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SA CH EF

MEDIA

ISSUE 07 | 2018

The Of ficial Voice of the South African Chefs Association

JAMES KHOZA

A New Era for SA Chefs Association

FOOD SAFETY

The Battle between Man and Microbes


WELCOME

A MESSAGE

FROM THE PRESIDENT BEING ELECTED AS PRESIDENT OF THE SA CHEFS ASSOCIATION IS THE HONOUR AND THE PRIVILEGE OF MY CULINARY CAREER, AND I AM COMMITTED TO BUILDING ON THE SUCCESSES AND INITIATIVES OF MY JAMES KHOZA

I

n my first letter in our official SA Chef publication, I am tempted to focus on my dreams, my aspirations, and my ambitions for my Presidency. Instead, I am going to ask you to tell me about yours. My door is (metaphorically) open, and I am eager to hear from our readership about all manner of issues, concerns, ideas and concepts relating not only to my role as President, but also to the editorial content of this esteemed publication. SA Chef magazine was created to serve you and our industry, and I want to work with you all to

PREDECESSORS.

consistently improve on our offering. To our Former President, Stephen Billingham, I share your passion for education and training, and I will continue the excellent work that you spearheaded. Thank you, Chef, for the years of friendship and opportunities. A very warm welcome to new board members Linah Pinky Maruping, Carianne Wilkinson, Peter Robertson and Stuart Cason. I look forward to working with you, as well as the rest of our trusted board. Being elected as President of the SA Chefs Association is the

honour and the privilege of my culinary career, and I am committed to building on the successes and initiatives of my predecessors. I am also wholeheartedly dedicated to furthering the Association’s aims of an inclusive, united, and transformed industry. I know I cannot do it alone, and I am so encouraged by the kind words and steadfast support that is already being offered to me by my peers, mentors and colleagues. Culinary regards, James Khoza

SA CHEFS PATRONS

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SA CHEF MEDIA

SA CHEF MEDIA ADVERTISERS Bidvest Catering PAGE 29 B-well PAGE 21, 25 Checkers Food Services Outside Back Cover, PAGE 17, 50 Chipkins PAGE 41 Compass Group PAGE 07, Inside Back Cover FoodServ Solutions PAGE 47 LANCE GIBBONS

SA CHEF CONTACTS Cover Image: Ginger Fruit Cake, recipe by Jodi-Ann Pearton Published by: SA Chef Media, a division of Film & Event Media

Publisher Lance Gibbons lance@sachefmag.co.za Editor in Chief Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@sachefmag.co.za Designers Sheree Steenkamp, Lauren Smith, Caitlin Perrett Writers Susan Reynard, Natasha Skoryk Contributors Brian McCune, Jodi-Ann Pearton, Stephen Hickmore Production Manager Katlego Molele katlego@filmeventmedia.co.za

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KATIE REYNOLDS-DA SILVA

Traffic Manager Tamlyn Peters tamlyn@filmeventmedia.co.za Digital Manager Cheri Morris digital@filmeventmedia.co.za Business Development Manager Wendy Navarra wendy@sachefmag.co.za Business Manager Coleen Tapson coleen@sachefmag.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 21 674 0646

SA CHEFS

President James Khoza General Manager Thomas Overbeck Financial Manager Jason Pitout Membership enquiries Precious Maseko Culinary Workshops enquiries Yejna Maharaj SACA Certification Elsu Gericke info@saca.co.za | www.saca.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 11 482 7250

Future Food Services PAGE 51 Imvusa Tech (Bermar) PAGE 39 Intertek Services PAGE 09 Kokoro PAGE 48 Mac Brothers Catering Equipment PAGE 30-31, 42-43, 59 Maximillien Restaurant PAGE 35 Masiwela Management PAGE 46 McDonald’s PAGE 18-19 Peppadew International (Pty) Ltd Inside Front Cover Petrow PAGE 55 TabeletPOS PAGE 12 Three Streams PAGE 49 Wilmar SA-Excella PAGE 13


CONTENTS

01 A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

14 JOCELYN MYERS-ADAMS

A Chef Showcase: From farm to fine-dining to foraging.

02 CREDITS AND ADVERTISERS 04 FOOD SAFETY 11 JAMES KHOZA – NEWLY ELECTED PRESIDENT 14 CHEF SHOWCASE: JOCELYN MYERS ADAMS

26 ARTISANAL CHARCUTERIE

Zen and the art of drying, curing and preserving meat.

20 SA CHEFS ASSOCIATION NEWS 22 AGM REPORT 26 ARTISANAL CHARCUTERIE 32 REGIONAL SHOWCASE: SANDTON

32 FROM SANDTON WITH LOVE

Natasha Skoryk discovers that Sandton is a foodie hub as well as a business hub.

36 PORK: TAKING CENTRE STAGE ’ 44 SPOTLIGHT ON THE SANDF’S CULINARY WORLD 52 OPINION: STEPHEN HICKMORE 56 JULIET CULLINAN STANDARD BANK WINE FESTIVAL 60 JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES

35 WINE PAIRING WITH STANLEY GRANGER Head Sommelier at the Legacy Group educates SA Chef’s editor.

62 EVENTS TO DIARISE 64 THE LAST WORD WITH BRIAN MCCUNE 03


© EPICURRENCE VIA UNSPLASH

FEATURE

BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY Food safety is the ongoing battle between man and microbes. Susan Reynard calls on the experts for advice.

F

ood safety, HACCP and personal hygiene are drilled into students at chefs’ school and reinforced in the workplace. Cooking competitions may be won or lost on the hygiene scores by the kitchen judge. And establishments may be shut down or sued if people fall ill. The recent listeriosis crisis has given consumers and the foodservice, production and manufacturing industry a big fright. To see food safety in action, Derek Lester, MD of By Word of Mouth (BWOM) catering and events management company, gave me the tour of their new and existing production facilities in Johannesburg. BWOM has taken a practical approach to food safety, adopting best practice and following strict hygiene, chemical, operational and behavioural protocols. Much of the operation takes place in a temperaturecontrolled environment following

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a stringent procurement process. Derek says the company has always invested heavily in food safety and the fact that they have had no incidents is always appreciated by clients. By employing chefs with three-year qualifications, staff are already fully trained in correct hygiene procedures across the board. They also have an external food safety consultant who monitors all areas of the business and sends swabs to an external laboratory. Their chemical provider is Hychem, which has set up an integrated cleaning, sanitising and monitoring system and processes, including a chemical regimen. Laundry of uniforms is done on site to ensure all staff wear clean, uncontaminated uniforms on every shift. On the events side, the process with a number of food items is to cook, chill, send to site in refrigerated trucks, and heat to

the correct temperature before serving. The new frozen meal offering is prepared out of segmented kitchen facilities to ensure no cross-contamination between this and the events kitchens. Blast freezing of freshly prepared dishes allows BWOM of produce an artisanal home product delivered directly to their clients’ door and to their retail store at Dainfern Square without breaking the cold chain. Derek says food safety requires a multi-level approach to be consistently effective. “A lot of places make the lowest paid person, the cleaner, responsible for the most important part of the business, food safety,” he notes. Alternatively, you can become paralysed by food safety, trying to solve every potential problem chemically or through processing, killing the “soul of the food” in the process.


