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Issue 04 | 2018 VEL D TRA A WORLET AFRIC MARK IMEXURT KF FRAN

+EXHIBITION + EXHIBITION ORGANISERS Changing Roles and Shifting Expectations

+CASINO + CASINO CONFERENCING Experiential Events You Can Bet On


DISCOVER THE POWER OF THE ASIAN TRAVEL MARKET

Asia’s Leading Travel Trade Show

17 - 19 October 2018 Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

SECURE YOUR BOOTH AT ITB ASIA 2018 Join Asia’s Leading Travel Trade Show with 940 Exhibitor from 113 countries, 951 Buyers from MICE, Corporate and Leisure and more than 11,000 attendees. For more information, please visit www.itb-asia.com

Supported by:

Held in:

Official Partner Hotel:

Organised By:


CONTENTS

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02.

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Register Now for Africa’s Travel Indaba

04.

10 Tips for Hosting Extraordinary Event

THE ROLE OF EXHIBITION ORGANISERS The role of exhibition and business-event organisers is an ever-evolving one,

05.

Wine Tourism Sees Tremendous Growth

and is influenced by multiple industry trends.

10.

The Changing Role of Exhibition Organisers

14.

The Norval Foundation: For Events That Leave a Legacy

THE NORVAL FOUNDATION The Norval Foundation is a new centre for art and cultural expression, yet is

16.

Casino Conferencing: Take a Spin

far more than a museum, and far more than a mere events venue.

20.

Innovate for Inclusion: The Differently Abled and Events

23.

Event Décor: Are You On Trend?

CASINO CONFERENCING Hosting your next business event in a casino setting has multiple pay-offs.

28.

Business Events Made Easy: Free State

Susan Reynard reports.

30.

Zambia: Ever-Growing Popularity For Events

INNOVATE FOR INCLUSION Including the “disabled” into society as a whole should be the norm, not the exception.

32.

Events to Diarise

34.

Associations News

36.

Directory of Advertisers


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SPOTLIGHT

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TELL THE STORY OF

AFRICAN SUCCESS Africa’s Travel Indaba is one of the largest tourism marketing events on the African calendar and one of the top three ‘must visit’ events of its kind on the global calendar.

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t showcases the widest variety of Southern Africa’s best tourism products and attracts international buyers and media from across the world. Africa’s Travel Indaba is owned by South African Tourism and organised by Synergy Business Events (Pty) Ltd.

• • • •

Show Dates 7 May 2018: 08h00 - 18h00 (Exhibitors Only) 8 May 2018: 10h00 - 18h00 9 May 2018: 10h00 - 18h00 10 May 2018: 10h00 - 17h30

Why Buyers attend Africa’s Travel Indaba • •

It is Africa’s top travel and tourism exhibition in the Southern Hemisphere. Keep abreast of global trends and new developments within the tourism and travel industry.

Meet industry stakeholders and decision makers face to face Conduct business with new and existing clients. Gain competitive advantage with a view to becoming market leaders. Meet with over 1 200 exhibitors from a diverse range of destinations and industry sectors. Opportunity to network with key decision makers and stakeholders on an exciting and informative platform.

Exhibiting - The Facts Before submitting your application, please take some time to familiarise yourself with the following: • Criteria to Exhibit are set by South African Tourism to ensure that products showcased at the exhibition are of the highest quality and broadly representative.

Indaba 2017 © SA Tourism, JP Crouch Photography

If you are considering sharing your space with other complimentary products, be sure to read through Managing Sharing Exhibitors. It is the responsibility of main stand holder to ensure that all requirements are met for those products on their stand. Rates Schedule and Options available – we have some exciting booth options for Africa’s Travel Indaba in order to maximise your participation. Floor Plans - the floor plans are available for you to view and accept your stand placement upon confirmation of exhibitor applications. In order to maximize your participation, please clearly specify your stand request on your application.

Registering for Your Own Stand Your application to exhibit at Africa’s Travel Indaba is made up of five areas: • Company and Contact Details – basic company information for all future communications • Invoice Details – invoicing contact and payment deadlines. • Stand Requirements – size, dimensions, location, and optional (excl. 9m² stands) shell scheme package. • This is used as a guide when placing exhibitors as requested space at Africa’s Travel Indaba is not always guaranteed. • Participation Information – this is required to support your application and submission to exhibit. • Comments – address your concerns or requests to the Organisers or the Selection committee. To register as an exhibitor, visit: www.indaba-southafrica.co.za/exhibitor


JSE

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BOOK YOUR NEXT BUSINESS EVENT AT THE JSE Companies don’t have to be listed to enjoy the excitement of a market open or utilise the venues at the Johannesburg Stock Exchange.

FACT FILE Venues • Atrium (includes bar and entertainment area) (180 pax) • Auditorium (145 pax) • Executive dining room (22 pax) • Meeting/breakaway rooms (20 pax each)

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nsys Limited (share code: ANS) celebrated its tenth anniversary as an AltX listed company on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) in June 2017 with a market open event. The company, also marking its 30th birthday milestone and a set of solid annual results filled the foyer of the JSE fora business breakfast and countdown to 9am when trading officially starts. Board members, executive committee and partners gathered on stage to blow the ceremonial kudu horn and vuvuzela, beat the drum and play the marimba as its staff and supporters cheered. A fresh breakfast was served and the annual results were presented in the adjoining auditorium. A symbolic market open like this may be celebrated every working day, offering a great opportunity for listed companies as well as businesses in general, including non-profit organisations, to shine the spotlight on commerce, says Carol Crozier, manager of Company Services in the Capital Markets division of the JSE. The JSE has a number of venues and services that are available for hire, creating business awareness and promoting South African investment. A total of 500 pax can be accommodated across the JSE’s venues for hire, located in a single building in the heart of the Sandton financial node. Parking is available on site

for a limited number of VIPs as well as in the adjacent underground parkade. Venue hire is competitively priced and a variety of optional extras, from equipment to services, additional venues to training, may be incorporated into special packages. Studios on site – SABC and PowerFM – plus a range of gathering areas, digital signage, media and breakaway rooms, an executive dining room and auditorium have the latest technical features that were part of a major renovation. Some of the companies that have utilised the space have live webstreamed their results around the world, thanks to the fast broadband Internet speeds and equipment on hand. In addition to the infrastructure, cabling and technologically advanced equipment, the venue has an onsite sound engineer and technicians to ensure everything runs smoothly. The eventing team takes care of client relations and are familiar with all of the necessary security and political protocol required when hosting high ranking government officials and dignitaries. A preferred caterer adds the finishing culinary touches. Events range from business meetings, executive lunches, smart awards functions and market openings. The JSE Training Academy offers a range of short courses for businesses keen to learn more about requirements for

Services • Set-up • Standard AV • Optional extras (wide range of tech) • Webinars • Road shows • Market opens • Videography • Value-added products (e.g. videos) for results presentations • Wallboard advertising • Free-standing touch screen • Catering Contact Tel: (011) 520 7131 | www.jse.co.za

listing as well as investor relations training, insights and collateral development, media training, roadshows, and analyst research report hosting. “This really is a one-stop shop and we offer a different dynamic – we’re not a convention centre or hotel and the JSE touch points we offer for events informs the experience.”


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JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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CRAIG’S LIST:

TIPS FOR HOSTING EXTRAORDINARY EVENTS Whether you’re an organiser or exhibitor, these tips will ensure nothing but a memorable experience.

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he Johannesburg Expo Centre (JEC) is one of the largest events venues Africa has to offer, and it’s only fitting that during the month of April it is home to one of the most popular consumer exhibitions in South Africa, The Rand Show! With a legacy dating back over 123 years, The Rand Show remains an iconic experience for both exhibitors and visitors alike with its family-friendly dynamic, a variety of entertainment for all ages and exhibitions that cater to every possible need and interest. With the highly proclaimed attributes of the Johannesburg Expo Centre and the ongoing success of the Rand Show in mind, here are our top 10 tips for hosting extraordinary events.

safety measures. When hosting or exhibiting at an event, your guests safety should be a top priority.

4. Know your target audience Who is your event or exhibition trying to reach? If you are interested in exhibiting your product at the Rand Show for example, it is important to know that 78% of the demographic is families. Always keep your target market in mind when choosing an event to join or venue to host at.

5. Personally interact with audience The Rand Show gives you the opportunity to interact with over 200 000 potential customers. But it’s up to you to make and leave a lasting impression!

1. Location, location, location

6. Stand out

Whether you’re organising an event at the JEC, or exhibiting your company at the Rand Show, selecting the right location is so important! You have to ensure that the size, environment and location of the venue is suitable for your events attendees. The JEC is situated in a central area that is easily accessed by most major highways and is a world class venue that is able to cater for 12 to 20 000 people, and is suitable for any event.

What can you do to differentiate yourself from your competitors? To ensure your exhibition or event is successful you need to stand out. Offer special demos, entertainment, and refreshments - even the smallest details will make a difference to your audience, so be sure to go above and beyond. The JEC Centre has facilities that will cater to every possible idea you may have so don’t hold back.

2. Plan ahead

How will anyone know about you or your exhibition if you don’t market yourself to your audience? The JEC goes a long way in marketing events for you but there’s no such thing as too much advertising. Think of creative ways to capture the attention of your audience both before and on the day of the event. This will ensure that you create an experience that will be remembered.

The JEC does its best to ensure nothing goes wrong during an event, but a little planning beforehand goes a long way. Be prepared for the unexpected so nothing will get in the way of the success of your event.

3. Safety first The JEC is fully equipped with all

7. Don’t forget to market

8. Relevancy is key Make sure you are offering products and services that are relevant to over 80% of your audience. Know what your audience is looking for and deliver exactly that. Pay attention to trends and align your event accordingly.

9. Attitude is contagious The Rand Show has its own personality and so should your event! Your guests will surely have more fun if you are! Create a comfortable environment, lead by example and have a good time. Your guests will thank you.

