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Issue 01 | 2018

+ THE FUTURE OF EVENTS

How the Business-Events Industry Will Change in 2018

+ WILD CONFERENCES Where Business Meets Natural Beauty


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Conservation, Partnerships & Ecotourism


CONTENTS

www.theevent.co.za

02. 03.

BUSINESS EVENTS OF THE FUTURE

04.

Kim Crowie explores how events have changed to appeal to an increasingly younger audience.

06. 07. 08. 09.

MEETINGS AND GOLF When business and leisure intersect, meetings are oft at their most productive, says Susan Reynard.

10. 14. 18. 20.

THE WILD SIDE OF CONFERENCING An intrinsically African experience, conferencing in the bush is ideal for small to mid-sized gatherings.

22. 24. 28. 30.

KZN: RENOWNED BUSINESSEVENTS LOCATION A popular tourism spot and well-known meetings location, KZN continues to grow from strength to strength.

New Exhibition Company to Manage Meetings Africa, INDABA Lack of Female Representation in Leadership Roles SA Unveils ‘Accelerated Drive’ to Attract More Business Events 56th ICCA Congress Ends on a High More Bid Wins for the Western Cape Protecting IP ibtm world Sets Appointments Record Business Events of the Future Meetings and Golf, a Winning Formula Flexibility Wins Association Business Tech Talk: Cyber Security for Events Conferencing in the Wild Trends and Opportunities for Exhibitions in 2018 UFI and Explori Global Exhibitor Insights KwaZulu-Natal Popular for Tourism and Business Events

32.

Events to Diarise

34.

Associations News

36.

Directory of Advertisers

01


02

NEWS

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SYNERGY APPOINTED TO

MANAGE SAT’S KEY STRATEGIC EVENTS Synergy Business Events (Pty) Ltd has, following an official tender process in compliance with Public Finance Management Act and National Treasury regulations, been appointed by South African Tourism to service both Meetings Africa and Africa’s Travel Indaba for the next three years.

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eetings Africa 2018 will take place on 27 and 28 February 2018 at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg, preceded by the Business Opportunity Networking Day (BONDay), dedicated solely to exhibitors, on 26 February 2018. Africa’s Travel Indaba will take place from 8 to 10 May 2018 at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli International Convention Centre in Durban. Synergy Business Events is an exhibitions and events company that is 60% owned by Tiisetso Tau (of Tau Management Consulting), with additional shareholding by Scan Display and the Scan Display BEE Trust. With little more than three months to go, Meetings Africa, the continent’s premier business events trade show organised by the South Africa National

Convention Bureau, will enter its 13 th year in 2018 with Synergy’s logistical support. The newly-inked three-year partnership with this experienced and capable exhibition management company is further testament to South African Tourism’s mandate of sustainably empowering black-owned businesses, says South African Tourism’s chief executive officer, Sisa Ntshona. In keeping with this ethos, the Meetings Africa 2018 trade show is aptly themed “Shared Economies”, alluding to the importance of the collaborative efforts of destination marketing organisations, the travel trade, media, governments and other stakeholders in working towards a transformed African economy. Ntshona adds: “Meetings Africa 2018 will draw together players from the broader African continent under its strategic

Meetings Africa 2018 will draw together players from the broader African continent under its strategic positioning of Advancing Africa Together, and aims to attract more regional and international business events to our shores. This will, in turn, boost tourism revenues and create more sustainable jobs for our country and our continent.

positioning of Advancing Africa Together, and aims to attract more regional and international business events to our shores. This will, in turn, boost tourism revenues and create more sustainable jobs for our country and our continent.” Official Meetings Africa 2018 registrations for buyers, media and exhibitors are now open and early-bird discounts are available for different categories of participation. Registration for the continent’s largest travel trade show, Africa’s Travel Indaba, which will also be managed by Synergy Business Events, will open on 24 November 2017. Ntshona believes that during these strategic trade shows, “innovation flourishes because of the dialogues and conversations that lead to collaborations and partnerships for inclusive growth - in tourism and the economy as a whole”.

To register for Meetings Africa 2018: Visit: www.meetingsafrica.co.za Email: exhibitor@meetingsafrica. co.za or info@meetingsafrica.co.za

For Africa’s Travel Indaba registrations: Visit: www.indaba-southafrica.co.za Email: exhibitor@indabasouthafrica.co.za


NEWS

www.theevent.co.za

03

LACK OF FEMALE REPRESENTATION IN LEADERSHIP ROLES

The annual Women in Tourism Conference highlighted a number of issues for the tourism industry, most notably, the lack of women participating in ownership, board representation and executive management.

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he 2017 Women in Tourism Conference took place in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, with the theme Sustainable Tourism: A Tool for Radical Socio-Economic Development for Women. The two-day conference provided a platform for dialogue on the challenges that affect women in this sector, from funding constraints to the establishments of support structures and incentives. A baseline study conducted by the Tourism BBBEE Council on the state of tourism transformation revealed that only 11% of the enterprises haves black female representation on boards and in executive and senior management positions. The overall rate of transformation was low. “Globally, tourism has recorded its 7th year of sustained growth despite the economic slowdown,” Minister of Tourism Tokozile Xasa said in her opening address. “This means that this sector isn’t just a major contributor towards our country’s GDP, but it is also a source of investment and job creation, especially for our rural areas. Tourism is already contributing to our economy by supporting over 1.5 million jobs in total and bringing in about 9% to our Gross Domestic Product.” She said that what now needs to be done is to identify opportunities for women in this sector and to drive female empowerment initiatives. The Department of Tourism has launched a 30 in 5 campaign with a focus towards representation for the next five years. This means that it has set a target of 30% to facilitate participation by women in ownership, board representation and

Minister of Tourism Tokozile Xasa executive management. “Our strategy is to drive this initiative through the pillars of respect, recognition, representation and reward, for and of women in the tourism sector,” Xasa explained. Efforts are now being made to establish Women In Tourism (WIT) chapters in all SA’s provinces, which will drive and escalate issues related to the empowerment of women in the sector. “The National Department of Tourism has moved to implement the Tourism Incentive Programme, to give support to women to have access to markets,” the Minister added. In addition, an Executive Women Development Programme has been formalised in partnership with UNISA School of Business and Leadership in order to strengthen mentorship programmes and build capacity, as well as encourage the exchange of skills and networking amongst other women in business. “Collectively as women, working with key strategic partners, we need to have a voice to influence the policies and programme of

the National Department of Tourism,” Xasa said. “We all need to ensure that South Africa and the industry understand that women constitute the majority in the tourism sector.”

The conference concluded with a consensus on a number of resolutions: •

The current Advisory Committee with work with WIT Provincial Chapters to develop a constitution for the formation of an autonomous body that will drive female empowerment initiatives. The Chapters will act as a support structure to coach and mentor new entrants to the tourism industry. The Department of Tourism will facilitate public-private partnerships that will assist women in financial education and management. Through the Tourism Incentive Programme, the Department will assist women in reaching domestic and international trade shows in order to market their products.


04

NEWS

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SA UNVEILS ‘ACCELERATED DRIVE’ TO ATTRACT MORE BUSINESS EVENTS At ibtm world, South Africa’s Deputy Minister of Tourism, Elizabeth Thabethe, announced a “bold and ambitious” delegate-boosting plan as part of a Bidding Support Programme to propel the country’s business-events industry forward.

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he South African National Convention Bureau (SANCB), a business unit of South African Tourism, attended ibtm to emphasise that South Africa – and Africa – is “open for business and on an accelerated drive to increase our share of the global business-events pie,” Ms. Thabethe told a press conference in Barcelona. This drive entails bringing more high-value business-events delegates to South Africa, aiding economic growth and sustaining much-needed jobs throughout the broader tourism economy, Ms. Thabethe explained. This is besides the contribution such events make to the local knowledge economy, she noted. Announcing the results of a threeyear study into South Africa’s businessevents industry, Ms. Thabethe said South Africa hosts about a million business delegates every year and that the local events industry sustains more than 250 000 jobs, directly and indirectly. She revealed that the businessevents industry contributes about R115-billion to South Africa’s gross domestic product every year. “This research proves what our industry has always suspected – that South Africa’s business-events industry contributes significantly to our broader tourism economy,” Ms. Thabethe told the assembled media. Importantly, she added, the study shows that delegates have an appetite to experience South Africa’s leisure attractions and that most have the

disposable income to enjoy an extended holiday add-on to their business trip. “Armed with this research, we want to entice business-events delegates to come to South Africa, stay for longer and bring people with them,” she said. To help achieve this tourism growth, the South African government has allocated R90-million for a Bidding Support Programme to enable South Africa to bid more aggressively for international association conferences, meetings, incentives and exhibitions over the next three years. This grant will give South Africa “extra muscle” to lobby for and attract big-ticket events, Ms. Thabethe said. The country is already widely regarded as a “go-to” destination for hosting international conferences, particularly in the medical and scientific field – last year’s International Aids Conference being a case in point. “Such high-profile events are putting South Africa on the map as an exciting and cost-effective option for meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions. We have all the infrastructure, technical

capacity, expertise and experience that’s needed, not to mention extremely welcome, service-oriented and capable people.” But more needs to be done for the country’s business-events sector to reach its full potential, she said. Hence the need for the Bidding Support Programme. As part of this, the SANCB is spearheading a global delegate-boosting campaign, targeting members of the association conferences that are already confirmed to take place in South Africa over the next five years. “We have already started reaping the rewards of this fund,” Ms. Thabethe said, revealing that since April the SANCB had submitted 54 bids that could potentially contribute R1.6-billion to the economy, attract 57 660 delegates and generate more than 214 combined conference days. She noted that each time a bluechip international event was hosted in South Africa, it not only added to the country’s prestige – “it also delivers important socio-economic benefits to our people, which is why Africa is the best place to bring your next business event, meeting or conference”.

This drive entails bringing more high-value businessevents delegates to South Africa, aiding economic growth and sustaining much-needed jobs throughout the broader tourism economy.


JSE

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05

LAUNCHING A NEW PRODUCT? THE JSE OFFERS A UNIQUE VENUE FOR CORPORATE EVENTS Host your next product launch at the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) and provide a unique experience that will set your company aside from the rest.

The JSE is not only Africa’s largest stock exchange; it also boasts one of Sandton’s unique corporate venue spaces. The JSE offers sophisticated conference, boardroom, auditorium and meeting spaces and is situated in the heart of Sandton’s financial node. Not only can you host your corporate event or signature market open at the JSE, but also use our venue for your next product launch. Some of the unique events held at the JSE in 2017 included the Remy Martin product launch, which saw the auditorium and wallboard area transform into a sophisticated lounge area with a popup bar that exuded the sophistication synonymous with the Remy Martin brand.