FEATURE

LISTERIOSIS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Minister of Health Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, made an announcement on Sunday, 4 March 2018, updating media on the listeriosis outbreak in South Africa, “As of 2 March 2018, a total of laboratory-confirmed cases have risen to 948, still counting from January 2017. Of these 948, a total 659 patients have been traced and 180 of them have unfortunately died. This constitutes 27% case fatality rate.” Ready-to-eat processed meat products, including polony, viennas, sausages and other cold meats were reported to be the culprits found to have Listeria monocytogenes in the environments in which they are produced. Two main suppliers were fingered, Tiger Brands’ Enterprise brand and Rainbow Chicken Limited, and several factories deemed to be involved in the outbreak closed. Retailers across the board started pulling products suspected to be affected from shelves and refunding consumers. The Minister added, “We advise members of the public to avoid all processed meat products that are sold as ready-to-eat. While

we know that polony is definitely implicated, there is a risk of crosscontamination of other readyto-eat processed meat products, either at production, distribution or retail. This is because Listeria on the exterior casing (packaging) of polony can be transferred to other products it comes into contact with, including viennas, russians, frankfurters, other sausages, and other ‘cold meat’ products that are typically not cooked before eating.” (To read the statement in full, go to www.health.gov.za.) Tiger Brands (owner of Enterprise brand) is a longstanding, valued patron of SA Chefs. CEO Lawrence MacDougall said in a statement, “It is extremely distressing that despite more than meeting food industry safety standards, there is an indication by the NICD that LST6 has been found in some of our products. While we continue our own detailed investigations to verify the NICD results, we remain committed to doing the right thing if any liability is established on our part for illness or death. I am deeply sorry and offer our

sincere condolences to those people who have been affected by the listeriosis outbreak in SA. One cannot put a price on life. Food safety remains Tiger Brands’ highest priority. We will always place consumers’ health and safety above all else. “Tiger Brands will continue working with the authorities towards curbing this outbreak and ensuring that the public is kept safe. Listeria is a complex global health challenge, and not enough is known about the bacteria and how it mutates. Current South African food industry standards do not detect the LST6 strain, and we urgently need industry and government to collaborate to revise these standards and ensure that South Africans are kept safe. Tiger Brands has a long heritage in South Africa. We are working hard to ensure that we restore trust through our actions and promise to deal with this honestly and with integrity, and we will continue to assume a leading role in resolving it.” (To read the full statement, go to www.tigerbrands.com.)

PHOTO BY BANK PHROM ON UNSPLASH

© PXHELE.COM

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FEATURE

Rainbow Chicken Limited (RCL Foods) in a recent stakeholders statement reported, “The listeriosis outbreak is a tragic event and of great concern to RCL Foods. The Company expresses its heartfelt sympathy to everybody affected. The Minister of Health in a media statement said that the listeriosis outbreak has been traced to a polony facility in Polokwane. The facility is NOT owned by RCL Foods. The Minister also stated in the same statement, that Rainbow polony products they have tested DO NOT contain the Listeria ST6 ‘outbreak strain’. “RCL Foods is pleased to state that tests conducted by an independent laboratory in France, which is considered to be a leading expert in this field, have confirmed that our Wolwehoek plant is clear of the ST6 Listeria strain. Rainbow polony products from the Wolwehoek plant were recalled as a precautionary measure and the plant has been temporarily closed. The recall does not affect any other RCL FOODS facilities or products, including fresh and frozen Rainbow

chicken.” (Emphasis in capital letters company’s own.) (To read the full statement, go to www.rclfoods.com.) The Red Meat Industry Forum (RMIF), which represents the entire red meat value chain from the primary producer through to the consumer, recorded its concern that lives had been lost as a result of the outbreak of listeriosis. “The RMIF has also noted with concern the media statement released by the Department of Health and the National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD) on 4 March 2018 which essentially concluded that the present outbreak was traced to a food production facility in Polokwane whilst raising further concerns about a facility in Germiston. “At the outset we must point out that food safety remains at the heart of the red meat industry and the RMIF would like to assure the consumer that everything possible is being done with the utmost urgency to ensure that our consumer’s personal health and well-being is protected not only as a matter of routine, but with increased vigilance.

LEGISLATION Food safety and quality is regulated by a number of national government departments in South Africa to protect consumers, including: •

The Department of Agriculture: Regulates safety and quality of agriculture and animal products in terms of the Agricultural Product Standards Act, 1990.

The Department of Health: Requires that all foodstuffs shall be safe for human consumption in terms of the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectant Act, 1972. Matters regarding the hygiene of foodstuffs are addressed by the National Health Act, 2003. Hygiene requirements at ports and airports including vessels and aircraft are addressed by the International Health Regulations Act, 1974.

The Department of Trade and Industry: The South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) falls under the jurisdiction of the Department of Trade and Industry and controls canned meat and frozen and canned fishery products through the Standards Act, 1993.

(Source: https://foodfacts.org.za)

THE RMIF WOULD LIKE TO ASSURE THE CONSUMER THAT EVERYTHING POSSIBLE IS BEING DONE WITH THE UTMOST URGENCY TO ENSURE THAT OUR CONSUMER’S PERSONAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING IS COURTESY OF THE RED MEAT INDUSTRY FORUM

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PROTECTED.


COMPASS GROUP

SAFETY FIRST AT

COMPASS GROUP

A

t Compass Group Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd Health and Safety is our number one priority. In fact, it’s a value that goes to the very core of who we are, what we do and how we do it! It is our belief that every employee has a moral obligation to safeguard each other, our clients and customers and the environment. We aspire to operate a safe, injury free and healthy workplace, serving food that is always safe to eat. We also believe that commitment to safety requires a balanced approach from both our management and employees. Having said that, our clients also have an important role to play in working with us to ensure a safe environment. Being a level 1 B-BBEE contributor, we take our responsibility to the country’s future very seriously and it is one of the reasons we look to develop long-term strategic partnerships with our clients and their employees. Our Operating Standards and procedures are based on sound science, regulatory compliance and industry best practice, and are implemented at every unit in which we operate. In addition to this, they ensure that we strive for continual improvement and drive a health and safety culture that is ingrained within the organisation. These standards have set Compass apart from its competitors and have established the benchmark for the catering and services industry in South Africa. While our operating standards across all units are aligned and comply with the requirements of

COMPASS GROUP IS UNIQUELY POSITIONED IN THAT WE HAVE MULTIPLE UNITS THAT HAVE ACHIEVED ISO 22000 CERTIFICATION. ASIDE FROM THE COMPETITIVE EDGE THAT IT GIVES US, IT ADDRESSES FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT.

OHSAS 18001 and ISO 22000, we have successfully achieved certification at a number of our units. In fact, Compass Group is uniquely positioned in that we have multiple units that have achieved ISO 22000 certification. Aside from the competitive edge that it gives us, it addresses food safety management. Food is grown, produced, packed and distributed under safer conditions than ever before, with more systems and procedures in place to control

the process. Yet, if you page through any local magazine you can see that the quality and safety of food is an ever-growing concern for today’s consumer. Food scares such as the European Horse Meat Scandal, Sudan Red and the recent Listeriosis outbreak have heightened the consumer’s awareness around food safety. The consequences of unsafe food can be serious and ISO 22000 is the system we have chosen to implement; to identify and control food safety hazards.

Through our systems and procedures, we can achieve: • More efficient and dynamic hazard control • Systematic management of prerequisite programs • Improved documentation and process flow • Effective communication at all levels • Optimization of resources

We believe this makes Compass a compelling service provider for our clients to partner with. Contact us on www.compass-group.co.za Contributors to the article: Lara Barlow – HSE Director Johnny Aucamp – Group Sales and Marketing Director

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FEATURE

THE RMIF MEMBERS TOGETHER WITH THE SOUTH AFRICAN MEAT PROCESSORS ASSOCIATION REMAIN COMMITTED TO STRENGTHENING THE NATIONAL FOOD CONTROL SYSTEMS.