10. Enjoy the experience After all the effort you’ve put into planning and executing your event, don’t forget to take a moment and enjoy your memorable experience at the JEC. The JEC is South Africa’s largest purposebuilt exhibition, conference, convention and events venue and is one of Johannesburg’s best-known landmarks. The Centre is owned by the UK-based Montgomery Group, black economic empowerment consortium Fluxrab (led by Andrew Mthembu), local entrepreneur Raymond Burke and Craig Newman as CEO. Tel: 011 494 1920 Email: Marketing@expocentre.co.za Website: www.expocentre.co.za


SPOTLIGHT

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NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT WINE TOURISM IN THE WESTERN CAPE HAS GROWN BY 16%

© SA Tourism

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n 2017, Wesgro, in partnership with Explore Sideways, conducted the second annual Wine & Food Tourism Study in the Western Cape. The study surveyed more than 40 South African tour operators, accounting for over 19 000 itineraries booked over the year. The study aims to determine sector trends and identify changing market conditions in the wine tourism industry in South Africa. Key findings from the respondent’s answers show that wine tourism in the Western Cape has grown by 16% between 2016 and 2017. This is further evidenced by tour operators indicating that 99% of Cape Town-based itineraries include a trip to the Winelands. Wesgro CEO, Tim Harris said: “There is a multitude of factors that have influenced the awareness of South Africa as a wine tourism destination. Positive media coverage and internationally recognized wine awards have generated interest and investment in the evolving local wine industry. Specialist wine tour companies have done much in the way of showcasing boutique, off-the-beaten-

track wine producers and properties, further enhancing the perception of quality and promoting the Winelands as an essential stop on itineraries.” Spending patterns of wine tourists, in particular, indicate higher than average expenditure than general tourists while visiting the Western Cape. This illustrates another important aspect of wine tourism as a means of enhancing economic growth through tourism in the Western Cape. Respondents indicated that offering tailor-made tours was the most important aspect of selecting a wine tour, allowing tourists to immerse themselves in authentic experiences rather than scheduled or packaged tours. This is further supported by the growing interest in unique activities like food and wine pairings (68%), cellar tours (54%), meeting the winemaker (51%) and food and wine tasting events (49%). Harris added: “While established wine destinations like Stellenbosch, Franschhoek, and Constantia remain the most popular with visitors, there was a 43% increase in requests for the Hermanus

(Hemel-en-Aarde Valley) wine route between 2016 and 2017, thereby surpassing Paarl as the 4th most popular wine route. Other wine routes like the Swartland, Helderberg, and Robertson Valley also experienced significant increases.” Sustainability plays a growing role in the wine industry, evidenced by the fact that 85% of wine tourists feel that sustainability is important when making bookings. Practices like organic farming, social equality, carbon neutrality as well as biodynamic winemaking and farming practices are important considerations for wine tourists when booking their trip. Western Cape Minister of Economic Opportunities, Alan Winde, added: “Growing wine tourism is one of the key goals we set ourselves through Project Khulisa, our focused economic strategy to grow the economy and create jobs in our province. The growth we are able to report today shows that we are on track in delivering on our objective. This is an important sector because it creates jobs for locals in both urban and more rural areas by driving the regional spread of tourists. The success we are seeing is as a result of the excellent service and unique experiences we offer, driving visitors to return for more.” A report on this annual study is available for use by members of the food, wine, hospitality and tourism industries and for members of the general public. The report goes a long way to enhancing the understanding of the relevant industries and aims to enhance and improve the quality of experience that tourists receive when visiting South Africa. The report can be obtained by contacting Explore Sideways at info@exploresideways.com.


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JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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THE LOGISTICAL CHALLENGES OF HOSTING THE RAND SHOW AND HOW TO PULL IT OFF SEAMLESSLY

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he Rand Show is a truly iconic multi-faceted consumer expo that focuses on introducing the public of South Africa to the incredible businesses, products and services that are available to them. It is a way for businesses to interact, face-to-face, with over 200 000 potential customers with anything from sports and lifestyle to outdoor and so much more! But what makes the Rand Show such an extraordinarily successful event for both exhibitors and visitors? The show’s success lies in the level of detailed planning and organisation that happens behind-the-scenes to ensure that every single individual at the event is offered a world-class experience.

1. Ticket sales

2. Parking

Before the event even begins, a seamless ticketing system needs to be put in place. The Rand Show offers convenient online purchasing of tickets for customers at competitive prices. There’s a reason why the Rand Show is one of South Africa’s largest consumer exhibitions!

Starting at the very beginning. With the execution of any large-scale event, parking management is a challenge. The Rand Show is dedicated to providing its clients with an efficient and convenient parking experience, providing enough safe, easily located parking spaces to ensure the event is effortlessly accessed at all times.

The show’s success lies in the level of detailed planning and organisation that happens behind the scenes to ensure that every single individual at the event is offered a world-class experience.


JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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3. Security Optimal security at any event is a challenge especially when the event is as complex as the Rand Show. The Rand Show focuses every effort to provide world-class security for a wide range of potential factors! We offer our clients a safe and secure experience throughout the venue, from allocated parking areas, to the gates and into the event.

4. Vendor placement and organisation In order to ensure the success of each and every business that exhibits at the Rand Show, it is vital for a systematic plan to be created to place all vendors in an optical location that will ensure they reach their desired target audience with

ease. The Rand Show has therefore been streamlined into categories. Visitors can enjoy a sports expo, kids expo, lifestyle expo, flower expo and so much more.

to overcome all logistic challenges that will impact the experience of our clients! Join us this year for an unforgettable experience.

5. Staff

Find out more about The Rand Show and all its offerings: Tel: 011 494 2894 Email: bella@randshow.co.za Website: www.randshow.co.za

Whether an event is successful or not relies heavily on behind-the-scenes strategies that are executed by staff. The Rand Show has spared no effort to hire only the best staff to handle any needs that may arise from our visitors and exhibitors. From medical staff to sanitation staff and security, our staff are the best at what they do and are guaranteed to help at all times with a smile. The Rand Show goes out of its way to plan and execute excellent strategies

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WTM AFRICA

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10 EXTRAORDINARY REASONS TO ATTEND WTM AFRICA

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TM Africa is a vibrant, culturally diverse, mustattend business-to-business travel and tourism event, with a diverse range of destinations and industry sectors to African and international travel professionals. Join travel professionals from 70 countries and regions over three days in Cape Town, South Africa. WTM Africa is an international event providing a platform to showcase your products to serious buyers. We know that you don’t need too many reasons to spend a week in glorious Cape Town, but just in case WTM Africa have put together their 10 reasons why you absolutely need to attend this extraordinary three-day show in Cape Town from 18 - 20 April 2018: 1. Make the right contacts – WTM Africa is the meeting place for the African travel industry and in 2017 we facilitated 8 905 pre-scheduled meetings and an incredible amount of US$-365 950 813 business!

2. WTM Africa 2018 focuses on both inbound and outbound travel within Africa, offering attendees a comprehensive exhibition that brings together both aspects of the travel industry. 3. WTM Africa 2018 takes place in Cape Town in April. Through research conducted with stakeholders within the travel sector, this is the best time in the annual buying cycle for both buyers searching for new and exciting products to offer their clients. 4. Through our Buyer Insights Programme, we are able to assist exhibitors in both presenting and positioning their products to international and local buyers. 5. A host of international speakers from across the globe will focus on pertinent topics and travel trends affecting the modern travel industry. 6. FESTIVALS! WTM Africa festivals give everyone the opportunity to socialise after the traditional working hours in a fun and vibrant atmosphere. Those

attending will experience the culture, hospitality and cuisine with each hosting exhibitor offering something unique. Relax and experience different food and drink from 4:30pm on Wednesday 18 April. 7. Attendees can enjoy a world-class diary system with the functionality to request meetings with fellow exhibitors and the ability to block out times in the diary. 8. Trending bolt-on events with international and local speakers: • Business Events Conference brought to you by IBTM Africa • Women in Travel Meet Up • Sports and Events Tourism Exchange (SETE) • Digital Tourism Summit in partnership with eTourism Frontiers – ETAS 9. Local and international digital influencers will be on hand to help you learn more about how to further your marketing objectives through online platforms and partnerships. 10. The world-renowned WTM Buyers’ Club will once again form a core part of WTM Africa. Buyers’ Club members have purchasing power and are primarily tour operators, travel agents, wholesalers and private travel arrangers with a reputation for generating business. Travel Professionals in both the outbound and inbound tourism sectors are encouraged to join us at WTM Africa in Cape Town this year. To make sure you don’t miss out, register to attend on africa.wtm.com today!


BUFFALO CITY

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East London beach front.

BUFFALO CITY

A SERIOUS CONTENDER

No longer content with its perennial status as South Africa’s best-kept secret, Buffalo City has recently been positioning itself as a serious contender in the conferencing market.

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ouch down in balmy Buffalo City and you’ll immediately be struck by our warm and friendly welcome, by the wealth of our diversity and by the unique richness of our spectacular natural landscapes. With all the creature comforts of a modern metropole coupled with uncrowded, sun-baked beaches and a wide range of leisure pursuits, Buffalo City is a destination that offers a multitude of attractions for visitors of all ages. As the geographical hub of the Eastern Cape, Buffalo City is the gateway to the laid-back Sunshine Coast to the west and the awe-inspiring and rugged beauty of the Wild Coast to the east, as well as a hinterland blessed with iconic mountain retreats and hidden gems of nature. Located in a province of unparalleled historical significance as the frontier of conflict between colonial expansion and indigenous resistance, the region claims, with justified pride, the badge of home to South Africa’s centuries-long struggle for freedom, equality and human dignity. At the heart of the Adventure Province, Buffalo City offers you the best of all worlds.

Located no more than 80 minutes’ flight from South Africa’s major cities, the city is well located geographically to take advantage of its central and coastal location. Having always been well-serviced in catering for groups of between 20 and 400, the city upped its game in 2009 with the opening of the world-class East London International Convention Centre (ELICC), a state-of-the-art facility that is able to host more than 2 000 delegates for conventions or trade shows. Located a mere 15 minutes from the city’s newly-refurbished airport, the ELICC boasts the unique distinction of being the first convention centre of its kind in South Africa to be located adjacent to the sea-front, with views of large pods of resident dolphins or seasonal sightings of whales being the reward on offer during periodic breaks from serious business. An integral part of the Premier Group and abutting the well-known and popular Regent Hotel, the ELICC meets the most demanding standards set by the international conferencing industry. For conferences of a smaller size, delegates will

not be disappointed with the other highquality venues that continue to be available both in East London and further afield. The Kat Leisure Group has recently upgraded both the Osner and Kennaway Hotels, and are able to offer professional conference and banqueting services to groups of up to 400 in a sea-front setting. Overlooking the spectacular Nahoon Estuary and an unrivalled location for a relaxing sundowner after a hard day’s work, the Blue Lagoon Hotel and Conference Centre offers competitive conference packages and a variety of accommodation options. To book your next business event, contact: Tel: +27 (0) 43 736 3019 +27 (0) 43 705 2111 +27 (0) 40 656 2062 Email: tourismunit@buffalocity.gov.za Web: www.bctourism.co.za


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FEATURE

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ORGANISE YOUR

WAY TO SUCCESS Take your role of exhibition, roadshow and conference organiser to the next level. Susan Reynard chats to the experts.