The auditorium and wallboard area were also transformed into an elegant tech bar for the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7. What adds to the uniqueness of the JSE venue hire is the fact that it is a one stop shop for anything you would require to run a successful event. From catering to technical sound and media equipment hire, the JSE offers it all. In addition to the infrastructure, cabling and technologically advanced equipment, the venue has an onsite sound engineer and technicians to ensure everything runs smoothly.

Parking is available on site for a limited number of VIPs as well as in the adjacent underground parkade. Usher your guests into a realm of sophistication where you can be assured you will be provided with the highest level of assistance and value for money. Hosting your next event at the Address for Success will lift your company profile to the next level.

FACT FILE Venues • Atrium (includes bar and entertainment area) (180 pax) • Auditorium (145 pax) • Meeting/breakaway rooms (20 pax each) • Executive dining room (22 pax) Services • Product launches • Set-up • Standard AV • Optional extras (wide range of tech) • Webinars • Road shows • Market opens • Videography • Value-added products (e.g. videos) for results presentations • Wallboard advertising • Free-standing touch screen • Catering Contact Tel: (011) 520 7131 www.jse.co.za


06

NEWS

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ICCA CONGRESS ENDS ON A HIGH

The 56th ICCA Congress took place from 12-15 November 2017, and was known as the biggest ‘congress on congresses’ ever.

View of a session on social media at ICCA Congress © ICCA World

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he 56th ICCA Congress, which took place against the picturesque backdrop of Prague in the Czech Republic, brought a record number of delegates together. Over 1 000 ICCA members, suppliers and associations were in attendance, with a number of new initiatives introduced to engage the association meetings industry and further position ICCA as a global knowledge hub. One of these initiatives was the introduction off e180’s leading event technology Braindate. A web-based knowledge-sharing platform that allows event participants to book 30 minute one-on-one or group conversations, it assisted delegates in forging connections in more meaningful ways. Braindate uses a recommendation engine to pull from each person’s behaviour and interests to highlight an individualised selection of topics. Each participant can then curate their own learning experience more easily, based on what they can learn from the collective genius around them. The three-day education programme was made up of custom-designed content, making it as relevant for ICCA members as possible. This assisted in stimulating strategic thinking and considering future

directions the industry is likely to evolve in – as well as the economic, technological and societal changes driving this evolution. Some of these highlights included a panel discussion on association meetings from 100-400 attendees, where speakers explored questions, ideas and opportunities for smaller meetings, and whether certain destinations are better suited to smaller rather than larger association events. Another was a session titled ‘Disruption and New Hyper-Competitive Environments Facing International Associations: Dangers and Solutions’. Other events of note were the ‘shark tank’ or pitching sessions where association executives shared their idea with the audience and speakers, value-based pricing in the meetings industry, ‘predatory conferences’ – a serious challenge to bona-fide associations and their quality education programmes, destination security and risk strategies, and associations’ role in the new education paradigm of today. The ICCA President’s choice session was ‘Collaborative Professionalism: The Next Knowledge Frontier’, where Professor Andrew Hargreaves discussed how we innovate, move knowledge around and build communities together in a fast-

paced world of increasing diversity. Organisations that collaborate, he showed, including with competitors, outperform those that don’t. Effective collaboration improves teachers’ performance more than any other factor. Collaboration gives your work meaning and purpose and also keeps you on your toes. In the session he informed delegates how to collaborate effectively with depth, focus and purpose. The ICCA Congress programme had a regular Tech Bar where guests could learn anything from mastering LinkedIn to Twitter 101. It also included more indepth sessions such as useful apps for busy events professionals, how to build and mobilise an event community, some deep dives, and a livestreaming boot camp. In addition, ICCA also hosted a ‘hackathon’ to develop a new tool to guide people in their personal career path. Also of note were the Connect sessions, where delegates could relax and kick back with guided meditation, healthy refreshments, yoga, and wellbeing workshops. There was even a session on how to incorporate health and wellbeing into tradeshow and meeting agendas, floorplans, and sponsorship opportunities. Flanders Meeting and Convention Centre Antwerp won ICCA Best Marketing Award for their campaign ‘A Room with a Zoo’, with 2017 Global Destination Sustainability Index Ward Winners, Gothenburg Convention Bureau and Glasgow Convention Bureau, receiving their trophies in Prague. Ray Bloom, Chair of the IMEX Group, was honoured with the ICCA Moises Shuster Award at the farewell dinner. The ICCA Congress closed on a high note, with Kaosiung in Chinese Taipei selected as the 2020 ICCA Congress destination, and Dubai beginning its countdown to host the 2018 ICCA Congress.


NEWS

www.theevent.co.za

07

MORE BID WINS FOR

THE WESTERN CAPE Cape Town and the Western Cape’s Convention Bureau secures 2 600 expected delegates, with an economic impact of R37-million.

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esgro is pleased to announce that the Cape Town and Western Cape Convention Bureau, a unit of the Agency, has secured 2 600 expected delegates in the second quarter of the 2017/18 financial year (July – October 2017), emanating from four new successful bids. This is estimated to have an economic impact of R37-million. If one combines the results from the first and second quarter (April – October 2017), the bureau has secured 18 new bids with an estimated economic impact of R157-million for the destination, Business tourism is an important component of the Western Cape’s economy. Not only does it bring in delegates from around the world who will spend money in our province, it also contributes significantly to the knowledge economy. The four successful Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE) bids secured in this quarter will all take place during low season (May – September) and are broken down as follows: • International Wikimania Conference (September 2018) with an economic impact of R9 630 000

SpaceOps International Congress (May 2020) with an economic impact of R10 272 000 15th International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant (July 2021) with an economic impact of R10 272 000 Volvo Trucks Corporate Incentive Group (September 2018) with an economic impact of R6 876 000

The Convention Bureau services include delegate boosting, hosting, lobbying and onsite support to new and existing clients, with nine such engagements taking place in the quarter. The bureau also organised and hosted four site inspections. All of the hosting was done prior to the bid being awarded, which meant the site inspection was an important determining factor as to whether or not a destination is fit to and able to accommodate the bid requirements. 29 stakeholder engagements were also conducted, including attending the Stellenbosch 360 Business Tourism Development meetings and a hosting of a Legacy Workshop. Chief Marketing Officer at Wesgro, Judy Lain, said: “On behalf of the team, I would like to thank the South Africa National Convention Bureau for their

support. It would not be possible to land these important conferences without their contribution and help. And of course, the industry itself deserves a special mention. They remain the backbone of the business-tourism sector in the Cape.” Wesgro CEO, Tim Harris said: “I am extremely impressed by the determination demonstrated by our convention bureau team. They are strengthening the business tourism industry, and helping grow the economy and create jobs, every single day. The fact that bureau is currently researching 93 leads, which should they be converted, would have an economic impact exceeding R2-billion is proof of this.” Alan Winde, Minister of Economic Opportunities, said the figures were excellent news for the Western Cape’s tourism sector. “This is another indication of steady growth in our tourism sector. Projections for tourism arrivals for December and January also show a five percent year-on-year increase.” “We know business tourism is a lucrative niche, and that many business tourists often return for leisure with their families. I’d like to commend the team for their commitment to growing tourism, and our reputation as a world-class business destination.”


08

SPOTLIGHT

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PROTECTING IP UFI recommendations for the protection of intellectual property rights at exhibitions.

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n exhibition, as the marketplace of an industry sector, is the perfect location for product and service counterfeiters to undertake illegal practices. However, exhibitions also contribute in the fight against these practices as they represent an easy way for manufacturers and service providers to identify counterfeited products and services, and potential threats. Exhibitions provide excellent opportunities to obtain information on competitors and to discover the existence of new products and services, hence pinpointing potential IPR infringements at the initial stage prior to large-scale manufacturing and commercialisation.

UFI’s Recommendations Exhibition organisers should ensure an equitable business environment during tradeshows by informing, protecting and assisting their exhibitors in acting against brand and product piracy: Before the event, organisers should provide exhibitors with information on IPR protection via a specific brochure to be provided with the registration/ participation forms, on the organiser’s website, in the exhibitors’ manual or in the tradeshow’s “General Terms and Conditions”. This information should contain general advice for exhibitors and include the following recommendations:

That exhibitors protect and register trademarks, patents or designs before the trade show starts, to obtain a valid right (an exhibition destroys novelty) and hence use all forms of legal protection, both in general and during the event. The use of a specialised patent and trademark lawyer regarding registration alternatives, requirements, procedures and maintenance. Exhibitors should bring to the trade fair all original documents or certified copies of their patent or trademark rights, so that a possible infringement can be established during the event. Any verdict already obtained against an exhibiting pirate should also be included. Exhibitors should be encouraged to indicate that their products or services are protected by IP rights, where applicable. If an exhibitor believes that another exhibitor will infringe their rights then they should make the appropriate application to the customs authorities (when applicable), who can then stop suspicious consignments, investigate them, take samples, and destroy copies. This should of course take place before the exhibition. In addition, the organiser should also provide both before and during the trade fair: The contact details of the person responsible for IPR issues within the organising company.

The contact details of local/national IPR organisations, customs authorities and patent and trademark lawyers willing to represent exhibitors who wish to pursue legal action against an alleged infringer. This may include the possible subsequent identification of counterfeit products during the trade fair.

Organisers should be able to provide a neutral arbitration, arbitrator, or judge to help determine if there is a violation or to resolve IPR disputes during the trade fair, and should provide interpreters to facilitate communication in the case of disputes with foreign exhibitors. When appropriate and if possible, organisers should provide an on-site office, a special stand or a point of contact, to deal with any IPR requests or complaints for the entire duration of the trade fair. During the trade fair, an exhibitor can take the following measures with the help of a lawyer: • Declaration to cease and desist: The “copier” signs an undertaking that he will no longer offer the copied products for sale and will pay a fine in the event of a further infringement. • Preliminary Injunction: The holder of the patent or design right obtains a temporary court injunction prohibiting the “copier” from selling and exhibiting certain products.

If an exhibitor believes that another exhibitor will infringe their rights then they should make the appropriate application to the customs authorities (when applicable), who can then stop suspicious consignments, investigate them, take samples, and destroy copies. Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash


SPOTLIGHT

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ibtm world 2016 © ibtm world

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ibtm world 2016 © ibtm world

IBTM WORLD SETS

APPOINTMENTS RECORD Over 74 000 appointments took place at ibtm world’s 30th anniversary show.

