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SA CH EF

MEDIA

SEPTEMBER | 2018

The Of ficial Voice of the South African Chefs Association

FORTI MAZZONE

The King of Fine Dining

GRAZING ON GAME

Exotic Meats Enjoy Increase in Popularity


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WELCOME

A MESSAGE

FROM THE PRESIDENT THIS YEAR HAS BEEN ABOUT BUILDING ON THE SUCCESSES OF SA CHEFS AND DRIVING A FUTURE IN WHICH THE ASSOCIATION IS MORE RELEVANT THAN JAMES KHOZA

I

t has been a very busy start to my presidency. July and August highlights include: the Worldchefs Congress and Exhibition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; InfoChef Africa held in Johannesburg and Cape Town; signing the SigmaChef sponsorship deal; the Distell Inter Hotel Challenge in Cape Town; Mandela Day and Woman’s Month activities around the country; Decorex in Johannesburg and Appetite Fest in Pretoria; and the monthly practice sessions of the Olympic Culinary Squad at HTA School of Culinary Art in Johannesburg. I am delighted and proud to see how many of our members, patrons and partners come out in support of the various educational,

EVER AS THE CULINARY AUTHORITY. charitable and networking events and programmes the Association is involved with. Seeing our brothers and sisters in chefs’ jackets around the country and around the world showcases the community of chefs, and how South Africa takes its place on the world stage. The ongoing work of the Association includes meetings of the board and undertaking resolutions to sustain the future of SA Chefs. The Young Chefs Club is undergoing changes as Adrian Vigus-Brown steps down as chairman – we thank him for his dedication and service. His replacement will be announced soon. We are greatly saddened by the passing of American celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain at age

61 by suicide in France on 8 June, and French chef icon Joël Robuchon at age 73 from cancer in Switzerland on 6 August. We mourn the loss of these great chefs who shaped the culinary industry and broadened our knowledge. This year has been about building on the successes of SA Chefs and driving a future in which the Association is more relevant than ever as the culinary authority. We do this together, from the board and committees to the student chefs starting out in their careers. I look forward to seeing you at the next gathering and wish you a successful fourth quarter of 2018. Culinary regards, James Khoza

SA CHEFS PATRONS

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SA CHEF MEDIA

SA CHEF MEDIA ADVERTISERS Barron Inside Back Cover Bidvest Catering PAGE 51, Outside Back Cover Food Focus PAGE 20 FoodServ Solutions PAGE 43 Gearhouse PAGE 41 LANCE GIBBONS

KATIE REYNOLDS-DA SILVA

KFOOD Antenna Shop PAGE 38

SA CHEF CONTACTS

Cover Image: The Meat Platter Speciality at Forti Mazzone's restaurant in Sun Time Square Casino, Forti's Grill & Bar, is for sharing by the whole table and allows patrons to taste the difference in flavour that the cut and quality of beef makes. Published by: SA Chef Media, a division of Film & Event Media

Publisher Lance Gibbons lance@sachefmag.co.za Editor in Chief Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@sachefmag.co.za Designers Sheree Steenkamp, Lauren Smith, Caitlin Perrett Writers Susan Reynard, Kim Crowie Contributors Brian McCune, Stephen Hickmore Jodi-Ann Pearton Production Manager Katlego Molele katlego@filmeventmedia.co.za

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Traffic Manager Tamlyn Peters tamlyn@filmeventmedia.co.za Digital Manager Cheri Morris digital@filmeventmedia.co.za Business Development Manager Wendy Navarra wendy@sachefmag.co.za Business Manager Coleen Tapson coleen@sachefmag.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 21 674 0646

SA CHEFS

President James Khoza General Manager Thomas Overbeck Financial Manager Jason Pitout Membership enquiries Precious Maseko Culinary Workshops enquiries Yejna Maharaj SACA Certification Elsu Gericke info@sachefs.co.za | www.sachefs.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 11 482 7250

Lynca Meats PAGE 09 Mac Brothers Catering Equipment PAGE 23, 37 McDonald’s PAGE 46-47 Parmalat (Pty) Ltd Inside Front Cover, PAGE 50 Peppadew International (Pty) Ltd PAGE 45 Sigma Chef PAGE 15 Sanders South Africa PAGE 59 Sovereign Foods PAGE 39 Three Streams Smokehouse (Pty) Ltd PAGE 53


CONTENTS

01 PRESIDENT’S ’ LETTER 02 CREDITS AND ADVERTISERS 04 GRAZING ON GAME

04 FEAST ON THE BEAST

Game meat – aka venison – is more than a winter addition to the menu. Susan Reynard gets her game on.

10 LUCKY CHEFS 11 HOPE MDAKANE A WINNER 12 ASIA ON A PLATE AT WACS CONGRESS 14 ALL THE ACTION AT INFOCHEF AFRICA 16 DINING IN THE AIR

26 CHEF SHOWCASE

Forti Mazzone, the King of Fine Dining, shares his passion for the culinary world and more.

20 FOOD SAFETY: LISTERIA, LAX HYGIENE AND THE LAW 24 CERTIFICATION AND DESIGNATION AWARDS PROGRAMME 26 FORTI MAZZONE, KING OF FINE DINING 30 ELEVATE THE HIGH TEA EXPERIENCE 34 CHEFS SET TO STOP FOOD WASTE

30 HEAVENLY HIGH TEA

High tea experiences continue to charm patrons, and they boost midafternoon revenue, too.

36 FOODFORWARDSA: ONE MEAL AT A TIME 40 MEET THE SA OLYMPIC CULINARY SQUAD 44 FOOD: FRIEND OR FOE? 48 CRAFT COFFEE CONNOISSEURS 52 FRESH OUT OF FRANSCHHOEK 54 HOSPITALITY’S ’ MENTAL HEALTH STRUGGLE

44 FOOD: FRIEND OR FOE?

Allergies, intolerances, sensitivities, preferences and poisoning. SA Chef explores ways to satisfy diners.

58 RECIPE: ROSEMARY INFUSED CONFIT DUCK 60 JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES 62 EVENTS TO DIARISE 64 THE LAST WORD WITH BRIAN MCCUNE 03


FEATURE

IMAGES © CARNIVORE

GRAZING ON GAME Game meat, also called venison, is more than a winter addition of a couple of animals to the menu. Susan Reynard chats to the experts.

W

inter is the season we traditionally associate with game meat. We look at the delicious, nutritious venison market and how chefs can incorporate game meat into the menu all year round. Robert Forsyth is owner and chairman of Recreation Africa Leisure Industries (RALI), which includes Misty Hills Country Hotel, Conference Centre & Spa and the Carnivore Restaurant in Muldersdrift, west of Johannesburg, and Kedar Heritage Lodge, Conference Centre & Spa in Rustenburg in the North West.

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Misty Hills is about food, art and gardens. Kedar is about local heritage, food and ecology. Both feature all the usual hotel and conferencing extras and especially celebrate food. They have been importing master chefs from India, who bring old recipes from the days of the Rajahs and cook them using game meat. They also have two full-time historians on the staff, and one of their jobs is to pull out recipes from that time and find out the philosophy behind each dish. Carnivore has one of the most famous game meat dining experiences in South Africa. It

celebrates its 25th anniversary this year and has fed well over one million people. It draws both locals and tourists in vast numbers. Robert says, “It’s a mistake if you think it’s fine-dining – we don’t want to be fine-dining, we want to be ‘beast of a feast’. It’s not delicate cuts; it’s designed for you just to have good fun and enjoy yourself. You can come with your bowtie if you like or you can come in your short pants, and you’ll be comfortable,” says Robert. He says the fascinating thing is locally it draws an audience of about 50:50 black and white patrons, so


FEATURE

CARNIVORE MENU “Enjoy a selection of succulent, charcoal grilled game and domestic meats, skewered on Masaai swords and cooked to perfection over an open fire (vegetarian and fish dishes are also available). Best of all, eat as much as you like – we only stop serving when you lower your flag in surrender! Only R285.00 per person, R160.00 for children under 12.” •

Starter: Carnivore soup of the day, served with home-made honey bread; Lazy Susan salad presentation comprising: Greek, salsa, sweet corn, three-bean, baby marrow and coleslaw. Sauces to accompany meat dishes: Garlic, horseradish, mint, apple, chilli and cranberry, sour cream and raita

Entrée: Served with pap, shebo sauce and baked potato – Chicken liver peri-peri, chicken yakitori, pork sausage, pork

the offering is very well accepted by all South Africans. Tourists, even with the growing vegetarian trend, come in vast quantities. Although the primary offering is in the name, Carnivore, they do have a selection of herbivore and piscivore dishes for vegetarians those who prefer fish, as well as a kiddies’ menu. “The number one message is about the ecology. If we do not eat game meat we will lose our wildlife. Land is under huge pressure, for all sorts of political reasons, and it has been for quite a while. Most of the land in South Africa is marginal, which means that most things won’t grow on it, it is not suited for the abundance of farming, and the amount of cattle you can keep on a piece of land is limited because we don’t have the same sort of grass or rainfall as some other places. What you can keep is game. All game seems to work at a different level, some eating tall grass, others the

next layer and so on, to the tender shoots, and the leaves are also grazed at various heights by different species, living a symbiotic life. The result is more people are keeping game and this protein has to come to the marketplace,” he explains. “We have this opportunity. There is venison or game meat from culls. We have our own property, Kedar, where we shoot the excess number of young males. The difference is hunting where they want the animal with the biggest horns, usually the older animal. This animal is not suited to eating, it’s tough.” At a game farm you have game you can look at, eat and hunt. Game meat is now specifically farmed for the plate, or in Carnivore’s case, the spear. With the older females, if their coats indicate a certain age and they don’t throw a foal, they will be shot and made into sausages and boerewors. “You deal with it as a farmer would,” Robert says.

spare ribs, venison meatballs, venison sausage, venison samoosas •

Main: Venison biryani, crocodile, three different types of venison meats (offerings vary daily), rump beef, leg of pork/gammon

Dessert: Chocolate mousse, fruit salad, ice cream, malva pudding with custard, cheese cake

• •

Tea and coffee Quips on the menu: ○ “Don’t take a butcher’s advice on how to cook meat. If he knew, he’d be a chef.” Andy Rooney ○ “Meat, meat! We are going to eat some meat; and what meat! Real game!” Ned Land in Jules Verne’s ‘Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea’ ○ “If you don’t eat yer meat, you can’t have any pudding. How can you have any pudding if you don’t eat yer meat?” Pink Floyd

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FEATURE

“These are not your pets, but they have the advantage of making sure your bushveld is maintained nicely, they keep the grass somewhat trim so you don’t have the bushfires you would normally have had, they trim up the trees from nibbling at the bottom so that they survive in the case of fire, and you have the advantage of tourism as well, as people come and look at your animals. It is the best kind of farming for our kind of land,” he maintains, describing the land around Kedar. “There is a need to re-educate people. The urban black community have often lost contact with the bush and they need to be reintroduced to game meat. It has less cholesterol and is better for your health. We do proper culling at night with silencers, which means the animals do not get spooked and don’t release any chemicals, as happens at an abattoir. It’s a very technical process, and you have to get the cold chain right. The meat is very clean and good, in all sorts of senses, for human consumption,” he notes. Most grass and leaf-eating buck are ideal for cooking with, as well as crocodile, which is farmed. The

©CARNIVORE

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fat and blood of the crocodile, for example, are popular in the Far East for their perceived healing properties. He prefers it cooked over a fire to render down the fat, otherwise it simmers in its own fat, he notes. Chinese visitors find crocodile meat a must on the menu. Game is usually culled and available in winter. South African law allows for exemption permits for commercial farmers, including game farmers. The price is traditional lower in winter and higher in summer; at Kedar they reserve some animals to be culled in summer to ensure greater availability of fresh meat and obtain a premium price for this meat. Robert’s personal preference is African game that is not hung for a long time, so that “it’s fresh, bloody and delicious”. “It’s a hugely exciting industry. A lot of what we knew and practised 100 years ago has been lost. More recently chefs have dug out the old recipes and are playing with them. We can be proud that we’ve entered a new age and venison – and meat in general – is now very sought after. Game meat includes exotics which cost a lot of money (e.g. sable and roan), and reasonably priced meats

such as eland, kudu, waterbuck, impala, blesbok, springbok (flavour changes dramatically depending on where it comes from, based on its wild diet, some of which may include herbs), hartebeest, nyala and warthog. We need to get away from just picking impala, blesbok and springbok. South Africa has a full range of suitable animals and chefs should be challenging themselves a little more,” he says. Smaller antelope ribs and knuckle make for very good curries on the bone, as well as pies, Robert notes. “There is an opportunity if chefs enquire, look for and experiment with different game meat. With blesbok, for example, if you make the double long chops as you do with lamb, you would be surprised at how tender and delicious it is. You have the opportunity to offset the taste with experimental side dishes, such as local berries, to bring out the taste of the meat. You have to go to the right butcher,” he adds. A common problem used to be overcooking game meat. It may, however, be served as a rare steak, Robert points out. He would also like to see more cooking lessons in game and sponsored competitions. “At Kedar we use the old Boer recipes and recipes from the war; the property is themed around Paul Kruger and the Anglo Boer War. The British generals came with their Indian chefs, as they had British and Indian command soldiers. They produced fantastic meals and these were shared with local people in South Africa. We have these kinds of trench food dishes at Kedar. You have to really look for these historical recipes from people who remember or have had recipes passed on to them, and enthusiasts. The dishes are influenced by the rest of the world that was passing through South Africa at that time – it was considered a time of great culinary breakthroughs,” explains Robert.


FEATURE

CARNIVORE © JC CRAFFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

THE VENISON VALUE CHAIN Braeside Butchery’s Caroline McCann is passionate about all things meat and education. She says, “It is a fallacy that venison is the only answer to conservation efforts. Unfortunately, our wildlife is being treated as a commodity without proper forethought as to its growing and where it’s going,” she explains. “From its growing perspective, the government has signed a declaration that one million hectares of South Africa’s land mass will go to the conservation of wildlife.” She continues, “A lot of traditional beef or cattle farms are being converted to game farms, but game is not the same as beef. With beef, farmers would take better care of their animals. With game, there is this idea that you just put the game on the land and they’ll do their own thing.”

Caroline discusses three distinct categories within the venison world:

1. Rare breeding to create animals like golden wildebeest and black impala. “This is effectively feedlotting as farmers try to create rare breeds, and if by the fifth generation you don’t have it the animal has to go. You can’t just say that’s a great piece of kudu steak, you have to ask, where does this come from? You cannot automatically assume that it is good, clean and fair because it’s venison.” 2. People running game farms. “Some are great but some are not: they may not be particularly concerned with things like soil conservation, which is critical because this is the stuff that gives the food. They have hunters that come onto the farm, they may have created guest lodges,

some are in partnership with the local community. The difficulty getting venison from there, say from the hunting fraternity – and I completely agree in ethical hunting – is you may be getting meat that was not ethically hunted or culled. Hunting is an incredible way to monetise our game industry and the people who subscribe to ethical standards are almost always guys doing great conservation work and great work with the communities around there. The focus is larger than just I’m going to get R100 000 for that amazing kudu that has five twists in its horn. The moment any animal has had a stressful death, the meat lands up with all the wrong chemicals in its body – bad taste, bad smell, tough meat. People are very forgiving of tough venison steak because people assume it’s got to be.

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FEATURE

THEY UNDERSTAND THAT WITHOUT THE GRASS WE HAVE NOTHING, THE SOIL HAS TO BE GREAT, THE WATER HAS TO BE KEPT CLEAN, AND YOU CAN’T HAVE INVASIVE SPECIES. ©CARNIVORE

It’s also generally eaten way too quickly. In Europe they wouldn’t touch a large animal unless it’s bled for three weeks. In this country, within 48 hours it’s been shot, killed, skinned, put on the back of a bakkie, gone through a butcher shop and vacuum packed with a great price tag. As a chef and butcher, you should ask, ‘What happens chemically in three weeks’ worth of ageing?’ That extra haemoglobin comes out so you don’t end up with an iron taste. Research done by the University of Pretoria has looked at the effects of ageing, particularly dry ageing, of venison: the tenderness that came about within three weeks. Because it is a lean meat the enzymes in dry ageing break down those muscle fibres and get it nice and tender, and work even quicker when there’s no fat to worry about. When you eat a meal by a chef who has been challenged with an animal that has had a horrendous death, you’ll end up with a tough, chewy piece of venison that tastes of iron. Government legislates meat to keep consumers safe. Our legislation is fair and sets out the process that needs to be followed before you can sell venison: the

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animal needs to be slaughtered; go through an inspector; be processed in a hygienic facility; have a permit that accompanies it that states where it came from, whether it was shot and allowed to be shot. As a chef your responsibility is to ask exactly the questions; you’re not there to simply pick up the phone and order four kilograms of springbok loin. The meat value chain is very long and there are a lot of people that need to be involved in it – many people want to close their eyes to this, or just stick to ostrich. Supermarkets often don’t stock game meat because they will not cut corners. Another challenge is, if you ask anyone if they like venison they’ll say they love it, but they won’t remember when they last ate it. When people do go out and venison is on the menu, nine times out of ten they are not choosing it because they are choosing their favourites – beef, lamb, pork and chicken. It’s almost the ‘horse meat’ of South Africa - it’s a tough sell.” 3. “There are a group of dynamic young people, mostly land claimants, who want to take venison and put it back onto our menu and do it properly.

They subscribe to conservation initiatives, and want to see conservation outcomes through everything they do. They understand that without the grass we have nothing, the soil has to be great, the water has to be kept clean, and you can’t have invasive species. Conservation Outcomes has a great conservation project they’re working on in KwaZuluNatal and Kruger National Park, working with communities to ensure great grass and therefore great venison. When you have people who are that committed to getting the product right, you need chefs to step up and make that much effort to get that product onto plate.”

