiopian Airlines Kenyan Airways KLM Qatar Airways RwandAir Turkish Airlines

Contacts Rwanda Convention Bureau Head Office: KN 5 Rd, KG 9 Ave, Gishushu, Kigali, Rwanda Postal Office: P.O. Box 6239, Gisttustto, Kigali, Rwanda Telephone: +250 78 835 8454 Email: frank.murangwa@rdb.rw | ronald.ngabo@rdb.rw Website: www.rcb.rw

Currency and Exchange Rate Rwandan Franc (RWF)

South African Rands (ZAR)

US Dollar (USD)

Euro (EUR)

Chinese Yuan (CNY)

50

0.79

0.057

0.049

0.38

Disclaimer: These figures relate to June 2018, but are subject to change.

Rwanda Development Board Head Office: KN 5 Rd, KG 9 Ave, Gishushu, Kigali, Rwanda Telephone: +250 72 777 5170 Email: info@rdb.rw Website: www.rdb.rw

Kigali Convention Centre, courtesy of Rwanda Convention Bureau


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EVENTS TO DIARISE

SEPTEMBER SOWETO WINE AND LIFESTYLE FESTIVAL 1–2 SOWETO, SOUTH AFRICA

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CAPE WINE 12 – 14 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA AGRI MEGA WEEK 12 – 15 BREDASDORP, SOUTH AFRICA

FOOD AND DRINK TECHNOLOGY AFRICA 4–6 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

COMIC CON AFRICA 14 – 16 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

IBTM LATIN AMERICA 5–6 MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

IT&CM ASIA 18 – 20 BANGKOK, THAILAND

BUYABUSINESS EXPO 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

CTW ASIA PACIFIC 18 – 20 BANGKOK, THAILAND

SMALL BUSINESS EXPO 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

AFRICA AEROSPACE AND DEFENCE EXPO 19 – 23 CENTURION, SOUTH AFRICA

FNB JOBURG ART FAIR 6–9 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA ELECTRA MINING AFRICA 10 – 14 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA CAPE CONSTRUCTION 12 – 13 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SIGN AFRICA 12 – 14 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA FESPA AFRICA 12 – 14 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT EXPO AND CONVENTION 26 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA STANDARD BANK JOY OF JAZZ 27 – 29 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA HERMANUS WHALE FESTIVAL 28 – 30 HERMANUS, SOUTH AFRICA

OCTOBER FUTURE ENERGY AFRICA 1–3 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICAN PORTS EVOLUTION 2–3 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICAN RAIL EVOLUTION 2–3 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA HOTEL INVESTMENT FORUM 2–4 NAIROBI, KENYA FINANCE INDABA AFRICA 3–4 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA JEWELLEX AFRICA 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA EDUTECH AFRICA 9 – 10 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA ELITE SPORT SUMMIT 10 – 12 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SWAHILI INTERNATIONAL TOURISM EXPO 12 – 14 DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA ACTE GLOBAL SUMMIT 14 – 16 PARIS, FRANCE


EVENTS TO DIARISE

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WASTECON 15 – 19 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA IMEX AMERICA 16 – 18 LAS VEGAS, USA SUB SAHARAN AFRICA POWER SUMMIT 17 – 19 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW 19 – 21 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH AFRICAN EDUCATION RESEARCH ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE 22 – 24 PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA INFRASTRUCTURE AFRICA 24 – 25 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA RMB WINEX 24 – 26 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA FIBO BUSINESS SUMMIT SA 25 – 27 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA MAMAMAGIC THE BABY EXPO 26 – 28 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA WHISKY LIVE 31 – 2 NOVEMBER JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA UFI CONGRESS 31 – 3 NOVEMBER ST PETERSBURG, RUSSIA

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

SAPHEX 1–2 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

TANZANIA TRADE SHOW 1–3 DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA

AFRICA OIL WEEK 5–9 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

WORLD SME EXPO 1–3 HONG KONG

WINDABA 7–8 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF ENDOCRINOLOGY 1–4 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

ICCA CONGRESS 11 – 14 DUBAI, UAE AFRICACOM 13 – 15 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA MISSION CRITICAL TECHNOLOGIES AFRICA 13 – 15 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA DISCOP AFRICA 14 – 16 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA RUBBER EXPO AND SUMMIT 20 – 21 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICAN AGRI INVESTMENT AND TRADE INDABA 27 – 28 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA IBTM WORLD 27 – 29 BARCELONA, SPAIN CHENGDU INTERNATIONAL TOURISM EXPO 29 – 1 DECEMBER CHENGDU, CHINA

POWER GEN INTERNATIONAL 4–6 ORLANDO, USA AL ANSAAR SOUK AND TRADE FAIR 21 – 1 JANUARY DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA

Photo by Jens Thekkeveettil on Unsplash

AFRICA HALAL WEEK 15 – 17 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

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ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