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ore than 74 000 meeting appointments took place at the latest ibtm world, which took place from 28-30 November 2017 in Barcelona. This was up 23% compared with the 2016 show, setting a new record. Some 3 000 exhibiting companies from 150 countries were in attendance, with 3 463 buyers and thousands of visitors joining the event and taking part in a busy schedule of meetings, networking and educational sessions. “In the 12 months preceding this year’s event, we spent a huge amount of time analysing and sourcing data and speaking to our customers to truly understand how we can best service their needs,”

said ibtm Portfolio Director Kerry Prince. “On the back of this, we made several changes and innovations, including introducing an enhanced hosted buyer programme, adding two renowned keynote speakers to the education programme and introducing the Start-Up Pavilion for new and emerging tech companies. “It has been fantastic to see first-hand the positive impact of the changes we’ve made. Ahead of the event we broke our record for the number of appointments made and not only have we received very positive feedback on the quality of those meetings – and seen deals done on the show floor – but also, we’ve been able to manage and reduce the number of ‘no-show’ appointments – all of which

EXHIBITION

n o i t c e f r Pe

makes a real difference to our attendees. “Of course, we’re always looking to the future and we’re committed to remaining on the cutting edge of the industry. There will be more innovations to come next year, including the introduction of a third keynote speaker session, following the success of this year’s programme. We’re already looking forward to coming back to Barcelona for ibtm world 2018.” Concierge Eventbot, created by Sciensio, won the ibtm world Tech Watch Award and Audience Engagement Award. Dr Rob Davidson was presented with the ibtm Lifetime Achievement award in recognition of his dedication to educating and inspiring young people entering the meetings industry.


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FEATURE

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BUSINESS EVENTS OF THE FUTURE Kim Crowie explores how conferences and exhibitions have changed their structure and content to appeal to a wider and younger audience.

Photo by Jesse Schoff on Unsplash

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glance through the recently concluded IMEX America programme leaves one wondering if it’s a day spa, a tech bootcamp, or a holiday retreat. Snappy titles for sessions like “Is Teambuilding Dead?”, “Guided Meditation: The Crystal Cave”, and “Powerful Learning In A World of Infobesity” dominate the menu. But what exactly does this mean for the business-events industry? Are we turning into big softies? Or is this simply the future catching up with us? In this segment, we analyse ten trends that are informing and shaping the business-events sector of tomorrow, giving you some futuristic reasons why you should get your next event on board.

Photo by Lily Lvnatikk on Unsplash

1. Hip, Happening Session Titles Ever wonder why so few people are attending your educational track? Perhaps it’s because it looks boring. Yes, looks can be deceiving, but as we’ve learned in the world of marketing, an attractive name and lively presentation can make all the difference. Say goodbye to a drab programme and hello to an exciting, eye-catching session people will immediately want to be part of. Why it’s important The event industry is changing to incorporate an increasingly younger audience (hello, millennials), and you definitely want to be inclusive of this market segment. Not only is the world at their fingertips (read: they’re always sharing their experiences live and online) but they genuinely want to be engaged and interact – far more than generations before them.

2. Shorter Conference Sessions Let’s be honest with ourselves. No one really enjoys sitting and listening to the same person drone on for half a day. Unless, of course, what they say is immensely interesting. These days, we’re seeing fewer and fewer three hour conference sessions and more 30-45 minute sessions. IMEX took it a step further and offered a lovely range of times to choose from (anywhere between 20-60 minutes), with some of the more pertinent ones repeating a few days in a row to ensure delegates aren’t missing out. Why it’s important As the world’s attention span gets increasingly shorter (unless the content is truly appealing) the need has arisen to not only cut long, waffling sessions down, but also to engage in more audience interaction. Shorter time spans ensure that you have someone’s full attention since they’re keen on absorbing as much as possible.


FEATURE

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What do sustainability, inclusivity, technology, and wellbeing have in common? These are the topics that are being covered more often and in more detail with every passing business event. Not only are they informed by the global state of society – equal pay and respect for women, recognition of the LGBTQI community, diversity in the workplace, and ways in which to save the planet while doing business, to name a few – but they also promote a healthier and far more educated outlook on business work ethic. Why it’s important Businesses are (finally) beginning to sit up and pay attention to more than their bottom line. They realise that change is necessary and unavoidable. They want to be more sustainable and inclusive. Often, however, they are not sure how to go about this – hence pertinent topics, like navigating the various forms of technology, being introduced. It also signals that more women, people of colour and of LGBTQI status are participating in the events community and want their voices heard in the same way that others are.

4. The How is as Important as the What

Photo by rawpixel-com on Unsplash

3. A Changing World View

There’s been a conscientious move away from the topic of a conference or session being a drawcard. That is, the way in which it is presented is as – if not more – important. Crowds want to be wowed. But they also want to learn creatively and efficiently. Gone are the days of the stale classroom-type streams, given up in favour of more immediate attendee gratification, and more mental stimulation in learning. This might come in the form of jokes, creating dialogue or discussion around topics, or doing audience votes among other things. Why it’s important As better content and presentations are offered, a unique trend has come out of it: the increased use of CMP (Certified Meeting Professional) points or credits. This is a huge motivator for people to attend conference streams where one can work towards being an internationallyrecognised meeting professional. It’s also great for conferences as it encourages planners to look for content that can truly fulfil a delegate’s needs.

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Photo by Nicholas Green on Unsplash

Gone are the days of the stale classroomtype streams, given up in favour of more immediate attendee gratification, and more mental stimulation in learning.

5. Dealing with Disruption

Photo by Andreas Klassen on Unsplash

As the world undergoes the fourth industrial revolution, business events are increasingly offering streams on how to navigate these fast-paced changes. A large part of this includes dedicated technology sessions – from tech bars and the latest tech trends to more practical advice such as hosting hybrid events, how to spend less on AV, and mitigating risk with event data. Why it’s important Not only is the older generation finding it increasingly difficult to cope and navigate this strange new world, but even younger event professionals struggle to keep up with the sheer pace of development. This creates a need for continual adjustment and education across technology, marketing and related sectors.


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FEATURE

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Photo by Brittany Gaiser on Unsplash

7. The Grouping of Events

Expensive, formal gala dinners are increasingly being phased out in favour of more relaxed networking opportunities and mixers. One of the main reasons for this change is the current global economic climate, where purse strings are incessantly being tightened. Another reason is that the delegates of today are less inclined to enjoy a formal programme when what they truly need to do is maximise face-to-face meetings.

Multiple events and conferences are now pairing up to offer extra value for money and to appeal to ‘binge’ attendees. We’ve seen this happen more often over the last few years, even in southern Africa, with prime examples such as Africa Travel Week that brings ibtm africa, ILTM Africa, and WTM Africa together, or Food and Hospitality Africa, which combines Hostex, IFEA, Tea and Coffee Africa, The Drinks Cabinet and Contract Furnishing Africa.

Why it’s important This may be the digital age, but there’s still nothing better than meeting people in person. An event that facilitates as many networking opportunities as possible – sometimes even between conference sessions – is always going to come out on top. Delegates need to meet in order to conduct the all-important business or outcomes that they ultimately attend your conference or exhibition for.

Why it’s important Once again, it’s value for money. Attendees get to widen their sales leads and broaden their horizons by learning about similar fields to the business sector in which they work. It also makes for an ideal way to partner with events that would otherwise be known as competitors, allowing planners to collaborate in areas they might not have considered before.

Most exhibitions and conferences now have sustainability programmes in place, as well as conference sessions catering to those who wish to learn more about being greener in the events industry. Even South Africa has jumped on board with a number of expos that now have Green Stand Awards. The Event Greening Forum has also created resource documents to assist trade shows in upholding the minimum standards for sustainable events. Why it’s important Events take a heavy toll on resources, society and the environment and can generate significant waste and put a strain on resources like water and energy. This is why, more and more, organisers are finding that it’s not only more costefficient to create a sustainable and ecofriendly event, but it also assists the local community and ecosystem in the long run.

Photo by Javier Graterol on Unsplash

Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

6. Goodbye Gala, Hello Mixer

8. Sustainability is King

Delegates of today are less inclined to enjoy a formal programme when what they truly need to do is maximise face-to-face meetings.


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Photo by Angela Franklin on Unsplash

As a younger, more technology-savvy generation joins the events industry, we will see an uptick in professionals pushing for change in event design and the use of technology in this space. An example of this is the introduction of facial recognition, which is predicted to make a strong entrance into the events industry in 2018, impacting delegate management. Augmented reality for sponsorship is another avenue currently being explored, while the likes of app interpreters – live translation through apps – and feedback via chatbots are quickly gaining speed.

Other Trends of Note

Why it’s important Although we may not see these trends surface in Africa for several years, they will undoubtedly make their way here in the short to medium term and it’s worth being in the know when that day inevitably arrives.

An increased focus on health and wellbeing is apparent in the food offerings, conference streams and pre- or postevent programmes. Cybersecurity – and security in general – is a hot topic on the cards for upcoming events, which will likely inform both destinations and the running of events. As Destination Managers and Convention Bureaus offer similar services, there is increased pressure for differentiation and redesign. Sexual harassment is a hot topic that continues to grow, and the events sector is an ideal stage for harassment or violence. A more active role is required to prevent such situations.

Photo by Luca Iaconelli on Unsplash

As a younger, more technology-savvy generation joins the events industry, we will see an uptick in professionals pushing for change in event design and the use of technology in this space.

10. Tech, Tech and More Tech

9. Associations Must Deliver Associations are under unprecedented pressure to deliver value to members in the 21st century. This can be seen in a number

Why it’s important This pressure comes as membership declines globally, with some associations reporting drops of 50% in their member base over the last decade. More consolidations are expected as associations partner and collaborate with other organisations, as well as private and public sectors in an effort to step up their member offerings.

Photo by The Climate Reality Project on Unsplash

of new initiatives coming to the fore, including professional certification, handson practice, and tangible opportunities for business and development.


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FEATURE

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Photo by Igor Ovsyannykov on Unsplash

MEETINGS AND GOLF, A WINNING FORMULA

Holding events and conferences at golf clubs and resorts gives delegates the value add of mixing business with sport, spa and open spaces. Susan Reynard reports.