OVERALL COMMENTS:

• Supply chain is a challenge, but don’t cull in the heat of summer or when babies are being dropped. • Smart chefs understand that venison is a seasonal product, so leave lamb alone in winter and opt for excellent game meat. • At Braeside we sell venison seasonally and very selectively, with all of the permits and we ensure we bleed it. Every hunter thinks they’re a butcher, but they’re not. • Chefs should be prepared to ask for the whole animal, as you would for beef or lamb, rather than just the fillet. Get to know the different species, their muscle structure, protein strains, which have more fat than not, and especially which is bled and aged. • There are a lot of butcheries who do venison, especially this time of year, and there are a fair number of butcheries who do a good job. Start by going to your butcher – not meat wholesaler – and start the discussion on how to strip a carcass, cost a carcass, and prepare different cuts of meat; that’s why we exist.


RECIPE

VENISON CURRY Misty Hill and Carnivore’s executive chef, Faraaz Panaino, shares his recipe for Venison Curry:

INGREDIENTS •

2kg kudu cubes

METHOD •

(goulash) •

600g potato (3cm

pieces) •

1 large onion

30g cumin

1. In a pot, heat up oil.

powder

2. Add in diced onions, cumin seeds,

10g cumin seeds

(diced)

ginger and garlic. 3. Add in the meat and allow to

150ml

fry for 5-8 minutes, stirring

sunflower oil

continuously.

3 tomatoes (diced) •

500ml water

4. Once the meat has browned, add

60g crushed

100g frozen

in chili powder, turmeric powder,

peas

coriander powder and cumin

30g fresh

powder, followed by the chopped

coriander

tomatoes and allow to cook down.

ginger and garlic •

50g chili powder

40g turmeric

30g coriander

15g fresh mint

powder

Salt

5. Gradually add in the water so that meat and spices do not burn.

Reduce the heat to a simmer (not boil) and add salt to taste. 6. Cook for about one hour and 15 minutes. 7. Once the meat has softened, add in potatoes and allow to cook. 8. Once the potatoes are soft, along with the meat, add in the frozen peas, fresh coriander and mint. 9. Remove from heat and allow 10 minutes of resting time before serving. 10. Serve with either rice or bread and enjoy!


NEWS

LUCKY CHEFS

THIRTEEN ENTREPRENEURS CELEBRATE THE COMPLETION OF THE SA CHEFS AND LUCKY STAR INCUBATOR OR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME.

T

he Lucky Star Caterers Academy incubator or Enterprise Development Programme, a social development initiative in association with SA Chefs, has upskilled 13 entrepreneurs. The programme was designed by SA Chefs past president,

Stephen Billingham, with input from both practicing urban caterers and the awarding body, City & Guilds. The successful initiative targets small to medium, black-owned catering companies which are registered as sole proprietors or closed corporations and generating

revenue by providing a catering and events service in townships and surrounding areas. The programme aims to allow each caterer to maximise opportunities, create employment, address health and safety issues in production and contribute to the country’s economy, while raising the standard of business ethics and quality of the hospitality and catering industry. “Growing skills and development in South Africa is very important to the work that we do at SA Chefs. We are proud and incredibly grateful to work with companies like Lucky Star to grow and fine-tune the operations of more entrepreneurs, which is critical to bridging the unemployment gap in this country,” says Elsu Gericke, head of professional body and skills development.

CAKE SECURES BURSARY

T

he Capsicum Culinary Studio Winter Wonderland Cake Competition held in Durban recently was won by 27-year old Priyanka Govender. She beat two others in a mystery bake-off final to claim the first prize of an all-inclusive, full-time Diploma in Patisserie bursary from Capsicum worth R98 000. “Priyanka's cake was delicious and her own recipe. The taste combinations were balanced and the overall aesthetics were appealing and had obvious talent applied. She had good time management, and a clean approach to her styling

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and the way she operated in the kitchen,” says Julia Greenaway, judge and principal of KZN's Capsicum Culinary Studio campus. Priyanka made a five-layered velvet cake, covered in a cream cheese icing, finished off with a dark chocolate ganache drip, edible flowers, toasted almonds, blueberries and strawberries. She says she found producing a cake in two hours stressful but enjoyed every moment of the bake-off. Priyanka hopes to open her own patisserie once she has completed her studies.


NEWS

HOPE MDAKANE A WINNER

O

n 1 June 2018, the annual HTA In-Service Apprentice Chef of the Year competition took place. Some nine finalists pitted their skills against each other in the competition kitchens at HTA School of Culinary Art in Randburg, Johannesburg. Six judges undertook the tasting and scoring. And about 80 guests came out for the prizegiving ceremony. Now in its 12th year, the competition, which was conceptualised by founder and owner Stephen Billingham and sponsored by Nedan and AFGRI Milling, aims to further invest in the culinary youth of South Africa and to reach a broader and wider variety of chefs and students currently working in industry, exposing them to the uses and diversity of textured vegetable protein.

1ST PLACE WINNER, HOPE MDAKANE © IBEK

Winner and runners-up are:

1st – Hope Mdakane from Saxon Boutique Hotel Villas & Spa 2nd – Luca Brits from Roots restaurant at Forum Homini Hotel 3rd – Amanda Mncube from Emperors Palace

Fellow finalists representing their training establishments included: Bianca Gunther (Protea: African Pride); Claud Foreman (Amakoekoe); Given Mashwane (Bidvest Catering); Luke Mckerr (Protea: Fire & Ice Menlyn); Elan Wellen (Totally Kosher); and Stanley Matjila (Emperors Palace). They are industry-based students who completed their final block release in 2017 from the Chef Apprenticeship Programme at HTA and were chosen based on their overall performance and marks practically and theoretically over a three-year period and following a semi-finalists cook-off at HTA in May. Finalists were awarded a Nedan and AFGRI Milling embroidered chef jacket from eChef, a branded commemorative trophy, framed HTA certificate and medal and various industry-related gifts from suppliers.

NEW BCE SHOWROOM

B

CE Foodservice Equipment officially launched its new showroom in Robertville, Johannesburg in July. MD Justin Morby-Smith and team welcomed chefs, hoteliers, suppliers, clients and the broader hospitality industry to tour the new facility – the largest of its kind in Africa – at a special cocktail event, with international suppliers out from the US, UK, Spain, Italy, France, Switzerland and Singapore chatting to guests about their brands, equipment and the latest

trends in modern establishments. Some 60 prizes from top suppliers were handed out on the basis of lucky dip of names in a bowl during the evening by emcee Harry Sideropoulos. Guests were wowed by the expansive, well-lit and laid out showroom that features an extensive range of equipment on display as well as a test kitchen. The launch date of 18 July coincided with Mandela Day and the launch of BCE’s new hefty print catalogue, a hospitality professional’s guide to the latest equipment for

JUSTIN MORBY-SMITH

back and front of house (BCE stocks about 6 000 items), and their spare parts catalogue.

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NEWS

ASIA ON A PLATE AT

WACS CONGRESS 2018 The much anticipated 38th biennual WACS Congress and Expo was a huge hit with SA Chefs delegates.

SA CHEFS HAD A LARGE GROUP OF MEMBERS ATTENDING THE CONGRESS. A SNAPSHOT OF THEIR EXPERIENCES:

ALLISTER ESAU (SA CHEFS VICE PRESIDENT)

excellent, focusing on sustainability and

amazing. A typical Malaysian dish that I

education, which are very relevant in

enjoyed for breakfast was Nasi Lemak, a

“Highlights included the focus on

today’s world. The last Congress I went to

coconut rice with cucumber, anchovies and

sustainability, seafood and educating

was in 1988 when I was still a student, so I

egg dish. Deep fried frogs’ legs with ginger

chefs and the consumer; the need to

did not know what to expect. All I can say

chips were also highlights.”

embrace chefs’ local country cultural

is that it was amazing – from the topics

cooking or recipes and be proud of

that were presented to the functions and

our own ingredients and traditional

our local tour of Kuala Lumpur, it was such

recipes; chef education and providing

a great experience. We were fortunate to

tools for free culinary education via

experience street food one evening. I am

the Worldchefs Academy app; chefs

not a fussy eater and being a chef, I will

giving back to society; meeting chefs

try everything. That evening we ate frogs’

with the same passion, reigniting old

legs, calamari and satays.”

ADRIAN VIGUS-BROWN (AFRICAN PRIDE MELROSE ARCH HOTEL HEAD CHEF; WACS YOUNG CHEFS AMBASSADOR – AFRICA AND MIDDLE EAST)

friendships and discussions about food;

The highlight as always is interacting

and the chefs’ competitions and trade

with the global community. I was proud

show. Malaysian meals that impressed

to be a part of a larger delegation representing South Africa, and related

each of the country’s cultures and

MICHELLE LOPES (MLK GROUP OF COMPANIES OPERATION DIRECTOR)

religions, with a variety of flavours and

“Highlights included the launch of the

opportunity to implement and succeed

textures we associate with lunch or

Worldchefs Academy offering free online

in so many aspects of Worldchefs. The

dinner served for breakfast; the gala

education for a pre-commis chef. Global

main Congress and after events were

dinner for 1 000+ chefs was served on

Chefs Challenge was another highlight,

informative, current and enjoyable as

time with good, hot, tasty food that

watching the dedication and discipline

were the national voting process and

was an expression of local ingredients

in some of the chefs participating and

debates. I love the process and am very

served on amazing dishes; and the

their final outcome was outstanding. The

keen to be involved in it one day. It is

street food in China Town.

speakers were great as they were diverse

a must to visit the street markets and

and in it for the love of this industry. Chef

sample the food the locals eat. Some of

Shaista Anoop (pastry lecturer at 1000

my favourites include Marmite Chicken

Hills Chef School in KwaZulu-Natal) did a

(for me a match made in heaven) as well

DAVID KEIR (FEDICS EXECUTIVE CHEF; SA CHEFS DIRECTOR)

fantastic Peppadew demonstration: she

as Malaysian dishes like Bakuteh (braised

presented her delicious winning main meal

pork in a broth), Nasi Kandar (rice and

“The highlight will always be the

and all the young chefs were invited to

meat), and all the different open flame

networking – it is great to see old friends

taste the piquanté peppers, many for the

cooked satays. For the brave is durian

and meet new friends. The agenda was

first time. The street food in general was

fruit, an acquired taste.”

me most were the hotel breakfast – a spread of over 80 dishes that embraced

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to and involved myself in many of the talking points. South Africa has an


NEWS

T

his year’s World Association of Chefs Societies (WACS) Congress and Expo was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 11 to 14 July. Jodi-Ann Pearton, SA Chefs director and founder of the Food Design Agency, reports: “The build-up to the Congress was exciting as it was going to be one of the largest delegations ever seen at a single Congress and by far the largest number of young chefs ever hosted at the Billy Gallagher Young Chefs Forum. “The Billy Gallagher Young Chefs Forum is the brainchild of the former president of Worldchefs it is named after. Billy had a huge and inspiring passion for young chefs and youthful talent in the industry and his vision was to leave a legacy in the form of the youth within WACS. "Under the guidance of Andy Cuthbert (UAE), the late Billy (RSA),

Alan Orreal (SIN), Dale Lyman (AUS) and me (RSA), the forum has grown from strength to strength and there were 147 international young chefs from at least 16 countries present in Malaysia. The young chefs had the opportunity to network with one another and the senior delegates, undertake experiential outings and sightseeing trips around the city, participate in charitable food events as well as cook and eat authentic Malaysian cuisine. Meetand-greet events were organised in a private venue with top chefs such as Andre Chiang (Michelin 3 star chef and motivational speaker) and Alvin Leung (Michelin 3 star celebrity chef), to mention just two. “The senior delegates had many treats of their own. The main forum was home to debates, discussions and the unveiling of what Worldchefs has in store for the international

community, which includes many initiatives on specifically the sustainability and educational fronts. The Congress placed great emphasis on the importance of sustainability in our future and how each of us are able to make impactful changes in the choices that we make in our establishments on a daily basis. “Worldchefs launched its free of charge educational online portal and mobile app, the Worldchefs Academy, offering culinary education to aspiring students who may not have the means, mobility or flexibility to attend full-time classes. It is revolutionary as it provides anyone in the world with an opportunity for free culinary education that is certified. “Congress would not be complete without evening events across the city and an opportunity to experience the amazing Malaysian street fare (I loved the Nyonya broth noodles: the complexity of flavours and textures, so simple yet fantastic!), the heady scent and tastes of durian and satay, luscious noodles, night life, gala dinners and wonderful networking opportunities, brilliant culinary competitions – including the Hans Bueschkens Junior Challenge and the Global Chefs Culinary Competition – and the voting and announcement of the 2022 host country for the World Chefs congress, Abu Dhabi. The 2020 event will be taking place in St Petersburg, Russia for the first time in the history of the organisation and aims to be bigger and better than ever.”

13


NEWS

ALL THE ACTION AT

INFOCHEF AFRICA 2018 Some 1 300 learners, trainee and senior chefs, suppliers and members from around the country attended InfoChef Africa 2018 at Emperors Palace, Johannesburg, on 25 and 26 July.

I

nfoChef Africa 2018 is an annual educational, networking and fun two-day event hosted by SA Chefs and its patrons, sponsors and friends. This year it was held at Peermont’s Emperors Palace, east of Johannesburg, and some 1 300 chefs in all stages of their career attended. Speakers included SA Chefs President James Khoza; Vice Presidents Kabelo Segone and Allister Esau; celebrity chef Benny Masekwameng; David Higgs of Marble and Saint restaurants; Adrian Vigus-Brown, head chef at African Pride Melrose Arch Hotel; Vusi Ndlovu, head chef at Marabi Jazz Club and former S. Pellegrino competitor; Caroline McCann of Braeside Meat Market; Thobi Skhosana and Bongani Hlatshwayo on their educational at Le Calabash in France; Adrian Vaughan from Sun Time Square

14

Casino; Nonkululeko BrittonMasekela on organic farming; and Sizwe Cebekhulu from Nestlé Professional. Many other chefs and industry professionals came out to take turns manning the mic, judge competitions, hold cooking demonstrations and network. A range of suppliers of products, services and training institutions hosted lively exhibition stands on which delegates could chat, win spot prizes and learn more about the culinary and hospitality industry. Two young chef competitions took place live on each of the two days.

WILLOWTON GROUP INFOCHEF 2018

Six young chefs produced creative canapés in the inaugural Willowton Group InfoChef competition. Kayla Kuhlman (27) from Steyns Culinary Academy took first place and R10 000 prize money. In second place was Yanga Kula from Tvet College (R7 500 cash prize) and in third place was Gregory Sprake from Steyns Culinary Academy (R5 000 cash prize). The theme was the “Big 5” and each contestant was required to prepare 10 units of five canapés in three hours using five of Willowton Group’s products. They created two sweet canapés using Allsome Rice and WoodenSpoon White Margarine; sweet and sour savoury canapés using Sunfoil Sunflower oil; a seafood canapé

using Sunfoil Canola oil; and a savoury canapé using Sunshine D Original Margarine. Kayla winning canapés consisted of: sweet arancini with ginger chocolate ganache filling; seafood en brouchette with aioli; rare steak and smoked black tomatoes on a tomato butter crostino; cake pops; and chakalaka on a polenta square with herb mayo.

HULETTS SWEET YOUNG CHEF

Gabriella Ferreira from CTIA won the Huletts Sweet Young Chef 2018 competition and R7 500 in cash as well as Huletts products worth R4 000 for her school. The three other finalists included Khuthala Dyonase from Westcol Chef’s Academy; Marco Venter from Limpopo Chefs Academy; and Siyanda Dingani Mthembu from 1 000 Hills Chefs School. To enter, each chef had to submit one original recipe of an innovative dessert plus photograph and costing. The recipe had to use three Huletts products and consist of at least five components. In competition, they had two and a half hours to recreate their recipe and produce four plates for the judges. Gabriella’s winning dish consisted of Fallen Apple SemiFredo Cardamom Cheescake Dome. Info Chef Western Cape took place on 13 August 2018 at GrandWest Sun Exhibits.


SIGMACHEF

DRESSING

AFRI-LLENNIAL CHEFS! Chefs today wear more than a uniform – they want workwear that combines fit and functionality with their brand of personal style. SigmaChef specialises in cutting-edge design and fabric technology.

P

rofessional chefs wear their uniforms as a badge of honour and a professional statement. It represents thousands of hours of training, practice, experience, blood, sweat and even tears. They want to look and feel good while undertaking one of the toughest yet most rewarding jobs in their kitchens, units and establishments. SigmaChef understands this and has a vast range of choices for chefs and kitchen staff at all stages of their career.

UNIFORMLY UNIQUE

David Myers, general manager of SigmaChef, says the brand is all about catering to Millennials and other style, comfort and functionality-conscious chefs. And he has the letters Dip. Clothing [SA] BA Hons.Clothing [UK] MBA [UK] after his name to prove it! He says their culinary apparel is a uniform market disrupter, featuring “Afri-llennial” designs that are kind on the pocket yet provocative in their appeal. “We’ve taken inspiration from the worlds of fashion and fabric technology

and engineered a full range of garments that meet the needs of today’s chefs,” David explains.

Look out for:

• Functional: Garments that are lightweight yet durable, made to handle the heat and the arduous environment that chefs work in while offering ease of movement and keeping their shape and clean, fresh appeal. • On trend: Out with the boxy, unisex outfits that drown or chafe and in with sleeker, fitted and more fashionable yet fully professional chefs’ uniforms, styled specifically for men or women and taking inspiration from the world of fashion. • Affordable: Great uniforms shouldn’t have to cost an arm and a leg; whether entering the culinary world from school, college or university, or moving from one establishment to another, chefs need budget-friendly options that are highly presentable and show that they’ve made it.