© On Show Solutions

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rganisers of exhibitions, roadshows and conferences have to master multi-tasking and cross-functional skills as the world of events becomes more competitive.

Evolution of enterprise Christine Davidson is vice president Africa for dmg events MEA and has been responsible for a range of business and consumer exhibitions and conferences around the world. She says of the changing role of exhibition organisers, “In today’s marketplace, exhibition organisers must be fully integrated with the industry they serve, play a part in it and be recognised as such – it is not sufficient to be simply a platform provider turning up once a year. We now must demonstrate greater depths of industry knowledge, know and reflect the changing dynamics and have insight into future trends so that our events

mirror and showcase the live marketplace. Organisers like us are now publishers, news providers, educators, social media experts and thought leaders. We are the creators of industry communities, structured to enable the necessary continuous flow of information and engagement with our audiences of suppliers and visitors. This in turn enables us to be part of daily industry.” Devi Paulsen is CEO of Hypenica, a business-to-business media and events company, and was responsible for launching their conference and exhibitions division. She notes, “Imagine the opportunities that become available when one business is given the platform to connect with another; the relationships that are built; the contacts that are made; and the business agreements that are signed through networking. Attending a show, exhibition or conference provides you with all these networking opportunities.

This is why Hypenica believes so strongly in making this happen.” She says, “Hypenica sees itself as a key participant in the industry we serve and the products we happen to produce are events. We have become consultants assisting our clients and stakeholders to make key strategic business decisions based on what they see at our shows and who they meet. Anyone working in our business has to understand the sectors we serve and has to take the time to get to know the value chain.” On Show Solutions is an exhibition and events team, with a personalised approach and vision for global marketing. It focuses on trade roadshows and its signature event is Africa Showcase, promoting travel to Africa. Co-owner Amanda Margison says their focus is on quality rather than quantity. “If you’re focusing on trade-related shows


FEATURE

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it’s not about how many people you can get into the event but the quality of delegates. Overall, consumers look more at awareness while business delegates are looking for quality meetings, what sort of value is being added to their business and quantifying their return on investment, especially with tight budgets. Delegates have to make tough decisions on which shows they can afford to attend.” An exhibition organiser used to be able to just put up a floor plan and hope for the best, Amanda furthers. In today’s more saturated market, exhibition organisers have to take a strategic approach to managing their events, including the date, venue, attendees, database and cost of floor space. “Also, our role has changed from being the organiser to delivering the service level itself – service-delivery levels are extremely tight. You have to bring new buyers and delegates year-on-year. They’re not coming to the event to see the same people, it’s all about new business. If we ask visitors why they attend, the top three reasons are: network with colleagues; find new business; and nurture existing relationships. If there is no new business, they won’t keep coming to the show,” Amanda explains.

Tools of engagement The kinds of technology in use by many organisers usually revolves around mobile phones: • Apps • Matchmaking tools • Registration tools • Lead generation tools • Gamification and augmented reality (AR) • Social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Whatsapp) Technology must be used to assist with solving problems and not be a hindrance, notes Devi: “Technology should not be used for technologysake. The key is to know your audience and ensure that the technology is appropriate and will add value.” Christine says technology affects every aspect of what they do, from the way in which shows are designed and brought together visually on screen before any physical build-up begins, through to online bookings and ordering of exhibitor services. “Our show guides are almost exclusively via a mobile-phone app. It makes it easier for visitors, means that they can access information quicker and its live and interactive and so they

can make better use of their time at the show and get more out of it, and of course it’s more sustainable,” she explains. Technology has transformed their marketing engagement, which is now very much in the digital space, Christine says. It has allowed data to be more accurate and allows for personalised communication tailored to clients’ needs. “We use technology operationally, for communication, as features, for audience efficiency and experience. We too, like so many other industries are working towards seamless customer experiences,” she adds.

Five features of expos Hypenica has identified five key objectives why events serve as an effective marketing channel for exhibitors, summarised here: 1. Lead generation: Generate new leads and fill their sales pipeline. 2. Branding: Reinforce brand identity to key customers. 3. Thought leadership: Position their company as the key provider of a service or technology through participation as a speaker or panellist at a conference. 4. Networking: Network with their peers, customers and even their competitors. 5. Product market testing: Test their products on the market and research and identify responses to new products or concepts.

Technology should not be used for technology-sake. The key is to know your audience and ensure that the technology is appropriate and will add value. © On Show Solutions

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12

FEATURE

Value-added activities An event will often extend beyond the trade show to include fringe activities that capture the mood of the show and trends within society as a whole. Health and wellness remains a popular trend, and at IMEX Las Vegas last year yoga and meditation were on offer. A dmg event is more than just a trade show, maintains Christine. “We invest significant time and resource in creating valuable and extensive conference programmes with industry figureheads leading the discussions. We ensure visitors have access to free training and skills development workshops, that we include latest innovation showcases and that we recognise industry achievement through important awards programmes, dinners and less formal get-togethers, including golf days, breakfasts and coffee mornings. The fact is, we work hard to create as many opportunities for our audiences to interact and get as much value from participation as possible,” she says. As organiser of international roadshows that take place monthly from February to November, Amanda says her exhibitor clients prefer to see key sights and experiences in their destination city. “Our unique selling point is to take the exhibitors to the buyers in market, so we have a very short time space to move exhibitors between cities,” she explains.

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A popular addition to exhibitions and roadshows, in keeping with the health and wellness trend, is a 5km runs organised for delegates. She believes that the focus should firstly be on getting the fundamentals of business right, and the next step after that may be to add on nice-to-have extras.

Platforms fit for purpose The introduction of video conferencing, e-meetings and the internet are sometimes cited as possible replacements for exhibitions and roadshows. However, this is unlikely, says Christine: “Human nature dictates that we enjoy interaction face-to-face and we still buy from people we like. Don’t get me wrong, there is a place for virtual events and meetings as part of our overall campaign, but I don’t see these overtaking exhibitions.” She says that when virtual exhibitions were introduced a few years ago, they weren’t hugely successful: “The key I believe to the success of traditional shows is that we still like meeting people, building relationships, talking and you can learn so much more from a faceto-face conversation than you can any other way. The online world becomes part of the exhibition experience and so, whilst we encourage and use the latest technologies and while we may find different ways of engaging visitors and exhibitors during events, the exhibition still remains unique. Exhibitions have maintained a very important role in all types of business and still lead the way in delivering decision-makers who decide purchases during the show – this has a huge value. The answer is straightforward: exhibitions satisfy the human nature of business. That won’t change.” Amanda finds that e-meetings are not replacing exhibitions but have changed the way exhibitions are designed. “People crave personal interaction, and business is about personal relationships.

Chefs Challenge Hotel Show 2017 © dmg Events E-meetings may subsidise a few meetings a year but it’s very costly to set up a whole lot of e-meetings. Roadshows are on the up and up and people are looking at their expenses of individual sales trips and looking at roadshows as alternatives to exhibitions. We’re finding growth in the roadshow concept as meetings are face-to-face and with the people you specifically want to meet,” she furthers. Devi concurs, adding, “I think the format may change, such as more thoughtful networking opportunities and delivery of content, but I don’t believe virtual engagements will replace face-to-face engagements in the immediate future.”

Devil still in the detail The role of exhibition and roadshow organisers has changed significantly during the past two decades. Christine has found, “The organiser has to be competent in so much more. One of the strengths

We work hard to create as many opportunities for our audiences to interact and get as much value from participationas possible. © On Show Solutions


FEATURE 13

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of dmg events, for example, is that it identified early on that it must be more than just a trade show organiser.” She adds, “I have seen that we play a major role in assisting the development of a market. For instance, we identify from our research what future trends are, what education is needed. More often than not that research will be quite ahead of the market in terms of providing the education – before the general market recognises it. But we work tirelessly with key research organisations sometimes to commission these insights so that we can plan and keep our events fresh and up to date.” “We also work with government and important industry associations to support, promote and drive their future strategy and we contribute by bringing together – often many months before an event takes place – the individuals and organisations that have a common interest. Today, an exhibition organiser is part of the industry and contributes, advises and helps shape the future, whether that’s building regulations and materials at a construction show to the quality and fit out of new build hotels on this continent. We bring ideas to a much wider audience and the international experience we bring really does contribute to future growth and success,” Christine explains.

© On Show Solutions

Devi says events must provide great support for businesses, as platforms for businesses to get in front of their customers quickly and in a short space of time. They provide opportunities for people to network and do business, achieving a real return on investment, both financially and in terms of time invested. “The greatest achievement is to see business taking place on the exhibition floor. We recently hosted an investment event in Cape Town, in a very unique format. Before we even started, we had brought in a total of US$2.6bn of project owners and potential investors together. For me that’s what it is all about,” she adds. “The devil is in the detail,” stresses Amanda. “If you’re not doing your logistics and planning correctly you will fail, but you also have to be adept at marketing, sales and finance too. The skills set is a lot more stretched. An organiser used to have a team to delegate a lot more tasks to, which they now have to do themselves. As an owner of a business you have to multi-task and be cross-functional; you have to manage every facet of a business,” she adds. On Show Solutions understands that they need to form part of the exhibitors’ strategy. “We’ve put together a full calendar for the year and if we don’t have our budgets and planning ready

early, we miss a very important link in our sales process. We have lengthy planning cycles for exhibitions and roadshows and with the nature of our events being constantly on the go, we have to offer a seamless experience for our travelling exhibitors to ensure they are well looked after. It’s no longer just about selling space but managing the entire experience.”

The skills set is a lot more stretched. An organiser used to have a team to delegate a lot more tasks to, which they now have to do themselves. As an owner of a business you have to multitask and be crossfunctional; you have to manage every facet of a business.


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THE NORVAL FOUNDATION

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FOR EVENTS THAT LEAVE

A LEGACY

The Norval Foundation is a new centre for art and cultural expression, yet is far more than a museum, and far more than a mere events venue - it is already the most exclusive, forwardthinking and in-demand destination for local and international event planners.

Elana Brundyn, Executive Director at the Norval Foundation.