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vents and meetings held at golf clubs or resorts, whether for the day or overnight, yield a number of benefits for delegates and organisers. Golf estates, clubs and resorts are available in cities for a quick commute and breath of fresh air and in the countryside across South Africa for destination events with incredible views. We take a quick look at what’s on offer.

Golf in the city Private golf clubs County Club Johannesburg, which has impressive grounds in Auckland Park and Woodmead, are popular for all manner

of events but these are only available at the request of a member. The Fairway Hotel, Spa and Golf Resort is part of the Guvon Hotels Group and has a symbiotic relationship with its landlord Randpark Golf Club and between the two facilities offer a range of corporate golf related activities. Once through the gates, the property provides a peaceful green haven close to the city centre and major highways but minus the hustle and bustle. Fairway caters for conferences, functions, corporate golf days, weddings and leisure guests. Conference facilities include Windsor I and II rooms which open up to accommodate 180 pax;

three boardrooms that also serve as breakaway rooms for 10 pax each or open up to accommodate 80 pax; and Randpark I, II and III boardrooms open up onto the Vista Deck where cocktails from the upstairs bar are ideal for sundowners. Accommodation includes 116 rooms split between 62 hotel rooms and 14 double-storey golf villas, each with four en suite bedrooms. Also on site are Balata Restaurant, Bar Verve, gym, tennis courts, private pool courtyard and a luxury spa. Houghton Golf Estate provides a “green lung” in the city and a place to escape for business or sport or both.


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It features an 18-hole Jack Nicklaus design golf course and conferencing facilities on offer include the Executive Suite for between and 50 pax and The View which accommodates 60 to 200 pax. Organisers of conferences are able to manage lighting, sound and visual setup from a pad at their fingertips and furniture is designed for comfort. An events professional is on hand to assist with the planning and execution of golf days from beginning to end, including: • Golf day planning including marshalling, starting and scoring • Golf clinics • Spa • Sponsored holes management • Corporate clothing and promotional gifts • Gifts and prizes • Catering • Decor • Photographer • Master of ceremonies and entertainment

Serengeti Golf Club Close to the OR Tambo International Airport but outside the city, Serengeti is a thoroughly modern and accessible golf club in Johannesburg with a 27-hole Jack Nicklaus signature golf course that opened in 2009. It has a multifaceted clubhouse. Golf days are offered on Monday, Tuesday or Thursday. An experienced team is on hand to help with all aspects of ensuring the event is a success. Services include: dedicated coordinator; variety of customisable packages and rates; complimentary starting, scoring and marshalling services; complimentary personalised of scorecards, bag tags and cart names; fully equipped golf academy for personalised lessons or clinics; complimentary prize-giving venue; and Proshop. Conferencing facilities include: four banqueting venues that can be joined or separated into various

configurations and accommodate 20 to 225 pax; a ballroom that accommodates 300 pax; and executive boardroom for maximum 25 pax. Conference facilities are flexible and can serve as breakaway rooms or main venues. There are a variety of accommodation providers nearby, although none on site. Serengeti also offers to have your customized golf event published in a digital magazine format, which includes: • Magazine cover • Letter from your CEO • Venue write up • Action photos which can be shared straight to social media platforms or saved to mobile devices • Four-ball photos • Video compilation • Video messages x 3 • Prize giving photos with results display • Tip from the pro • Nine pages of advertising/ sponsorship opportunity

© Houghton Golf Club

Photo by Igor Ovsyannykov on Unsplash

Serengeti is a thoroughly modern and accessible golf club in Johannesburg with a 27-hole Jack Nicklaus signature golf course that opened in 2009. Photo by Tyson Dudley on Unsplash


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FEATURE

© Stellenbosch Golf Club

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© Oubaai Hotel, Golf and Spa

© Serengeti Golf Course

Golf in the winelands

Destination golf resorts

Stellenbosch Golf Club in the Cape winelands celebrated its centenary in 2004 and hosts a series of prestigious golf tournaments. The 18-hole golf course offers visitors rounds of golf on 18-holes or 9-holes plus reasonably priced coaching sessions for all levels of proficiency, for 30 minutes or 50 minutes, individually or in groups. Conferencing, parties and wedding facilities are available for between 20 and 80 pax with spectacular mountain views during breaks. Full day packages include venue hire; standard equipment; tea, coffee and juice on arrival; mid-morning tea and coffee with confectionary; lunch; and afternoon tea and coffee with biscuits. Accommodation is available at nearby Protea Hotel Stellenbosch plus a variety of boutique hotels, guesthouses and B&Bs.

Oubaai Hotel, Golf & Spa is located outside of George in the Garden Route in an area known for its beaches, forests, nature reserve and mountains. The Ernie Els 18-hole Championship Golf Course is the major drawcard. The hotel features 100 rooms, Cucina and Waterside Grill restaurants, Freesia spa, fitness centres, outdoor swimming pool, tennis court, squash court and kids club. Events and

meetings facilities include a 150 to 300 pax Ballroom, which can be split into two venues which accommodate 20 to 40 pax in Ballroom 1 and 30 to 110 pax in Ballroom 2. The Ballroom Foyer and Terrace on the second level are suitable for cocktail functions and can accommodate around 300 pax combined (200 in the foyer, 110 on the terrace). Four studios cater for between 10 and 45 people depending on whether used singly or combined.

The 18-hole golf course offers visitors rounds of golf on 18-holes or 9-holes plus reasonably priced coaching sessions for all levels of proficiency.


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Golf tourism Satsa Golf Council (SGC) was formed mid-2017 to take over from now defunct SAGTA to promote and market golf tourism in South Africa and increase exposure to the international market. Its role is to lobby national, provincial and local destination marketing organisations to include the golf sector in their tourism strategies and garner their support for the promotion of golf tourism in South Africa. Council members include Carl Reinders (Pro Golf Safaris), Adam Veysey (Giltedge), Sally Hancock (Sun International) and Peter Dros (Fancourt), who report to Satsa CEO David Frost. The SGC provides public sector entities such as South African Tourism (SAT) with a means of transacting with the collective golf parties. SGC and SAT have identified three key projects for the 2017/18 period:

1. Attending IGTM (International Golf Travel Market) in Cannes in December 2017 under a dedicated SA branded stand which will offer great exposure for SA as a global golf destination. 2. In conjunction with IAGTO host a dedicated Golf Tourism Road Show in Europe focusing on the promotion of golf tourism. 3. Host a dedicated International Tour Operator CEO Fam trip to South Africa where hand selected CEOs will be invited to experience the SA product offering. These will be funded through the joint marketing agreement (JMA) and partnership with SAT and by the individual contributions and memberships of interested parties. The council is calling on all stakeholders that have interest in promoting their products and services in the international market to get in touch with the council via Satsa, says David Frost.

Š SA Tourism

The SGC provides public sector entities such as South African Tourism (SAT) with a means of transacting with the collective golf parties.

Photo by Fancycrave from Pexels

Photo by Juan Gomez on Unsplash

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FEATURE

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Southern Sun Cape Sun, where the SASTM will be holding their 2018 event © Tsogo Sun

FLEXIBILITY WINS

ASSOCIATION BUSINESS Associations are under increasing pressure to host special events for smaller budgets. Dr Garth Brink from the SA Society of Travel Medicine chats to Susan Reynard.

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he South African Society of Travel Medicine (SASTM) is hosting two major events in 2018: The Travel Medicine Course taking place on 16 May at Bytes Conference Centre, Midrand, Johannesburg and the first Pan African Travel Medicine Congress entitled “Focus on Reality” taking place from 12 to 15 September at Southern Sun Cape Sun in Cape Town. President of SASTM Lee Baker says the presentations at the Congress will be in the form of plenary sessions, scientific symposia, workshops, travel scenarios, risk assessments and poster sessions. “Although South Africa lies at the southern tip of the continent, it is very actively involved in travel and trade with many African countries and SASTM aims to forge strong ties with travel health practitioners in the rest of Africa. Congresses are an opportunity

to learn, meet new colleagues and reestablish old relationships,” she explains. Project manager and past president of SASTM Dr Garth Brink says the increased cost of hosting conferences and a shrinking delegate base due to the global economic climate mean associations have to look for affordable locations and accommodation. Delegate numbers have a direct impact on profitability and a congress cannot run at a loss as this would be crippling for the society. In some instances, it is a major income source for some societies. Dr Brink says he regularly engages with national and regional convention bureaus, noting great support from Wesgro and the South Africa National Convention Bureau (SANCB). Funding from bureaus is limited and there are strict criteria guiding what funding may be used for: mostly marketing materials and venue hire.

The SANCB has also been helpful in facilitating relationships with organisations such as the African Society of Association Executives, which provides a forum for the education, training and knowledge sharing by associations and non-profit management across the continent. “We have a good working relationship with the SANCB, we let them know what we’re trying to achieve, who we’re negotiating with and the impact the event will have on industry,” he notes. “Associations are held accountable for return on investment and spend,” Dr Brink says. He lists the three biggest logistical challenges to hosting association meetings as: • Venue hire fees • Accessibility • Attractive destinations


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Dr Brink says he regularly engages with national and regional convention bureaus, noting great support from Wesgro and the South Africa National Conventions Bureau (SANCB). Bytes Conference Centre Booths

Bytes in brief Bytes Conference Centre in Midrand, between Johannesburg and Pretoria, caters for a wide range of conference, training, events and function business. Its facilities include an auditorium for 300 pax, Solaris Room for 150 pax; presentation room for 20 pax; and a boardroom for 14 pax. They offer value for money conferencing without compromising on quality or service. A number of hotels for different budgets are nearby. General manager Paul Campbell says, “We offer a bit more flexibility to our association clients, for example, in terms of the deposit as we realise that it is hard for an association to pay a 50% deposit a year in advance to secure a venue when they are still waiting for payment from delegates, sponsors and exhibitors.” Paul says associations often have more budget constraints than corporate clients, so when required they offer associations additional extras such as complimentary exhibition space. “We also include our standard AV equipment at no additional charge; this includes the projector, screen and microphones as well as technical support for the duration of the event. When required we also offer the breakaway rooms at no additional charge to our association clients,” he adds.