SigmaChef is a patron of SA Chefs and dresses the Olympic Culinary Team. Their garments capture the creative and courageous spirit of chefs. They believe that if you look and feel good, you’ll work even better!

CONTACT + 27 11 046 6664; +27 74 0666 444

info@SigmaChef.com www.SigmaChef.com 33 Amsterdam Ave (Cnr London Lane), Park Central, Selby, Johannesburg 2001 Postal: PostNet Suite #691, Private Bag X29, Gallo Manor 2052 @SigmaChef on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest

15


FEATURE

DINING IN THE AIR AND THE AIRPORT

The logistics of catering to travellers in-flight and in-transit is part science, part sensory management. Susan Reynard reports.

C

atering for travellers in the air and the airport requires particular understanding of their needs and specialised facilities and systems. Comair launched its own catering operation, Food Directions, in 2012 to simplify processes, increase control and reduce costs, while providing customers onboard its British Airways and kulula.com flights with top quality, fresh and tasty food. The HACCP compliant, bespoke kitchens in Jet Park just outside OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg and Airport Industria outside Cape Town International

16

Airport have been specially designed for maximum productivity and best hygiene practices. Comair CEO Erik Venter says Food Directions prepares on average 210 000 complete meals per month for Comair’s airline brands – British Airways and kulula. com – while around 100 000 meals per month are prepared for its various SLOW Lounge outlets. The company averages 2.5 meal items per passenger, which is an average of 775 000 meal items per month. Erik says the onboard menu is created in a staged approach. “Before recipes are considered, a

concept meeting is held whereby current trends and ideas are discussed. In this meeting, we also decide whether the concepts are viable for onboard. Once the concepts are set in place, the recipes are created and various trials are conducted. The recipes are then entered into a live system where the chef has access to the entire product database. As it is a live system, the prices for every item are updated immediately so current menu prices can be obtained. The meals are then presented to a panel and they are deemed as a ‘fly’ or ‘no fly’.


FEATURE

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF COMAIR FOOD DIRECTIONS

After the presentations the methods of the recipes are written and a kitchen and plating specification manual is compiled,” Erik explains. During the development of each meal, Food Directions chefs have to consider flavour as well as seasoning. At altitude, the sense of smell is dulled due to the dry air in the cabin. As 80 to 90% of

your sense of taste depends on your olfactory sense, or sense of smell, food needs to have intense flavour and more seasoning, Erik notes. Other considerations include how reheating food to be served hot impacts flavour; how the cold chain affects products that are served cold; and how to maintain the products’ integrity for passenger consumption. Budget is key when creating onboard meals. Meals need to be cleverly compiled to ensure they are substantial and costeffective. Dietary requirements are important when creating special meals (i.e. gluten-free, diabetic, vegan and low-fat). The meals are developed and then evaluated by a registered dietician. Erik says Food Directions’ creates and proposes menus versus costings, based on historical data, client product and brand, industry standards and approved budgets. To sign on new clients, Erik explains, “We go through a tender process for external customers, based on their prescribed procurement processes. Internally, we do a value proposition against current suppliers.”

FLYING AND FLAVOUR Airline food tastes different and here are some reasons why: 1. Flying at altitude reduces your sense of smell and changes your ability to taste. 2. Low humidity and air pressure reduces the amount of saliva produced, changing flavour. 3. The constant noise of the aircraft’s engines distracts the senses, further reducing taste. 4. Dry air in the cabin cools food faster which alters and reduces the perception of taste. 5. Altitude reduces salty and sweet flavours by up to 30%. 6. Sour and bitter flavours tend to stay the same in flight. 7. Natural herbs and acids should be used to enhance flavour, rather than chemical flavourants. 8. Herbal beverages and savoury, bitter snacks and foods have a more noticeable effect on taste. 9. Flavours of sweet and salty foods tend not to linger. 10. Tomato juice and ginger ale may have an umami or salty flavour, making them popular in the air. Source: https:/blog.klm.com

17


FEATURE

AIRPORT LOUNGES

SLOW Lounges are part of Comair’s food and beverage services to qualifying clientele at the country’s three busiest airports. In brief: • OR Tambo International Airport, Domestic – SLOW Lounge: Fully run kitchen with 30% of items bought in as finished products • OR Tambo International Airport, International – SLOW Lounge: Fully run kitchen with 30% of items bought in as finished products • Lanseria International Airport – SLOW XS: 100% of items bought in as finished products • King Shaka International Airport, Domestic – SLOW Lounge: Fully run kitchen with 30% of items bought in as finished products • Cape Town International Airport, Domestic – SLOW Lounge: Fully run kitchen with 30% of items bought in as finished products

BIDVEST PREMIER LOUNGE © SPHERE MEDIA

18

The SLOW offering also includes SLOW in the City as well as the restaurant The Course at SLOW in the City, based in Sandton, both with fully run kitchens. BIDvest Premier Lounges offer business and leisure facilities at all ACSA Airports plus Lanseria, operating ten lounges at six airports across the country. The lounges are open to travellers on any airline, with any class of ticket, and provide an oasis of comfort and relaxation. Gavin Bell, CEO of BIDVest Premier Lounge, says the lounges are comparable to other commercial, global lounge offerings, with certain food items prepared on site, others brought in and cooked off and certain items brought in premade. They cater for several thousand passengers per day and operating hours

are largely determined by flight schedules. New airline business into lounges is driven by a request for proposal process. Menu costs are driven by input costs and achieved rate charged. Several lounges are currently being upgraded, Gavin notes. During the refurb, King Shaka International Airport will have a small, temporary lounge facility available with a limited service offering located on the lower boarding gate level. The lounge at OR Tambo International Airport will continue to operate during the refurbishment. “This refurb will be done in stages over a few months, during which at certain times we will not have showers nor smoking room facilitates available. These restrictions will be available or updated on our website and signage will be available outside the lounge,” he adds.


FEATURE

BIDVEST PREMIER LOUNGE (LEFT AND RIGHT) © KENNY GILROY / SPHERE MEDIA

THE LOUNGES ARE OPEN TO TRAVELLERS ON ANY AIRLINE, WITH ANY CLASS OF TICKET, AND PROVIDE AN OASIS OF COMFORT AND RELAXATION.

AIRLINE AWARDS

Awards 2018 judging criteria:

The 2018 Travellers’ Choice Tripadvisor

Cabin Service: Meal service efficiency

Awards for Airlines indicates how

Onboard Product: Quality of meals;

important onboard dining is for

Quantity of food; Selection of meals;

travellers. In almost all ratings, travellers

Standard/choice of beverages;

mentioned in-flight food and service.

Selection of buy-onboard F&B; Prices of buy-onboard F&B

Top three in the world are Singapore Airlines; Air New Zealand; and Emirates.

Ground/Airport: Airport Lounge:

Ethiopian Airlines won Best Business

product facilities; staff efficiency;

Class in Africa and the Indian Ocean, with

staff hospitality

Air Austral and FlySafair winning Best Economy Class.

Top three in the world are: Singapore Airlines; Qatar Airways; and ANA All

The quality of food and beverage served

Nippon Airways. Best Regional Airlines in

onboard is included in several categories

Africa are: Royal Air Maroc; Air Namibia;

of the prestigious Skytrax World Airline

and RwandAir.

COMAIR - FOOD DIRECTIONS

19


FOOD SAFETY: LISTERIA,

LAX HYGIENE AND THE LAW

South Africa was hit by the biggest listeriosis outbreak in the world earlier this year. The solution is building a safer food culture in the hospitality industry and at home. Susan Reynard reports.

E

arlier this year, South Africa faced the biggest listeriosis outbreak in the world. Although considerable steps have been taken to control the listeria outbreak, the recent recall of certain frozen foods at supermarkets has left consumers anxious of future occurrences across the country. Good food hygiene habits are vital in preventing food-related illnesses.

FOOD SAFETY BEGINS AT HOME

Four out of five people worldwide put themselves at risk of foodrelated illnesses due to poor hygiene habits in the kitchen, reports the Food Standards Agency, a UK independent government department dedicated to protecting public health and consumers’ wider food interests. “It’s important for us as consumers to understand the ways in which bacteria can spread during the handling, preparation and storage of food,” says James Khoza, President of SA Chefs. “As an organisation that represents chefs, cooks and caterers of all levels, it is our responsibility to help the industry maintain the highest level of food safety

20

standards and we will continue to assist with food-safety programs, procedures and measures that educate chefs to control risks and hazards through the flow of food.” Karin Kok, Ecolab’s G360 solutions and support manager of institutional Middle East/Africa, adds: “Poor domestic and personal hygiene practices can enable the transmission of disease-causing micro-organisms. This is why it is critical to identify the hidden ways that dangerous bacteria and other micro-organisms can be spread through the kitchen, and how better health and hygiene choices can be implemented to reduce risks.”

Ecolab and SA Chefs share three key preventative steps to develop good hygiene habits at home and at work and avoid food-related illnesses:

1. Keep the kitchen clean: In most homes and offices, the kitchen is the central room and often the most used. It also harbours more microorganisms than any other room, which is why keeping a kitchen clean is of paramount importance. This includes disinfecting worktop counters, thoroughly cleaning chopping

boards and utensils as well as regularly changing dish cloths and tea towels. Utilising disposable dishcloths is a good option to avoid crosscontamination, and where possible, use non-porous cutting boards that do not harbour bacteria. Unlike other food-borne pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes can grow in refrigerated foods that are contaminated. To prevent this, make a habit of cleaning the inside walls and shelves of your fridge with hot water and liquid soap once a week. If there is a spill in your refrigerator, especially juices from lunch meat packages, raw meat and poultry, clean it immediately and disinfect the area with a household bleach or disinfectant. 2. Store food adequately: Be conscious of best-before dates. Storing food for too long in the refrigerator is dangerous and leftovers should be used within three to four days, or sooner in some cases. To store leftovers, divide them into shallow containers as this promotes rapid and even cooling, and label leftover food with the date of storage.


Get access to educational & procedural information.

Learn more: ecolab.com/listeria

LISTERIA Know your MONOCYTOGENES suppliers.

Source Listeria-sensitive foods from suppliers who implement valid Listeria controls.

FACT SHEET

Keep prep areas clean.

Avoid cross contamination.

Thoroughly wash and sanitize kitchen work surfaces and utensils according to product labels immediately after contact with high risk foods.

Keep raw and cooked products separate, especially raw eggs, milk, meat and poultry.

PREPARE FOOD CAREFULLY

WHAT IS LISTERIA Rinse fruits

Appropriate & vegetables cook times. Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen that causes listeriosis, a severe gastrointestinal

FACT: Unheated IN THE U.S. hot dogs are ONE of of thefood poisoning HIGHEST RISK

43%

before preparing and serving Cook food thoroughly. ready-to-eat foods DEATHS illness. Unlike most otherthoroughly foodborne pathogens, Listeria can grow atserve proper unless it’s been commercially pre-washed. Do not foods for containing raw eggs rate. or refrigeration temperatures. Listeriosis is a rare disease with a high mortality areListeriosis attributed to raw (unpasteurized) milk. People at highest risk include the elderly, pregnant women, young children and the LISTERIOSIS1 Please reference the Food Code for specific cooking temperature guidelines.2 immunosuppressed.

Learn more: ecolab.com/listeria CLEAN

THOROUGHLY & ROUTINELY

Wash hands

Clean and sanitize food centric objects and

Hands should be washed BEFORE handling food and • BETWEEN handling different food items.•

EPA-registered, food-safe sanitizer.

SYMPTOMS TYPICALLY OCCUR AFTER surfaces in the 7 backDAYS of the house with an frequently. • •

Fever Muscle aches

ESPECIALLY on prep NauseaFOCUS & diarrhea surfaces and high-touch objects: utensils, prep and serving ware, cookware, etc. neck Headache & stiff

• •

Clean and disinfect storage areas, restrooms, and breakrooms using an EPA-registered sanitizer or disinfectant.

Confusion FOCUS ESPECIALLY on high-touch areas: chairs, door knobs, menus, etc. Loss of balance & convulsions

Follow us at #foodsafetymatters

HOW LISTERIA ENTERS A RESTAURANT

Sensitive Items

2

1. CDC(2006). Surveillance for Foodborne-Disease Outbreaks --- United States, 1998—2002. MMWR 55(SS10);1-34 http://www.cdc.gov/MMWR/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5510a1.htm 2. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/UCM374510.pdf

• Raw or unpasteurized dairy products • Raw meat & poultry

FOOD CONTAMINATED

In produce growing environments

During processing

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH LISTERIOSIS RISK

2

· FREQUENCY AND EXTENT of contamination of a food with Listeria · TEMPERATURE AND DURATION of refrigerated/chilled food storage

Follow us at #foodsafetymatters

æ Learn more: ecolab.com/listeria © 2016 Ecolab USA Inc. All rights reserved. 49852/0400/0616

• Deli salads • Deli meats

· AMOUNT AND FREQUENCY of consumption of a Listeria sensitive food

· WHETHER FOOD CAN SUPPORT GROWTH of Listeria

During handling & preparation

• Fresh soft cheese (non hot packed)

• Cooked meat, poultry & seafood (including smoked)

• Cooked eggs

1. CDC(2006). Surveillance for Foodborne-Disease Outbreaks — United States, 1998—2002. MMWR 55(SS10); 1-34 http://www.cdc.gov/MMWR/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5510a1.htm 2. FDA/USDA-FSIS “Quantitative Assessment of Relative Risk to Public Health From Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes Among Selected Categories of Ready-to-Eat Foods”. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/ FoodScienceResearch/UCM197330.pdf


FEATURE

Fridges must be set at the right temperature: below 4⁰C and food should be cooled within two hours. As per SA Regulation 962, freezer temperatures can range between -12 and -18⁰C, and it is recommended that freezer temperature is set below -18⁰C. It is highly recommended that raw meat, poultry and seafood are kept separate to avoid cross contamination. After handling and storing raw food, wash hands thoroughly before handling cooked food. 3. Prepare food properly: Microorganisms can be transferred during food preparation and it’s very important to have clean hands at all times. Wash hands

RAW FOOD FROM ANIMAL SOURCES SUCH AS BEEF, PORK AND POULTRY SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY COOKED TO A SAFE INTERNAL TEMPERATURE OF ABOVE 60°C, EXCEPT FOR CHICKEN WHICH SHOULD BE ABOVE 75°C. thoroughly with warm water and soap repeatedly during the food preparation process. Raw food from animal sources such as beef, pork and poultry should be thoroughly cooked to a safe internal temperature of above 60°C, except for chicken which should be above 75°C. Bacteria

FOOD SAFETY LEGISLATION

breed faster between 40 and 60°C so when reheating cooked food ensure the temperature is above 60°C. When preparing fruit and vegetables, rinse them under clean running (or previously boiled) water before eating to remove any soil-dwelling pathogens.

facilities and hygiene standards

facilities, food containers, appliances

approved.

and equipment, food display, food

Every establishment that prepares

storage and temperature, employee

Regulations governing hygiene

and/or sells food to consumers is

protective clothing, the duties of

requirements for a food premises, the

required to hold a valid Certificate

those in charge, the duties of a food

transport of food and related matters

of Acceptability. The Certificate is

handler, the handling of meat, the

in July. Information was prepared

issued in the name of the person in

transportation of food and certain

by Fedhasa’s legal expert, Peter

charge of the establishment and its

Cumberlege. Those wanting to apply for

food premises and not the name of the

a “Certificate of Acceptability” or wishing

establishment and is not transferable.

may make application to the local

Certificates made out in the name of

authority for exemption from any

handling standards comply with specific

the person currently in charge of an

of the provisions set out in the

requirements are referred to the gazetted

establishment will remain valid.

regulations with the exception of the

Certificate must be on public display

issuing of the Certificate. Exemptions,

on the premises or a copy must

if granted, may be subject to certain

immediately be made available on

conditions decided upon by the local

request.

authority and may be withdrawn if the

Establishments with certificates

exemption is deemed likely to become

hygiene requirements for a food

made out to a person who is no longer

a health hazard. A local authority

premises and for the transportation of

in charge or who has left must inform

may set additional requirements to

food. This document, which amends the

the local authority in writing of the

be met at any food premises where,

previous set of Regulations published in

change within 30 days after the date

despite compliance, a health hazard

2002, was gazetted and came into force

of the replacement. Local authorities

exists that is not provided for in the

on the 22 June 2018. A few key points:

will either re-inspect the property

Regulations.

or issue a new Certificate without

SA Chefs shared a guide to the National

to ensure their food facilities and food

Regulation available on the Fedhasa

website (www.fedhasa.co.za). The Minister of Health published Regulations setting out the general

Mandatory inspection by a local

A person in charge of food premises

inspection.

( These views and content of the above

The Regulation provides specific

are those of the writer and they do not

food to the public, with a Certificate

hygiene requirements for matters

represent the views of any other person or

of Acceptability awarded once

concerning: food premises, food

organisation.)

authority health officer of any business that provides and/or sells

22

exemptions. •


0860 111 MAC | www.macbrothers.co.za

COOKING SUITES RANGES INCLUDE: Grills, fryers, ovens, gas hobs, induction units as well as refrigeration and storage options with work surfaces. They are put together by the collective knowledge, skill and experience of the Mac Brothers team who will continue to support the cooking suites with our after-sale service on all units.