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t comprises state-of-the-art facilities and gallery spaces, as well as a sculpture garden, an intimate amphitheatre and a world-class restaurant, all enhanced by a design that is guided by the fundamentals of light and air. To visit the Norval Foundation is to understand elegance in its most natural form, an adaptive space that, through architectural expression, puts culture first. Elana Brundyn is the Executive Director at the Norval Foundation and serves as a trustee of the Gerard Sekoto Foundation. From 2014 to 2017 she was Director of Institutional Advancement and External Affairs at Zeitz MOCAA (Cape Town), part of the inaugural team to launch the institution in September 2017. Brundyn’s career in the contemporary art industry spans 20 years as a consultant and advisor to corporate and academic collections, charity art auctions and commercial galleries with a strong focus on philanthropic projects and fundraising.

What is the overarching purpose of the Norval Foundation? We aim to create high quality exhibitions and public programming to broaden our

Wim Botha, Prism 5, 12 and 7, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

understanding of the visual arts. The Norval Foundationis honoured to be the custodians of the Gerard Sekoto Foundation, Edoardo Villa Estate Collection, and the Alexis Preller Archive. We believe that art has the power to enrich our lives and that artists contribute to or communities in a profound way. The Norval family are the founders and initial funders of the Norval Foundation, through which they aim to make art widely accessible to local and international visitors. The proceeds from capital donations will be used to secure the foundation for future generations.

What kind of events is the Norval Foundation suited to? The Norval Foundation was designed to be a flexible space that can be adapted to suit the needs of the event, therefore we are not limited to the kinds of events that can be held here. Smaller spaces such as the library are perfect for smaller gatherings, such as C-suite meetings. The foyer is an elegant space, with the Serge Alain Nitegeka sculpture as its focal point, and I envision cocktail functions taking place within it.

The larger halls are ideal for cultural exhibitions, while the amphitheatre is perfect for intimate performances. I am certain the restaurant will be popular for fun, informal foodie events. The most important feature of the centre is not the spaces that comprise it – it is the artwork that provides the essence. Above all, the art will ultimately provide the complement or counterpoint to the event.

Will you be hosting opening events? We have organised a Private Garden Party Fundraiser to celebrate the opening of the Norval Foundation on Friday, 27 April 2018, and tickets can be purchased by the public. The Norval Foundation is opening to the public on April 28th, 2018. For more information please mail events@norvalfoundation.org or call us on +27 (0) 76 476 1299


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Golf Reef City couple gambling © Tsogo Sun

PUT A SPIN ON YOUR NEXT CONFERENCE Casino resorts as conference destinations offer a range of experiences delegates and organisers can bet on. Susan Reynard reports.

S

outh Africa has several significant casino resorts spread around the country. We look at what makes them ideal destinations for your next meeting, conference and event.

Location Glenn Joseph, chief operating officer of gaming at Tsogo Sun says when you unpack the offerings at a casino resort, you will see that all features work together. “When you choose a casino property like Montecasino, Silverstar, Gold Reef City and Suncoast, it adds a whole new dynamic to your experience. Traditional conferencing venues have conference rooms and a set menu, and if you’re doing

something at night you need to bring in your own entertainment and décor. At a casino property you’re coming to an entertainment destination. When you plan your conference and say two days’ stay at a casino, you’re exposed to the hotels, which also have meeting rooms and restaurants, as well as the restaurants and entertainment facilities across the property,” he explains. Events are tailor-made with a different theme for breakfast, lunch and dinner because all of these venues are available on site, adds Glenn. With the variety of themed restaurants at casino resorts, organisers can switch up dining to offer, for example, a Mexican and Indian and Italian

dining experience without the added costs of draping and décor hire. It serves as a value-added offering. “We provide so much more than just casino and conferencing: people want options, they want something different, and we can provide that at any of our casino resorts. We can put a spin on it and also offer traditional conferencing if that is what the client wants,” he says. Trevor Wolverson, food and beverage manager at Silverstar, says the resort is a one-stop venue. “Delegates can fly or drive to Silverstar and not have to leave for the duration since we have everything including conferencing facilities, food and beverage options, as well as team-building (laser tag or 10 pin bowling), entertainment


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Photo by Carl Raw on Unsplash Southern Sun Montecasino school room set up © Tsogo Sun

(Barnyard, movies and regular shows in Silverstar Centre) and a spa. There really is no need for anything else,” he notes. Peermont’s Emperors Palace is conveniently located next to OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg and is home to 29 venues in the Convention Centre, which can comfortably accommodate intimate meetings and large groups of up to 3 000 delegates, explains Peermont’s general manager: hospitality Rekha Sohan. “Conference packages are tailor-made to suit any budget and can include overnight stays, which means delegates can easily transition from business formal to cocktail casual once the formalities are over. Our properties are not only ideal

Companies have access to awesome morale-building activities to complement their conferences all in one place.

for conferences but also small parties, meetings, year-end functions, weddings and team-building events,” she adds. Sun International’s Sun City has been a business and leisure destination since its launch in 1979 and has evolved its corporate conferencing to offer more than meeting rooms and venues. The activities that can be built into the packages continue to make the offering special. The resort has recently undergone a R1-billion upgrade to ensure its facilities and services meet the needs of business travellers. “Nothing can beat the high level of interaction and collaboration that comes with meeting face-to-face and off site. The opportunities to connect, engage and create that conferences offer certainly promote teamwork, productivity and performance. We offer the opportunity to companies to build bespoke packages which combine any of the entertainment activities available at Sun City. This means that companies have access to awesome morale-building activities to complement their conferences all in one place. The experience continues after conference hours, with an array of activities, restaurants and vibrant night life to enjoy,” explains Raul de Lima, general manager at Sun City.

Experiences The casino theme is a popular one for events, inspired by movies like Casino Royale. Also providing much inspiration are any films with James Bond and glamorous settings such as The Great Gatsby. Glenn says they can incorporate these kinds of themes according to what is trending at the time, including: • Setting up a few tables with croupiers to teach people to play in a non-live setting (no actual money is won or lost) • Adding a whisky tasting experience • Hosting black-tie events • Focusing on fine-dining cuisine Trevor says casino conferencing has a number of advantages: • Large capacity venues • Competitive pricing and packages • Group-owned restaurants on-site may be booked out for conference clients, serving as an extension of the conference facilities • Fun breakaways and teambuilding activities • Blend of business and fun on one property • Save time and money on logistics and transport


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© Peermont

Rekha says that the casino element at Emperors Palace allows delegates access to a large variety of entertainment and it is easy for delegates to entertain themselves during their spare time. The resort element allows an all-in-one offering such as accommodation, conferencing, events and entertainment. “The fact that an event is hosted at Emperors Palace, which is well-known for its casino facilities, automatically benefits guests who enjoy gaming. Alternatively, conference packages can be put together that include shows and events, as well as a gaming element which can form part of the itinerary,” she adds. The Entertainment Centre at Sun City has been rebuilt and renamed Sun Central as part of the significant upgrade of the resort. Sun Central is now an experiential entertainment and conference hub. On the upper level is Sun Central, the state-ofthe-art Sun City Convention Centre offering a variety of banqueting and conference venues plus entertainment for large groups of delegates. It features a selection of boardrooms; breakaway rooms; fully equipped venues; Splice dedicated slow lounge; Stir coffee shop; and the interactive South African Hall of Fame honouring the country’s most memorable achievers. Delegate experiences often begin with accommodation and The Maslow at Time Square hotel is the latest offering launched at Sun International’s Time Square in Pretoria.

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Sibaya Exterior © Sun International

Time Square casino launched a year ago, Sun Arena 8 500-seater multipurpose venue launched three months ago, and the new hotel is the final stage of the project. The property has a range of restaurants and leisure facilities, plus 13 conference rooms. The 238-room The Maslow at Time Square has an innovative concept at its core: it features three grades of accommodation within one building: • The Foundation Level offers a full range of amenities and delivers good quality service, design and physical attributes to meet guest expectations. • The Median Level offers a deluxe experience, with a wider range of facilities and superior design qualities that meet the needs of discerning guests including a gym, pool and conference centre. • The Zenith Level offers an exceptional range of facilities and premier services

that are personalised and designed to provide exclusive experience including butler service, fully stocked mini bar, Luminary Lounge, Solis Bar, infinity pool and conferencing facilities. Brett Hoppé, general manager of Time Square, says that every aspect of the hotel has been intuitively designed to help guests to balance work and life, focusing on the individual’s needs.

Entertainment Just some of the options available across various properties and nearby include: • Innovative event spaces • Large function facilities • Range of themed restaurants • Theatres and live shows • Outdoor facilities • Team- and morale-building options • On-site entertainment

Rekha says that the casino element at Emperors Palace allows delegates access to a large variety of entertainment and it is easy for delegates to entertain themselves during their spare time. The resort element allows an all-in-one offering such as accommodation, conferencing, events and entertainment.


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Gold Reef City slots © Tsogo Sun

• • • • • • • • • •

Hotel accommodation from three- to five-star Plenty of parking Cultural, educational and fun experiences Spas State-of-the-art technology Sporting activities Adventure activities Safety and security Inclusive packages Group tours of the city

Sun International’s Sibaya Casino & Entertainment Kingdom in KwaZulu-Natal has added new Sun Park to the offering, ideal for large events. Sun Park has a semi-permanent, flexible infrastructure built around a 2 400m2 grid that can be

gives you easy access to amenities, it’s quick and easy to build any type of event, of various sizes or configuration,” says Rory Phelan, business development manager: Sun Sales. Sun International currently operates three Sun Parks at its casino resorts Sun City, Carnival City and now Sibaya, with GrandWest offering the grid but not the marquee. Sun City has added numerous sporting and outdoor activities for the adventurous, plus a range of new teambuilding experiences. Together with the many popular signature experiences across the property, these serve to ensure the resort remains competitive.

arranged in any configuration. It consists of a 1 750m2 marquee structure and deck plus large grassed areas, featuring the facilities and support services of an indoor events venue coupled with the flexibility of an outdoor space. It is ideal for conferences, lifestyle events, product launches, banquets, exhibitions, concerts and more. “Sun Park can rapidly bring large events to life. The semi-permanent modular design of Sun Park is based on internationally proven expo parks. Whether you want outdoor, indoor, multiple or triple-story structures, Sun Park is easily transformed. Due to the flexibility of the semi-permanent Sun Park infrastructure and the sophisticated grid that © Peermont

Time Square has brought a wide range of experiences to visitors, including 18 bars and restaurants, many headed up by big-name restaurateurs, chefs and celebrities. Three establishments that stand out include: • Forti Grill & Bar by award-winning chef and restaurateur, Fortunato Mazzone, also of Ristorante Ritrovo • Something’s Cooking by J’Something by Joao da Fonseca, lead singer of Mi Casa • Guy Fieri’s Kitchen and Bar South Africa by Guy Fieri, American celebrity chef, restaurateur and TV host of Guy’s Big Bite and Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.