Dr Garth Brink Large, convenient convention centres are often too expensive for association meetings of between 200 and 300 delegates. Destinations need to be accessible and affordable for delegates travelling in from out of town, so while the Kruger National Park or Victoria Falls are attractive destinations the travel and accommodation costs are prohibitive. The bigger the association and number of local and international delegates, the bigger the budget, he notes. As associations are always on the lookout for venues that can accommodate their needs, many smaller properties can snap up steady business if they understand the market. Key on the list of association requirements are: • Flexibility of offering • Suitability of space • Proximity to major businesses in sector • Efficient and effective management

Often the best solution for a small association is to hold their event at a hotel which offers the necessary facilities, accommodation and catering for a reasonable price. Associations usually return to properties at which successful events have been held and properties welcome the opportunity to discuss ways to be creative and innovative. Dr Brink has high praise for the two venues hosting SASTM events in 2018. He says the association regularly hosts events at Bytes Conference Centre and Tsogo Sun hotels and the support from the properties has been phenomenal. “They are open, willing to meet with us, have brilliant facilities and most importantly show great attention to detail,” he notes. He warns that one needs to have a conference of a particular size in order to warrant the cost of a PCO. PCOs charge a flat rate regardless of the success of the event and he suggests as a rule of thumb to manage the event in house if under 250 delegates, with the cost of a PCO viable if numbers are above 300. “PCOs need supervision to deliver what you and the association want from the event,” he adds. Dr Brink always looks forward to Meetings Africa: “Meetings Africa is a wonderful opportunity for us to find venues inside and outside of Africa. Everybody is there and we can discuss, meet and see a number of properties under one roof. It is the most important meeting on the calendar for us.”

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TECH TALK WITH KIM

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CYBER SECURITY FOR EVENTS

As technology develops at an ever-increasing rate, events are more at risk than ever for cyber-attacks. Here’s a look at how you can keep your data safe. By Kim Crowie.

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ata theft is an issue for any organisation, particularly those with valuable information to protect. The events industry is no different and as we enter a new year, much of the discourse around big data will not only be how to effectively utilise it, but also how to ensure it is secure from hackers. This is particularly important for event organisers as the sheer amount of information collected from delegates is a potential goldmine. Here are a few basic tips for securing your event from cyber-attacks.

Photo by Drew Graham on Unsplash

1. Be Careful With Your Email According to Eventsforce, 65% of planners email event data to people outside the events team. This is an issue as emails are difficult to encrypt from end to end. A golden rule is not to put any sensitive information in an email, and always think twice about attendee information you share and who you share it with. Never email any keys or passwords via email. If you must, do this on the phone.

2. Passwords are Precious You might not have thought so, but using strong passwords and changing them once every three months is prudent. 80% of event planners change their event system passwords less than once a year, while 33% share their passwords with other people. This weakens a system that has been put in place to protect sensitive information. A great idea is using password managers like 1Password and LastPass can help you pick long, random passwords and synchronise then across your devices. You can also control access by using Single Sign-On so passwords are never submitted to your event systems and

access can be controlled centrally by your organisation. Cut access to anyone leaving your company immediately.

3. Don’t Print Your Data Having event data in print form, or even saved on external hard drives and USBs, can increase the chance of it getting into the wrong hands. 60% of planners print data for reporting purposes or to replicate data from one system to another. If this is what you do, you should invest in secure cabinets, lock doors and have shredders to dispose of data when you need to.

4. Being Cautious Pays On the day of the event, be careful with your data. Don’t leave registration lists, laptops and smartphones unattended, and ensure data on screens is not visible to unauthorised users. Discussing sensitive information over the phone is also a no-no, especially in areas where you can be overheard. It’s imperative to train your staff in following these procedures as well. They need to understand how important your event data is and what they can do to protect it.

5. Check Your Provider’s Security Policies Your event technology provider needs to prioritise and ensure maximum protection of your data. Always check that they meet regulatory and legislative requirements. Find out things like where and how your event data is stored, and how often it is backed up – the more often the better so that no changes are lost if restoration is required. Ensure you are happy with the team who has access to your data and how they handle authorisation, and what happens when someone leaves their company.

2018 Tech Trends to Look Out For • • • • • •

Facial recognition for events RFID for event sponsors AI for events Livestreaming Social media walls Event tech for productivity


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Main Conference Centre, All images © Aquila Private Game Reserve

THE WILD SIDE OF CONFERENCES A conference in the bush is an intrinsically African experience – and one not to be missed. Kim Crowie explores the wild side of conferencing.

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ost conferences and events are typically held in meeting hubs and cities where amenities are at one’s fingertips. Convenience and location are important to conferences – particularly those of larger proportions – but an extraordinary experience in the wild simply cannot be beat. Bush conferences are a truly African offering, with many sub-Saharan countries providing quality, all-inclusive event services in game reserves and off the beaten track. Thanks to South Africa’s many reserves and hotel establishments, it’s not hard to find any number of breathtakingly beautiful places that are ideal for small to mid-

sized meetings. These include the likes of the Kruger National Park, Madikwe Game Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal’s iSimangaliso Wetland Park and many more, most of which offer luxury safari getaways in malaria-free zones.

Why Bother with the Bush? Busy corporates don’t often find time to unwind, and as a result, bringing incredible and inspired ideas to the proverbial table can sometimes be a challenge. Taking individuals out of their comfort zones and placing them in a unique setting can make all the difference. Not only are meetings in the wild perfect for strategic or brainstorming sessions, but they also have fewer distractions for

delegates, which, added to unparalleled natural beauty, can assist in providing fresh focus. In addition, memorable experiences are there for the taking – often strengthening relationships. At first glance, this type of setting might seem an outlandish and challenging conference option. But when properly scrutinised, one finds that most game reserves and establishments offer a range of services to assist in every aspect of an event. These include dedicated event staff, pre- or post-event activities, and complete audio-visual assistance. And, if this conference is one for the books, a number of DMCs and event planners will jump at assisting in bringing your vision to life, no matter the remote location.


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Stone Cottage

Main Conference Setup

Main Conference Informal

Stone Cottage

Aquila: For the Quintessential Safari Conference Aquila Private Game Reserve is an ideal example of conference excellence in a bush setting. Not only is it a convenient two hours outside the city of Cape Town, but their conferencing venue offers packages that include a host of Big 5 and other wildlife safaris. Safaris include full-course buffet breakfasts, picnics at rock pools, and of course, unforgettable animal encounters. Their facilities have both a dance floor and buffet area for special functions, and the conference centre itself can

hold up to 92 guests. There are also two breakaway rooms and an option to strategise in the Boma restaurant. The venue offers a range of audio-visual equipment for use, and also attends to meals, beverages and other conferencing needs. In addition to stellar service, Aquila has an impressive wildlife activities list which includes the likes of traditional game drives, horseback safaris, and quad biking.

Contacts

Wild Conference Ideas •

Tel: +27 (0) 21 430 7260 Email: corporate@aquilasafari.com Web: www.aquilasafari.com

Aquila Private Game Reserve Meeting Space

Area (m2)

Cinema

Buffet

Cocktail

U-Shape

Conference Centre

125m2

80

92

80

56

Breakaway Room 1

10m2

Breakaway Room 2

5m2

Outside Boma Area

36m2

-

-

-

-

In addition to stellar service, Aquila has an impressive wildlife activities list which includes the likes of traditional game drives, horseback safaris, and quad biking.

Kruger National Park, stretching across Limpopo and Mpumalanga, has a wide selection of conferencing venues within close proximity. It is home to an impressive number of species including 147 mammals and 507 birds. KwaZulu-Natal offers a range of reserves to choose from: Hluluwe and Umfolozi National Park, iSimangaliso Wetland Park, Tember and Ndumo Game Reserves, and Kosi and Sodwana Bays. The Eastern Cape is best known for its malaria-free ‘Big 5’ reserves like Shamwari and Addo Elephant Park. Malaria-free Madikwe and Pilanesberg Game Reserves in the North West are popular. The province is also home to the world famous Sun City and The Palace of the Lost City.

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TRENDS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR EXHIBITIONS IN 2018 The new year is upon us: budgets have been planned and exhibition calendars booked. The time is now to strategise how your display will stand out from the crowd. Here are the hottest exhibition trends forecast for the forthcoming year to ensure that your business will own the exhibition space in 2018.

Trend #1: It’s All About Technology As a highly connected society, visitors are expecting information to be conveyed in novel and innovative ways. The information you deliver is equally as important as how you deliver it: attendees are looking to be wowed. The good news, incorporating technology into your display doesn’t need to be complicated to be effective. Your strategy can be as simple as including touch-screen interfaces or nifty devices like Bluetooth beacons to connect with consumer’s devices. The benefit of this is threefold: attendees will be drawn to your stand, there is an opportunity to capture their data, and convey your brand’s message in an innovative and exciting way.

Trend #2: Natural Wood In order to juxtapose the sophisticated technology brought into your stand, one of the hot new trends of 2018 is to incorporate natural wood into your display. The effect is striking, especially when contrasted with more refined materials that are commonly used in exhibition stands.

Trend #3: Take the Hands-On Approach While technology is vital in attracting visitors to your stand, quality human interaction cannot be underestimated.

An authentic conversation is still your most valuable asset. Your staff are, quite literally, the spokespeople for your brand and should therefore be well-versed in your brand story, warm, engaging an excellent listeners. A dynamic and interesting stand draws people in, while the people on-hand deliver a message in a compelling way to endear consumers to your brand.

Trend #4: Keep it Eco-Friendly Consumers at large are adopting a green lifestyle, therefore incorporating ecoconscious designs and decor, repurposed materials and energy-saving fixtures creates an impression with visitors who already have sustainability in mind.

Trend #5: Clever Use of Lighting LED lighting is hardly a novel concept, but the innovation driving it is. Custom lighting options are the name of the game, incorporating a range of intensities and colour options to create the right mood and effects. In previous years, lighting has been very

monotone and one-dimensional. For 2018, expect ranges of softer lighting effects to create an ambiance.

Trend #6: Less is More The trend set by international exhibitors is that their stands contain fewer AV screens and marketing. By bypassing pamphlets, Powerpoint presentations and the like, the emphasis shifts to engaging with potential consumers and talking to them about their needs and interests. The focus is on making your exhibition stand a memorable experience. Adam Dembovsky, the CEO of Innovation Factory, says, “Exhibition stands are no longer just a onedimensional platform to sell your brand. In order to get people out of the aisles and into the booth, strive to create a memorable experience. Exhibitions are theatre; you’re putting on a show. Each attendee is an audience member waiting to be enthralled.” So when you’re creating an exhibition stand to put on a stellar performance, keep these six trends in mind.

A dynamic and interesting stand draws people in, while the people on-hand deliver a message in a compelling way to endear consumers to your brand.


AFRICACOM

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AFRICACOM 2017 The 20th anniversary of Africa’s largest tech-focused event may have come and gone, but beyond the record-breaking number of visitors, exhibitors and speakers and new launches and cutting-edge products this year, the outcomes make for a lasting impression.