Customized modular unit either bolted together or welded together in one solid piece

Install as many hobs as you need, a grill or deep fryer according to what you will be preparing

Design becomes flexible with the freedom of choice

Induction tops (optional) for ease and speed

Create your own showpiece that is visually appealing

Organise your cooking suite based on the sections of your kitchen brigade

Complements your menu functionality

Plan your equipment to suit your business’ needs and budget

Durable (3mm stainless-steel top)

Affordable and reliable products – the best way to begin a journey in the food industry

Easy to clean and hygienic Certified and SABS approved

Aesthetically appealing, adding to the visual profile of any establishment

Personalize your storage

CAPE TOWN (HEAD OFFICE)

JOHANNESBURG

DURBAN

32 Benbow Ave, Epping 1, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa

138 Terrace Road, Sebenza Edenvale, Johannesburg, 1609, South Africa.

Unit 2, Heron Park, 80 Corobrick Road, Riverhouse Valley, Redhill, Durban, 4051

Tel: +27 21 505 4100 Fax: +27 021 534 0319

Tel: +27 11 456 9000 Fax: +27 11 456 9006

Tel: +27 31 569 5216 Fax: + 27 31 569 2205


SPOTLIGHT

CERTIFICATION AND DESIGNATION AWARDS PROGRAMME

Certification and designation by SA Chefs is easier than you think. Follow this step-bystep guide to see where you fit in best, and contact us to help you gain the recognition and career boost you deserve.

1. PROFESSIONAL TITLES

3. DESIGNATION

Technikon, Cathsseta or HITB, or a

Certification was developed in line with the

A designation is a title or status awarded

Diploma from a culinary academy or

designation awards.

by SA Chefs to recognise qualified

school. In future, the qualification

SAQA has allowed SA Chefs to develop a

professionals’ expertise and right to

needed will be the QCTO Occupational

system that awards professional titles to

practice in their culinary field.

Certificate Chef (SAQA ID 101697).

chefs.

Applies to all chefs with a Culinary

Non-qualified professionals now have equal

Diploma or recognised equivalent and

opportunities in the culinary industry.

specified number of years’ experience. It

Registered designations and professional

is valid for three years.

titles are:

SAQA recognised designations:

COOK ~ CHEF DE PARTIE ~ SOUS CHEF ~

HEAD CHEF

COOK: Three years’ experience and

5. APPLICATION PROCESS FOR CERTIFICATION AND DESIGNATION

still in a study programme (costs

1. Identify if you are eligible for the

R350) •

2. CERTIFICATION

2. Identify the level you want to apply for

completed and three years’ kitchen

3. Fill out the application form, sign the

experience (costs R500) •

Certification is a title or status awarded

SOUS CHEF: Culinary Diploma

by SA Chefs to recognise non-qualified

completed and five years kitchen

professionals’ expertise and right to

experience (costs R750) •

practice in their culinary field.

HEAD CHEF: Culinary Diploma

Applies to all non-qualified cooks and chefs

completed and seven years’ kitchen

who work in a formally structured brigaded

experience (costs R950)

Professional titles: COOK: Three years’ experience (costs

• •

CHEF DE PARTIE: Five years’ experience (costs R675)

Similar criteria to Certification except for:

SOUS CHEF: Seven years’ experience

(costs R950) •

HEAD CHEF: Nine years’ experience (costs R1 250)

24

receive 5. Complete the technical assessment documents you are sent – this is your Portfolio of Evidence (POE) 6. Submit your POE within 60 days of 7. SA Chefs verifies the information and

4. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGNATION

R420)

Ethics Code and email it to SA Chefs 4. Make payment on the invoice you

making payment

kitchen system. It is valid for three years. •

programme

CHEF DE PARTIE: Culinary Diploma

Fewer number of years’ experience needed

assesses the document and POE (takes about 30 days) 8. If successful, you will receive notification and will be issued with an electronic certificate 9. You will be registered on the SA Chefs

Formal culinary qualification needed,

Certification System and issued with

such as a Diploma from City & Guilds,

the CPD policy and details


SPOTLIGHT

© PHOTO BY ELEVATE VIA UNSPLASH

6. BENEFITS TO EMPLOYERS Employers can have the peace of

8. CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

mind that:

As a professional cook, chef de

Attend skills development short

The culinary skills of the applicant

partie, sous chef or head chef,

courses such as bread baking; knife

have reached a set benchmark

you should continue to develop

and have been assessed at his/her

and maintain your skills and

current employment level

knowledge.

courses

They are passionate and dedicated

Continuing Professional

Attend 5-day beginners course; 10-day

individuals that take responsibility

Development (CPD) is compulsory

proficiency course; HACCP; menu

for their careers

to retain your Designation and

engineering; recipe development;

They recognise the need for high

Certification status. It’s also fun

competition workshop; judging

standards in food preparation and

and informative!

hygiene

SA Chefs will audit members

The Professional Body has verified

annually to ensure compliance and

courses (on Certification)

the competency of the individual

you need to keep updated records.

Attend assessor, moderator, training

as well as the validity of the claims

CPD words on a point system that

facilitator, skills development

on the candidate’s CV

accumulates over two years:

7. BENEFITS TO INDIVIDUALS •

COOK: 45 points

CHEF DE PARTIE: 50 points

SOUS CHEF: 55 points

HEAD CHEF: 65 points

Career advancement opportunities Process to Recognition for Prior Learning (RPL)

Recognition for experience and

skills; cake decorating etc. 2. SA Chefs-approved development

workshop etc. 3. SA Chefs-approved further education

facilitation etc. courses 4. Industry development Job promotion based on personal development 5. Networking development exhibitions, conferences and seminars 6. Encouraging staff to enter

Professional Body •

1. SA Chefs-approved CPD skills courses

Attend industry trade shows,

Stamp of approval from the

9. EARN POINTS FOR YOUR CPD

competitions

10. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT ELSU GERICKE AT SA CHEFS HEAD OFFICE:

A head chef will receive points for every currently employed member of staff who enters a competition 7. Competitions

skills •

Motivation to advance and up-skill

Email: Elsu@sachefs.co.za

Participate in professional cookery

Continuing professional

Telephone: (011) 482 7250

competitions or the SA Olympic

development

Culinary Team

25


CHEF SHOWCASE

FORTI MAZZONE, KING OF FINE DINING

Forti Mazzone of Forti Grill and Bar restaurant in Sun Time Square Casino in Pretoria is a multi-generational restaurateur with a passion for fine dining and a powerful message of brotherhood for the culinary industry. Susan Reynard reports.

SIGNATURE PROFITEROLES AND SORBET DESSERT

26

© XAVIER SAER (WWW.BYXAVIER.COM)

WINE CELLAR PRIVATE ROOM


CHEF SHOWCASE

BESTSELLING DISHES LUMACONI SIGNATURE PASTA (R180): Pasta Shells stuffed with beef, spinach, mushroom and ricotta baked in the oven under a creamy béchamel and mozzarella crust

WAGYU BEEF, 300G (R590): The Rolls Royce of meat, famous for its intense marbling, served only rare, medium rare or medium

PRAWNS OF MY FATHER GIOVANNI (R390): Oven-roasted,

FORTI MAZZONE

garlic, champagne, butter, “secret ketchup”, creamy Parmesan rice

F

orti Mazzone is a muchrespected restaurateur and chef who has a strong voice in the South African culinary industry. His eponymous restaurant, Forti Grill and Bar launched in April 2017, was instantly an icon, as was his previous establishment Ristorante Ritrovo, both in Pretoria. As successful as he is, he remains approachable and warm, a knowledgeable mentor and loyal friend to patrons and industry. The hospitality gene is definitely inherited from his father Giovanni and Forti has grown up in restaurants, working in his father’s establishment from the age of 14. He is a member of the Academy of Chefs, the honour society of SA Chefs.

BEST OF THE BEST

“A vast amount of money was spent on this restaurant, not on flash but on creating a contemporary space. The interior of this restaurant could be in Milan, New York or London. It’s bright, spotlessly clean and, most importantly, everything in this restaurant was created bespoke. Every light fitting, piece of furniture, table, chair, crockery, artwork. Nothing was bought from a shop.

PRAWNS OF MY FATHER GIOVANNI

FRESH SALMON (R300): Seared, lemon caper sauce OR roasted and wrapped in pancetta, wilted spinach, lentil ragout, yoghurt, mashed potato

The tables are topped with marble, the chairs feature lumbar support so you can sit for the entire night and won’t suffer from back ache. I Went to the nth degree of detail to ensure absolute customer comfort and a designer experience. This includes back of house – all of my pots are Le Creuset, as are the salt and pepper sets on the table. One can pay lip service to the fact that you’re cooking this casserole and you want it all to be warmed equally in the same direction, but if you buy an aluminium pot it’ll never be right,” he explains. Forti Grill and Bar is on the top floor of Sun Time Square and has a magnificent view. It is at the end of a strip of restaurants and is an elegant oasis that features several dining spaces, bar, private dining room, deli and wine cellar. The kitchen is behind glass walls so that diners and chefs are visually connected. One of Forti’s favourite spaces in the walk-in humidor, something he has always wanted. “It adds a tone; a really great cigar enjoyed outside on a

OXTAIL CASSEROLE (R280): Our speciality prepared in red wine, tomato and beans served with mashed potato and vegetables, in a cast iron pot

couch with a great cognac or single malt scotch,” he adds. Sun International wooed Forti to open his restaurant in their newest casino complex and he says they have been an excellent business partner. “This restaurant has been a great financial success for me and a good return on investment for Sun International. In one and a half years we’ve created an iconic restaurant. This is the first restaurant that’s ever carried my own name – it’s a big commitment. When I opened this restaurant, two days later I broke my neck in a bicycle accident, I had surgery and came back to work the next day. I looked after my neck but was back at work, that’s how important this is to me,” he notes.

27


CHEF SHOWCASE

FINE FOOD

Forti is obsessed with authentic food and has put together an extensive menu of signature dishes and gourmet cuisine. Everything is prepared from scratch using only the best ingredients. For example, he only uses extra virgin olive oil from Tokara or Saronsberg. Beef is from Woodview and from grassfed cattle that are slaughtered at six years, internationally certified organic, heavily marbled and costs more than twice what conventional grain-fed meat costs. Prices reflect this quality and attention to detail, and yet Forti often has a lower markup on his dishes that he could do as he would rather give customers the very best. Vegans and vegetarians are well catered for on the menu and the restaurant makes the promise that vegan and vegetarian food is prepared separately by the chef team. “I will fight for the best products with my suppliers, and I’m not prepared to accept second-rate ingredients on special. I serve pasta with freshly shaved truffle over it and charge R250 – customers don’t always realise that the truffle on that dish cost R150. I’m not doing it to make money but doing it as a service, so that this can still exist in this country, so that you can still get it if you need it,” he notes. Just one of the many signature experiences at Forti is the table dessert, which costs R120 per person and involves an elaborate dessert prepared on the table itself by their pastry chef – edible art that reminds diners that fine dining can also be playful.

FINE DINING IS NOT DEAD

“They say the age of the fine dining restaurant is dead – I say it’s not dead, it’s just that people aren’t prepared to put the effort that’s required to produce a truly fine dining experience any more. They’re not prepared to go to the trouble to find

28

MEAT PLATTER

the ingredients, or spend the money on ancillaries, or the effort to give the customer the very best experience. Those that do are prospering, such as Mosaic and Marble. The busiest restaurants are by the people doing fine dining properly. Fine dining has become concentrated into pockets of excellence and everything else is becoming a pastiche of the lowest common denominator,” he points out. “Fine dining is about the essence of the word ‘hospitality’. If you look at the Michelin Guide, what is the point of two or three star restaurants? They make you feel ultra-welcome, they make you feel like you’ve never had this experience before. And that’s what I try and engender in my staff and myself when we interact with guests. People may be here on their first or tenth visit, they may have saved up for months to come here, so I respect the fact that someone

has made a huge financial sacrifice to come and eat at my restaurant. It is my responsibility to make them feel ultra-welcome and give them the experience of their lifetime. Some restaurants treat diners with a patronising attitude and make them feel unwelcome, belittled, while spending their own money – it’s the ultimate hypocrisy. If people come here and I can see they feel slightly out of place, I go out of my way to make them feel more welcome than ever, explain the menu in full detail, let them know their business is very valuable to me and I respect the sacrifice they’ve made to eat here, because their sacrifice means my expenses get paid. The fact that you choose to spend your money with me rather than somewhere else, I value that fact, and make them feel special,” Forti says. And this is why Forti has


CHEF SHOWCASE

customers for life, seeing generations of people grow up in front of him, celebrating all manner of special occasions in his restaurants. He knows that today’s student may be tomorrow’s big corporate client; a nervous date night may several decades later be celebrated as a silver wedding anniversary party. “Somebody once said, people might forget when it was they ate, they might forget the details, but they’ll never forget the way you made them feel,” he maintains.

GROWING UP IN THE AGE OF MENTORS

Forti grew up in his father Giovanni’s restaurant. He feels fortunate to have come into the industry with so many exceptional elder and senior chefs. Among his mentors is Billy Gallagher and the other chefs of the great five-star hotels in Johannesburg such as The Landdrost, The Carlton, The Johannesburg Sun as well as Walter Ulz of Linger Longer, many of whom were among his father’s circle of friends. At university, Forti would save up all month so that he could dine at Linger Longer in Braamfontein, while his friends were eating hamburgers and chips elsewhere. “I grew up with this idea and this understanding of what I believed constituted great hospitality and great restaurants, so I’m very fortunate that I had this example of that generation of chefs. They were chefs growing up in post-war Europe and South Africa but they were completely self-made people and had a drive and a passion and they understood quality. If you look at the first area of South Africa that truly became depoliticised and became the area where racism was tackled it was in the kitchen – it’s the ultimate meritocracy. I grew up in kitchens where you didn’t look at people because of their colour; what you value is hard work, effort, skill, integrity. My father is

the person with the most integrity. I try to be an example of that today. I also believe that cheffing is a brotherhood. That is the one thing that a lot of people seem to have forgotten lately,” he notes. Forti says of passing on knowledge, “I love having students here, and we throw them in at the deep end. I love working with young chefs, with the Olympic Culinary Team chefs. You’ve got to identify and build talent.”

FACT FILE CONTACT DETAILS: Forti Grill & Bar, Top Floor, Sun Time Square Casino, Corner of Aramist and Corobay Streets Landline: 08600FORTI (36784); 012 003 6180 Mobile: 083 467 2588; 076 260 3025 Instagram: @fortigrillandbar Twitter: @AtForti Facebook: @FortunatoMazzone

OPERATING HOURS: Sunday to Thursday 11:45 - 22:00 Friday to Saturday 11:45 - 24:00

DATE NIGHT SPECIAL on Mondays and Tuesdays: R300 per couple for any two pastas and a bottle of Leopard’s Leap Wine (prebooked and prepaid)

MENU SELECTION: Food, wine and cigar menu; set menus for functions; business menu for convenience during the week; Halaal menu

DELI sells a range of interesting wines, Italian food products, quality extra virgin olive oils, pasta, house coffee and coffee from Tribeca and Le Creuset cookware

THEMED EVENTS held regularly, listed on the website

ORIGINAL ABSTRACT ARTWORK by Carinda Appelgryn, some pieces for sale

LUMACONI

TRAVEL FOR INSPIRATION

“I travel every year for three weeks, starting with a week in a major world city to really drink it in and then I go to my home in Italy. I go to some of the great restaurants – literally 20 minutes from my house is Marennà which is one of the great Michelin star restaurants in Italy and the chef, Paulo Barrale, one of my closest friends. We eat together and exchange ideas. About an hour from my house right on the Amalfi Coast is two Michelin star Don Alfonso, considered by many the greatest restaurant in Italy, which we’re eating at on 23 August, and I’m so excited about it. We eat in fine-dining right through to casual restaurants and bistros – we eat a lot and that’s what our holiday is based around. It’s a complete pleasure but it’s also research. With Paulo I can be a guest in their restaurant one day and the next day I’ll do a one-day stage in his kitchen and see what’s happening with his new menu,” Forti explains.

USING SOCIAL MEDIA

For anyone following Forti on social media, he is a wealth of information, observations and humour. He spends quite a lot of time on social media and believes people respond well to his approach of being ultra-honest. “I try combine truth with humour to put poignant information across and it seems to work quite well. It’s important for people to know what you think, to have a conversation, to share messages with industry,” he adds.

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TREND WATCH

ELEVATE THE

HIGH TEA EXPERIENCE High tea continues to charm patrons, showcase chefs’ skills and boost mid-afternoon revenue. Susan Reynard reports.

A

display of miniature sweet and savoury bite-sized snacks perfectly displayed on tiered stands and smart platters is guaranteed to impress. High tea or afternoon tea: call it what you wish, done well it is a lucrative offering that showcases the best of the kitchen brigade’s creativity and skill. If a weekend away is considered a mini-break then high tea is a welcome microbreak on the menu; a diminutive degustation menu. High tea is freshly prepared by chefs to order and booking is essential. Lighter, interesting meals served mid-morning – brunch – and mid-afternoon – high or afternoon tea – are growing in popularity, reports Wendy Alberts, chairperson of the Restaurant Association of South Africa. She outlined major food trends at The Hotel Show Africa and Africa’s Big7 held in Johannesburg in June 2018. Restaurateurs are focusing on decorative plates and plating techniques, and “making available products and dishes that are special and different to those offered by retailers,” she notes. Tsogo Sun’s Palazzo Hotel at Montecasino in Johannesburg has fine-tuned its high tea offering under the supervision of head pastry chef, Marco Gaspar. The summer menu was all about light and bright seasonal ingredients, including: lime cheesecake mousse

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TREND WATCH

MARCO GASPAR, PALAZZO HOTEL PASTRY CHEF

with raspberry jam; orange soft cake; dark chocolate berry tart; mango coconut custard choux puff; macarons; lemon meringue tart; dark chocolate slices; scones served with Chantilly cream, strawberry jam and cheese; chicken pastrami, pesto and smoked mozzarella on focaccia; smoked salmon, cream cheese and cucumber en croute; grilled halloumi and roasted Mediterranean vegetables on rye bread sandwiches; smoked salmon or spinach and ricotta quiche; duck and cherry pie; and Moroccan vegetable pie. A choice of Dilmah teas and freshly brewed coffee is served, with bubbly on request. The high tea experience at the Palazzo Hotel is popular for all sorts of events, including birthdays, bridal showers, kitchen teas or ladies get togethers. It may be served in the restaurant or on the terrace and larger groups of up to 50 people may be accommodated in the beautiful Rosa venue. Marco, who enjoys creating a high tea experience that perfects techniques of miniaturising, tweaked the menu for winter to include new items such as vanilla panna cotta with stone fruit compote; lemon soft cake with lemon curd and Italian meringue; apple strawberry crumble tart; raspberry lime custard mini éclair; dark chocolate mousse dome with crunchy nuggets; and baked vanilla cheesecake with assorted berries.