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INNOVATE FOR

INCLUSION

Including the “disabled” into society as a whole should be the norm, not the exception. Susan Reynard reports.

Did you know More than one billion people – approximately 15% of the world’s population or one in seven – live with some form of disability, and some 80% of those people live in developing countries. (Source: United Nations)

Musa Motha captivated audience at the 30th and final annual Dance Umbrella in Johannesburg in March. © John Hogg

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t opening night of the Dance Umbrella in Johannesburg, Musa Motha, a member of the Vuyani Dance Theatre, danced solo and in a group. He is a mesmerising performer and athlete. And he has only one leg, dancing the Mayhem piece choreographed by Gregory Maqoma sometimes on crutches, sometimes not. What starts out as a surprise, a novelty even, is quickly normalised by Musa’s fluidity and interaction with fellow dancers. The world mourned the death of British Professor Stephen Hawking earlier this year in March, known for his ground-breaking work in physics and cosmology. He developed ALS, a form of Motor Neurone Disease, in 1963 at the age of 21 and famously continued to work, travel, lecture and publish books throughout his life despite being in a

wheelchair and only able to communicate by twitching a muscle under his eye that activated a computerised voice system. The more people living with challenges and limitations – physical, visual, hearing, intellectual – that are integrated into society, the more infrastructure and understanding will be the norm. Danie Marais, Universal Design and Access Manager at the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) www.ncppdsa.org.za, says, “Equitable participation in the life of the community, without restrictions or disadvantages, is a human right that extends to all areas of society and social life. It is the right of different groups of people to have respect for their social position and receive equitable treatment in society.” He says that the application of Universal Design principles is a step

forward in mitigating inadvertent prejudice against people, irrespective of their race, gender, age, faith, political or other opinion and physical and mental limitations. “Incorporation of Universal Design principles also helps in conferring independence and mobility onto individuals. Accessible features are integrated into the overall design process, resulting in better design and avoiding the stigmatising quality of accessible features that are added on late in the process or as modifications after completion. In other words, there is no compromise on aesthetics or usability,” he explains. Universal Design is high on the agenda in government, specifically the National Department of Tourism: Responsible Tourism, and is aimed at everyone, not only persons with disabilities, Danie notes. “Anybody who visits a tourism attraction should have the same experience – no compromise.” It is hard to quantify how many properties truly cater for the needs of the differently abled. Danie says a few hotel groups have embraced access for persons with disabilities, but most do not achieve full Universal Access. Some architects develop greater understanding of what is required after researching the topic. Similarly, some hotels have added universally accessible bedrooms and bathrooms, but the majority of the property may still have accessibility issues.


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Equitable participation in the life of the community, without restrictions or disadvantages, is a human right that extends to all areas of society and social life.

“Disability awareness is key, as well as the understanding of Universal Design principals and to know that Universal Access will benefit everyone. Good access is good business! Monitoring changes to incorporate Universal Access in existing buildings is very important. You do not want to spend money, only to find out later that the changes are incorrect,” he adds. He is an access consultant and advises and guides clients on achieving Universal Access without compromise.

Chef Dr Billy Gallagher

Disability infrastructure considerations Duane Riley was assistant to the late, great chef Dr Billy Gallagher for several years. Billy was paralysed in 2000 after being shot in the spine in a botched hijacking in Johannesburg. At the time, he was a director at Tsogo Sun and after a year’s rehabilitation returned to work, as a quadriplegic in a wheelchair accompanied by a nurse and driver, until his retirement in 2008 at age 60. In an instant he went from being 5ft 10” to 3ft 6”, his height in a wheelchair. He remained an active member of the SA Chefs Association and various other educational and charitable organisations until his death in 2016 at age 67. His work, travels and functions required careful planning and support, and Duane helped to manage the logistics of working for a busy quadriplegic in a wheelchair. He highlights some of the personal challenges they encountered: 1. Billy would generally only attend meetings and functions if familiar with the property. 2. For unfamiliar properties, a site visit was vital. If this was not possible (distance etc.), I would phone the co-ordinator of the property enquiring about the following: a. Dedicated parking area close to the entrance. Distance from the car to venue. Ensure that the parking bay is blocked off – often people think that having a “sore back” entitles them to use disabled parking. b. Full walk-through from car to venue. Is the surface 100% flat? Paved? Gravel? Are there any small steps (bigger than 2cm)? c. Are there steps? If so, is there an elevator? If no elevator, what is the property’s procedure for wheelchair-bound people? d. Is there a clear walkway for wheelchair-bound people at the venue once tables and chairs

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

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are laid out (not meandering between tables, asking people to move their chairs etc.)? This is probably the biggest problem that we encountered, as use of floor space is very important in the industry. e. If Billy is giving a speech, how will he get on stage? f. Is it well-ventilated with easy access to a rest area? Depending on the site visit, we would know if ramps were needed and if would be able to use his motorised wheelchair or manual wheelchair. Standard items that Billy’s driver, nurse or assistant carried included: hand assistance tool; apron; spare clothes; straws; personal items (i.e. mobile phone, wallet). Bathrooms: The majority are not wheelchair-friendly even if there is a dedicated bathroom as they provide very little movement (i.e. turning circle) for the wheelchair. Ideally you would need a straight entrance with no corridors and corners. Bathroom stalls need to be bigger as currently a wheelchairbound person is often unable to function unassisted. Managers of the venue would try and accommodate us wherever possible, however if you are not a wheelchairbound person you would not know all the smaller details. Other things to consider: a. Table height: Most tables were fine for the wheelchair but there were occasions that proved troublesome and Billy would need to sit further back from the table. b. Hot spots and cold spots within the venue. c. Type of crockery: It would be difficult for him to eat unassisted if the crockery was oddly shaped (it wouldn’t fit into his hand assistance tool).


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“A lot of people think that if a person using a wheelchair – or any other disability for that matter – gives advice regarding access it will be acceptable. Not so: mostly the advice will be linked to that person’s individual needs,” he notes. With the emphasis on access for all, Danie lists key points for the business-events market to consider: • Closed and undercover accessible parking with an even path of travel from parking to event • Signage • Lighting • Ramps if required must be non-slip with handrails on both sides and a gradient of not more than 1:15 • Accessible toilet facilities • Provision of interpreters (there are different types, not only sign-language interpreters) • Provision of alternative technologies to assist persons with hearing loss (i.e. persons with hearing loss or post-lingual deafness not using sign language as their first language) • Access to eating areas, bars etc. to be accessible (choice of tables and chairs, height of tables and counters to be considered) • Information services must be accessible in a variety of formats (i.e. Braille and large print) • Online bookings of event For more information on reputable suppliers of products and services specialising in catering for the disabled, go to www.ncppdsa.org.za

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Differently abled in the workplace Did you know that a deaf receptionist in a hotel can “read” guests’ body language exceptionally well and in an instant? As much of the check-in process for regular guests is simply routine and requires a few signatures and credit card transactions, the warm and welcoming nature of the staff member on duty plays a major role. Nancy Gaylard, director of Not Just Consulting and previously training manager at the Balalaika hotel in Sandton, has a passion for placing deaf people into the hospitality industry. She has placed several trainee chefs from St Vincent School for the Deaf at Balalaika since 2015 while they undergo training in a one-year cookery programme at HTA School of Culinary art and a four year hotel management block programme at the UJ School of Tourism and Hospitality. She asked staff to volunteer to learn South African sign language and 45 put up their hands. The result is a workplace that is increasingly more inclusive. This is important as trainees on rotation work across several areas of the property. Health and safety are a primary concern as deaf people rely on visual cues, and to this end revolving lights on the ceiling activate in addition to an alarm if there is a fire and a flashlight may be turned

Beach wheelchairs, sponsored by the Ford Foundation, ensure access to the beach and water for persons with mobility impairment.

on and off to attract attention of deaf chefs in case of emergency. As much of what chefs learn on a practical level is by watching and then imitating senior chefs and then practising, deaf chefs are able to keep up with their hearing colleagues. The Clickatell SMS communication system links up to the chefs’ mobile phones. And with a number of staff that use sign language throughout the property, training continues with relative ease. Nancy says staff are fine to wear signs that indicate they are deaf, and uniforms that have “I am deaf” printed on the back to alert guests. It is all part of “taking the dis out of dis-ABILITY” and rather focus on the ABILITY of the person. As the major driver of the project, Nancy is looking for other ways to incorporate deaf learners into the workplace, including in Stuart Cason’s kitchens at Hilton. She is keen to boost employment for the blind, noting that several properties use JAWS or Dolphin screen readers or voice recognition programmes for the blind. “I have received an email from a blind person and didn’t know they were blind until we chatted on the phone. Technology and systems are evolving and companies need to start investing in this to integrate differently abled people into the workplace,” Nancy says.

Examples of shelves that are accessible for persons with disabilities.


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23 © Bruno Nascimento

© By Word Of Mouth

PRETTY, PRACTICAL,

PROVOCATIVE DÉCOR Décor at events may be laden with meaning or rich with visual appeal, or both. Three experts in the field share their aesthetic with Susan Reynard.

T

he sky’s the limit when it comes to the visual element of events. There are definite trends, however, and staying abreast ensures events look current, fresh and appealing. By Word Of Mouth events management company owned by Karen Short is known for incorporating the latest trends in décor, dining, presentation and entertainment into their events. Karen says they are inspired by, for example, what they see on the Chanel runway during Fashion Week, what the models wore, the setting and mood of the event. They experiment in the mini-showroom on the premises once or twice a week, playing with ideas and colour combinations.

• A quick glance at what has caught Karen’s eye recently that will inform décor: • Earthy colours such as khaki

and autumnal shades. Black with a bright pop of colour, such as black candles on tables contrasted with bright pink peonies; black cakes (even wedding cakes); black food such as tacos; and black cutlery. Green has been in for a while, as seen in leafy foliage as opposed to flowers, textures and food. Move to vegetarian, vegan, natural and organic foods and flavours, with an emphasis on Asian green curries and spices like sumac. Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2018 is Ultra Violet, which will be introduced through florals, napkins, fabrics and glass. Layering of textures, such as white on white using fabrics like raw linen and natural objects like stone, bleached wood, driftwood and shells.