7 STEPS OF HACCP

USEFUL CONTACTS

HACCP is a systematic system

www.gov.za

which uses seven principle systems

www.thedti.gov.za

for analysing and controlling food

www.daff.gov.za

processing:

www.nda.agric.za

1. Conduct hazard analysis

www.foodbev.co.za

(microbiological, chemical and

www.health.gov.za

physical)

www.who.int/en/

2. Identify the critical control points

www.saafost.org.za

for each step in the food process

www.nicd.ac.za

(receiving, storing, preparation,

www.redmeatsa.co.za

cooking, holding, servicing, cooling

www.savam.co.za

and reheating)

www.sancu.co.za

3. Establish critical limits (adopt good

www.foodfacts.org.za

working practices like using colour

www.haccpacademy.co.za

boards correctly; freeze, chill and heat

www.en-za.ecolab.com

products at the correct temperatures)

www.hychem.co.za

4. Establish monitoring requirements

HYCHEM PRODUCTS

www.listeriosisfacts.co.za

(constant checking of: temperatures of fridges and freezers and frozen, and reheated food items; crosscontamination; dry goods storage; overall cleanliness and hygiene) 5. Take corrective action when a critical limit has been exceeded (deal with affected food; prevent problem from happening again) 6. Keep records (flow charts, policy and procedure manuals, written logs, spot checks of temperatures, corrective action taken) 7. Verify the HACCP system is working correctly (ongoing monitoring of the overall programme, laboratory testing, hand swabs, microbial cleaning controls) (Source: HTA School of Culinary Art)

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HYCHEM BROOM SET

chilled, cooked, holding, cooled

Unfortunately, the aforesaid media release is devoid of detail and this lack of detail has resulted in misinformation which is not only detrimental to the consumer, but also the South African red meat industry. In this regard, the average consumer is being led into a Listeria hysteria which is having unfortunate consequences for families who rely on processed meat as their source of protein.” “The Red Meat Industry Forum members together with the South African Meat Processors Association remain committed to strengthening the national food control systems to ensure that healthy, nutritious and safe South African red meat and red meat products is sustainably supplied to the consumer and again pledges its full support to the competent authority and its ongoing investigation. The RMIF also urges for close cooperation between the respective departments in establishing food safety guidelines and to utilize the opportunities to interact with industry on the forums provided. All industry stakeholders are encouraged to review and strengthen their hygiene management systems to provide the consumer with the peace of mind to offer her family the product of choice, which is red meat.” (To read the full statement, go to www.redmeatsa.co.za.)


FEATURE

WASH YOUR HANDS For how to wash your hands, follow the instructions supplied in the adjacent poster; for when to wash your hands, follow the instructions below: 1. Prior to commencement of each work shift 2. After a tea, cigarette or lunch break 3. After going to the toilet 4. After blowing your nose 5. After coughing or sneezing 6. After handling raw vegetables, fruit, eggs, meat or fish 7. After every activity 8. After handling refuse or rotten food 9. After handling any deliveries 10. After handling any dirty dishes or utensils 11. When hands are dirty for any other reasons 12. Every five to ten minutes (Source: HTA School of Culinary Art)

STOP CROSSCONTAMINATION 1. Ensure food is obtained from reliable suppliers 2. Handle foods as little as possible: use tongs, palette knives, plastic gloves 3. Ensure utensils and work surfaces are clean and sanitised 4. Pay attention to the handling of raw eggs, poultry, meat and fish 5. Wash raw fruits and vegetables

THE PROCESS WITH A NUMBER OF FOOD ITEMS IS TO COOK, CHILL, SEND TO SITE IN REFRIGERATED

6. Clean as you go 7. Keep foods covered as much as possible 8. Have boards and knives coloured for

TRUCKS, AND HEAT TO THE CORRECT TEMPERATURE

particular foods, for example red for

BEFORE SERVING. THE NEW FROZEN MEAL OFFERING

vegetables and white for cheese and

meat, blue for fish, green for fruit and bread

IS PREPARED OUT OF SEGMENTED KITCHEN

9. Take care when reheating prepared

FACILITIES TO ENSURE NO CROSS-CONTAMINATION

10. Main kitchen and pastry equipment

BETWEEN THIS AND THE EVENTS KITCHENS.

(Source: HTA School of Culinary Art)

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foods should be kept separate


NEWS

MEET OUR NEW PRESIDENT,

JAMES KHOZA!

James Khoza was voted in as President of the SA Chefs Association at the AGM in March. He makes history as the first “home-grown” leader at the helm of the Association. Susan Reynard reports.

JAMES KHOZA

T

he highlight of this year’s AGM was the election of James Khoza, head chef at the Sandton Convention Centre, as President. He takes over from Stephen Billingham, who served the Association in this role for eight years, eight months and 27 days. James is the first South African born and trained President of the Association since it started 44 years ago, and marks a major milestone set by Stephen several years ago to achieve a fully “home grown” President heading up the Association. James had previously been serving in the role of Vice President and joint competitions portfolio. James said on accepting this honour, “I now carry the hopes and aspirations of many chefs and I look forward to continuing the association’s ongoing work

of uniting all chefs. SA Chefs is home to all chefs and no one must feel excluded. I aim to further the Association’s work in building a space for development, in ensuring equal opportunity, in improving standards in the industry through training and mentorship, and to working with industry stakeholders to set and maintain the highest level of culinary excellence, growth and development of young chefs and professionalism.” He urged members at the AGM “to be ambassadors of this noble society – it’s not about any one individual, it’s about people. It’s about mentoring the young chefs in our association and advancing the unity of chefs.” James shares outgoing President Stephen Billingham’s passion for education and, during his time with Tsogo Sun at Sandton Convention Centre and Sandton Sun, has worked closely with and mentored many young learnership students and trainee chefs. “I believe that we have a vitally important role to play with the chefs who are starting out – they are our legacy and have the potential to make a difference in our industry in a country that has so much to offer by way of unique ideas and skills,” he adds. James achieved his Diploma in Food & Beverage Management from Technikon Witwatersrand in Braamfontein in the 1990s and then started his culinary career working under Walter Ulz at Linger Longer

restaurant as Demi Chef de Cuisine. Through his career, he has travelled and worked in France, Guinea, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Berlin, where he worked in a Michelin-starred restaurant. He then returned to his South African roots 11 years ago and joined Tsogo Sun, working in various Southern Sun kitchens, followed by the Sandton Convention Centre, where he has been for seven years. Stephen says James has played an active role in SA Chefs for many years and has a true passion for improving the culinary industry and developing new talent. “He is ably equipped to continue the great work done by the Association and all its members,” he says, adding that he is proud to leave the Association in the safe hands of the new leadership supported by a strong board and thriving committees, clubs and other initiatives. Ravi Nadasen, chief operating officer of Tsogo Sun hotels, congratulated James on this auspicious occasion, saying, “James is a true asset to Tsogo Sun and I have no doubt that he will apply the exceptional work ethic, integrity, quiet confidence and wisdom for which he is so respected to the industry role he now deservedly occupies. As his employer, we are delighted to offer our full support to James as he leads the SA Chefs Association to achieve his vision of mentorship and unification.”

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TABLETPOS

TABLETPOS Managing Director of TabletPOS, Michael Da Silva, explains what TabletPOS has to offer the hospitality sector. Control from anywhere in the world — the best example to explain this is with the new 15% VAT increase, the legacy-based POS companies would require you to change the VAT yourself manually, but on iKentoo we can schedule it to happen after hours across our whole user base automatically. Now that’s the beauty of cloud-based mobile POS.

Have you aligned with other hospitality partners?

Tell us about TabletPOS.

We started in earnest three years ago and have grown dramatically, we are just under 1 000 sites. The response from the hospitality sector has been unbridled amazement at our product. We are competing with the incumbent’s in the SA POS market head on, we don’t charge for license fees annually and we are not rand/ dollar dependant, the customer is billed monthly in advance for the use of our software. It’s a simple, easy formula that makes sure we deliver on our support levels and our product.

Why Mobile POS?

PC-based POS is old technology; if you go overseas, you will see that the trends are to use mobile tablets to run your businesses, it is the de facto standard. The move to tablets is logical and more cost effective. The old technology will work

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but it’s like buying an old 2004 model car, it works for a while, but the maintenance is high, not to mention the added burdens of viruses, malware and daily backups, this all adds up in the end. Running iKentoo on an iOS device (iPad, iPad Mini, iPad Pro and iPhone), you are able to run a full-blown POS environment with all the technology sitting in the cloud which makes your POS future proof.