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ducation was a key buzzword at this year’s conference as well as a major topic of conversation in the newly launched Technology Arena. “Connecting people is one thing but teaching them how to make the most of that connectivity and the tools to hand, is another thing entirely” shared Rekindle Learning’s Rapelang Rabana. Future Horizon Technologies’ Raj Waniappa agreed, referring to the fact that Africans needed to contribute to their own digital ecosystem not just consume what was on offer, thus echoing a narrative that is beginning to resonate across the continent – African solutions for African problems. Africans are extremely resourceful and innovative as it happens – with the AfricaCom 20/20 showcase and the Innovation Stage providing an excellent glimpse into some of the developments that the convergence of technology, media and telecommunications can provide. Capebased carpooling app, uGoMyWay (referred to by panel moderator Deseré Orrill of Ole! Media Group as the ‘Tinder for Mobility’) for instance, was awarded the conference’s first AfricaCom 20/20 Innovation award. Organisers of the conference and

exhibition – Knect365 – successfully managed to address both the B2B market and the B2C sector this year, separating the streams into clearly demarcated areas, easy to understand and follow. In the main exhibition hall, AfricaCom hosted the ‘engine drivers’ of innovation - the B2B components that make the apps and technology products a reality. Here visitors were able to engage with tower infrastructure providers, discuss connectivity issues and base station solutions – such as Parallel Wireless’ unique solution that provides 2G, 3G, 4G and LTE capabilities all in one housing that even communities can install and maintain alongside the telco operators (for which they were awarded a prize at the 10 th staging of the AfricaCom Awards). Eugina Jordan, Vice President of marketing at Parallel Wireless confirmed that the company would be back in 2018 with a bigger stand to allow for the interest shown in their novel products and services. Over in the new Technology Arena, the creators of content, apps and the technology for end users proudly displayed their wares to an engaged cross section of visitors. Also housed in this new arena, the third staging of AHUB – where top entrepreneurs

meet potential investors and where those considering a career in technology (which let’s face it all of us in the future), gain valuable insights into prospective revenue generation opportunities. Summing up AfricaCom 2017, Tom Cuthell, Portfolio Director of KNect365 said: “2017 was a major achievement for us as organisers – not only in celebrating two decades of staging this event, but in the sheer breadth of content on offer, covering everything from Blockchain and IoT to e-health and rural connectivity. It was a learning experience that united the entire digital ecosystem.” Dates for AfricaCom 2018 are 13 – 15 November. The event will once again be held at the CTICC, Cape Town and interested parties looking to contribute towards ‘shaping Africa’s digital future’ are invited to contact James Bull, Business Development Director at KNect365 on James.Bull@knect365.com


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JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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WELCOME TO 2018!

HOW CAN JEC BRING YOUR EVENT TO LIFE THIS NEW YEAR? Each New Year brings with it fresh new hope and a multitude of opportunities for growth and development. At Johannesburg Expo Centre (JEC), we see the New Year as another opportunity to work hand-in-hand with new and current clients to create even bigger and better exhibitions, conferences and events, that will make a lasting impact on your brand.

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or over three decades, the JEC has hosted some of the most popular consumer events, trade shows, conferences and exhibitions in Southern Africa, and 2018 will be no exception. But, for now, we’d like to take a moment to introduce the team behind the JEC who bring these events to life.

Introducing....

Desrae McDonnell – The Events and Exhibitions Manager JEC’s Exhibitions and Events Manager, Desrae McDonnell, is a logistical mastermind, who seamlessly brings each and every event to life. Working closely with clients, Desrae has more than 17 years of experience at the JEC, and is the driving force behind the versatility, flexibility and ease with which the JEC is able to meet client expectations.

Refilwe Mokgaotsi – Marketing and Communications Executive Refilwe is one of the Marketing and Communications Executives at JEC, who embraces every challenge and uses her creative flare and previous experiences to come up with innovative solutions. Her love of working with people has served her well, as a member of the marketing team for JEC. Refilwe is committed to representing the JEC brand in the best possible light in an industry where reputation is critical to success. Refilwe is also deeply passionate about tourism and has completed several courses in this field as well. She believes that a combination of education, motivation, inspiration, and especially hard work are the stepping stones to achieving goals.

Believe Sibiya – The Receptionist Believe is the first point of contact for anyone visiting the JEC, as she heads up the reception area at Expo Centre. With her contagious smile and positive attitude, Believe has been with JEC for a couple of years, having initially joined the team to assist the Marketing and Communications Department. Believe still contributes a valuable stream of innovative

ideas to the marketing team and as a committed team player she has become a strong ambassador for the JEC brand.

Craig Newman – CEO Craig Newman has served as JEC’s CEO for over 11 years, turning it into one of Southern Africa’s most sought-after, award-winning and highly profitable exhibitions, conferences and events venues. Craig has over 25 years of experience in this sector, and has occupied a number of leadership positions at some of South Africa’s leading MICE industry companies. With over 25 years of industry experience, Mr Newman, took on the role of CEO at the JEC, which signalled the start of a new era and significant financial turnaround for this venue. His unwavering dedication and commitment to turning the venue around, resulted in JEC being awarded the bid as the 2010 FIFA World Cup’s international broadcast centre. Under Mr Newman’s leadership, the JEC has prospered and ranks as one of the top exhibitions, conferences and events venues in Africa today. Mr Newman was elected as the incoming President by the UFI Board of Directors during the European Conference in Cologne,


JOHANNESBURG EXPO CENTRE

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Germany. Prior to this, Mr Newman was a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee, as well as Vice Chair of the UFI Middle East/ Africa Chapter. Mr Newman has actively campaigned and advocated to expand Africa’s footprint in the global exhibitions industry as well as the growth and development of UFI’s global membership. Craig became the major driving force behind the JEC with his exceptional vision and his confidence to make things happen. His liberal and frank demeanour is complemented by his positive outlook and where some may see challenges, Craig sees opportunities.

play sports professionally, but like so many others, he found himself channelling his passion for people and business in a completely different direction. As a prominent member of the Marketing and Communications team at JEC, Leighton is organised, efficient, and driven to deliver on all of the JEC’s objectives. His love of sports has earned him respect among colleagues as an excellent team player and over the years he has become somewhat of a mentor to younger colleagues and aspiring athletes.

Hannes is one of the longest serving members of staff at the JEC, having witnessed the venue go through multiple changes and evolutions for the past 30 years. Hannes has shown tremendous commitment to the JEC, and has taken great pride in upholding its appearance and maintenance over the years. As the one individual who knows the JEC better than any other, it came as no surprise when Hannes was appointed as the JEC’s General Manager for over ten years. In January 2017, Hannes was recognised as the “Best Venue Employee for 2016” at the Exhibition Industry Awards (A United Industry) evening held at the Dome in Johannesburg.

Tracy is one of the young-bloods in the Marketing and Communications Department at JEC. As someone who believes that its critical to develop a deep understanding of the industry in which the JEC operates, she has become a dynamic and vibrant member of the marketing and publicity team, responsible for securing new business leads and portraying the best possible image to clients and stakeholders. Tracy dedicates herself to constantly finding new ways to boost the JEC brand and finding strategic solutions and partnerships that will enhance the JEC’s position in the marketplace.

Prince Moloi – The Maintenance Manager

Leighton May – Marketing and Communications Executive With significant experience in the retail sector and a dedication to sports and fitness, Leighton had always hoped to

Mr Newman has actively campaigned and advocated to expand Africa’s footprint in the global exhibitions industry as well as the growth and development of UFI’s global membership.

A fresh approach

Tracy Malebana – Marketing and Communications Executive Hannes Venter – The General Manager

27

The JEC is pleased to announce that Prince Moloi has joined the team. As the new Maintenance Manager at JEC, Prince will head up and oversee the upkeep of all indoor and outdoor facilities at the JEC, keeping Southern Africa’s largest exhibitions, conferences and events venue in impeccable condition.

The JEC is committed to delivering on the high standards that clients have come to expect, while constantly evolving to exceed their expectations. The JEC has a formidable reputation for its outstanding hospitality and professionalism. Each event, regardless of size and stature, is given the same amount of dedication and attention. Over the years the JEC has become synonymous with some of Southern Africa’s largest events, including: Rand Show, Automechanika, Electra Mining, Classic Car Show, Ultra South Africa, Bassline Africa Day, The Encounter, Love World Festival. Time and Again, the Expo Centre team have proven that there is no limit to what can be achieved.

Let us meet your demands and exceed your expectations this New Year. Cnr Rand Show and Nasrec roads, Johannesburg Tel: (011) 494 1920, (+27) 82 855 0292, (+27) 83 461 0627 W: www.expocentre.co.za E: info@expocentre.co.za F: @jhbexpocentre1 T: @jhbexpocentre1 I: johannesburgexpocentre L: Johannesburg Expo Centre Y: Johannesburg Expo Centre


28

SPOTLIGHT

www.theevent.co.za

UFI & EXPLORI

GLOBAL EXHIBITOR INSIGHTS Key findings of the UFI and Explori global survey, which surveyed industry stakeholders from over 40 countries. About the report This report gives an overview of the experience and intentions of exhibitors at trade shows across the world. It aims to give event organisers a deeper understanding of the patterns and trends that drive positive and negative exhibitor experiences and the objectives and behaviours that underlie them. This report has been created in two stages. The first part utilises exhibitor feedback held in the Explori database. This is drawn from post-show email surveys conducted on 1 040 trade shows, across 40 countries, from a cross-section of sectors and sizes. They are primarily organised by “For Profit” organisers, but association organisers are also represented. The second part was executed using in-depth interviews with trade show event directors. 57 trade show directors from 17 different countries participated in the depth interviews.

Key Findings Exhibitor advocacy is low across the globe Low advocacy is one of the biggest challenges facing the industry globally. Trade show exhibitors have a global Net Promoter Score (NPS) of -17.25% of shows have an NPS of less than -36. This is the same percentage that have a positive NPS score. Larger shows have more advocates, but size isn’t everything Unsurprisingly, exhibitors are more likely to recommend events with more visitors. But there is no correlation between visitor numbers and exhibitor satisfaction, leading to larger

Exhibitor Satisfaction by Region

America: 3.45

8% 14%

25%

21%

33%

Very satisfied Fairly satisfied Somewhat satisfied Not very satisfied Not at all satisfied

events having more participants who exhibit high loyalty but low satisfaction. (18% vs. 13% showing high loyalty but low satisfaction in smaller shows) Shows with high exhibitor Net Promoter Score are more likely to experience growth When exhibitor NPS was compared

with growth metrics, shows with a higher NPS were performing better across all metrics. 71% of shows with positive NPS are experiencing growth in exhibitor numbers compared to 32% of shows with negative exhibitor NPS. More than twice as many high NPS shows are experiencing notable revenue growth as low NPS shows.