EXHIBITION INDUSTRY REPORTS SYNCHRONISED GROWTH GLOBALLY UFI, the Global Association for the Exhibition Industry, has released the latest edition of its flagship Global Barometer research. One of the key findings is that for the first time in the past ten years, all four global regions have reported a positive turnover development simultaneously. In terms of operating profit, most companies maintained a good level of performance in 2017, and more than 40% of companies from all regions declared an increase of more than 10% compared to 2016. However, the prospects for 2018 are currently lower globally. Results also indicate that the top business issue for the industry remains the “state of the national/regional economy” (listed by 24% of all respondents), ahead of “competition within the industry” and “global economic developments” (listed by 18% of each respondents). For the second year running, the barometer included a section focusing on the state of digital conversion in the industry. The headline “Digitisation Implementation Index – DIX” has moved slightly up to +32 (up +1 from last year). “We are pleased to see that the growth for 2018, anticipated 6 months ago, appears to be confirmed, and that this is the case in all regions of the world; at the same time, geopolitical uncertainty and specific industry shifts lead to cautious expectations in terms of profits,” says Kai Hattendorf, UFI Managing Director / CEO. To read the full report, visit www.ufi.org.

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Rudi Van Der Vyver Chief Executive Officer at SAACI

COLLABORATE, LEARN AND GROW WITH SAACI Collaboration, learning and growth are SAACI’s new focus areas, and when we say new, can you believe it’s been almost a year since we started with the implementation of our new member centric strategy? In terms of collaboration, SAACI works closely with international organisations and associations. We collaborate with these associations to provide more value to our members through knowledge and best practice sharing, as well as to encourage greater market access for our members. SAACI also represents South Africa on the recently established BRICS MICE Forum.

With a strong focus on learning, the SAACI Online Academy continues to grow, with an ever-increasing number of registered users and active students, and 59 courses available. More face-to-face training will also be introduced as it is clear that there is a need for increased communication with the youth. SAACI will also support three organisers to complete their Certified Meeting Professional exams to obtain this internationally recognised designation. Professionalisation is the key focus in terms of growing the industry. SAACI is constantly looking at new valueadds for members, such as negotiating airline and car rental discounts for event delegates. These value-adds are in addition to core member benefits and we strive to create more value for our members on a daily basis.


ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

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The Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) announced the appointment of Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa as interim Chief Executive Officer in mid-August. “We are pleased to have Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa on board. Whilst the process of appointing a permanent head for the organisation continues, we believed it was important for the business council to have someone of his calibre to continue steering the ship in the direction required by the new board,” says Blacky Komani, TBCSA Board Chairman. Tshivhengwa is currently CEO of the Federated Hospitality Association of Southern Africa (FEDHASA). The business council has entered into an agreement with FEDHASA which allows him to, in addition to his current role; take up the position of TBCSA interim CEO. His critical function within the TBCSA will be to oversee its day to day operations and assist the business council to assume its leadership role in the travel and tourism sector. He has previously worked for companies like South African Tourism, Myriad Marketing, Protours, SARS, and HRG Rennies Travel. In addition to the TBCSA Board, Tshivhengwa is a board member of the Tourism BBBEE Charter Council; and he is a former board member of the Tourism Grading Council.

Leatitia van Straten Chairperson of AAXO Marketing expert Leatitia van Straten has been elected as the new Chairperson of the Association of African Exhibition Organisers (AAXO). Van Straten, who has served as Marketing Director at Terrapinn and is now Marketing Director of Specialised Exhibitions Montgomery, was instrumental in founding AAXO and sat on its Board of Directors since its inception. She has been listed on the International Who’s Who multiple times as an expert in her field, and has been recognised as one of the Top 40 Women in the MICE industry. She notes that AAXO is growing well and delivering on its original goals of conducting thorough industry research, growing its pan-African representation and serving both as a voice of the exhibition industry and a barometer of its standards.

ICCA MEMBERS LEARN INTRICACIES OF GLOBAL BIDDING Leading global meetings industry suppliers gathered at ICCA’s Global Bidding Workshop on 17 July 2018 at World Meetings Forum Vidanta – Riviera Nayarit 2018, Mexico, to discuss the best practices of bidding for international association meetings, using Houston’s successful bid for the 2019 ICCA Congress as the basis for discussion. The interactive session aimed to highlight the difference between “best practices” and “fatal flaws” in the international association meetings’ bidding process through real-life case studies. ICCA encourages its members to share knowledge about international association meetings because of their cyclical nature; as association meetings rarely return to the same destination within a short timeframe. Joanne Joham CMP, CMM, Regional Director North America, said: “In support of member requests, the North American ICCA Chapter is pleased to have had the opportunity to offer tips on bidding intelligence to all ICCA Members attending World Meetings Forum 2018. The interest and excitement we created was phenomenal, and we are sure to repeat such offerings in the future. “ICCA sees our 2019 Congress as a bridge to extending our network and influence on the North American continent. More and more activities in the U.S.A. are planned in the runup to our 58 th Congress, including our involvement in IMEX America in Las Vegas this October.”

Photo by Geran de Klerk on Unsplash

TBCSA APPOINTS INTERIM CEO

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The Event Issue 09  

Issue 9 of the Event is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we explore eight ways to win a bid, what South Africa is doing to p...

The Event Issue 09  

Issue 9 of the Event is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we explore eight ways to win a bid, what South Africa is doing to p...

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