How is TabletPOS changing the mainstream hospitality philosophy?

Our product offering is unique in many ways – power failures don’t affect us, backups are automatic, continuous and offsite. Hardware is reliable and state-of-the-art. With table-side ordering, we empower the waiter to upsell while they are processing the order.

Yes, we have integrated with SnapScan and Zapper, thus empowering the consumer to pay their bills using their phones quickly and securely. We have also integrated with Yoco, the fastest-growing merchant banking solution in SA. This is a match made in heaven for merchants. You can apply, pay for and receive your device within 48 hours. This integration empowers your waiters to receive payments at the tableside as well, no running around to find the speed point machine.

CONTACT US Nationwide Contact Centre: 0860 TABLET(822538) Email: hello@tabletpos.co.za Website: www.tabletpos.co.za Facebook: www.facebook.com/Tabletpos/


WILMAR EXCELLA

WILMAR EXCELLA OILS Whether you want to fry, roast or marinate, Excella has an oil to suit every application.

Why should Excella Oils be used by the readership of SA Chef magazine?

Excella is a Proudly South African brand member with a strong heritage in the cooking oil industry and is well loved for delivering excellent cooking results. Excella understands cooking and baking needs and offers a range of oils

EXCELLA PREMIUM Excella Premium is a vegetable oil blend made from the finest

to meet your recipe requirements and deliver the best results.

What makes your oil superior to others?

Excella is brought to you by Wilmar SA who have an esteemed reputation as a leading global oils refining and manufacturing organisation. Additionally, Excella cooking oil is endorsed by the South African Heart & Stroke foundation, and is fortified with vitamins A & D, these vitamins, are essential for maintaining a healthy body.

ingredients – it’s the premium choice in Excella’s stable of oils. Features:

EXCELLA SUNFLOWER OIL

Quality guaranteed

Excella Sunflower Oil is made from

EXCELLA PAN PALM OLEIN

Versatile for large-scale catering

premium grade sunflower seeds and is

Excella Pan Palm Olien is the caterers’

requirements as it is suitable for

naturally high in Vitamin E and low in

choice for superior quality cooking oil.

all types of cooking applications,

saturated fat. Features:

from frying to baking, marinades •

to salad dressings.

Features:

Rich in vitamin E

Tasteless and odourless when

Ideal for use in frying and roasting, as

Reliable and consistent

fresh and doesn’t impact the

well as in sauces, marinades and salad

Versatile – it’s suitable for pan-

flavour of your dish. Excellent

dressings, and replacing butter in baked

infusion properties

items

frying, deep-frying and baking •

Affordable and long-lasting as it

Contains no artificial colourants

Odourless and flavourless

has extremely high temperature

Long-lasting as it contains anti-

Long-lasting and withstands high

stability, which also makes it a

oxidants and antifoam which enhances the longevity of the oil

temperatures. •

safer alternative to other oils

Endorsed by the South African Heart

No excessive smoking

and Stroke Foundation

Tasteless and odourless when

A source of unsaturated fats

Excellent browning properties,

High in Vitamins A and E

giving food a lovely golden-brown

Low in Saturated fat

Fried food absorbs less oil

colour

Halaal and Kosher certified

Halaal and Kosher certified

fresh

Stable at high temperatures and more resistant to natural breakdown

No excessive smoking

Halaal and Kosher certified

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CHEF SHOWCASE

MASLOW SOUS VIDE BLESBOK LOIN, CARAMELISED APPLE JUS, SCALLOP RAVIOLI WITH MAURITIAN PIMENT, MACADAMIA AND HONEY CELERIAC, RAINBOW CARROTS

JOCELYN MYERS-ADAMS

CHEF’S SHOWCASE:

Jocelyn Myers-Adams has gone from farm to fine-dining to foraging as her love of all things food and beverage has evolved, taking her from Canada to Cape Town. She takes Susan Reynard behind the scenes of her extraordinary career.

J

ocelyn Myers-Adams is best known as executive chef at Sun International’s The Table Bay hotel in Cape Town. A five-star establishment with an impeccable reputation for cuisine, Jocelyn has recently left the establishment after nine years to pursue other interests, including consulting to industry, as well as a trip to her home country of Canada with her family scheduled for this year. She has worked with the best around the world following her training at Stratford Chefs School in Ontario and is a sommelier to boot. Jocelyn was at The Table Bay for nine years, joining in 2009 as executive chef tournant, working up the ranks to acting executive chef and executive chef. We peek beneath Jocelyn’s serene surface:

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When did you fall in love with cooking?

I was fortunate to have had a grandmother that loved to cook and bake. She made the most delicious pies, scones, roasts and her specialty was an aged-cheddar soufflé with homemade tomato relish. We lived on a farm and had a literal farm-totable culture. My father brought up the idea of my becoming a chef at a culinary school luncheon that he was invited to as a benefactor of the school. It was a beautiful outdoor venue and I was engrossed in each course as it was delivered, when my father leaned across the table and asked, “Isn’t this what you want to do?” with a big smile. I looked back at him and the penny dropped for me – I enrolled at that culinary school the next week.

Where did you train?

In Canada you train at a culinary institute and you also complete a government qualification for your apprenticeship. This entails thousands of skills that you must be verified as competent in by a government-accredited chef and complete 6 000 hours of training. The culinary institute that I attended was Stratford Chefs School in Stratford, Ontario in Canada. This is one of the best chefs’ schools in the country. They teach cooking really well and have amazingly qualified instructors, including a former executive pastry chef from Claridge’s, London. Chef Jamie Kennedy sits on the board and the governor of the Sommelier Guild of Canada and author, Jacques Marie, was the teacher for wine


CHEF SHOWCASE

Miami, East Coast USA, Portofino, Cinque Terre and Cuba.

knowledge. We were also taught food costing, budgeting, HR management, business management, property and equipment maintenance, making and getting a business plan approved, and compliance with the labour board. It was really comprehensive. I would love to bring the curriculum here. Maybe I will…

Who has helped guide your career?

Where has your culinary career taken you so far?

I have been incredibly blessed: I have travelled to London to work with Gordon Ramsay, and Australia where I worked at, managed and owned businesses, including a stint on an exclusive eco island in the Whitsundays with helicopter access only. I have worked as executive chef on private yachts in Monaco, St. Tropez, Sardinia,

JOCELYN MYERS-ADAMS © FIONA MAC PHERSON

MY GREATEST BELIEF THAT HAS STOOD FAST THROUGHOUT MY CAREER IS TO USE GREAT INGREDIENTS AND DON’T MESS WITH THEM TOO MUCH. I BELIEVE THAT IT IS IMPORTANT TO BE HEALTHY.

I have worked with many talented professionals. The governor for the Sommelier Guild for Canada, Jacques Marie, was a great mentor of mine. Jamie Kennedy oversaw my apprenticeship and I was fortunate to work with him and Michael Statlander when they started the organic movement in the Toronto fine-dining scene. I learned discipline from Gordon Ramsay, whether I needed it or not. I have been influenced by Alice Waters, for always honouring and showcasing products simply; Anthony Bourdain, for pushing boundaries with his maniacal and totally engrossing approach to cooking; and Alain Ducasse, for his contribution to the culinary industry and unwavering classical style. I had a stage for a few days at his restaurant in Monaco, the Louis XV. In South Africa, I joined Sun International in 2009 and worked with many professionals that brought me to my tenure as executive chef, during which I was able to take The Table Bay hotel to new standards and create a business model that produced great profits. My foraging was inspired by Charles Standing, the Urban Hunter Gatherer, and Chris Erasmus from Foliage. I really enjoy any foraging experiences that we have together. Now, as chairperson of SA Chefs Western Cape, I have worked with many great chefs in SA and am proud to be part of such a talented group of chefs.

What is your current food philosophy and has it changed?