TSOGO SUN’S PALAZZO HOTEL’S SUMMER HIGH TEA (ABOVE AND FAR LEFT)

MARCO TWEAKED THE MENU FOR WINTER TO INCLUDE NEW ITEMS SUCH AS VANILLA PANNA COTTA WITH STONE FRUIT COMPOTE; LEMON SOFT CAKE WITH LEMON CURD AND ITALIAN MERINGUE; APPLE STRAWBERRY CRUMBLE TART; RASPBERRY LIME CUSTARD MINI ÉCLAIR; DARK CHOCOLATE MOUSSE DOME WITH CRUNCHY NUGGETS; AND BAKED VANILLA CHEESECAKE WITH ASSORTED BERRIES.

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TREND WATCH

SUN INTERNATIONAL’S THE MASLOW SANDTON HOTEL HIGH TEA (ABOVE AND RIGHT)

He says, “We pull out the stops to make sure that every high tea experience is world-class, both from a menu perspective and for the tranquil and elegant atmosphere that the Palazzo offers.” The winter menu runs to end-August 2018 and costs R260 per person. “Our high tea has had and is having a significant effect on our revenue as it does help through the odd hours between afternoon and

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early evening, which contributes greatly to our overall revenue,” March notes. “We cost our high tea offering exactly the same way as we would our breakfast, lunch or dinner menu; it is just another dining option that we would like to offer to our guests.” Sun International’s The Maslow Sandton hotel has added a modern twist to the traditional high tea offering by creating a five-course

food and tea pairing experience. Executive chef Justin Jonah says, “We are inspired by the burgeoning diversity of locally produced, specialty teas and how their flavours and aromas can enhance those of food. Tea and cake has been done for years, but now with the ever-widening choice of teas, we can really explore how they can be paired to enhance the experience of taking afternoon tea.”


TREND WATCH

WE ARE INSPIRED BY THE BURGEONING DIVERSITY OF LOCALLY PRODUCED, SPECIALTY TEAS AND HOW THEIR FLAVOURS AND AROMAS CAN ENHANCE THOSE TSOGO SUN’S PALAZZO HOTEL’S HIGH TEA

OF FOOD. TEA AND CAKE HAS BEEN DONE FOR YEARS, BUT NOW WITH THE EVER-WIDENING CHOICE OF TEAS, WE CAN REALLY EXPLORE HOW THEY CAN BE PAIRED TO ENHANCE THE EXPERIENCE OF TAKING AFTERNOON TEA.

Served in arm chairs overlooking the hotel’s gardens every Saturday between 8am and 5pm at a cost of R320 per adult and R160 for children under 12 years, high tea includes: • First course: Vanilla bean scones with Cape fig jam; cucumber and cottage cheese knots; caramelized tomato and onion quiche; and strawberry frangipane served

with Rooibos vanilla tea • Second course: Lemon meringue tartlets, salmon and lemon aioli on brioche; egg mayo and watercress; and decadent choux paired with lemon fresh tea • Third course: Green tea mousse with mango salsa; orange and almond cake; bitter chocolate tartlet with Turkish delight, and sushi served with green tea Morgentau • Fourth course: Curried mince vetkoek and koeksisters paired with black tea • Fifth course: Red velvet opera; berry tartlets; rainbow cake and chocolate friandise served with sweet berries tea.

The Michelangelo in Sandton, part of the Legacy Group, offers high tea promotions to woo day visitors into its five-star establishment. Executive chef Trevor Boyd and his team prepare fine-dining cuisine expertly served as part of a leisurely experience at the hotel, with the menu themed to suit the season and occasion. Priced from R295 per person, patrons are offered an extensive menu of sweet temptations and savoury delights ranging from sushi to colourful cupcakes, plus coffees and speciality teas. For Woman’s Day on Thursday, 9 August, the hotel offered a special high tea experience that included musical stylings from two Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra musicians.

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FEATURE

CHEFS SET TO STOP

FOOD WASTE

Chefs and the food industry at large are behind some of the best ways to fight the war on food waste. It starts in the kitchen and extends into communities. Susan Reynard reports.

C

hefs are trained from their earliest days in the classroom and kitchen that food waste is a nono. Firstly, all food is paid for so what lands up in the bin is the same as throwing money away. Secondly, wet food and scraps are health hazards in the refuse area. Lastly, and most importantly, chefs, restaurateurs and diners are increasingly asking themselves what is being done with fit-forconsumption food that would normally have gone to waste. Food waste was one of the hot topics at the Worldchefs Congress and Exhibition in Malaysia in July. Many of SA Chefs members who attended the event came back with added impetus to drive down food waste in their establishments and ensure any excess prepared foods are donated to worthy causes.

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RECIPE FOR DISASTER

Worldchefs shared the following alarming insights in its World Food Programme presentation: 1. In 2018, three million children will die from hunger-related causes. 2. The world produces enough food to feed nine billion people each year, and currently the world population stands at 7.4 billion – yet so many people go hungry. This is because one-third of the food we produce is lost or wasted. 3. “Zero hunger” has never been achieved in the history of mankind but is achievable. 4. Chefs can make a difference. They control the kitchens, suppliers and customers that come through the doors. 5. Contributing to food waste is the unrealistic benchmarks of what food should look like

posted to social media. Join the #recipefordisaster movement by grabbing near-expired ingredients from your fridge, prepare a dish and share it on your social media with #recipefordisaster. (For more information go to www.wfp.org/recipefordisaster.) Demonstrating the concept of “one ingredient, zero waste”, lunch packs at the Congress were prepared by the Electrolux Professional team, which created a wholesome and tasty meal out of the humble and ubiquitous carrot. On the menu: Carrot Focaccia, Thai Carrot Soup and Chocolate Carrot Muffin.

GOOD, CLEAN, FAIR FOOD

During InfoChef Africa 2018 in Johannesburg, butcher and owner of Braeside Meat Market and Slow Food SA counsellor, Caroline


FEATURE

McCann, shared the thinking behind the Slow Food movement globally and in South Africa. Their philosophy: “We aim to create awareness about the need to transform our food system so that we can achieve Good, Clean and Fair Food for all in South Africa.” Caroline discussed the driving principles of Slow Food to the young chefs on the verge of entering the industry. In brief: celebrating local food traditions, ingredients and recipes (#eatsouthafrica); encouraging local food biodiversity; supporting small local growers, producers, distributors and processors; ensuring access to affordable, nutritious food to all; and sharing ideas. Slow Food is no longer a paid membership based organisation so everyone who is passionate about food is encouraged to join (go to www. slowfood.co.za for more information). World Disco Soup Day held this year on 28 April is a Slow Food initiative that is all about eliminating food waste. Groups of young people get together around the world to prepare soup using whatever ingredients are to hand. It demonstrates how 20 tonnes of what would have ended up as food waste is turned into a nutritious and delicious meal and served in a fun, festive environment. Activists include chefs,

volunteers, farmers, producers and visitors who join forces to collect leftover food and cook together. More than 40 000 meals were made out of the food that would otherwise have been thrown away. It stimulates ideas in all involved on how important it is to turn surplus into sustenance. Each of the 50 countries across six major regions of the world had its own unique take on the Disco Soup idea, some involving government or holding food waste classes and others showcasing fine-dining cuisine. In Cape Town, they focussed on using indigenous ingredients and in Soweto the soup was served with beer, with a gogo teaching people the tricks of making traditional sorghum beer.

AIM FOR SUSTAINABILITY

Food waste fits into broader discussions on sustainability and emphasising the importance of this, the Eat Out Woolworths Sustainability Award was introduced in 2016 to increase awareness about economically and environmentally sustainable practices in the local food industry and to recognise restaurants that are making good strides in this regard. The aim is to celebrate restaurants that are committed to responsible sourcing, reducing their negative impact on the environment, and fair labour. The list of qualifying criteria allows restaurants well on their way to sustainability to enter and those beginning the journey to take inspiration. Eat Out editor, Linda Scarborough, says, “We’re looking for an awareness of not just the environment and higher animal welfare standards in farming, but of human health and social justice, too.” It reflects the growing number of restaurant owners who connect with their farmers, ask for proof of claims from suppliers, take steps to improve their own methods and menus, and

MICHAEL COOKE OF CAMPHORS, EAT OUT WOOLWORTHS SUSTAINABILITY AWARD WINNER AND FEROZ KOOR WOOLWORTHS GROUP HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY

in so doing educate customers. Last year’s winner was Camphors at Vergelegen Estate in Somerset West headed up by chef Michael Cooke. Entries to this year’s award close on 31 August 2018. (For more information go to www.eatout.co.za).

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

A great way to get involved is to get involved in a food waste distribution system, such as FoodForwardSA. This organisation feeds millions of hungry people in South Africa by recovering edible surplus food from wholesalers, retailers and manufacturers and redistributing it to registered nonprofit organisations across the country. The organisation depends on public support to help cover the costs of distributing the food it collects. By adding special stickers to your menu, you can encourage your patrons to add a little extra to their bill, or purchase an entire meal, to benefit those in need. Take a look at the information provided on FoodForwardSA elsewhere in this issue of SA Chef. (Go to www.foodforwardsa. co.za for more information.)

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FOODFORWARD SA

ONE MEAL AT A TIME, URGES

FOODFORWARDSA

FoodForwardSA is calling on consumers and restaurateurs to help it distribute surplus food to hungry people around the country.

F

oodForwardSA feeds millions of hungry South Africans by recovering edible surplus food from wholesalers, retailers and manufacturers and redistributing it to registered nonprofit organisations across the country. The organisation depends on public support to help cover the costs of distributing the food it collects. Some 79c of every R1 FoodForwardSA receives is translated into the delivery cost of a meal to someone who is hungry.

WHAT WE WANT TO DO We would like to call on South Africans to donate to FoodForwardSA and help provide someone who is hungry with a meal.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

We have created three different ways in which you can show your support as a chef and restaurateur. By choosing any one of them, you will be driving awareness of what FoodForwardSA does and providing your patrons with the opportunity to donate.

HOW TO SUPPORT FOODFORWARDSA

In recognition of your support, we will provide you with a means of displaying your association with FoodForwardSA, call out your involvement on our social pages and communicate it to our database.

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Three easy ways to facilitate donations from customers and restaurateurs: 1. Table talker to drive awareness and call for donations from customers at the table. 2. Meal item added as a line item to the menu encouraging customers to donate. Example of wording you could use on your menu to indicate special dishes: “This meal is sure to fill you with a good feeling as it provides a meal for someone who is hungry. Simply add it to your order to make a R1 donation.” 3. Menu stickers and table talker with easy-on, easy-off stickers to mark meals that carry a donation and a table talker, allowing the restaurant to donate. Big stickers read: “Buy someone hungry a meal for R1. Choose any menu item with a FoodForwardSA sticker.”. Small stickers will have the FoodForwardSA logo and read: “Includes R1 donation.”

IMAGES COURTESY OF FOODFORWARD SA

R1 = 1 MEAL This is not the cost of a plate of food but the cost of moving donated food to the people who need it most.

FOODFORWARDSA PROGRAMMES •

Warehousing: Sourcing, collecting, sorting and storing edible surplus food for distribution to beneficiary organisations.

For more information go to www.foodforwardsa.org.

Foodshare: Connecting beneficiary organisations to retail stores or food outlets for the daily collection of food

AT A GLANCE

via virtual technology. •

Second Harvest: Recovering post-

4.4m kgs of food distributed

harvest surplus from the agricultural

17.6m meals last year

sector to improve the nutritious

R0.79 cost per meal

600 beneficiary organisations

basket to beneficiary organisations. •

Development Projects: School

supported

breakfast programmes to 30 000

250 000 people fed daily

students daily.


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KFOOD ANTENNA SHOP

DASIDA Dasida is a Korean soup stock that can consist of beef, clam, chicken or anchovy flavored seasoning for making soups or casseroles.

S

ome types can also contain vegetable mix to enhance flavours, and you won’t need more than a spoonful of Dasida to bring out the rich flavours of your stews, soups, and casseroles. It’s perfect for braai seasoning, spaghetti sauce, or any type of sauce that needs flavour. It’s an ideal base for all kinds of soups, including beef, dumpling, and even spicy soups which are essential for achieving the perfect flavour of delicious food. With various vegetables and spices, this enhances the natural taste. Like the taste of mom’s cooking; Dasida preserves the taste of home-style creations. Dasida contains beef, garlic, onions, black peppers and other vegetables and spices to enhance the natural taste of food (non-beef contain Dasida is also available).

Manufacturer information:

CJ CheilJedang is the core subsidiary in charge of the food and bioengineering business sectors of the CJ Group. It has led the development of the Korean food industry for the past 60 years and contributed to the development of the bioengineering industry as the nation’s top food company. Launched in 1953 as a food ingredient company, CJ CheilJedang

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has expanded its business to processed foods. It was spun off from CJ Corp in 2007 and has concentrated on the food and bioengineering business. CJ CheilJedang has achieved outstanding growth, quantitatively and qualitatively, in food processing and food ingredients in the foodbusiness sector, as well as the bio and pharmaceutical in the bioengineering business sector. We are striving to go beyond being No. 1 in Korea to becoming a global leader in each business sector.

The Nation’s Best Food Safety

CJ CheilJedang manages food safety with the world’s best systems and processes to provide the safest food to its customers in Korea and around the world. We control all processes for our customer’s’ food safety throughout the manufacturing, distribution, and launch stages, utilizing the industry’s best food-safety experts and cutting-edge analytical equipment in accordance with the internally established, strict quality and

safety management standards. As such, CJ CheilJedang has been recognized for its expertise in food-safety management by food-safety management systems such as HACCP and FSSC 22000. Moreover, CJ CheilJedang is the leader in creating shared value (CSV) and was the first food company that established Korea’s first Food Safety Collaborative Cooperation Association (NGO) to transfer its knowledge in food safety accumulated over the past 60 years to small businesses so that they can practice food safety properly.

AVAILABLE AT: • K-FOOD Antenna Shop (Belair Superspar, Horbart Superspar, Broadacres Superspar) And also: • Kokoro Rivonia – G5, Rivonia Junction Centre • Kokoro Fourways – Leaping Frog Shopping Centre • Kokoro Pretoria – Brooklyn Centre (751 Jan Shoba Street) Tel (Head Office): +27 11 608 3050


FEATURE

MEET THE SA

OLYMPIC CULINARY SQUAD! Some of South Africa’s finest young chefs are hard at work preparing to compete in the IKA Culinary Olympics in Stuttgart, Germany in 2020.

MEET THE SQUAD

JAEN-MARI BREYTENBACH

DION VENGATASS

HENRICO GROBBELAAR

Age 24

Age 32

Age 37

Lives in Pretoria

Lives in Cape Town

Lives in Cape Town

Pastry chef at Sun Time Square

Chef de cuisine at Belmond Mount

Executive chef at the NH Hotel

Casino •

Loves work with pastry as

Nelson Hotel •

opportunities are endless • •

T

Entered and won several prestigious

In industry for 14 years

Culinary Studio in 2014

Entered and won several top cooking

Working for the Sun Times Square

competitions; part of 2016 Olympic

is a dream come true, and having

Culinary Team •

Obsessed with food and cooking with

cooking competitions •

Vibrant and passionate by nature

“It is an honour being part of

Loves teaching and takes charge of

Passionate about the logistics of the kitchen: operations, food costs, food standards

flavours

nicknamed ‘the mad scientist’

Captain of Olympic Culinary Team for 2012 and part of team since 2005

Brings experience, commitment and maturity to team

such an amazing group of chefs;

motivating and encouraging staff at

being part of a group that I can

“The Nellie” by adding in elements of

Olympics, it is not just for us but it’s

learn from.”

fun in the kitchen

for the entire industry.”

raining sessions of the South Africa National Olympic Culinary Squad are an exercise in intense focus, concentration, innovation, creativity, experimentation, excellence and laughter – they are chefs! Heading up the action is team manager Trevor

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In industry for 18 years

was inspired by his grandmother •

the amazing chef Shaun Mann, •

Graduated from Capsicum

the opportunity to work under

Somerset West

Started cooking at a young age and

Boyd, executive chef at Legacy Group’s The Michelangelo Hotel in Sandton, Johannesburg. The men and women who are currently part of the squad and will eventually face selection to be part of the team meet once a month at HTA School of Culinary Art in Johannesburg for an

“If we achieve something great at the

intensive three-day practise session of their chosen dishes and to talk strategy. Working all day Saturday and Sunday, they cook the full menu on Monday for a Chef’s Table of top chefs and mentors in industry, who critique each element of every dish to help fine-tune the process.