• •

• •

Hanging installations of porcelain, organic materials and wood. Moving away from gold, which has been huge for the past few years, to metallics. Gold will still be present in cutlery. Blush pink and Millennial pink are popular. Economising on entertainment by moving away from big bands towards smaller scale entertainment like single actors or performers, artists on a stepladder painting a wall or a ballerina on a table, for example. Combination of new and recognisable features, to create excitement and retain comfort. Familiar cuisine and food presented in a new way, such as colourful tacos; sushi doughnuts; rainbow/unicorn sushi; and alcoholic freak/gourmet shakes.


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Move away from molecular gastronomy as people opt for more carbs. Doughnuts still big news, now being seen as doughnut walls and chandeliers. Sweet and savoury profiteroles are in, cupcakes and macaroons are out. Avocado is huge and seen in fresh smashed avo stations, guacamole bars, chopped into foods, churned into ice cream, added to tacos and served in poke bowls. Vintage weddings are out.

“We’ve been in business for 25 years and have excellent supplier relationships. They are our friends as well as business partners and listen to us,” says Karen. In addition to owning and buying in a large amount of furniture, fittings, crockery, cutlery, glassware and accessories of every kind, By Word Of Mouth also hires in key items to reflect certain trends. Their designer attends the major trade shows around the world to gather ideas and other caterers hire items from By Word Of Mouth. Sustainability, green issues and environmental responsibility impacts in every way on how the company does business. They have replaced plastic straws with paper ones and look to utilise the products and services of

© By Word Of Mouth

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people from local communities in their events. There is a move away from floral centrepieces towards reusable centrepieces such as rocks, driftwood, wicker mats, printed menus and candles. Vaughn’s Creations owned by Vaughn Durant has a wealth of design and décor inspiration and ideas. “The noticeable trends for 2018/19 are botanical, natural, greens and recycling. The face of events is changing in the direction of reducing our carbon footprint on the earth,” Vaughn notes. This is carried through the influence of fashion and furniture; natural woods; plants; natural and neutral fabrics; and a reduction of plastics and bio-hazardous elements from events, such as removing oasis foam from floral arrangements and changing standard candles for those that use soy wax. He has seen a move towards a crisp, modern and refined look and feel; a less is more approach, with attention focused on a single vase or few objects on the table. To determine what kind of décor will work best for a client, Vaughn looks at the following: 1. Demographics and gender of invitees. 2. The space for the event – marquee, function room, open terrace or

offices – to determine the look and feel and most importantly, the colour scheme that will work best. 3. What the client needs to obtain from the event and their return on investment. 4. Keeping a signature feel running throughout the event including invitations and RSVPs; menu cards; programs; welcome cocktails; main event; and entertainment. 5. Working to a budget and getting the biggest bang for their investment and an experience that the guests will take home with them. Depending on the nature of the event, Vaughn suggests at least 25% of the budget be dedicated to décor. When it comes to sustainability, Vaughn says, “As a whole, we at Vaughn’s Creations started with how we can give back to the community; we did not just want to give money with no purpose. We try to incorporate locally sourced goods, beaded napkin rings, wire art, woven cushions and throws, basket ware or even pottery pots. A strong move to raw wood has seen us invest in recycled pallets as furniture and tables, which has become a sustainable business for the handyman that manufactured them for us.

Robyn Davie Photography © By Word Of Mouth


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Colours of the Year Pantone 2018: Ultra Violet 18-3838 – Blue-based purple; “originality, ingenuity, and visionary thinking that points us toward the future” 2017: Greenery 15-0343 – Yellow-green; “nature’s neutral”; “revive, restore and renew” Plascon 2018: Amadeus (Y2-B1-4) – Earthy yellow; “a neutral with character which, when combined with other colours, brings a grounding energy” 2017: In the Mood (O6-E2-3) –Earthy soft pink; “cocooning qualities”; “connection to the outdoors and the open landscape beyond”

Vaughn’s Creations

The noticeable trends for 2018/19 are botanical, natural, greens and recycling. The face of events is changing in the direction of reducing our carbon footprint on the earth.

We are not always able to bring this element into the event but we do try and make it happen as much as possible.” Weather, seasonality and region of the country also impact décor. With the international flower market open to the world, it is easier to source specific flowers requested by clients all year round. “At the end of the day it all comes down to what the client wants and expects. There are no hard and fast rules: as long as the overall look is experiential and plays with the guests’ senses of touch, sight, smell, taste and hearing and they leave with a great feeling, you have done your job well,” he adds. Gill Martini, a freelance project manager of events, conferences and exhibitions at Phambili African Events, has been involved in the local organising committees of major government events, such as the late President Nelson Mandela’s inauguration, state banquets

and functions attended by heads of state, royalty and politicians. She is passionate about incorporating the cultures of all South Africans at these events through décor, cuisine and accessories. In her quest to celebrate local cultural traditions through their cuisine, designs, fabrics and beliefs, she has amassed a huge amount of research. She pushes hard to have local communities involved with and benefitting from events, by making decorative items for the table and gifts, as well as spreading the business to a number of local caterers rather than a single one, for example. “My approach to décor during events for presidents Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki was to mobilise people at grassroots level, incorporating features of the region in which the event took place. For example, in the Western Cape we used fynbos, proteas and vine leaves as floral arrangements to showcase what is unique to that region,” she explains. “This

Dulux 2018: Heart Wood (10YR28/072) – Warm pink; “comforting, energising or relaxing, depending on the colours you pair with it” 2017: Steel Symphony 2 (90BG30/073) – Calm blue; “Life in a new light”; “connection, simplification, recognition and a slow pace of life” Farrow & Ball 2018: Pitch Blue and Calke Green – “Combined together in equal measure, rather than one being an accent to the other” 2017: Radicchio – blue-toned red that is “exuberant, romantic and sensual”; Studio Green – sober green that is “unapologetically clubby and has a fantastically timeless old-world quality”; Hay – aged yellow with underlying green with a “quiet quality” creating a “hushed atmosphere as well as an unmatched depth and gentleness”; All White – “uncomplicated” and “naturally fresh, but not stark or brilliant” to create “stillness and calm by layering different whites”

influences the meal and wine and I would consult experts like chef Dr Billy Gallagher and wine connoisseur Michael Fridjhon.”


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FEATURE

Before project managing each event, Gill unpacks the message and her client want to communicate. In the case of government events the overarching themes are unity, diversity and the rainbow nation that is South Africa. Décor is used to communicate a range of cultural dynamics, including the national flag. The logo of the event or company is the first design element in Gill’s strategy, and from there the corporate identity is written up for the event and used as a guideline for all visual and décor elements throughout the project, including branding and marketing collateral. Although she is not primarily focused on “the pretty”, as she calls it, Gill speaks with enthusiasm about striking baobab tree lamps, blankets made in the style of the Eastern Cape and Lesotho, woven and hanging baskets, and delegate bags made from recycled billboard fabric by local communities. Every event requires a great deal of homework, she adds, as project managers, PCOs and event planners are messengers for their client’s brand. Once she has the master plan and strategy in place, she then looks at how every aspect of the event can boost the economy by creating jobs, big and small. No stone is left unturned and she will often add an unexpected element, such as inviting local crafts people to set up a pop-up market at an event with international delegates.

© By Word Of Mouth

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Robyn Davie Photography © By Word Of Mouth A decade ago exhibitions were rows of shell schemes, whereas the show floor is a place of leisure, entertainment and business. There are many more open stands, lounge seating, beautiful branding, recycled materials, green walls and crafted décor. Design and décor sets the tone of the function that delegates and visitors respond to using the senses. “Whatever event I’m doing, I’m only the project manager – I’m only as good as my team, and this includes those involved in selecting the menu, décor

and protocol of the event,” she notes. In her quest to facilitate knowledge sharing, she encourages people to work together, some senior and some junior. She believes the events industry needs to be leaders and initiators in thinking and purchasing local. Her role in giving back to industry is training project managers and event organisers in countries like Rwanda, on how to grow their business-events market and ensure the value chain benefits as many people as possible.

© The Forum White Light


IMEX FRANKFURT

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INSPIRATION, INSIGHT AND INNOVATION AT IMEX IN FRANKFURT 2018 At IMEX in Frankfurt, taking place 15-17 May, thousands of hosted buyers and buyer attendees from all over the world will meet and do business with almost 3,500 international destinations and venues under one roof.

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hey’ll also discover the latest learning ideas in over 180 education sessions, make new contacts and catch up with colleagues at the many networking events. “Innovation is at the heart of IMEX in Frankfurt and we’re creating a series of new initiatives that will meet the needs of buyers and exhibitors and substantially enhance their business experience,” says Carina Bauer. The innovation begins on EduMonday, a free, full day of learning and insights taking place the day before the show. Open to all IMEX attendees and exhibitors, EduMonday brings together a vast range of learning sessions, with insights into event design, future trends and the power of partnerships. From general education open to all – planners, suppliers, partners, exhibitors - to specialist sessions designed for specific areas of the industry, the expert-led education programme during

EduMonday will help attendees foster fresh ideas and new habits, with a firm focus on professional development. The Agency Directors Forum is a new facilitated forum for professionals who own, or are part of a senior management team at small to mid-size meetings and events agencies. Future meeting professionals can kickstart their career at Rising Talent, a new programme designed for the under 35s by the under 35s. London Business School’s Executive Director of Thought Leadership Adam Kingl heads up PCMA Business School, offering a free MBA-quality professional development programme. IMEX is also offering the Event Design Certificate, a full day workshop intro to the Event Canvas Model, a strategic event management model for customer-centric events. This allows 30 English and 30 German-speaking event professionals to take their career to the next level by taking the certification free of charge on

EduMonday, taking in new perspectives © IMEX Frankfurt

the day. There’s also exclusive education and networking for corporate meeting planners and association meeting planners in the form of Exclusively Corporate and Association Day. Also taking place on EduMonday is the She Means Business conference, a new event that will celebrate the role of women in the industry. Meeting and event strategists – both female and male – are invited to network and learn from a packed programme of highly influential speakers and mentors. One of Germany’s only three female Eurofighter pilots, Major Nicola Baumann, and a former astronaut instructor and CEO of European Astronaut Centre, Laura Winterling, are among some of the high calibre speakers, discussing how they followed their intuition and beliefs to deliver truly pioneering work. Attendees can choose from carefully selected tracks, including Business Skills, Creative Learning, Marketing & Social Media and Diversity, to create their own bespoke schedule, all designed to help them keep a finger on the pulse of the industry. Carina Bauer, CEO of the IMEX Group said; “IMEX in Frankfurt is firmly established as the place where the meetings industry worldwide comes together in May each year. We know it is in their diaries well in advance – and many senior people, as well the leaders of the future from all sectors agency, association and corporate - have already planned their schedules to be there.”