WILD ROOIBOS GRILLED SPRINGBOK LOIN, APPLE AND PLUM WELLINGTON, PRESSED SPRINGBOK SHANK WITH DUKKAH CRUST, CANDY BEETROOT, PARSNP OUREE, POMNEGRANATE JUS

My greatest belief that has stood fast throughout my career is to use great ingredients and don’t mess with them too much. I believe that it is important to be healthy and therefore have a very holistic approach to cooking.

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CHEF SHOWCASE

I used to create dishes that were more complicated and have used many techniques and methods, including molecular gastronomy. I use less ingredients and simpler methods for producing dishes now and when I am done creating a dish, I ask what I can take away.

What are your favourite ingredients, flavours and equipment?

My favourite ingredients are foraged. Foraging has become my innovation – you can find a plethora of mushrooms, hibiscus, wild garlic, lemon, rose and mint pelargonium, veldkool, waterblommetjies, spekboom, amaranth, wild rosemary and sage and soutslaai, to name a few. If you pick up a fishing permit from the Post Office you can collect hundreds of different seaweeds, sea urchin, sea snails, mussels and limpets, as some examples of the sustainable jewels that the sea can

offer. The adventure of sourcing the ingredients yourself adds to the art of creating the dish. I enjoy using fresh flavours like lemon, fennel and radish to add contrast in flavour and texture to dishes. My favourite piece of equipment is my KitchenAid Professional Series mixer in matte charcoal that my father brought over in 2009. There are incredible pieces of innovative equipment that have the ability to change the production capacities of kitchens; it is important that you research and understand this innovation.

What is your superpower in the kitchen?

It is very important to me that through everything that I do or say, I maintain my integrity. There are many things that are important to me: treating people with respect, being aware of the impact of what you are doing will have on those around you and in the world in which you live. I

MASLOW HOUSE CURED AND SMOKED OSTRICH WITH HIBISCUS AND WILD GARLIC MOUSSE, MAURITIAN PAPAYA JELLY, CURED BEETROOT, COMPRESSED WATERMELON, RADISH, BRAISED BEETROOT TARTAR

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have worked for big corporations and I keep myself grounded by looking at what I can do within the company to improve the lives of those that work for the company, and to promote initiatives that protect the environment. I am an ambassador for SASSI and I raise funds through CSI and SA Chefs to create opportunities for others.

How do you motivate your team?

I have been blessed with the power to motivate. I have always been a passionate and motivated chef. When there is absolute turmoil, I can remain calm and continue to motivate any team into staying on track and working through together. I have an ability to see the best solutions quickly and guide teams to goals. I believe in developing staff and have their motivation come naturally…instead of with a stick.

JOCELYN MYERS-ADAMS © C&D HEIERLI PHOTOGRAPHY


McDONALD’S

100% BEEF OR NOTHING AT ALL!

IT’S AS REAL AS IT GETS WITH YOUR FAVOURITE BIG MAC® “McDonald’s South Africa serves approximately eight-million customers every month and places food safety as the highest priority in all our restaurants. We remain committed to providing customers with the highest-quality food that is prepared according to global and local best practice and standards.”

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t is as iconic as the Eiffel Tower and the ancient Pyramids and enjoyed the world-over by millions of people who have come to love and trust the delicious taste of a Big Mac. But did you know that your Big Mac is made with only 100%

ground beef, a dash of salt and pepper and layered with only the freshest ingredients sourced from local farms? Well it is! Actually the Big Mac consists of two 100% beef patties, “special sauce,” iceberg lettuce, cheese, pickles, and onions, served in a

three-part sesame seed bun. And as with all other menu offerings at McDonald’s, consumers can now find answers to their burning questions and find out exactly what goes in the make-up of their favourite burgers and meals.

IT IS AS ICONIC AS THE EIFFEL TOWER AND THE ANCIENT PYRAMIDS AND ENJOYED THE WORLDOVER BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, WHO HAVE COME TO LOVE AND TRUST THE DELICIOUS TASTE OF A BIG MAC.

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McDONALD’S

CONSUMERS CAN NOW FIND ANSWERS TO THEIR BURNING QUESTIONS AND FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT GOES IN THEIR FAVOURITE BURGERS.

Spearheaded by their on-going transparency journey through the Know Our Food platform – www.knowourfood.co.za – you can now view and search for videos detailing the ingredients used. These videos showcase McDonald’s SA suppliers and their manufacturing processes. “McDonald’s South Africa is proud of our world-class supply chain, hygiene, food safety and quality controls. These are the same high standards we have consistently demonstrated in South Africa for the past 23 years. We serve approximately

eight million customers every month in South Africa and place food safety as the highest priority in all our restaurants. We remain committed to providing customers with the highest quality food that is prepared according to global and local best practice and standards,” said McDonald’s SA Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, Daniel Padiachy. As part of McDonald’s ongoing commitment to engage openly about their practices and products, McDonald’s customers can expect more

than their meal options at their next visit. Digital menu boards, tray-liners and leaflets detailing important information around the quality and what goes into their food, will become more available as customers continue to make informed food choices.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON KNOW OUR FOOD Visit www.knowourfood.co.za For more information contact Prinella Pillay at prinella@pacinamix.co.za

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NEWS

SA CHEFS

NEWS ROUND-UP boosting the businesses of culinary entrepreneurs through the skills and knowledge transfer that takes place during the EDP training.

NYCTP CHEFS RETURN FROM OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENTS

NHLAKANIPHO ‘SGAZO’ NGUBANE - MINT PANNA COTTA WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE CASING, ALMOND CRUMBLE, APPLE GALETTE WITH ZABAGLIONE, APPLE JELLY, CHOCOLATE BRANCH, AND POMEGRANATES

LUCKY STAR COMMUNITY CATERERS PROGRAMME BUILDS RELATIONSHIPS

Lucky Star held its first Community Caterers Programme session for the year at the West Rand Centre for Culinary Excellence in Johannesburg. The lucky 13 community caterer graduates present have been upskilled to help grow their businesses and build partnerships, with new information on the latest trends in the catering industry shared, tried and tested. The Programme aims to nurture the relationship between previous and new Enterprise Development Programme (EDP) graduates to reconnect, refresh and inspire; build a lifelong relationship with other EDP graduates and with Lucky Star’s values to make a positive impact to the individuals and their

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companies. This sentiment was shared by Lucky Star’s brand ambassador, Kabelo Segone.

EXCELLA CONTINUES TO SUPPORT EDP

Excella has sponsored 12 new students in the Enterprise Development Programme (EDP), currently undergoing training at SA Chefs’ West Rand Centre for Culinary Excellence. Last year the previous group of 12 students sponsored by Excella graduated in October in a ceremony attended by representatives from the company, including Graham Jehoma (marketing and sales), Amanda Mulder (finance), Patience Fakude (head of RND) and Leon Niemand, GM of holding company Wilmar SA. Excella continues to play an important role in

On 30 March 2018, NYCTP chefs were given a warm welcome home at OR Tambo International Airport on their return from placements in various workplaces in the Seychelles, including Beachcomber Seychelles Sainte Anne, Avani Seychelles Barbarons Resort & Spa, La Plage Restaurant, Constance Ephelia Resort and Kempinski Resort. This was made possible by the National Department of Tourism and Seychelles Tourism Academy.

DEPUTY MINISTER OF TOURISM VISITS 1000 HILLS CHEF SCHOOL

Deputy Minister of Tourism Elizabeth Thabethe visited 1000 Hills Chef School on 28 February. She was accompanied by representatives from the National Department of Tourism and supported by SA Chefs Project Manager for the National Youth Chef Training Programme (NYCTP), Hudson Masondo. 1000 Hills is one of the accredited training providers for the NYCTP, which gives young, unemployed South Africans the opportunity to train as chefs.