FEATURE

KIRSTIN HELLEMANN

APHELELE DLUNGANA

BRADLEY VAN NIEKERK

Age 29

Age 29

Age 27

Lives in Cape Town

Lives in Cape Town

Lives in Cape Town

Junior sous chef at Belmond

Chef de partie at The Round House

Senior chef de partie at The Round

Mount Nelson Hotel

Loves challenges and cooking

House

In industry for nine years

competitions, previously

In industry for seven years

Started in hot kitchen and for

participating in several

Joins squad as a senior member

Experiments with molecular

“I’m keen to learn from senior members

past two years focused on

improving her pastry skills

gastronomy, trying out new flavours

as it’s my first time competing at this

“I am honoured to represent

level. I’ve never been surrounded by

Culinary Team

my country, and be given the

this many talented, hardworking and

Enjoys learning from her seniors

opportunity to grow in knowledge

Focused on furthering her

and be exposed to chefs and the

career

industry”

Member of 2016 Olympic

gifted chefs in one space!” •

Passionate about training and development


FEATURE

They will be competing for gold medals in Stuttgart, Germany in February 2020. Trevor says of the July training session, “The team has come a long way in a short time. Our biggest improvement is the conceptualisation of the two menus necessary for the IKA Culinary Olympics. We are focused on the fundamentals and are very excited to see the two menus developing into worldclass competition food.” The squad is concentrating on professional preparation and trying to achieve as many marks out of the 25 points allocated to this section.

MORE ABOUT THE SPONSORS

The City Lodge Hotel Group, home of accommodation establishments in five brands (City Lodge, Town Lodge, Road Lodge, Courtyard and Fairview), is the official accommodation partner of the SA National Olympic Culinary Squad. The group provides squad members with accommodation when they attend group training sessions, and will continue to do so right up until the IKA Culinary Olympics in February 2020. Zuki Jantjies, divisional director: sales and marketing for City Lodge, says, “This partnership with the Olympic Culinary Squad is testament to our long-standing commitment to the South African hospitality industry. We share the same passion that sits within the core of the team’s culinary creations and are exceptionally proud to be an official sponsor of the team that represents South Africa in one of the toughest challenges on the culinary calendar.” Tel: Head office: +27 11 557 2600 Reservations: 0800 11 37 90 Email: info@clhg.com Website: www.clhg.com SigmaChef is a leading, highly innovative supplier of chef uniforms

42

OSCAR BAARD

ADRIAN VIGUS-BROWN

Age 31

Age 28

Lives in Cape Town

Lives in Johannesburg

Started cooking in his mother’s

Chef de Cuisine at African Pride

kitchen, not knowing it would grow

Melrose Arch Hotel, Autograph

into a passion

Collection

Loves working with chocolate

Heads up the pastry section

Has worked locally and overseas

“It has been my dream to represent

Chefs Club and World Chefs Young

my country”

Chefs Ambassador mentor - Africa and

In industry for 15 years and joins squad as a senior member

Past Chairman of the SA Chefs Young

Middle East

and apparel. Their clothing is made using the finest raw materials and features distinctive designs. They have their own manufacturing plant based in South Africa to provide garments that are performance guaranteed, with exceptional speed to market. The brand develops lifelong relationships with its clientele and the Olympic Culinary Squad is proud to wear their gear. Among the items they supply are chefs jackets, trousers, aprons, headwear and footwear. Augmenting SigmaChefs offerings is corporate wear, promotional items, general apparel, and a wide range of workwear, from front to back of the house. “SigmaChef has a highly experienced, dedicated and humble team devoted to those hard at work in the kitchen, ensuring they are expertly dressed for comfort and safety, augmented by an aesthetically appealing product. Total Quality Management and continuous improvement is at the core of the organisation’s culture. We are a learning company, continually expanding and improving our knowledge and carrying these

Young, determined and passionate

Takes pride in exceeding expectations of guests

learnings over into best practices for constant improvement of products and service for our end user,” says Alyssa McConnell of SigmaChef. Tel: Head office: +27 11 046 6664 Mobile: +27 (0) 74 066 6444 or +27 (0) 84 666 6655 Email: info@sigmachef.com Website: www.sigmachef.com Ecolab is a long-time supporter of SA Chefs as patron and now a sponsor of the Culinary Olympic Team. The company is the global leader in water, hygiene and energy technologies and services, delivering comprehensive solutions and on-site service to promote safe food, maintain clean environments, optimise water and energy use, and improve operational efficiencies for customers in more than 170 countries. Tel: +27 11 578 5000 Email: EcolabSA@Ecolab.com Email: www.en-za.ecolab.com


FEATURE

FOUR SEASONS THE WESTCLIFF, JOHANNESBURG LAUNCHED A NEW HEALTH MENU

JACKSONS REAL FOOD MARKET IN KYALAMI

FOOD: FRIEND OR FOE? Allergies, intolerances, sensitivities, preferences and poisoning – unpacking the challenges and solutions to suit most diners. Susan Reynard reports.

A

known allergy is one reason diners may choose to avoid certain foods. Other reasons may be generalised media reports of what is good for “gut health”, what constitutes “clean eating” and the latest “superfood”. Chefs and restaurateurs report increasing numbers of patrons with very specific dietary requirements, who have chosen diets that are vegan, vegetarian, no eggs, wheatfree, dairy-free, sugar-free, glutenfree, or free from preservatives and colourants. It has become the norm for menus to offer solutions to all manner of dietary requirements.

LIFESTYLE CHOICES

Megan Hussey has specialised in healthy quick service restaurants since 2006 and is now with Ume Goodness Cafés located in Wellness Warehouse stores around the country. She has built her career on catering for the most exacting dietary requirements and creating

44

recipes and dishes that are delicious, nutritious and are all about what’s in them rather than what’s been left out. She believes in using affirming words and phrases on the menu, rather than

INTOLERANCE VS. ALLERGY •

punitive ones, to encourage more people to make healthy choices. A taste test leaves the diner realising that sugar-free banana bread is as tasty as its sugar-laden alternative.

limited to digestive problems. •

be able to eat small amounts of the

are common, but most are caused by

offending food without trouble. One

a food intolerance rather than a food

may also be able to prevent a reaction:

allergy.

those with lactose intolerance may be

A food intolerance can cause some

able to drink lactose-free milk or take lactase enzyme pills to aid digestion.

of the same signs and symptoms as a food allergy, so people often confuse •

Celiac disease has some features of a

the two.

true food allergy because it involves

A true food allergy causes an immune

the immune system. Its symptoms are

system reaction that affects numerous

mostly gastrointestinal and triggered by eating gluten.

organs in the body, causing a range of symptoms. •

If one has a food intolerance, one may

Physical reactions to certain foods

Those with food allergies may be at risk

In some cases, an allergic food reaction

of a life-threatening allergic reaction,

can be severe or life-threatening. In

such as anaphylaxis, even if past

contrast, food intolerance symptoms are generally less serious and often

reactions have been mild.

(Source: www.mayoclinic.org)


FEATURE

And Ume is all about offering tasters, finding that once customers sample a dish they’re hooked. Megan says, “Bodies don’t lie – people make choices and it is our job to honour the choice they have made.”

FIVE-STAR HEALTH

Four Seasons The Westcliff, Johannesburg launched a new menu to coincide with Global Wellness Day in collaboration with Christine Phillips, a wellness chef, health coach and founder of Health Yourself. “I have seen a considerable increase in the number of clients who have gluten and dairy intolerances. This is a global trend and therefore the buzz words right now are ‘glutenfree, dairy-free and sugar-free’. I make a big effort to come up with recipes that are super healthy and still taste incredible,” she explains.

Christine says people are becoming more aware of how food effects them daily and how their bodies react to different foods. The brief for Four Seasons The Westcliff was to uplift the Deli, Apres Spa and in-room dining menus to add healthier options to meet customer demands. Christine worked with the hotel’s chefs on the recipes and alternative ingredients. Training is essential to ensure staff are comfortable with the new menu and ingredients, she notes, such as using tamari instead of soy sauce as it is gluten-free.

RETAILER RESTAURANTS

Jacksons Real Food Market in Kyalami and Bryanston, Johannesburg has revamped the menu in its in-store eateries to feature healthy, nutrient dense, low carbohydrate, paleo,

keto, vegan and plant-based options, alongside its more mainstream dishes. The aim is to get people excited about “real” food. A few of the new items: • Scrambled Vegan Tofu Breakfast Couscous, kale, mushrooms, tofu fried in garlic and mixed organic spices, and fried tomatoes sprinkled with mixed seeds. • Organic Acai Bowl Fresh acai, honey granola, frozen mixed berries, coconut flakes, nut butter, chia seeds, banana and coconut milk. • Glow Buddha Bowl Quinoa, spicy chickpeas, raw kale, red cabbage, carrot and cucumber sticks, avocado, cherry tomatoes, sprouts, herbs and basil, raw cashew nut hummus drizzled with lemon and sprinkled with four seed mix. • Turmeric Cappuccino


McDONALD’S

MCDONALD’S COFFEE The Coca-Cola Company’s (TCCC) Georgia blend for McDonald’s is a 100% Arabica blend with superior flavour and embodies distinct flavour profiles of the exotic regions from which it is sourced – Brazil, Colombia and Central America.

B

razilian coffees are largely grown at temperate climates, that make this origin one of the best agricultural regions in the world. Typically Brazilian farmers use the Natural processing method after picking ripe berries. Generations of farmers with a long tradition of good farming and processing techniques have helped Brazilian coffees enjoy the benefit of a fairly uniform cup quality. TCCC buys only the best quality of these Natural Brazil coffees by focusing on coffees that are full-bodied, soft, fine, sweet and balanced with inherent nutty and chocolatey characteristics along with a hint of fruit.

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Colombian coffees on the other hand, have the unsurpassed unique combination of altitude, latitude and climate, as well as near perfect soil: volcanic ashes, containing a high quantum of organic material. Grown at higher altitudes upwards of 1 200 metres, the rich bio-diversity allows for cultivation to vary between partially shade grown and shadegrown plantations. The coffee is all Arabica dominated by Bourbon, a classic old-world coffee varietal as well as other good cultivars like Típica and Caturra. Colombian farmers follow the traditional hand-picking method of harvesting and also classic fermentation and

washing techniques that impart unique characteristics that set apart Colombian coffees as the “Champagne” of the coffee world. TCCC buys the finest Colombian coffees that are moderate bodied with their bright, pleasant and distinct fruit character that complements the sweetness and chocolate notes. The key components of the blend are coffees from Central America such as Guatemala, Honduras, El-Salvador and Costa Rica, which are also blessed with soil, altitude, and climate as well as classic Arabica plant variety/ cultivars – Bourbon and other


McDONALD’S

COLOMBIAN FARMERS FOLLOW THE TRADITIONAL HAND-PICKING METHOD OF HARVESTING AND ALSO CLASSIC FERMENTATION AND WASHING TECHNIQUES THAT IMPART UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS THAT SET APART COLOMBIAN COFFEES AS THE “CHAMPAGNE” OF THE COFFEE WORLD.

equally good natural hybrids of Bourbon, Pacas and Caturra. Farming practices are very much traditional: shade-grown, handpicked to ensure ripeness of the fruit and age-old fermenting and washing techniques. Central American or centrals as they are known in the coffee trade are renowned for their delicate floral character which provides the Georgia blend its unique fragrant appeal. The coffees are also characterised by their medium bodied and soft, sweet notes. Together with our roasting partners, TCCC has set detailed quality parameters for sourcing,

blending and roasting coffee to ensure that the Georgia blend meets the high standards that are associated with “A Product of The Coca-Cola Company”. As part of this, each batch of green coffee is carefully documented against strict quality parameters based on taste profile, origin and preparation at the origin. To ensure that the coffee is according to specification, each green coffee lot that is bought is quality checked and manually cupped by TCCC and its roasting partners both before being exported from the origin and also upon arrival at the roasting unit. Finally, the

production lots are also evaluated to verify they meet the physical as well as sensory specifications. The end result in the cup of the Georgia blend for McDonald’s – is a full bodied, smooth, clean coffee with a balanced flavor that comes through the premium roast filtered coffee as well as Bean-toCup expresso based coffees.

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FEATURE

CRAFT COFFEE

CONNOISSEURS

Craft or artisanal coffee has garnered loyal followers professionally and at home. Susan Reynard reports.

COFFEE ROASTERS GAUTENG • AfricaBlack Coffee Roastery, Barista School & Espresso Bar • Aroma Gourmet Coffee Roastery • Bean There Coffee Company • Craft Coffee and The Daily Buzz • Doubleshot Coffee and Tea • Faba Roastery • Father Coffee

SIDU DUBE (CRAFT COFFEE ACADEMY BARISTA TRAINER), QUEEN JAMILE (STUDENT BARISTA), SIBONGILE MAHLANGU (STUDENT BARISTA), JAPHET MATIMBE (CRAFT COFFEE ROASTER), LOVEJOY CHIRAMBASUKWA (CRAFT COFFEE ROASTERY MANAGER) AND ANDREW BROWN (CEO OF THE DAILY BUZZ AND CRAFT COFFEE).

• 4th Avenue Coffee Roasters Company

KWAZULUNATAL

• Motherland

• Bean Green

• Lucky Bread

Coffee Company • Naked Coffee • Origin Coffee Roasting • The Perfect Cup • Third Space Coffee • Roast Republic • Snob’s Coffee • State 5 • Tribeca Coffee Factory

Coffee Roastery • Beaver Creek Coffee • Boston Coffee • Colombo Coffee and Tea • Firebird Coffee Works • Fortune Coffee Forever • Lineage Coffee • Noble Coffee

• Urban Grind

Roasting

Roasters

• Terbodore

• Vintage Coffee

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Coffee Roasters

C

onsumers are increasingly obsessed with their preferred brand of coffee. The artisanal or craft movement has grown rapidly in the coffee category as a result. Micro-roasters abound, with each new brand, outlet and café specialising in a niche product and roastery and garnering loyal customers. Some have gone on to mainstream supermarket shelves, offering alternatives to the bigname brands. While the major coffee suppliers offering local and international coffee brands service their high-volume beverage clientele satisfactorily, some consumers take great delight in knowing their coffee and travelling to buy a particular blend or brand. From a couple of

decades ago when gourmet coffee was virtually unknown in South Africa and a cappuccino usually came with whipped cream as standard, coffee connoisseurs are big business and prepared to pay for their bean and roastery of choice. The Speciality Coffee Association of Southern Africa (SCASA) has done a lot to promote gourmet and speciality coffees as well as latte art and barista training. It organises competitions regionally, nationally and internationally in which baristas can demonstrate their personal flair in the global world of coffee. Its members are coffee industry players from all sectors as it aims to promote the consumption of quality coffee as well as recognition of employees


FEATURE

in this industry. The Association is also active in environmental and social issues, while it seeks to boost the industry as a whole. South African National Cup Tasters and Latte Art Champ, Donovan McLagan and Christopher Abrahams, are heading to International Coffee Week (ICW) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil in November. ICW is the largest coffee expo in Brazil and will take place from 7 to 9 November 2018. Now in its sixth edition, the event allows thousands of coffee producers to present the best of their harvest to buyers, roasters and international traders. Several coffee producing regions are promoted through various cupping sessions and it is possible to taste the finalist coffees from the quality contest that gathers the best beans from the new crop.

TRAINING

Training in the fine art of making speciality coffees is an important element of job creation, especially in South Africa. The skill of a good barista in boosting business cannot be over-emphasised and it is their handiwork that customers connect with as well as the roast, beans and blend. The Daily Buzz, which operates 12 coffee bars in corporate offices around Gauteng, has launched the first South African developed and fully SETA-accredited barista training academy at its in-house coffee roastery, Craft Coffee, in Newtown in Johannesburg’s CBD. Eight students were in the first enrolment undertaking an NQF3 skills programme. The course was developed by the Craft Coffee team with the help of the SETArecognised specialists at THRIVE. Participants are assessed in-house and receive official results from SETA. The training programme is designed to allow learners to build on it by undertaking other courses at hospitality schools.

Craft Coffee is an artisan roastery headed up by Lovejoy Chirambasukwa, the 2013 South African and All Africa Barista champion. The Daily Buzz CEO, Andrew Brown, says of the new initiative: “South Africa’s biggest problem is unemployment. But every new coffee bar needs at least five new baristas. We want to improve the quality of baristas’ skills, employ more people and improve their earning ability.” He says their baristas are key to the success of their corporate coffee shops, both in terms of technical expertise and customer engagement. Andrew adds, “Taking pride in the smallest detail, such as knowing repeat customers by name, has been a key differentiator for our business. We have proved the value of extensive investment in staff training and educate our staff as meticulously as we choose our coffee.” Trainees undertake formal lectures as well as complete workplace assignments and present their “Portfolio of Evidence”. They are issued a learner guide and workbook that covers a broad range of content that shows them how to clean and adjust a grinder so that it turns out the perfect espresso and teaches them about stock taking, storing coffee, hygiene, quality standards, service and customer interaction. Lovejoy says, “We ensure that there is a technical, theory side and a practical side. For example, they get to learn about tasting the various flavours, different coffees and blends and related aromas. They will be fully equipped to work as a barista once they graduate. This will be a

good stepping stone into the world of coffee.” He encourages trainees to think big, noting that the skills they have as baristas are in demand around the world and they can make a career out of their coffee expertise. Recruitment company Hospitality Placements’ Jason Olive says he looks forward to receiving CVs from baristas who have completed this course. A career in the coffee industry offers salaries from R4 000 to R20 000 per month depending on expertise and experience. Andrew confirms the growing market for coffee in South Africa, noting, “A love for coffee is stirring which is why we have to keep turning out better baristas to serve up the very best cuppa.”

EASTERN & WESTERN CAPE • Alchemy Coffee Roasters • Baseline Coffee Roastery and Espresso Bar • Bean There Coffee Company • Bootlegger Coffee Company • Byblos Trading Co. • Citizen Roastery • Deluxe Coffeeworks • Espresso Lab Microroasters • Flatmountain Coffee Roasters • Grounded Coffee Co.

• Pause Coffee Roastery • Rosetta Roastery • Run Rabbit Run Coffee Roastery • Shift Espresso Bar • Solid Ground Coffee Roasters • Strictly Coffee • The Coffee Roasting Company • The House of Machines • The Village Roast • Tribe Coffee Roasting • Truth Coffee Roasting • Tulip Coffee

• Haas Coffee

Roasting

• Häzz Coffee

• Walt Coffee

• Kamili Coffee Roasters

Company

(Sources: Huletts

• Mischu

Coffee Guide;

• Origin Coffee

Eat Out; author’s

Roasting

research)

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BIDVEST CATERING SERVICES

BIDVEST CATERING’S ’

TOP CHEF MAKES US PROUD By Janese Sooka.