SPOTLIGHT

www.theevent.co.za

29

Exhibitors are more likely to recommend events with more visitors. But there is no correlation between visitor numbers and exhibitor satisfaction, leading to larger events having more participants who exhibit high loyalty but low satisfaction. (18% vs. 13% showing high loyalty but low satisfaction in smaller shows).

Europe: 3.62 Asia / Pacific: 3.50 12%

4% 20%

3% 13%

15%

22% 42%

28%

40%

Middle East / Africa: 3.46 6% 13%

25%

15%

41%

This summary of the research is available free of charge at www.ufi.org/research, while UFI Members benefi t from the full report, in the UFI Members’ area. *Summary data comes from a point-in-time analysis and is subject change over time

Organisers can counter poor performance by educating exhibitors Many exhibitors face significant challenges in engaging visitors. This can lead to low exhibitor satisfaction, even at shows with very high visitor numbers. Organisers can counter poor exhibitor performance by offering training programmes and actively

working with exhibitors to showcase innovation and launch products. Shows that offered exhibitor training to all or most, saw a 23 point boost in NPS vs. shows that did not. A proper “newness” strategy boosts both visitor and exhibitor satisfaction The 2016 report highlighted the

importance of “newness” in driving visitor satisfaction. It is now also clear that shows with a well-defined “newness” strategy are more successful at satisfying both visitors and exhibitors. Shows that actively promote “newness” have notably higher exhibitor satisfaction scores than shows who do not. (3.71 vs. 3.35 out of 5)


30

BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

www.theevent.co.za

View of the Durban beachfront from Elangeni

Crowned Hornbill, Ndumo Nature Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal © Derek Keats

KWAZULU-NATAL Although a popular tourism spot thanks to its diverse natural beauty and rich cultural heritage, KwaZulu-Natal is also a renowned business-events location.

O

ne of South Africa’s businessevents hubs, Durban – KwaZuluNatal’s capital – attracts a range of high-profile conferences and events annually. Known locally as the Zulu Kingdom, KZN is not only home to awe-inspiring World Heritage Sites like the iSimangaliso Wetland Park and the Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg Park, but it is also home to many icons of democracy. Coupled with its rich natural beauty and cultural heritage, it’s no wonder KZN is a popular destination for both local and international tourists and incentive travellers.

Over the years Durban has won many awards for its exceptional work in the conferencing world, with the Durban ICC regularly ranking amongst the top convention centres in the world. In addition to being one of South Africa’s leading convention centres, Durban ICC is also a flexible, welcoming venue that delivers memorable events of any kind on a consistent level. One of the most notable events for the centre was hosting the 21st International AIDS Conference in July 2016, which saw over 18 000 delegates converge on the city. In addition, Africa’s Travel INDABA and the Loeries Creative

Week Durban take place at the ICC annually in May and August respectively.

Key Venues Durban International Convention Centre Durban ICC caters to the needs of local and international conferences, special events and exhibitions, and has an intelligent design with flexibility for all sorts of meeting needs. All halls are multi-purpose, while the centre also offers internet connectivity and caters to up to 12 000 delegates for plenary sessions and 5 000 banquet style. www.icc.co.za

Durban International Convention Centre Meeting Space

Specifications

Plenary

Main Convention Hall

11 600m² (Can be subdivided into 22 separate halls of various sizes using operable walls)

12 000 maximum pax

Hall 1 (Hall of Stars)

1 448m² (divisible into Halls 1A – 1B)

1 000 theatre 750 classroom 500 banquet (plated)

Hall 2

2 760m² (divisible into Halls 2A – 2H)

2 500 theatre 2 200 cocktail 1 350 classroom

Hall 3

2 346m² (divisible into Halls 3A – 3C)

2 000 cocktail 1 800 theatre 1 000 banquet

Hall 4

1 628m² (divisible into Halls 4A – 4D)

1 400 theatre 960 classroom 640 banquet (plated)

Hall 5

1 656m² (divisible into Halls 5A – 5D)

1 500 cocktail 1 400 theatre 600 banquet (plated)

Hall 6

612m² (divisible into Halls 6A – 6B)

400 cocktail 300 theatre 230 classroom

Durban ICC © Kierran Allen


BUSINESS EVENTS MADE EASY

www.theevent.co.za

Climate KwaZulu-Natal has a sub-tropical climate with hot, humid summers. It is ideal for year-round events thanks to its temperate weather.

Access Southern Sun Elangeni and Maharani

Southern Sun Elangeni and Maharani Southern Sun offers a number of quality meeting spaces in their hotels in Durban, however the best known are the Elangeni & Maharani, situated on Durban’s beachfront. Elangeni and Maharani offer a number of meeting spaces with its largest plenary being 500 theatre style. It hosts Durban FilmMart and satellite events for The Loeries annually. www.tsogosun.com/ southern-sun-elangeni-maharani.

Incentive Travel Products KwaZulu-Natal offers a vast array of incentive options for travellers, from the historic Battlefields to the Valley of a Thousand Hills and two World Heritage Sites to explore. Its coast is also renowned for its blue-flag beaches in and around Durban, as well as the natural wonders of the Wild Coast. From game experiences to adventure tourism, deluxe shopping malls to health and wellness spas, there’s something for everyone in KZN.

As one of SA’s busiest port cities, Durban is both an air and sea gateway to South Africa. King Shaka International Airport connects both local and international carriers to the region. Airlines flying to Durban include: • • • • •

South African Airways British Airways Safair Kulula Mango

Currency

Southern Sun Elangeni and Maharani Meeting Space

Specifications

Plenary

Great Ilanga

420m2

500 theatre/cocktail 400 classroom 350 banquet

Small Ilanga

258m2

150 cocktail 100 theatre 80 banquet

Suites 1-5

564m

500 cocktail 400 banquet

Umgeni and Congella

142m2

100 cocktail 80 theatre 60 classroom/banquet

Sky

293m2

150 cocktail 120 banquet

2

South US Dollar African Rand (ZAR) (USD)

Chinese Euro (EUR) Yuan (CNY)

50.00

3.00

3.56

23.52

Contacts Durban KwaZulu-Natal Convention Bureau Head Office: 29 Canal Quay Road, Ithala Trade Centre, Durban Waterfront, 4001 Tel: +27 (0)31 366 7500 Email: conventions@ durbankzncb.co.za Web: www.durbankzncb.co.za Tourism KwaZulu-Natal Tel: +27 (0)31 366 7500 Email: enquiries@zulu.org.za Website: www.zulu.org.za

Durban Beachfront © Darren Glanville

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EVENTS TO DIARISE

JANUARY INTERNATIONAL CES 9 – 12 LAS VEGAS, USA THE LONDON TEXTILE FAIR 10 – 12 LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM MEETINGS MOROCCO 11 – 12 MARRAKECH, MOROCCO CABSAT 14 – 16 DUBAI, UAE TRADEXPO 14 – 18 PARIS, FRANCE PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL EXPO 14 – 18 LAS VEGAS, USA SOLAR EXPO 15 – 18 ABU DHABI, UAE INTERNATIONAL WATER SUMMIT 15 – 18 ABU DHABI, UAE WORLD FUTURE ENERGY SUMMIT AND EXHIBITION 15 – 18 ABU DHABI, UAE ECOWASTE EXHIBITION 15 – 18 ABU DHABI, UAE INTERNATIONAL AGRO CHEMICAL AND EQUIPMENT EXHIBITION 15 – 17 ABUJA, NIGERIA

www.theevent.co.za

FITUR 17 – 21 MADRID, SPAIN INTERSEC 21 – 23 DUABI, UAE SHOWCASE, IRELAND’S CREATIVE EXPO 21 – 24 DUBLIN, IRELAND AGFOPEX NIGERIA 21 – 24 KANO, NIGERIA MULTIMODAL WEST AFRICA 23 – 25 LAGOS, NIGERIA WORLD OF CONCRETE 23 – 26 LAS VEGAS, USA PROMOTION TRADE EXHIBITION 24 – 26 MILAN, ITALY INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY TOKYO 24 – 27 TOKYO, JAPAN THE HOLIDAY WORLD SHOW 26 – 28 DUBLIN, IRELAND ARAB HEALTH 29 – 1 FEBRUARY DUBAI, UAE ECOMMERCE EXPO PRAGUE 30 PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC IHS ENERGY SOUTH AFRICAN COAL EXPORTS CONFERENCE 31 – 2 FEBRUARY CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

FEBRUARY ACC INTERNATIONAL URBAN CONFERENCE 1–2 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA MINING LEADERS AFRICA SUMMIT 2 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SALON DU MEUBLE DU TUNIS 2 – 11 TUNIS, TUNISIA INVESTING IN AFRICAN MINING INDABA 5–8 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA KZN CONSTRUCTION TRADE EXPO 7–8 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE 8 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MECHANICAL AND INTELLIGENT MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES 10 – 13 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA EXPO SUMMIT AFRICA 14 – 16 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 16 – 18 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA WOMEN IN ENERGY CONFERENCE 19 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

UGANDA TRADE EXPO 16 – 18 KAMPALA, UGANDA

AFRICA ENERGY INDABA 20 – 21 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

NEPCON JAPAN 17 – 19 TOKYO, JAPAN

ITWEB’S GOVERNANCE, RISK AND COMPLIANCE SUMMIT 20 – 21 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA


EVENTS TO DIARISE

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MY BUSINESS EXPO JOBURG 21 – 22 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA NSBC SUMMIT 21 – 22 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA DESIGN INDABA 21 – 23 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA JOHANNESBURG HOMEMAKERS EXPO 22 – 25 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA EXHIBITOR LIVE 25 – 1 MARCH LAS VEGAS, USA MEETINGS AFRICA 26 – 28 SANDTON, SOUTH AFRICA NIGERIA OIL AND GAS 26 – 1 MARCH ABUJA, NIGERIA SECURA NORTH AFRICA 27 – 1 MARCH ALGIERS, ALGERIA PROPAK EAST AFRICA 27 – 1 MARCH NAIROBI, KENYA