NEWS

The Deputy Minister’s visit encouraged and motivated the group of 29 Certificate students who enrolled in 2017. She reminded them to grab this opportunity with both hands. She also encouraged the learners to travel once they had completed the course, saying they will be great ambassadors for South Africa. They will also bring back their international experience, raising the bar to make South Africa a world-class destination. Ms Thabethe also spoke about entrepreneurship and her message planted the seed to grow future executive chefs who will run their own food businesses one day, creating employment, and paying it forward. She also got stuck into chopping and preparing vegetables with the students, showcasing the importance

of the hands-on nature of the programme with chef Sam Maseko.

SA CHEFS SAVES THE DAY WITH TRAINING When the chef lecturer tasked with training young people in the skill of cookery at the Missions Ablaze church outside of Durban left suddenly, students were left

high and dry in their sponsored course. The church approached SA Chefs for assistance as well as Chef Fatima Stanley of the Masters Chef Academy in Durban. They stepped in to assess the students, fill the gaps and hold exams. These young cooks have now graduated and are set to enter a career in the culinary industry.

CHEF TIAAN ON B-WELL’S ELITE FRYING OIL

“I have used B-well olive and canola oil blend for quite some time now. You get the great olive oil taste with all the health benefits of canola. I love using it for frying and dressing as well as for marinades and preserving things like garlic and chilli. You cannot go wrong with this affordable, great quality and very tasty product! B-well has also recently launched a new premium quality pure extra virgin olive oil at an affordable price.”

CHEF TIAAN LANGENEGGER; WINNER AND JUDGE OF THE KYKNET TV COOKING SHOW KOKKEDOOR 2013.

Tel: +27 (0)28 514 3441

- Chef Tiaan Langenegger |

Email: info@bwellfoods.co.za

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Web: www.bwellfoods.co.za

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NEWS

NEW ERA FOR ASSOCIATION AGM HERALDS

The Annual General Meeting of the SA Chefs Association was held on 28 March 2018 and it was a well-attended and lively one. Susan Reynard reports.

Association in a voluntary, unpaid capacity. Past president Stephen Billingham stays on as a director for two years, as per the Rules. • James Khoza (President) • Kabelo Segone • Allister Esau • David Keir • Peter Robertson • Linah Pinky Maruping • Carianne Wilkinson • Jodi-Ann Palmer • Stuart Cason

STEPHEN BILLINGHAM

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he Annual General Meeting (AGM) of SA Chefs was held on 28 March 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Johannesburg – The Rosebank. The head office team of SA Chefs delivered a great performance, performing their registration and all administrative duties efficiently. Arnold Tanzer performed his role as principal officer of the AGM admirably. The Association gave a rousing welcome to newly elected President, James Khoza, and bid farewell to outgoing President, Stephen Billingham.

NEWLY ELECTED DIRECTORS

The newly elected board of directors consists of the following members, who continue to work for the

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New to the board are Carianne, Pinky and Stuart, and the Association thanks outgoing directors Craig Elliot and Kevin Gibbs for their contribution.

DISCUSSION POINTS

Arnold Tanzer put in hundreds of hours, together with legal experts, to ensure that every aspect of the AGM was delivered correctly. He explained in great detail, providing clarity of both a legal and general nature, on the questions raised by members. The board approved the Rules for the Company, which were registered with the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission on 5 February 2018, in compliance with the Companies Act. Special and Ordinary Resolutions voted on, included: the adoption of the Memorandum of Incorporation; ratification of the Rules (new name

for what were previously referred to as By-laws); reappointment of the auditors; election of the President; and the authority of the directors. The request by Caryn Smith and Mahlomola Thamae that the Association be investigated by an independent auditor, other than the independent auditor currently tasked with this duty (it was noted that SA Chefs has received a clean audit for the past 20 years), was voted against. Arnold also tackled the misleading information doing the rounds on social media; managing the question and answer sessions which preceded and followed each vote. The financial report was presented by CTF Services, the Association’s auditors, and the makeup of various line items explained in detail. While revenue is down due to the stress of the 2017 economy, there are sufficient funds to ensure the investment in various development projects by the Association as well as its ongoing financial security.

STEPHEN’S LEGACY

Outgoing President, Stephen Billingham, gave his final annual report of Association activities during his leadership, at the AGM on 28 March 2018: “In many of my inaugural speeches in 2009/2010, I made


NEWS

a number of promises, pledges and commitments, please allow me to take stock” • Increasing the membership base – Done! (1 800 – 9 600) • Increasing revenue and long term financial security – Done! (R1.8-million to R12-million) • Enhancing our role in education, again “For Chefs by Chefs” – Done! • Breaking the culture and mould of the old boys’ club – Done! • Engaging with all hotel groups and catering companies – Done! • Continuing and improving the respect for our forefathers and elders of the Association and industry at large – Done! • Supporting and growing our member schools, both private and Governmental – Done! • Starting and nurturing a Young Chefs Club – Done! • Implementing a World Chefs endorsed Culinary Competition for smaller African and middleeastern countries not getting the same traction as our European and American counterparts – The African Culinary Cup – Done! • Working closer with Government departments – Done! • Addressing transformation in committees, teams and boards – Done but always ongoing! • Becoming the SAQA recognised Professional Body for all cooks, chefs and caterers. Developing qualifications, again “For Cooks by Cooks” – Done! • Thank you to the CEP, TWG through to the current guideline committee for again volunteering your time and expertise to ensure fairness and incorporate a massive amount of viewpoints and opinions. • Working with DOE by adopting high schools consumer studies departments – Done! • Creating jobs in our industry for unemployed youth – Done! (With

1 700 young chefs in full-time employment to date since 2011.) • Increasing patrons and main sponsors – Done! (In fact, tripled from four to 12. Patrons are the backbone of our income and support.) • To implement a skills programme to uplift and enrich 100% black owned township and community caterers – Done! 650 companies trained to date. • The most important was to hand this noble 44 year old Association, all of its members, past, present and future, its celebrated achievements, all of its milestones accrued over four decades, its history, its heritage and future over into the conditioned, and ultimately prepared and safe hands of a truly home-grown, born and bred South African President for the first time; that milestone, my legacy, will happen in this very room, this very day for all of us to witness. To the incoming President and incoming Board of Directors: it is not so easy, trust me, but you are not alone as you have a combined 1000 years of experience, at

your side and at your service. The late great Dr Bill Gallagher told me a number of times to learn from his biggest mistake and always put your family first. Sorry Dr G, I let you down on that one. To my wife Kerry and my two boys Ryan (9) and Liam (11), who have only known me and grown up with me as ‘’the President’’ and bragged to their friends at school from grade 0 to grade 6 that their Dad is in fact the President: I am sorry for travelling so much, working so long, working so late, missing birthdays, swimming galas, tennis practice, show and tell, soccer tournaments, spotlight days and parent evenings. To Kerry and boys, as of tomorrow, you will see more of your husband and your Dad. To my remarkable staff at my own business, for eight years and some a lot more, I am sorry that I have not been there enough to groom, grow and lead as often as I should have been, but I am proud of you all for blossoming and improving yourselves with a reduced input from me; I’ve drawn from your energy. As of tomorrow, things at work may be a little different around the classrooms, kitchens and offices at HTA School of Culinary Art.

SA CHEFS AMG REGISTRATION

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chance on me to serve you eight years ago: I am asking you to believe, not in my ability to bring about change, but in yours. I gained an additional three fathers along the way, lost one, gained scores of extra brothers and sisters to whom I am forever indebted for their invaluable time and knowledge that they have shared and invested in me. I have loved, learned and lost, but my greatest moment, my greatest achievement is to leave my office, my Association, our Association in its strongest ever position, in its 44-year history with a strong board, eight Regional Committees, a respected AOC, a Young Chefs Club with a bright future, a strong Head Office, with plenty of cash and investments in the bank, an Association that is secure, respected globally and in the safe hands of future leaders with a noble past, a solid present and an unlimited future! I thank you, God bless you and God bless the South African Chefs Association and all who serve her!