G

iven Katlego Mashwane is a young chef from Soshanguve currently heading up the kitchen at Nedbank Menlyn on Maine. He was fortunate enough to be granted the opportunity to complete a one year Professional Cookery course though HTA School of Culinary Arts and later on selected to participate in the HTA Chef of the Year 2018 competition. We interviewed Chef Given, to gather his thoughts on the competition and life as a chef.

Chef Given, how long have you been working for Bidvest Catering Services? I have been working for the company for six years and seven months.

What inspired you to become a chef?

As a storeman, I was always

curious as to how the chef’s would transform the ingredients I ordered and issued into well presented and tasty dishes, and therefore decided to start spending more time with them. Through observation of their cooking techniques, skill and creativity, I fell in love with food. I took the initiative to start learning from them by better managing my tasks as a storeman. In doing so I was able to build on my passion.

What valuable experience do you feel you have gained from the HTA Chef of the Year Competition?

What is your ultimate comfort food and favourite dish to cook?

Nothing is impossible. Nothing we need in life is beyond our reach, we simply need to uplift ourselves and grab the opportunities. Poverty is the fortune of a lazy person.

My ultimate comfort food is a well prepared Chicken Caprese Salad and I thoroughly enjoy preparing a hearty rosemary and red wine infused beef stew.

I have learnt that a competition is not just about winning but being granted the opportunity to cook from your heart and give people a taste of who you are through the dishes prepared and presented.

What is your message to young aspiring chefs out there?

Watch this space as this chef has not Given his all yet!

What is your culinary must have? (e.g. chef knife/blender etc.)

A good chef’s knife is a must!

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REGIONAL SHOWCASE

FRESH OUT OF

FRANSCHHOEK

LA PETITE COLOMBE © CLAIRE GUNN

A region known for its rich gourmet culture and decadent vineyards, Franschhoek brings a little taste of France to the discerning food lover. Here’s a look as some of the newcomers and longstanding locals who make Franschhoek a foodie paradise.

A

world surrounded by vineyards and picturesque architecture, Franschhoek is a haven for those in search of delectable cuisine to sate the palate. Not only is it home to over 40 extraordinary wine cellars, but it combines fresh, modern taste with warm hospitality and centuries of fine dining. At any given time, up to eight of South Africa’s top restaurants are located here, from Pierneef à La Motte and Vrede en Lust, to Foliage and Racine at Chamonix. Some of the more remarkable vineyards include Anthonij Rupert Wine Estate, home to the Franschhoek Motor Museum, and the worldrenowned Babylonstoren Wine Estate, where sustainable living and farm-to-fork are always in style. Also of note is the Moreson Wine Estate where Chef Neil Jewell, of Bread and Wine Vineyard Restaurant, handcrafts charcuterie.

NEWFANGLED VITTLES

In addition to the many wellknown gourmet options available to visitors, Franschhoek also has a number of newcomers, up and comers, and steadfast eateries with incredible dining options and unique experiences. Some of these include Marigold with its exotic Indian menu, and Le Coin Francais, headed up by award-winning Chef and owner,

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Darren Badenhorst, whose menu embodies the essence of the valley in heritage, cuisine, art and wine. The internationally acclaimed La Petite Colombe offers a range of delectable menus – gourmand, reduced, vegetarian gourmand and veg reduced, with Head Chef John Norris Rogers at the helm. Other great foodie options include Chefs Warehouse at Maison Estate for unique gourmet delights, Bovine for some of the finest burgers, steak, pulled pork and comfort foods, or Beleef Restaurant for beautiful dinners by Head Chef Herman Steyn.

SUPPORTING AND GROWING THE LOCAL INDUSTRY A unique way in which local estates assist in the growth in hospitality and tourism to the region is through supporting restaurants by doing business with them. One such supporter is Three Streams Farm, which is also home to the famous Three Streams Smokehouse and their salmon and trout farming operations. The company has been processing high value seafood products in Franschhoek for 27 years, and the business began by dealing with the local hospitality industry – so cheffing in Franschhoek is close to their hearts. “We run a dedicated vehicle to Franschhoek daily, delivering both fresh and frozen products to a large

number of establishments. We do development work with a number of chefs, and engage in joint marketing with the hospitality industry when opportunities arise,” they explain. “Our business has changed over the years, and our primary focus is on supplying Woolworths in retail and a number of large distributors in the hospitality sector, but the industry in Franschhoek remains key to us, as we want those who supported us from the beginning to enjoy the benefit of products and services directly.”

FANCY A GLASS?

With a host of renowned wineries, cellars, vineyards and venues to choose from, visitors to Franschhoek are spoiled for choice. Some truly unique places worth visiting include Grande Provence Heritage Wine Estate where visitors can picnic, book wine tastings, or enjoy some fine dining. Haute Cabrière Cellar Restaurant is another historic estate with an exquisite view of Franschhoek. Orangerie Restaurant at Le Lude offers up classical French cuisine, as well as High Tea complete with a glass of the estate’s award-winning MCC. And, if you simply cannot decide, La Rochelle Wine and Gourmet Tours, the Franschhoek Wine Tram, and the Hopper can assist you in exploring as many vineyards as possible!


THREE STREAMS

THREE STREAMS A company with people and planet at the core of its ethos.

How are Three Streams products sourced?

Three Streams has built strong and lasting relationships with a number of suppliers, both in South Africa, and internationally. We only purchase sustainably farmed aquaculture products or sustainably caught seafood products. Our salmon is all of Norwegian origin, and is either Global GAP or ASC certified. We only procure superior-grade Norwegian salmon that meets our exacting specification. We do not purchase salmon speculative, but order as we require, in order to ensure optimal product quality. The majority of our trout is supplied by our own trout farm, Katse Fish Farms, based in the Highlands of Lesotho. We farm our trout to internationally recognised farming standards, and all trout produced in Lesotho is SASSI Green. We also source trout from the Western Cape, during the Western Cape production season. We process a number of other species, including tilapia, basa and North Sea mackerel, all of which are either ASC or MSC certified.

How do you ensure that sustainability remains part of the company’s ethos?

We’ve built our company around sustainability. It is part of our culture, and everything that we do is based on our deep commitment to the planet; the absolute need for sustainable fishing methods, and responsible fish-farming practices. All the raw material that we purchase, process, and sell, is either SASSI Green, Global GAP, MSC or ASC certified. All the salmon and trout that we supply can be traced from egg to plate, as we believe you should know the journey that your fish has travelled.

What are some of your most in-demand products, and how has demand for products changed over the years?

Our cold smoked salmon and trout products remain our most popular. We built the business with these products, and they remain our mainstay. We’ve developed many other product ranges and categories over the years, and we now supply a broad basket of product, ranging from raw fillets and portions, to hot smoked products, to highly valueadded terrines and roulades. We’ve seen the demand for both fresh salmon and trout grow dramatically with the growth of the sushi market in South Africa. The demand for salmon, trout, and other high-value

seafood products has increased consistently over the last 27 years. South Africans have become more accustomed to the products and look for healthy dietary alternatives.

How do Three Streams products differ from similar products on the market?

Our focus has always been on sustainability, quality, and innovation. We pride ourselves on marrying traditional production techniques with modern processes and foodsafety standards. We’re the largest, dedicated seafood smokehouse in Southern Africa, and endeavour to provide our customers with a product that meets their expectation every time they buy. We don’t compromise on this, and while other processors may supply lower cost alternatives, we believe that we offer the best products on the market, and that our customers will not be disappointed.

CONTACT US

www.threestreams.co.za +27 21 876 2485

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OPINION

© PHOTO BY NICK KARVOUNIS VIA UNSPLASH

HOSPITALITY’S ’

MENTAL HEALTH STRUGGLE By Stephen Hickmore

T

he first half of this year has been especially sad. It was a dark time. We lost two lovely chefs. They decided that life was no longer worth living. We didn’t see it coming. They both seemed just fine. Bright, sparky as always, funny and full of fun. Two vibey and talented guys. But, they chose an optimistic sunny day in Autumn to end it. Life was just too painful. Who knows what joys they will miss, the success not experienced, the friends

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not met. They left behind them a void and devastated family and friends. A tragic loss. Along with the suicide of chef and author Anthony Bourdain, it’s enough already. Recently, I’ve been in conversation with chefs about mental health challenges. It’s not that chefs are a special study group on depression and anxiety, I don’t have any statistics to refer to and I am not a psychologist, I just talk to people. But, anecdotally, we have

a massive problem in our society and our culinary community. The hospitality industry tends to attract deeply creative types. The work is arduous and does not always allow for a healthy balance in life. Along with musicians, artists, and writers, chefs appear to be a particularly vulnerable group. The ‘black dog’ of depression, as Winston Churchill called it, is a bitch to shake off and a silent, lonely struggle. All people suffer from low


OPINION

CHEFS, WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT MENTAL ILLNESS NOW! WE NEED CHANGE IN OUR KITCHENS. THE LONG HOURS, THE RELENTLESS PRESSURE, THE OFTEN CONFLICT-RIDDEN ENVIRONMENT IS A POTENTIAL BREEDING GROUND FOR ANXIETY, MENTAL ILLNESS AND LIFE-THREATENING DEPRESSION. NOT TO MENTION THE COUSINS OF MENTAL ILLNESS: DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM.

moods occasionally, we are happy and sad because we are human. But, I am not talking about being down in the dumps here. I am speaking about a crippling dark abyss. A foggy and fearful place where light has no dwelling, where the pain of hopelessness rules supreme. A place that sucks all energy, decimates joy and annihilates happiness. An inescapable labyrinth in a tortured mind without a skylight to see out or in. I know that place, I’ve visited it and I’m not going back. Mental illness never discriminates. Its victims can be wealthy and successful and appear to have perfect lives, like Anthony Bourdain. But, when the mind is in such turmoil the black dog’s prey looks for an escape. Tragically, this escape is often suicide. Selfish! some people say. It’s not. A sufferer can be in such mental pain that the belief that they have no place in the world is wretchedly dominant. They say it’s easy to snap out of it, to overcome the temptation to end the hurt, to simply put on a Disney-style happy face, click one’s heals and be magically transported to a place where all is safe. I only wish it were that uncomplicated. Most employers and colleagues don’t see that mental illness is life threatening. Sufferers are often afraid to talk about it lest they lose their job or be branded an

employment risk. A nutter, mad as a hatter, bonkers. Stigma stops people coming forward and opening up. Unlike other illnesses and dread disease, the symptoms of mental illness and depression are hard to see, no plaster cast or scar from an operation. For some victims simply getting out of bed and making it to work takes courage and mind over matter. Attaching a cheery façade to mask the sadness of desperation is a daily make-up routine for many. Research shows that many mental health conditions are caused by a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and environmental factors – not personal weakness or a character defect. Chefs, we need to talk about mental illness now! Look around you. At least one member of your brigade is battling with something. We need change in our kitchens. The long hours, the relentless pressure, the often conflict-ridden environment is a potential breeding ground for anxiety, mental illness and life-threatening depression. Not to mention the cousins of mental illness: drug abuse and alcoholism. Let’s not be afraid to talk, and create an environment where it is possible to do so. A person living with a mental illness will tell you that being able to talk is a life saver. The first step on the road to recovery is to ask for help. No person should feel

KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR CHANGES IN BEHAVIOUR: •

Tiredness and loss of energy.

Complaining of sleeping problems

Sadness that doesn’t go away.

Loss of self-confidence and selfesteem.

Changes in personality

Difficulty concentrating at work. Increase in errors.

Not being able to enjoy things that are usually pleasurable or interesting.

Avoiding other people

Loss of appetite and weight

shame in saying “I am not coping, I need help” to a colleague that one can trust. Getting the treatment needed starts with a simple conversation and an empathetic ear. Listen, help your buddy talk it out. Support her struggle and be compassionate, have patience but don’t try to be a psychologist. Help him get the support needed. Let’s not lose any more gifted chefs and friends. Let’s take care of each other.

LifeLine

0861 322 322

SADAG

SADAG Suicide Crisis Line 0800 567 567 SADAG Mental Health Line 011 234 4837

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NEWS

SIGMACHEF SIGNED

S

A Chefs President, James Khoza, concluded a prestigious Patronage Agreement with general manager, David Myers, of SigmaChef culinary apparel and design manufacturers at the Infochef Africa 2018 exhibition in Johannesburg on 25 and 26 July. This was an iconic moment for James, who secured his first patronage sponsorship under his newly appointed position as SA Chefs president. SigmaChef is equally proud and look forward to a long

relationship with the Association. David says: “SigmaChef is very honoured to be a part of the everincreasing footprint of SA Chefs and the prolific growth in the industry. This milestone represents a step forward in SigmaChef’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and augments well with its current CSR initiatives and policies. It is of import that initiatives to create increased employment in the hospitality industry as a whole are supported by key stakeholders. This way,

sustainable sector growth will be achieved and moreover, provide the chefs of tomorrow and institutions that create opportunities in the industry the requisite support.” “This is a momentous occasion and no better time to sign the deal than at InfoChef Africa 2018, which is all about educating, guiding, mentoring and growing our young chefs and learners. We would like to thank SigmaChef and David for their support of the Association and Olympic Culinary Team,” says James.

NEW HOME

FOR GEORGE SCHOOL

T

he Francois Ferreira Academy of Culinary Art and Hospitality in George moved to new, state of the art, purpose-built premises at Mount View Resort in July. Attending the official opening were representatives from the National Department of Tourism and SA Chefs, with guests greeted by a guard of honour by 21 NYCTP

56

students. The school started in 2004 at the back of a restaurant in George with four students. In 2007 it moved to an old laundry building at the PW Botha College, where it continued to grow during the next ten years. The new practical kitchen has 20 individual and fully-equipped cooking stations plus demonstration counter for Chef Francois. The

counter was donated by Conti Kitchens and Caesar Stone, and equipment was sponsored by Siemens and Bosch. Only 20 students are taken at a time in the kitchen and classrooms to ensure personal attention. The Francois Ferreira Academy has also opened a Skills Academy at Oubaai Hotel Golf and Spa to offer courses in customer service, table attendance and wine stewards, as well as assistant chef. Equipment was purchased from the Ikusasa School of Cooking in Riebeek West and the hotel takes on students who come from disadvantaged homes for their experiential learning.


NEWS

MANDELA DAY

M

andela Day on 18 July 2018 saw a wide range of feeding schemes undertaken by the hospitality industry. SA Chefs did its bit by cooking up a nourishing meal for communities at the African Children’s Feeding Scheme in Naledi and the Diamonds for Dignity Feeding Centre in Pimville in Soweto, Johannesburg on Monday, 16 July. Chefs, head office

staff and some of the Enterprise Development caterers from Lucky Star, Excella and the Red Meat Industry Forum came out to lend a hand, as did chefs on the National Young Chefs Training Programme (NYCTP). Sponsors included Turn ‘n Slice, Tiger Brands, Blue Ribbon, Nedan, Unilever, Fresh Morning Bread and Spar. The two feeding centres were: African Children’s Feeding Scheme

in Naledi and the Diamonds for Dignity Feeding Centre in Pimville. The Rise Against Hunger Africa Hunger Eradication Programme consists of various activities that involve donors, volunteers and beneficiaries. SA Chefs Vice President Kabelo Segone and the team packed food parcels at the Sandton Convention Centre as part of their 67 Minutes for Mandela Day.

ADOPT-A-HIGH SCHOOL

S

A Chefs appointed training institutions that are part of the National Young Chefs Training Programme (NYCTP), funded by the National Department of Tourism, are giving back and helping close the information gap between high schools and the industry. This is the main aim of the Adopt-A-High School initiative, conceived by past President of SA Chefs, Stephen Billingham. The first donation by HTA School of Culinary Art on 2 May 2018 saw some R70 000 worth of kitchen equipment sourced from the Hilton Hotel Sandton donated to John Orr Technical High School in Auckland Park and Phoenix High School in Vereeniging, both schools that offer hospitality studies. The Famous Brands Group has donated 400 unused chef uniforms to the project. Training institutions are encouraged to chat to their local hospitality establishments to facilitate

the donation of unused and secondhand equipment, furniture and fittings plus hospitality and recipe books and other useful items to their adopted high school, says Hudson Masondo, project manager for the NYCTP. They are also urged to invite students from local high schools offering hospitality studies to participate in open days and offer lecturers to conduct guest demonstrations. Other involvement may include volunteer catering for their adopted high school. Gauteng schools have been formally paired through the guidance of the Gauteng Department of Education: • Prue Leith Chef’s Academy (Pretoria) adopts Sonitus Secondary School • JHB Culinary & Pastry School (Johannesburg) adopts Nigel Secondary School • NDS Chefs Academy (Vereeniging) adopts Phoenix Secondary School • Swiss Hotel School (Randburg)

adopts Sizwile Secondary School • HTA School of Culinary Art (Randburg) adopts John Orr Technical High School Hospitality establishments keen to participate and donate goods to adopted high schools in povertystricken areas should contact SA Chefs, which together with the NYCTP will ensure all unwanted equipment is given a second lease on life in deserving high schools. These are officially donations and may be reflected as such for accounting and tax purposes.

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RECIPE

ROSEMARY INFUSED

CONFIT DUCK

Served with mashed Baby Potatoes, Blanched Biancoli Cauliflower Spears and a Turmeric Carrot puree. Recipe by Jodi-Ann Pearton.