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BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

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Sun Windmill Casino, Hotel & Entertainment Centre in Bloemfontein © DSA Architects

Clarens

FREE STATE The heartland of South Africa has much to offer those in search of natural beauty, history and tranquillity as part of their business event.

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he Free State is the third-largest province in South Africa, and a pivotal part of the country’s economy. It is the agricultural heart of SA, and also holds rich gold fields within its borders. In addition to this, the Free State is also home to Bloemfontein, the country’s judicial capital. Other cities of note include Clarens, Sasolburg, Welkom, and Bethlehem. The region has a host of leisure and business events throughout the year including the Bloemfontein Show, Nampo Agricultural Show, Wild Kos Fees, and many sporting events ranging from soccer to athletics and extreme sports. It is also a vibrant tourism destination, with five main routes with incredible natural, cultural and historical attractions including

the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, Gariep Dam, Clarens – the Jewel of the Free State – the artist paradise of Parys, and the oldest and largest crater on earth: the Vredefort Dome.

The region has a host of leisure and business events throughout the year including the Bloemfontein Show, Nampo Agricultural Show, Wild Kos Fees, and many sporting events ranging from soccer to athletics and extreme sports.

Key Venues Windmill Casino Sun International’s Windmill Casino, located in Bloemfontein, is an ideal conference venue for small events and corporate meetings. It holds between 20 and 250 delegates in its meeting spaces, and also offers a host of activities to keep visitors entertained, including a crèche for children, a wellness spa, a bowling centre, arcade games, and of course gambling options galore. www.suninternational.com/windmill

Windmill Casino Meeting space

Cinema

Classroom

Banquet

Cocktail

U-shaped

Diamond Lil’s

-

-

-

180

-

Eiffel & Versailles Rooms

40

30

25

25

25

Lodge Boardroom

20

16

16

15

14

Windmill A and B

250

170

150

200

90


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Kopano Nokeng Country Lodge and Conference Centre Meeting space

Cinema

Classroom

Banquet

Cocktail

U-shaped

Boardroom

Forum 1

200

120

140

165m2

90

-

Forum 2

50

35

-

60m2

26

20

Forum 3

15

15

-

-

15

15

Forum 4

700

400

350

525m2

200

-

Forum 5 (Lapa)

120

50

60

-

50

20

Garden

300

-

200

-

-

-

Kopano Nokeng Country Lodge and Conference Centre A tranquil venue situated just 4km from the Bloemfontein Airport, Kopano Nokeng is an ideal destination for small to mid-sized business events. It offers visitors oldworld charm and a choice of 10 different function venues for banqueting, as well as five conference spaces for between 15 and 700 delegates. www.kopanonokeng.co.za

Incentive Travel Products The Free State has myriad hidden gems to explore, making it ideal for incentive travel

planners in search of a different side to SA. It has five major tourism routes named for local wildlife – the Cheetah, Eagle, Lion, Flamingo and Springbok Routes, which include visits to the likes of the National Museum, ‘kasi’ visits in Botshabelo, fishing in Clocolan, or a tour of the cherry capital of the world in Ficksburg. Other places of interest include visits to historical Clarens or Sasolburg – a town built on oil – and Parys, with 42 restaurants to choose from and a variety of arts and craft shops. Also worth adding to the itinerary

are hiking, birdwatching and watersports, as well as underground mine tours, and diamond and wine routes. Finally, any incentive package would be incomplete without exploring the San Rock art and the Vredefort Dome, the biggest meteorite impact to have been found on Earth.

Climate The Free State generally has a hot, arid climate with weather typical to a high-lying inland area. It often has rainy summers, and cold winters with lots of sunshine.

Access Bloemfontein and Welkom Airports serve the region, connecting flights with international hubs in Johannesburg or Cape Town. Carriers flying to the Free State include: • CemAir • Mango • South African Airways

Currency and Exchange Rate

Kopano Nokeng © Daniel Cronje

South African Rand (ZAR)

US Dollar (USD)

Euro (EUR)

Chinese Yuan (CNY)

50.00

4.26

3.43

26.97

*Information correct as of March 2018

Contacts Free State Tourism Tel: +27 (0) 51 409 9900 Website: www.freestatetourism.org South Africa National Convention Bureau Tel: +27 (0) 11 895 3000 Email: travel@southafrica.net Website: www.businessevents. southafrica.net Clarens

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ZAMBIA A central African country with ever-growing potential in business events, Zambia is an ideal destination for the discerning planner.

David Livingstone Safari Lodge and Spa © Zambezi Traveller

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landlocked country located in central Africa, Zambia is one of the region’s most urbanised nations. Its economy is historically based on the coppermining industry, and as such, it attracts many mining and related events and conferences. Agriculture represents about 20% of the country’s GDP, while the travel and tourism sector is an ever-growing market that contributed 7% to the national GDP in 2017. Some of the annual events that take place in Zambia – often in the country’s capital of Lusaka – include Afritech Expo, African Conference of the International Telecommunications Society, ICT4D

South Luangwa National Park, Zambia © Ian McGrory (via Unsplash)

Conference, Zambia International Mining and Energy Conference and Exhibition, Zambia E-Commerce Expo, and the Zambia International Trade Fair. Livingstone is another location of note for conferencing, with a plethora of small to mid-sized venues available in the vicinity of the mighty Victoria Falls.

Key Venues InterContinental Lusaka An exquisite venue that can host up to 600 delegates theatre style, the InterContinental Lusaka is designed for prestige. It offers nine meeting rooms for conferences and special events, including a ballroom of 517m2, an exhibition space,

a separate meeting registration area, and four sales and meeting professionals on site to support any function. www.intercontinental.com/Lusaka Victoria Falls Conference Centre The Victoria Falls Conference Centre at the David Livingstone Safari Lodge and Spa is a state-of-the-art facility that can accommodate small conferences and events for up to 250 guests. It also has an outdoor Bedouin tented patio for up to 160, an exclusive boardroom, an open-air Boma, and an amphitheatre area where traditional cuisine, experiences and performances by local talent can be arranged. www.aha.co.za/davidlivingstone

InterContinental Lusaka Meeting space

Area (m2)

Theatre

Classroom

Banquet

Boardroom

Cocktail

The Ballroom

517.50

600

450

500

200

700

Nalikwanda

208.08

200

100

100

50

120

Siavonga

40.70

30

25

20

20

25

Nsumbu

27.14

30

25

20

20

25

Insaka

36.40

25

20

20

20

25

Kafue

41.25

30

25

20

20

25

Makumbi

300

250

100

120

40

250


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Incentive Travel Products Zambia offers a plethora of wildlife to explore within its borders, and has warm, welcoming people offering some of the finest safari experiences. The country boasts 17 magnificent waterfalls aside from the renowned Victoria Falls, and offers visitors the option of canoeing and fishing on its five great lakes. Zambia also offers a unique experience for the more adventurous incentive travellers, such as white-water rafting, kayaking, river surfing, abseiling and elephantback rides, while those with more laidback agendas can soak up an orange sunset cruise along the Zambezi River.

InterContinental Lusaka © IHG Victoria Falls Conference Centre

Zambia offers a plethora of wildlife to explore within its borders, and has warm, welcoming people offering some of the finest safari experiences. The country boasts 17 magnificent waterfalls aside from the renowned Victoria Falls, and offers visitors the option of canoeing and fishing on its five great lakes.

Meeting space

Area (m2)

Plenary

Event Space

250m

250 cinema 176 banquet 170 conventional

Boardroom

-

12

2

Climate

Access

Zambia has a tropical wet and dry climate with patches of semi-arid weather in the south west of the country.

Currency and Exchange Rate Zambia Kwacha (ZMW)

South African Rand (ZAR)

US Dollar (USD)

Euro (EUR)

Chinese Yuan (CNY)

50.00

60.82

5.13

4.13

32.39

*Information correct as of March 2018

Kenneth Kaunda International Airport in Lusaka is the main entry point to Zambia, while Harry Mwanga Nkumbula International Airport in Livingstone services the southern regions. Carriers flying to Zambia include: • British Airways • FastJet • Kenya Airways • Kulula • Proflight Zambia • RwandAir • South African Airways

Contacts Zambia Tourism Agency Head Office: 1st Floor Petroda House, Great East Road, Lusaka Tel: (260 211) 229087 / 90 Email: info@zambia.travel Web: www.zambiatourism.com Zambia Tourism Agency Livingstone Tel: (260 213) 321404 / 5 Email: livingstone@zambia.travel The Victoria Falls Conference Centre and Boma

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EVENTS TO DIARISE

APRIL AFRICA POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE 4–7 POTCHEFSTROOM, SOUTH AFRICA DUBAI INTERNATIONAL DENTISTRY CONGRESS 4–7 DUBAI, UAE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PROTEOMICS AND BIOINFORMATICS 9 – 11 DUBAI, UAE INTERNATIONAL WINELANDS CONFERENCE 11 – 13 STELLENBOSCH, SOUTH AFRICA ILTM AFRICA 15 – 17 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SME AFRICA 16 – 17 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA SIGN AFRICA EXPO 19 – 20 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA TRAVEL WEEK 18 – 20 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA WORLD TRAVEL MARKET AFRICA 18 – 20 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA IBTM AFRICA 19 – 20 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

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SPORTS AND EVENTS TOURISM EXCHANGE 18 – 20 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA ARABIAN TRAVEL MARKET 22 – 25 DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES SA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES 23 – 25 PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA AFRIKABURN 23 – 29 TANKWA, SOUTH AFRICA NEXT GENERATION TELECOM SUMMIT 23 – 25 LUSAKA, ZAMBIA A’SAMBENI AFRICA BUSINESS TOURISM EXPO 24 – 28 BULAWAYO, ZIMBABWE ZIMBABWE INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR 24 – 28 BULAWAYO, ZIMBABWE HEALTHCARE TRAVEL EXPO 25 – 27 KIEV, UKRAINE HUNTEX 26 – 29 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA DECOREX CAPE TOWN 27 – 1 MAY CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