STEPHEN BILLINGHAM

In closing, thank you, thank you, thank you to SA Chefs for building me as a person and President over the past eight years. I believe that I/we have served our noble Association well and with due respect, moved it to greater heights and cemented its future for the next 40 years. Personally, I have become a better member, a better Director, a better Vice-President and ultimately a better President and along the way a better father, husband and clearly a better business man and entrepreneur. SA Chefs has given me friendships that will never fade whatever the distance, memories that time can never erode, experiences and challenges that my grandchildren won’t believe. I have laughed

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with, cried with, grown with some phenomenal people. I have used my power to change lives, change futures. I have used my power to simply do good for others. I have witnessed every variety of human folly and injustice, I have endured the discriminations of our industry, I have witnessed pure evil and deceit at its worst. I have witnessed, joy, achievements, happiness and pure miracles. My fellow members, it has been the honour of my life to serve you. I won’t stop; in fact, I will be right there with you as a member for all my days that remain. For now, whether you are young or young at heart, I do have one final ask of you, as your President; the same thing I asked when you took a

I DO HAVE ONE FINAL ASK OF YOU, AS YOUR PRESIDENT; THE SAME THING I ASKED WHEN YOU TOOK A CHANCE ON ME TO SERVE YOU EIGHT YEARS AGO: I AM ASKING YOU TO BELIEVE, NOT IN MY ABILITY TO BRING ABOUT CHANGE, BUT IN YOURS.


Vegan

Friendly


FEATURE

COURTESY OF BREAD & WINE VINEYARD RESTAURANT

RICHARD BOSMAN © AGLOW PHOTOGRAPHY

ZEN AND THE

ART OF CHARCUTERIE Artisanal charcuterie is the time-honoured art of drying, curing and preserving meat. Susan Reynard chats to three experts passionate about the process.

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harcuterie is at the heart of the nose-to-tail movement. Caroline McCann, one of the country’s top butchers and owner of Braeside Meat Market with stores in Greenside and Boksburg, Johannesburg, says the art of charcuterie, rather than simply “cold meat”, has come into its own in South Africa during the past decade and is a way to utilise the entire carcass. She notes charcutiers are producing some really interesting products. Traditionally, charcuterie was produced in colder climates, like Europe, as curing requires careful temperature control to avoid going from drying to rotting meat. Other areas of consideration include preparation areas well away from fresh foods to avoid

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cross-contamination of bacteria and careful use of additives. When it comes to the skills set required, Caroline says, “The biggest problem we have in South Africa is we don’t have butcher traineeships like we did in days gone by, and these skills need to be passed on by experienced, knowledgeable butchers. So few people do it and do it well – Richard Bosman and Neil Jewell are shining lights in this regard.” Charcuterie requires patience, Caroline adds, as what you produce today will only be shelf-ready three months to three years from now. “It can be a lot of hard work for small turnover.” She no longer makes charcuterie but does stock products from top suppliers. Talking of trends,

she says popular products include saucissons, which she describes as thick, dried sausage, like a fancy dry wors, as well as pancetta (a type of bacon) and prosciutto crudo (a type of ham). The key is integrating charcuterie into the menu and this needs to be planned in advance. “Pork is the predominant animal in charcuterie, but there’s nothing stopping beef and lamb from also appearing,” she notes.

NEIL FINDS THE PATIENCE REQUIRED TO MAKE CHARCUTERIE SOOTHING.


FEATURE

RICHARD BOSMAN SPICE ROUTE © AGLOW PHOTOGRAPHY

CAROLINE MCCANN, ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S TOP BUTCHERS AND OWNER OF BRAESIDE MEAT MARKET

JEWELL’S JOURNEY

Chef and charcutier, Neil Jewell, of Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant on Môreson Farm in Franschhoek is a legend in the world of charcuterie. He says he fell in love with this culinary art form because it’s fun. “One of my earliest, proper food memories was when we were travelling with my parents and best friend in the South of France on a canoe trip. We stopped at a bend in the river at a little white shed that was the restaurant. On the menu was unpasteurised camembert, red or white wine (cooled in the river), baguette and saucisson. That was lunch and one of the best I’ve had in my entire life,” he recalls. He started out making bacon and his range grew to the 25 different products he produces today. In the frenetic, adrenalinefueled business of the kitchen, Neil finds the patience required to make charcuterie soothing. “You can’t rush it, you must do it in parts, cleaning down in between. It’s therapeutic, honest and enjoyable, turning a raw pig into seriously groovy delicacies,” he explains. In the restaurant, which he runs with his wife Tina, one of

the most popular dishes on the menu is the charcuterie platter. Another hit is the Glen Oakes pork sausage made from eisbein and braised mustard seeds, served with spätzle and compressed peach. Neil buys in about eight pigs per month and two days a week are dedicated to charcuterie. His charcuterie is now sold in delis and restaurants in and around Cape Town and Franschhoek as well as Johannesburg. He is able to produce charcuterie with a particular flavour profile to suit his clients’ needs, such as coffee-cured bacon made specially for Big Dog Café. “We’ll never compete with the big processing boys but we can make a product that is world-class. We’ve had lots of Italians thinking they’re eating product from their own country. We are very proud of what we’re doing – we’re a small, hands-on bunch of people who care a lot about what we do. Food trends come and go but they can create micro-industries. If you’re doing something you wholeheartedly believe in and it’s a quality product, it’s a unique selling point,” he notes. Neil also holds charcuterie courses, sharing his knowledge to ensure these vital skills are not lost.

CHEF AND CHARCUTIER, NEIL JEWELL, OF BREAD & WINE VINEYARD RESTAURANT

CHARCUTERIE IN BRIEF “Charcuterie is not just a preparation method but was a tool for survival 6 000 years ago, allowing meat to be kept for longer periods of time by curing with salt and/or drying. It has since developed into an art form. US author Michael Ruhlman says in his 2005 book Charcuterie, ‘It has been carried on in many forms through virtually every culture, and it has been one of the foundations of human survival in that it allows society to maintain a food surplus.’ The importance of charcuterie in preserving meat pre-refrigeration times cannot be overstated, and the resurgence in its popularity is widespread. As the do-it-yourself food culture grows, more small, local businesses are curing meat to cater to consumers who demand sustainable, old world preparation methods.” (Source: www.agfoodcouncil.com)

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FEATURE

BREAD & WINE VINEYARD RESTAURANT BAKING

“People have preconceptions about making charcuterie. We dispel the myths, break down the pig in front of clients, show muscle and fat structure, and turn it into all sorts of things. But you must commit to it; it takes time,” he notes.

BOSMAN’S BUSINESS

Richard Bosman is another big name in artisanal charcuterie. “I used to own a delicatessen selling imported charcuterie. During this time, my friend Walther Haller showed me how to make cured meat products and initially it was just a hobby. After two years I decided to make a go of it and started my business in 2009. There are a few reasons why I love it: obviously I enjoy

eating – still to this day- but also it is a craft that originates from the days before refrigeration, and while we have tweaked it and refined it, the basics have remained the same for hundreds of years. It is also a process that utilises every part of the animal and nothing goes to waste,” he explains. Richard makes a range of Mediterranean-style, air-dried products, including prosciutto, coppa, bresaola, salami, chorizo, pancetta, bacon, guanciale, crackling, sausages, duck prosciutto, patés, pork pies, rillettes and his latest experiments using Koji to cure some of the products. Koji is a Japanese fungus used to make miso, sake and soy sauce. He recommends two ways of incorporating charcuterie into the menu: “The first is the traditional charcuterie board with a variety of meats, cheeses and pickles. I always recommend prosciutto, coppa, bresaola, salami and chorizo to my customers as this gives a couple of pork options, a beef option and a spicy option. Coupled with a great brie and a hard cheese, sourdough bread and pickled vegetable such as artichokes, courgettes, sun dried tomatoes and olives and you have a platter that presents beautifully and serves two. The other way I recommend is to take a couple of

WE’LL NEVER COMPETE WITH THE BIG PROCESSING BOYS BUT WE CAN MAKE A PRODUCT THAT IS WORLD-CLASS.