INGREDIENTS

refrigerate for at least 12 hours. 3. Preheat the oven to 100°C

CONFIT DUCK: • 2kg Duck, portioned • 1.5kg Duck fat • 8g Oregano

4. Brush excess garlic and oregano mixture from duck and place the duck in a deep roasting pan. 5. Warm duck fat in a saucepan over

• 8g Rosemary, fresh

low heat until just melted and pour

• 2 cloves Garlic, minced

the fat over the duck until completely

• Salt and pepper to season

submerged. 6. Bake at 100°C until very tender and just

SMASHED BABY POTATOES:

beginning to fall from the bone (1-1½

• 1kg baby potatoes

hours).

• 2 garlic cloves, minced • 4g dried rosemary • 4g dried thyme • 30ml olive oil

ATION PREPAR : TIME RS 12 HOU E: G TIM COOKIN URS O 1-1.5 H

7. Remove duck from fat, place in a single layer in a separate dish. 8. Strain duck fat and cover the duck completely.

CARROT PUREE: 1. Peel and grate the carrots and place into a pot of boiling water until the carrots are soft. 2. Drain the water from the carrots and add in your butter and turmeric. 3. Blend with a hand blender until smooth, season with salt and pepper.

• Salt and pepper to season

9. Cover and refrigerate.

CARROT PUREE:

SMASHED BABY POTATOES:

Bring a medium sized pot to a boil and

• 210g Carrots

1. Preheat oven to 200°C.

blanch the cauliflower for about 3 minutes

• 100g Butter

2. Boil potatoes in salted water until the

or until the cauliflower is cooked but still

• 3g Turmeric

potatoes are softened and a fork can

crunchy with a vibrant colour. Set aside.

• Salt and pepper

easily poke into a potato, about 15-18

BIANCOLI CAULIFLOWER:

minutes, depending on the size of the

BIANCOLI CAULIFLOWER:

CHEFS TIP:

potatoes. Drain and pat the potatoes dry

Confit duck legs are particularly worth

• 300g Biancoli cauliflower florets

using a paper towel.

the wait. Cooked long and slow in duck

• Salt and pepper to season

METHOD:

3. Place the potatoes on a baking sheet.

meltingly tender, preserved in that fat,

thyme, salt, pepper, and oil.

then roasted quickly until crisp and

4. Take a fork and carefully press down on

CONFIT DUCK:

each potato until the potato is flattened,

1. Combine salt, pepper, garlic and oregano

but still holds together.

in a bowl.

5. Space the potatoes on the baking sheet

golden. Duck legs are also great value compared to breasts.

SERVING INFORMATION:

so they are not touching. Bake for 20-25

• Serve hot

layer. Rub the mixture all over duck

minutes, until the potatoes are crispy and

• Serves 3

portions. Cover with plastic wrap and

lightly golden in appearance. Set aside.

• Weight of one unit: 150g-200g

2. Place duck portions in a dish in a single

58

fat flavoured with aromatic herbs until

Coat the potatoes with garlic, rosemary,


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thesofterside.co.za


OPPORTUNITIES

OPPORTUNITIES Your next business opportunity or dream job could be right here…

GENERAL MANAGER

The four-star Jozi City Hotel is looking for a Millennial with a passion for the city to join their team. Food and beverage skills, an entrepreneurial spirit, and a link to all that is great about Johannesburg is a must. Candidates will be responsible for planning events, managing the hotel, and turning the property into one of the prime urban spaces in Johannesburg. The job could suit a deputy looking their first GM job, as well as someone who wants to make a splash rather than follow the rules. Salary is in the R40k range, and will include various incentives. Visit www.hospitality.co.za or email hickmore@iafrica.com for details.

SALES AND BANQUETING COORDINATOR

A conference and banqueting venue in northern Johannesburg is looking for a Sales and Banqueting Coordinator. Successful candidates should understand banqueting and functions, have a sales mentality, and ensure customer satisfaction. This position would suit a recent graduate or a person with two years’ experience in coordination. The salary offer is R12 000 per month. Visit www.hospitality.co.za or email hickmore@iafrica.com for details.

HEALTH FOOD SOUS CHEF

This position is part lecturing, part demonstration and part entertainment. Good communication skills are vital. The job provides a great kitchen for catering to clients who are looking to learn about healthy food and nutritional

60

cooking. Salary is R15 000 per month. Inspired people can apply via www.hospitality.co.za or email hickmore@iafrica.com for details.

CHEFS DE PARTIE

Four positions available at Chef de Partie level in Sandton hotels. All are five-star jobs and all have great prospects for development and promotion. Salaries are around R10-13 000 per month. For more information, visit www. hospitality.co.za or email hickmore@ iafrica.com for details.

RESTAURANT MANAGER

A dynamic, energetic and experienced restaurant manager is required for a casino-based restaurant. Candidates need to be super customer–focused in a fastmoving and fun environment. They must also be able to motivate the team to upsell, ultimately making a name for themselves in a prominent hotel and casino company. The salary is R30 000 per month, and applicants can send their CVs via www.hospitality.co.za or email hickmore@iafrica.com for details.

SANDTON BEVERAGE MANAGER

A stunning five-star hotel in Sandton is currently looking for a Beverage Manager to join their dynamic team. They are in search of passionate, hard-working team players to grow with the hotel team. The ideal candidate will be a new-generation super bartender who has transitioned into a leadership role and wants to take their career further.

Requirements and Duties:

• Must have extensive 5* experience • Works with F&B manager to improve and maintain beverage standards for alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages • Leads the Bar and Barista teams • Sets up all beverage-related training programs both internal and with key suppliers • Manage beverage menus • Creates and drives a worldclass beverage menu • Drives auction wine sales in the hotel • Identify beverage opportunities • Work with the F&B team to support service during peak times • Take full responsibility for beverage cost and work closely with the F&B controller to maintain budgeted targets • Creates opportunities for the bar and barista teams to take part in relevant competitions • Grade 12 (NQF 4) or Degree (NQF 5) • Good communication skills • Ability to work under pressure • High standard of accuracy • Interaction skills with internal and external customers • Computer skills • Responsibility, commitment, vigilance and observation skills • At least 5 years’ experience in a similar role. • Must be able to work with high volumes and international experience a big plus. • Also important that they have the ability to take a bar team and ignite a passion for beverages and the theatre element of bartending.


OPPORTUNITIES

PHOTO BY SHENGGENG LIN ON UNSPLASH

• •

the agreed standards and whilst respecting the budget and optimising the costs Lead, coach and train the Asian kitchen team to deliver the best gourmet experience to every guest In collaboration with the Group Executive Chef, conceptualise and develop creative and innovative dishes to enhance the overall dining experience for our guests Prepare and ensure the correct and timely mise en place for the Asian kitchen as per set standards Ensure that hotel and statutory hygiene standards are adhered to Ensure full compliance with management standards such as ISO 22000, ISO 14001 and ISO 9001 Be responsible for all ordering and stock takes as well as rota scheduling Any other cognate duties

Desired Profile

Please send your updated CV together with a recent, professional head and shoulders photograph through www.hoteljobs.co.za

HEAD CHEF AT ASIAN FUSION RESTAURANT

Le Labourdonnais Waterfront Hotel in Mauritius is looking for a dynamic, creative and fully qualified Head Chef to lead the culinary team of Yuzu, its Asian Fusion gastronomic restaurant which offers the best of Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese and Japanese fine-dining experience to its guests. Reporting to the Group Executive

Chef of Indigo Hotels, the Head Chef is specialised in Asian Cuisine and is passionate about the hospitality and culinary industry. The ideal candidate has a solid technical cooking ability gained in high-end fresh food establishments and also has a strong understanding and appreciation of Asian cuisine flavours and techniques.

Core Duties

• Be responsible for the smooth running of the daily Asian kitchen operations and for the production, preparation and presentation of all Asian food items, as per

• Relevant diploma/degree or professional certifications in cookery and hospitality • At least 2 years work experience in a similar position, preferably in a 4 or 5 star business hotel • Culinary expertise - Chinese, Japanese, Thai and Asian cuisine • Has an excellent understanding of HACCP food and health safety practices • Creative and flexible, with the ability to work under pressure • IT literate with strong leadership skills • Ability to manage both individual and team performance • Excellent organisational and time management skills with an eye for detail • Excellent communication skills both written and verbal For more information or to apply, visit www.hoteljobs.co.za.

61


EVENTS TO DIARISE

NOVEMBER SEPTEMBER SOWETO WINE AND LIFESTYLE FESTIVAL 1–2 Soweto, South Africa CHINA WUHAN INTERNATIONAL TEA INDUSTRY EXPO 1–3 Wuhan, China INTERPLAST – INTERPACKPRINT KENYA 2–4 Nairobi, Kenya SPECIALTY AND FINE FOOD FAIR 2–4 London, United Kingdom EXPO BRASIL CHOCOLATE 2–4 São Paulo, Brazil FOODAGRO AFRICA 4–6 Nairobi, Kenya FOOD AND DRINK TECHNOLOGY AFRICA 4–6 Johannesburg, South Africa FOOD, RETAIL AND HOSPITALITY EXPO IRELAND 5 Dublin, Ireland UNILEVER CHEF OF THE YEAR COMPETITION 5 Durban, South Africa RIGA FOOD 5–8 Riga, Latvia

WORLDFOOD ISTANBUL 5–8 Istanbul, Turkey

DRINKTEC 13 – 17 Munich, Germany

FOOD-BEVERAGE AND HOSPITALITY 7–9 Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

SA CULINARY OLYMPIC TEAM PRACTISE 15 – 17 Johannesburg, South Africa

SOWETO KOTA FESTIVAL 8–9 Johannesburg, South Africa

SAHARA EXPO 16 – 19 Cairo, Egypt

HOTEL ASIA EXHIBITION AND INTERNATIONAL CULINARY CHALLENGE 9 – 12 Maldives

WORLDFOOD MOSCOW 17 – 20 Moscow, Russia

AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL TEA EXPO 10 – 12 Melbourne, Australia PACK 2 PACK 10 – 12 Cairo, Egypt PAPER MIDDLE EAST 10 – 12 Cairo, Egypt PACKAGING INNOVATIONS 12 – 13 London, United Kingdom

SA CHEFS ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETING 18 Johannesburg, South Africa FOOD BEVERAGE BRAND EXHIBITION 18 – 20 Abuja, Nigeria FOOD AND HOTEL KENYA 21 – 23 Nairobi, Kenya NATEXPO 23 – 24 Lyon, France

CAPE WINE 12 – 14 Cape Town, South Africa

FOOD TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT AND EXPO 26 – 27 Mexico City, Mexico

BAKEPOL 12 – 14 Lublin, Poland

FOODNEXT AFRICA 27 – 28 CTICC, Cape Town

NATURAL PRODUCTS EXPO EAST 12 – 15 Baltimore, USA

SA CHEFS PRESIDENT DINNER 28 Johannesburg, South Africa NATIONAL TOURISM CAREER EXPO 29 – 1 October Sun City, North West, South Africa

62


EVENTS TO DIARISE

AMERICAS FOOD AND BEVERAGE SHOW AND CONFERENCE 1–2 Miami, USA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR FOR GASTRONOMY 1–4 Poznań, Poland MED FOOD 1–4 Doha, Qatar THE DAIRY SHOW 3 Shepton Mallet, United Kingdom AFRICA FOOD MANUFACTURING AND SAFETY SUMMIT SOUTHERN AFRICA 3–5 Lusaka, Zambia NYCTP GRADUATION 4 Eastern Cape, South Africa CAKEOLOGY CAKE FEST AND BEYOND 5–7 Mumbai, India ANUGA 5–9 Cologne, Germany INTERNATIONAL WHITE TRUFFLE FAIR OF ALBA 6 – 25 November Alba, Italy SAUDI FOOD PACK 7 – 10 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

INDIAN ICE CREAM CONGRESS AND EXPO 8–9 Chennai, India

THE BUSINESS OF WINE AND FOOD TOURISM Stellenbosch, Cape Town 17 October

FOLIE CULINAIRE 8 – 10 Maastricht, Netherlands

NYCTP GRADUATION 18 Free State, South Africa

INTERNATIONAL CANDY, CHOCOLATE AND RELATED MACHINERIES TRADE FAIR 9 – 13 Tabriz, Iran

SA CHEFS ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETING 18 Johannesburg, South Africa

GWANGJU INTERNATIONAL FOOD FAIR 10 – 14 Gwangju, South Korea NYCTP GRADUATION 11 Gauteng, South Africa ATLANTIC COAST EXPOSITION CONVENTION AND TRADE SHOW 11 – 13 Myrtle Beach, USA CEBU FOOD AND BEVERAGES EXHIBITION 11 – 14 Cebu, Philippines OKTOBERFEST 12 – 13 Bad Salzuflen, Germany

© KABOOMPICS.COM

OCTOBER

INFOCHEF 18 Durban, South Africa INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY 20 Worldwide SA CULINARY OLYMPIC TEAM PRACTISE 20 – 22 Gauteng, South Africa RMB WINEX 24 – 26 Johannesburg, South Africa NYCTP GRADUATION 25 Limpopo, South Africa WESTERN CAPE GALA DINNER 28 Western Cape, South Africa

HOTEL SUPPLIES & CATERING EQUIPMENT EXHIBITION (HACE) 15 – 17 Cairo, Egypt

NYCTP GRADUATION 25 Kwazulu Natal, South Africa

INDEPENDENT HOTEL SHOW 16 – 17 London, United Kingdom

WHISKY LIVE 31 – 2 November Johannesburg, South Africa INDAGRA 31 – 4 November Bucharest, Romania

63


THE LAST WORD

R-E-S-P-E-C-T For a satisfactory dining experience, respect should be paid to both customer and chef.

E

very restaurant has customers it doesn’t like from time to time – I know, I’ve often been one of those unwanted souls; cold shouldered and ignored as I walked the path of shame to the dark, uninviting car park — you are the weakest link…goodbye! My sins – having the temerity to point out that there was quite a leap of faith to be taken when comparing the work of fiction masquerading as a menu and what actually ended up on my plate. But equally, there are some restaurants that have chefs that some customers don’t like from time to time – you know the type: “I’m running a restaurant here not a bloody democracy, choose from what I’ve prepared and don’t ask me to cook your steak well done, do the sauce without garlic or give you half a portion of duck and half a portion of calamari”. With tasting menus that run to 30 courses, not only do they dictate in what order you are going to eat your spoonful of what was a perfectly decent piece of food before it was minced, pulverised, had suspect chemicals added and extruded into something unrecognisable, but they also ensure that a nanny is on hand to explain what it was before, what you are supposed to be enjoying, oh and by the way here is a thimbleful of wine. With so many chefs changing their highly publicised routine from early morning meanderings through markets to foraging forays plundering nature’s rich and free bounty, it’s amazing that we don’t see this economy reflected in menu prices — but I digress! However it’s

64

BRIAN MCCUNE

a relief that there are still good restaurants where it’s perfectly safe to take your mother-in-law! The customer is not always right but then he’s not always wrong either, although pretty often all the cards are stacked in the favour of the house. Dining out is often like visiting your local casino, it’s a gamble and most of the time you end up being the loser! You see, the chef has the upper hand here, he gets to choose what’s on the menu, which ingredients are used, how the food is prepared, how the dishes are presented and even what you’re going to pay for the meal. The customer, well, the only choice he gets is to go elsewhere. The whole dining out experience surely should be pleasant, hassle free and non confrontational, so I reckon a little more respect all around would be a step in the right direction. Running a busy kitchen is a tough job, dozens of dishes are in various stages of preparation, the adrenalin is flowing and as service proceeds then the rhythm picks

up and the team makes sweet music – the last thing needed is a clashing cymbal in your ear. If you don’t like garlic, perhaps one of the other dishes on the menu could satisfy you? The customer also deserves a little respect, don’t use his special occasion or his wallet as an experimental testing ground for your sleight of hand parlour tricks. Offer him plenty of choice on the menu, ensure that the dish described on the menu is what he gets on his plate, cook everything to the best of your ability and in the event he is less than satisfied with the experience, then treat his concerns with empathy and a genuine desire to rectify the problem before you comp the Irish Coffee. Brian owns the Food Biz, a Cape Town based food consultancy, and instead of working spends his time telling other people how to work. Contact him at www.thefood.biz, foodwizard@ iafrica.com, 082 492 9239

ENSURE THAT THE DISH DESCRIBED ON THE MENU IS WHAT HE GETS ON HIS PLATE, COOK EVERYTHING TO THE BEST OF YOUR ABILITY.


OUR BRAND Bidvest Catering Services, a Level 1 BBBEE organisation, offers world-class food service solutions to business sectors including but not limited to Industrial, Corporate, Healthcare, Mining, Education, and the Public Sector. Offering customised solutions based on individual client requirements, we ensure compliance with stringent health and safety processes and procedures, across all our operating units around the country. In order to deliver on our promises, we focus on health, quality and service; ensuring that our food is always safe to eat, tasty and made with passion and creativity. Bidvest Catering Services fosters a holistic approach to catering in Staff Restaurants, School Canteens, and Healthcare & Retirement Facilities including Coffee Shops, Special Events and an in-house Gourmet Kitchen. In addition to this, we have our very own event catering division that is able to cater for all occasions as well as provide master culinary classes and team-building events.

Key sectors in which we operate

Our Gourmet Kitchen based at our support centre offers fun team-building events through culinary cook offs and challenges incorporating mystery baskets and master classes.

Book your next catering or team-building event with us: events@bidvestcatering.co.za

Tel: 012 001 7160 Email: info@bidvestcatering.co.za

• Business & Industry – both corporate offices and industrial locations • Mining and Remote Sites • Education Sector • Healthcare Sector

Profile for Film & Event Media

SA Chef Issue 9  

SA Chef Magazine is the official voice of the South African Chefs Association (SACA). In our ninth edition, we chat with the King of Fine Di...

SA Chef Issue 9  

SA Chef Magazine is the official voice of the South African Chefs Association (SACA). In our ninth edition, we chat with the King of Fine Di...

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