MAY FOOD AND HOSPITALITY AFRICA 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA HOSTEX 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA IFEA 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA THE DRINKS CABINET 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA CONTRACT FURNISHINGS AFRICA 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA TEA AND COFFEE AFRICA 6–8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA’S TRAVEL INDABA INDABA 8 – 10 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA WESTERN CAPE PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT FORUM 10 – 11 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA


EVENTS TO DIARISE

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IMEX FRANKFURT 15 – 17 FRANKFURT, GERMANY AFRICAN UTILITY WEEK 15 – 17 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA NAMPO HARVEST DAY 15 – 18 BOTHAVILLE, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA CONSTRUCTION AND TOTALLY CONCRETE EXPO 16 – 17 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA MAMAMAGIC – THE BABY EXPO 17 – 20 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA SECUREX 22 – 24 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA HEALTH 29 – 31 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

JUNE MARKEX 6–7 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA MADEX 6–7 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA COMRADES MARATHON EXPO 7–9 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA THE TOPS WINE SHOW 7–9 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA THE WEDDING EXPO 9 – 10 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SAPICS 2018 10 – 13 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA RAIL 12 – 13 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA WATER AFRICA 13 – 15 ACCRA, GHANA CHINA TRADE WEEK KENYA 13, 15, 18 NAIROBI, KENYA

IFSEC INTERNATIONAL 19 – 21 LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM SAPOA CONVENTION 19 – 21 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA FIREX INTERNATIONAL 19 – 21 LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM RETAIL SOLUTIONS AFRICA 21 – 23 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA INTERNATIONAL FAIR OF LISBON 23 – 1 JULY LISBON, PORTUGAL SAITEX AFRICA 24 – 26 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA HOSPITALITY WEEK 24 – 26 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA’S BIG 7 24 – 26 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA THE HOTEL SHOW AFRICA 24 – 26 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

Underberg, South Africa © Dan Grinwis via Unsplash

WE ARE AFRICA 14 – 17 CAPE TOWN

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ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

Carol Weaving Chairperson of AAXO

WORLD IN A DAY: B2B EVENTS UNLOCK TOURISM INNOVATION There’s no doubt that busy travel professionals use all the resources at their disposal to stay abreast of what’s trending, what’s coming and what’s ‘so last season’ in travel. But it’s a busy industry that’s constantly in a state of change, and nobody has time to spend hours a day online, tracking trends. This is why B2B events like World Travel Market Africa attract 5 000 visitors a year and will remain a catalyst for innovation and growth in the travel market for years to come. Because of their format, B2B events are the only platforms consolidating all the niche stakeholders, products and themes into one space within one intensive timeframe. Professionals can discover all the latest products and solutions, talk to vendors, network and strike up new partnerships and debate industry issues in a mere 2 to 3 days out of the office. For many, events like these are a once a year opportunity to move from an isolated sphere in which they deal only with end customers, to an environment in which they’re immersed in relevant industry information from around the world. It’s usually an eye-opener for them. Most attendees leave events like this inspired to change, encouraged to innovate and equipped to grow their businesses. And as Africa’s borders become increasingly porous

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for business, events like World Travel Market Africa, with their pan-African focus, draw together professionals from across the continent. For many, this could be their only opportunity to network with their peers from other countries, discuss partnership opportunities and learn from approaches that have worked elsewhere. So the seeds sown during a single event can grow to drive positive change and innovation that endures for years to come. As part of AAXO’s commitment to training facilitation, the creation of networking opportunities and to enhance the knowledge and opportunities that exhibition and event participation presents, AAXO will host an Open Conversation at WTM on 20 April at the Cape Town International Convention Centre. This is an opportunity for the industry to discuss pressing matters and glean advice and knowledge from professional peers.

MONICA FREIRE APPOINTED TO IAPCO COUNCIL Monica Freire, Congress Department Director of AIM Group International Portugal, has been elected to the new Council of IAPCO (The International Association of Professional Congress Organisers). The work of the council – of which members have a two-year term – is to administer the Association, ensure quality standards are upheld, and members are served, among other things. AIM Group is a leader in organising meetings, congresses and events, with a long history of active engagement in the sector. Freire was elected at the IAPCO General Assembly in Tokyo recently. “I am very honoured to have been elected as Council member of IAPCO,” she says. “As a representative of an international company it is an added honour to serve as a council member and to continue AIM Group’s dedication and close collaboration that we have witnessed over the years with the association”. Freire joined AIM Group International in 2010 and has been heading the Congress Department in Lisbon since 2012, dedicating her time to establishing the Lisbon office as one of the major players in the local industry as well as growing its presence internationally.


ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

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Chief Executive Officer at SAACI

SAACI – CONGRESS 2018 “IT TAKES A VILLAGE” It’s that time of the year again and we are gearing up for the SAACI 2018 Congress! SAACI 2018 will be held at Misty Hills in Johannesburg, South Africa, from 29 -31 July 2018. We are extremely excited to open registrations for this industry leading event and this year it will be directly aligned with our new focus areas of learning, growth and collaboration. As per the theme “It takes a village” this event will provide an abundance of networking opportunities, a solid learning platform and encouraging open and honest industry discussions to affect growth for our current and future members alike. This forward-thinking congress welcomes professionals from a variety of conference industry sectors including conference and event organisers, event management companies and service providers, as well as

industry stakeholders representing government, venues and destinations. Registration for SAACI 2018 is already open. Visit www.saacicongress.org for details and to register. We at SAACI have listened to our members and reduced the Congress Registration fees by 20% from 2017. Registration fees now also include your Gala Dinner registration. Don’t miss this industry leading event for fresh ideas, new concepts, thought leading speakers and great networking with industry colleagues. SAACI Congress 2018, can’t wait to see you there.

EGF ANNOUNCE 2018 COMMITTEE The Event Greening Forum’s Annual General Meeting was held on Monday, 26 February 2018. During the AGM, the following members were elected on the EGF’s committee for the year: • Chad Botha (Inspire Furniture) • Greg McManus (Heritage Environmental Management Company) • Lisa Jade Merven (GingerBiscuit) In addition, the following members were co-opted into the committee: • Justin Hawes (Scan Display Solutions) • Gary van der Watt (ReSource Design) • Gavin Burgess (Ultimate Data Sciences) These new members will join the following existing committee members: • Grace Stead (Steadfast Greening) • Lynn McLeod (individual member) • Morwesi Ramonyai (Borena Energy) • Neo Mohlatlole (7 Colours Communications) • Doug Rix (EXSA) • Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa (Fedhasa) • Janet Landey (IFEA Africa) • Helen Brewer (The MICE Academy) • Rudi van der Vyver (SAACI) • Tim Jones (SACIA/TPSA) • Bernard Sebothoma (SA Roadies) • Hannlie du Toit (SATSA) For more information, visit www.eventgreening.co.za.

Photo by Antoine Beauvillain on Unsplash

Rudi Van Der Vyver

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DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS

ADVERTISERS AAXO

ITB Asia

PAGE 34

INSIDE FRONT COVER

T.

T.

+27 11 549 8300

+65 6635 1188

E. info@aaxo.co.za

E. siti.banding@itb-asia.com

W. www.aaxo.co.za

W. www.itb-asia.com

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CONTACTS Cover Image: Courtesy of Buffalo City (East London International Convention Centre) Publisher: Lance Gibbons lance@filmeventmedia.co.za Editor in Chief: Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@filmeventmedia.co.za Assistant Editor: Kim Crowie kim@filmeventmedia.co.za Writer: Susan Reynard susan@filmeventmedia.co.za Head of Design: Sheree Steenkamp sheree@filmeventmedia.co.za

Buffalo City

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FRONT COVER, PAGE 09

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+27 43 705 9095

+27 11 520 7000

E. mirandano@buffalocity.gov.za

E. shavanib@jse.co.za

W. www.buffalocitymetro.gov.za

W. www.jse.co.za

EPG

The Norval Foundation

INSIDE BACK COVER

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+27 21 674 0646

+27 76 476 1299

Special Projects Designer / Illustrator: Lauren Smith lauren@filmeventmedia.co.za Junior Designer: Caitlin Perrett caitlin@filmeventmedia.co.za Business Manager: Coleen Tapson coleen@filmeventmedia.co.za Business Development Manager: Shaheen Jutzen shaheen@filmeventmedia.co.za Production Manager: Katlego Molele katlego@filmeventmedia.co.za Traffic Manager: Tamlyn Peters tamlyn@filmeventmedia.co.za

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Expo Centre

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+27 11 880 5883

E. info@expocentre.co.za

E. info@saaci.org

W. www.expocentre.co.za

W. www.saaci.org

IMEX Frankfurt

World Travel Market Africa

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+44 1273 227311

JOIN US

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LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL

BUSINESS-EVENT INDUSTRY Distributed in collaboration with the SANCB to Event Organisers, PCOs, Exhibition Organisers, Incentive Travel Houses, Corporate Clients and Government Offices; and through the following Media Partnerships:

CONTACT COLEEN TAPSON: Tel. +27 21 674 0646 Email: coleen@filmeventmedia.co.za

Photo by LoboStudio Hamburg © Unsplash

Meetings Africa | International Meetings Review | ibtm world | EXSA Conference and AGM | ibtm arabia | IMEX America | IMEX Frankfurt | IT&CM Asia Pacific | IT&CMA China | Loeries Creative Week | Markex | SAACI Congress | SITE - Swahili International Tourism Expo | WTM Africa | Zambia International Travel Expo


BRING YOUR BRAND TO

LIFE OVER 50 000M2 INDOOR SPACE

24-HOUR SECURITY

CONTEMPORARY CONFERENCE FACILITIES REGISTERED HELICOPTER LANDING SITE

30 MIN TO ALL INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTS EASE OF ACCESS Contact Details:

Expo Centre, Cnr Rand Show and Nasrec roads, Nasrec, 2000, Johannesburg

AT SOUTHERN AFRICA’S LARGEST FULLY-CONTAINED EXHIBITION, OVER 100 000M2 CONFERENCE OUTDOOR SPACE AND EVENTS VENUE

20 000 SECURE PARKING BAYS

5-STAR CATERING

CLOSE PROXIMITY TO HOTELS

The Event Issue 04  

Issue 04 of the Event is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we explore the life of exhibition organisers, conferences at casin...

The Event Issue 04  

Issue 04 of the Event is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we explore the life of exhibition organisers, conferences at casin...

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