MARCH HOBBY-X 2–5 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR OF MEDICAL DEVICES 2–5 ALGIERS, ALGERIA THE BIG 5 SAUDI 5–8 JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA INTERNATIONAL YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE INDIA 5 – 10 GOA, INDIA CAREER INDABA 6–7 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AFRICABUILD LAGOS 6–8 LAGOS, NIGERIA THE BLOCKCHAIN AFRICA CONFERENCE 8–9 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA ICMEI 2018 9 – 11 HONOLULU, HAWAII NIGERIA MANUFACTURING AND EQUIPMENT EXPO 13 – 15 LAGOS, NIGERIA BAUMA CONEXPO AFRICA 13 – 16 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA ECOMMERCE MONEYAFRICA CONFEX 14 – 15 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA SIGN AFRICA CAPE TOWN 14 – 15 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA NAIROBI INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FAIR 16 – 18 NAIROBI, KENYA

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NUTRITION AND GROWTH 17 – 19 PARIS, FRANCE CSAE CONFERENCE 18 – 20 OXFORD, UNITED KINGDOM MIDDLE EAST COATINGS SHOW 19 – 21 DUBAI, UAE SECUREX WEST AFRICA 20 – 21 LAGOS, NIGERIA ICIN CONFERENCE 20 – 22 PARIS, FRANCE CIES 2018 25 – 29 MEXICO CITY, MEXICO AGROFOOD NIGERIA 27 – 28 LAGOS, NIGERIA POWER AND ELECTRICITY WORLD AFRICA 27 – 28 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA THE SOLAR SHOW AFRICA 27 – 28 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA THE WATER SHOW AFRICA 27 – 28 JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA INTERMODAL AFRICA 28 – 29 BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

London © Piotr Chrobot (Unsplash)

SENCON 20 – 23 DAKAR, SENEGAL

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34

ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

TECH AND GREENING Technology may offer myriad benefits to the events industry and it can also greatly assist with event greening. But what about electronic waste, asks the Event Greening Forum? E-waste refers to any type of electronic device that has come to the end of its life. What makes handling this waste problematic is, first, the amount of waste being produced, and second, what is in it. Malcolm Whitehouse, Operations Manager at the e-Waste Association of South Africa (eWASA), says it’s estimated that, on average, every person produces 6kg of e-waste a year. It’s important to divert this from landfill as most e-waste contains toxins. These can leach into the earth or be released into the air if burnt. “Safely disposing of your e-waste is simple; you can find any one of our 600 national members on www.ewasa.org. They comply with our waste management standards, and will recycle as much e-waste as is possible, and in a safe way. What cannot be salvaged is then disposed of responsibly.” There is no cost to have your e-waste disposed of in this way. To find out more or to download the EGF’s Minimum Standards for Sustainable Events, visit www.eventgreening.co.za.

www.theevent.co.za

Rudi Van Der Vyver Chief Executive Officer at SAACI

SAACI –PROFESSIONALISING THE BUSINESS EVENTS INDUSTRY As we kick off 2018 at SAACI we’ve launched various programmes toward the end of 2017 geared to professionalising the business-events industry within Southern Africa. Professionalisation is not exclusively measured by regulation, although this is one aspect of it. We however view the professionalisation of the industry to be a phased approach with a large focus being placed on learning/education and business ethics. These will then naturally progress into policies or guidelines for operation within the industry. Another component of professionalisation is the nurturing, growth and guidance of new entrants into the industry to create sustainability but, that being

said, this growth and sustainability needs to be created using the correct business practices to promote the overall growth of the industry. Part of this education and learning as an example is the SAACI Mentorship program set to launch in March 2018. With this programme, we link up industry experts as Mentors with future industry leaders as mentees to ensure effective knowledge transfer and coaching within the industry. This allows us to, as an industry, continue to grow and move forward and not make the same old mistakes but rather be innovative in our thinking and approach to business. Keep an eye out for communications during the year on all our projects, partnerships and calls for input from our members to truly affect change and move our industry into a space of formailsed professionalism.


ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

www.theevent.co.za

The Association of Southern African Travel Agents has announced that travel agents in South Africa will soon be able to apply for the official designation of Travel Practitioner (TPrac) following the accreditation of ASATA by the South African Qualifications Authority. This means that SAQA has recognised ASATA as a professional industry body and that ASATA can award individuals this professional designation. This does not, mean, however, that ASATA is an accredited Training Provider. ASATA has revived the ASATA Professional Programme, which is the process through which a travel consultant can seek to achieve the designation of Travel Practitioner. ASATA is currently testing their online platform where consultants can create a profile and update their skills and Continuous Professional Development (CPD) points to achieve a designation. Once this phase is complete, the association will launch the site to members and nonmembers seeking to participate. ASATA has also requested further designations from SAQA, set to be registered in 2019/2020 subject to approval. For more information and to find out about costs, visit www.asata.co.za.

Carol Weaving Chairperson of AAXO

INDUSTRY LOOKS AHEAD TO AN EXHILARATING 2018 THANKS TO AAXO As usual, 2017 was an action-packed year for The Association of African Exhibition Organisers (AAXO). Some of the initiatives we implemented include the launch of the Associate Membership tier, Open Conversations, Approved Suppliers, the Badge of Approval and ABC audits. In line with our mandate of transforming the African exhibition industry, 2018 will be a continuation of this as we have already set various plans in motion to ensure another productive and exhilarating year. To start the year off in true AAXO style, January will be a busy month. The much anticipated AAXO ROAR Awards, Exhibition of Exhibitions and training days for organisers and exhibitors, will all take place during the last week of January. While entries have closed for the ROAR Awards, there are still a few spots available for Exhibition of Exhibitions and the training too – so don’t miss out. Our International Safety training, also set to take place in January, is being very well received and tickets are being sold quickly.

This year we will also provide an exciting training opportunity for the newbies in exhibition organising, thanks to the introduction of the AAXO Incubator Program for New Exhibition Organisers. The rest of 2018 will not disappoint either. On top of our usual, wellreceived, events and training days, the 2018 calendar further boasts two Open Conversation events – another opportunity for our members and the industry as a whole to voice their opinions and needs in a constructive fashion. If you have not yet joined the biggest organising community in Africa, now is your chance. AAXO already boasts more than 80% of the industry as our members and offers ample opportunity for you to join the conversations and networks, both nationally and internationally. Either way, I am looking forward to seeing you at our January events.

Photo by Ferdinand Stohr on Unsplash

ASATA TO OFFER PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

35


36

DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS

www.theevent.co.za

ADVERTISERS AAXO

Event Greening Forum

PAGE 35

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T.

T.

+27 11 549 8300

+27 82 891 5883

E. info@aaxo.co.za

E. info@eventgreening.co.za

W. www.aaxo.co.za

W. www.eventgreening.co.za

AfricaCom

Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife

PAGE 25

INSIDE FRONT COVER

T.

T.

+44 20 7017 7169

+27 33 845 1000

E. africacommarketing@knect365.com

E. bookings@kznwildlife.com

W. www.tmt.knect365.com/africacom

W. www.kznwildlife.com

CONTACTS Cover Image: Courtesy of Johannesburg Expo Centre Publisher: Lance Gibbons lance@filmeventmedia.co.za Editor in Chief: Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@filmeventmedia.co.za Assistant Editor: Kim Crowie kim@filmeventmedia.co.za Writer: Susan Reynard susan@filmeventmedia.co.za Head of Design: Sheree Steenkamp sheree@filmeventmedia.co.za Special Projects Designer / Illustrator: Lauren Smith lauren@filmeventmedia.co.za Junior Designer: Caitlin Perrett caitlin@filmeventmedia.co.za

Aquila Private Game Reserve

Inspire Furniture

OUTSIDE BACK COVER

PAGE 07

T.

T.

+27 21 430 7260

+27 76 644 0271

E. res@aquilasafari.com

E. chad@inspirefurniture.co.za

W. www.aquilasafari.com

W. www.inspirefurniture.co.za

Business Manager: Coleen Tapson coleen@filmeventmedia.co.za Brand Manager: Jerome Dyson jerome@filmeventmedia.co.za Production Manager: Aayesha Parker aayesha@filmeventmedia.co.za Traffic Manager: Tamlyn Peters tamlyn@filmeventmedia.co.za

ASATA

Johannesburg Stock Exhange

PAGE 35

PAGE 05

T.

+27 11 293 0560/1

T.

E.

general@asata.co.za

E. ShavaniB@jse.co.za

+27 11 520 7000

W. www.asata.co.za

W. www.jse.co.za

Expo Centre

Le Franschhoek

OUTSIDE FRONT COVER, 26 - 27

PAGE 21

T.

T.

+27 11 494 1920

Data Manager: Ricky Ortell info@filmeventmedia.co.za Regent Square, Block A, Ground Floor Doncaster Road, Kenilworth, 7745 Tel: +27 21 674 0646

+27 21 876 8900

E. info@expocentre.co.za

E. banqueting@lefranschhoek.co.za

W. www.expocentre.co.za

W. www.lefranschhoek.co.za

JOIN US www.theevent.co.za

Expo Guys

SAACI

PAGE 09

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T.

T.

+27 11 433 3260

+27 11 880 5883

E. info@expoguys.co.za

E. info@saaci.org

W. www.expoguys.co.za

W. www.saaci.org

DISCLAIMER: Opinions expressed in The Event do not necessarily represent the official viewpoint of the editor or the publisher, while inclusion of adverts/ advertising features does not imply endorsement of any business, product or service. Copyright of this material is reserved. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, The Event and/or its employees may not be held liable or responsible for any act or ommission committed by any person, including a juristic person, referred to in this publication. It and they furthermore accept(s) no responsibility for any liability arising out of any reliance that a reader of this publication places on the contents of this publication.


2018

THE PREMIER MARKETING TOOL

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CONTACT COLEEN TAPSON: Tel. +27 21 674 0646 Email: coleen@filmeventmedia.co.za

Photo by LoboStudio Hamburg © Unsplash

Meetings Africa (2018 Launch) | International Meetings Review | ibtm world | EXSA Conference and AGM | ibtm arabia | IMEX America | IMEX Frankfurt | IT&CM Asia Pacific | IT&CMA China | Loeries Creative Week | Markex – World of Events | SAACI Congress | SETE - Sports and Tourism Exchange | SITE - Swahili International Tourism Expo | Tourism Expo Botswana | WTM Africa | Zambia International Travel Expo


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Event Issue 1 2018  
Event Issue 1 2018  

Issue 1 2018 of the Event is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we explore how the business-events industry will change in 201...

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