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BREAD & WINE VINEYARD RESTAURANT

outstanding products and make them the stars of the dish. Some freshly sliced prosciutto with a beautiful burrata cheese, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil only need a grind of black pepper to be complete. You don’t need fancy foams and a sous vide machine to make a brilliant dish,” he explains. Looking at the merits of craft charcuterie, Richard says, “One of the big differentiators in charcuterie is the source of the meat. We have three farms that supply us with the most beautiful pork that we try to do as little as possible to. The pigs are reared in pastures and have no routine antibiotics, steroids and hormones added to their diet. Farming this way means that every pig is different in terms of fat content and weight. Large scale factories (local and imported) making cured meats have to buy in factory-farmed pork which gives a very consistent yield but the quality is inferior.” Richard also runs courses in charcuterie, allowing him to interact with enthusiasts who want to make cured meats at home. He has a stand at the Oranjezicht Farm Market at Granger Bay, which allows him to chat to customers and let them try out products. He and his wife opened Bacon on Bree restaurant, which showcases their bacon and cured products.


BIDVEST CATERING SERVICES

BIDVEST CATERING SERVICES Bidvest Catering Services, a Level 1 BBBEE organisation offers world-class food service solutions to business sectors including but not limited to Industrial, Corporate, Healthcare, Mining, Education, and the Public Sector.

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ffering customised solutions based on individual client requirements, we ensure compliance with stringent health and safety processes and procedures, across all our operating units around the country. In order to deliver on our promises, we focus on health, quality and service, ensuring that our food is always safe to eat, tasty and made with passion and creativity. Our brands to brag about include Bidvest Royal Mnandi and Bidvest Gourmet, both of which focus on selected sectors within the food services sectors. Whichever brand you choose, our Executive Chef and Sous Chefs will ensure that our food, quality, standards and variety are maintained. Bidvest Gourmet is a niche, boutique-style catering solution predominantly focusing on highend corporate environments which include staff restaurants, coffee shops and special events. Bidvest

Royal Mnandi focuses on catering where critical mass and consistency is important, such as staff canteens, schools and frail-care facilities. For businesses that are not equipped with kitchen facilities, we offer modular or mobile-food service concepts providing a range of freshly prepared grab ‘n go items, snacks, confectionery, and hot and cold beverages. We are, in addition, able to offer all our clients frozen meals for a convenient take-home option. Our Gourmet Events Chefs are able to meet all your function catering requirements wherever you may be. Simply put, relax and leave the food, drinks, décor and music … in fact everything, to us! Our Specialised Production Kitchen focusing on critical mass meal production has to date produced over 22 million meals without incident. The same remarkable achievement translates to our clients for continued business support around the country.

In today’s work environment, productivity is key and for us at Bidvest Catering Services, there are simply no compromises. Our brand new Gourmet Kitchen situated in Centurion is geared to provide an exciting and entertaining programme for your next teambuilding event. We have a variety of options including mystery baskets to open pantry and masterclasses — select a package that suits you. Whilst we endeavour to provide nothing but the highest-quality food and service, we invest in our people, putting them at the heart of our business. As an accredited training facility, we are very proud that we can provide accredited training through our Bidvest Catering Services Learning Academy and as such continuously uplift and empower our employees. For more information or for a solution customised to your requirements, please contact info@bidvestcatering.co.za

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MAC BROTHERS

MAC BROTHERS

CATERING EQUIPMENT

Mac Brothers Catering Equipment is one of the largest catering equipment manufacturers in South Africa and is owned by the JSE listed Grand Parade Investments Ltd.

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ac Brothers was established in 2002 and has grown to become one of Africa’s leading catering equipment suppliers. This is no surprise when you walk around the facility and see the state-of-the-art technology the establishment has on offer. Mac Brothers offers not only pre fabrication advice, establishment and in-house kitchen design, in-house menu and product development, equipment manufacturing, installation, support but also post installation service and support. The fabrication factory and head office is based in Cape Town, with branches in Johannesburg, Durban and Harare. Mac Brothers manufactures and supplies a range of stainless steel catering equipment and refrigeration equipment to

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clients within the hospitality industry including, but not limited to, restaurants, hotels, golf and wine estates, canteens, prisons and hospitals. Mac Brothers also has an extensive dealer network throughout Africa, including Namibia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Congo, Nigeria, Lesotho, Swaziland, Ghana, Uganda and Mauritius. The company’s range includes a huge variety of fabricated equipment, refrigeration, ventilation, smalls, a large variety of ovens as well as a range of imported equipment from the UK, Germany, Italy and the USA. The standard of machinery on the Mac Brothers factory floor is at a level equal to any international competitor. Equally Mac Brothers is producing equipment that is

of a standard that can more than compete anywhere in the World. The facility runs like clockwork and each and every piece of stainless steel is molded to perfection, polished, turned, checked and rechecked to ensure that the end user is receiving nothing but the very best product. Mac Brothers were one of the first in the industry in South Africa to pioneer the use of 3D architectural design software such as Revit and 3D Max. The team of designers liaise with clients from conceptualisation through to final building plans, focusing on creating an efficient, sustainable and productive working environment that is world class. Mac Brothers offers the 3D animated renderings for presentation purposes, which enables the client to “view” their completed kitchen even before the first brick is laid. Mac Brothers has a Project Management Division that is actively involved in overseeing every kitchen fit-out process, including consultation with other specialists for plumbing, electrical, ventilation and gas services.

For further details contact Mac Brothers on: Tel: 021 505 4128 or visit www.macbrothers.co.za


0860 111 MAC

0860 111 MAC

www.macbrothers.co.za

www.macbrothers.co.za

www.macbrothers.co.za

NOTHING STRIKES LIKE A COBRA

WHAT MAKES BERTHA UNIQUE?

0860 111 MAC

WHY MACBROTHERS GRILLS?

Craftsmanship – 100% British design. Manufactured under license in Cape Town, South Africa.

Silently hidden, waiting and watching for even the slightest fire threat, the NEW COBRA™ Commercial Kitchen Fire Suppression System from Amerex is ready to strike in seconds. Contemporary stainless steel design throughout the system complements sleek kitchen appliances. 60” nozzle heights don’t interfere with cooking, and the system easily adapts to kitchen and appliance recognfiguration. Plus, COBRA™ is the first commercial kitchen fire suppression system with fully electronic detection, actuation, and pressure monitoring–the NEW STRIKE™ Electronic Control System.

Craftsmanship – Fabricated and handcrafted in South Africa from the best hard wearing materials Versatility – available in a variety of formats to suite your requirements.

The unique ‘tall’ design results in a space efficient unit with excellent ergonomics.

Fuels – charcoal or wood. Creativity – The addition of flavour to food through the cooking process

Versatility – elongated ‘cooking chamber provides a range of cooking temperatures.

No electricity or gas required.

Fuels – charcoal or wood.

Competitive on price. Contact us directly for pricing information.

Easy to clean. Aesthetically appealing. Retro-fitted into any kitchen.

Creativity – BERTHA gives chefs room to experiment. Retro-fitted into any kitchen. Easy to clean.

CAPE TOWN (HEAD OFFICE) 32 Benbow Ave, Epping 1, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa Tel: +27 21 505 4100 Fax: +27 021 534 0319

CAPE TOWN (HEAD OFFICE) 32 Benbow Ave, Epping 1, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa Tel: +27 21 505 4100 Fax: +27 021 534 0319

CAPE TOWN (HEAD OFFICE) 32 Benbow Ave, Epping 1, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa Tel: +27 21 505 4100 Fax: +27 021 534 0319

JOHANNESBURG 138 Terrace Road, Sebenza Edenvale, Johannesburg, 1609, South Africa. Tel: +27 11 456 9000 Fax: +27 11 456 9006

JOHANNESBURG 138 Terrace Road, Sebenza Edenvale, Johannesburg, 1609, South Africa. Tel: +27 11 456 9000 Fax: +27 11 456 9006

JOHANNESBURG 138 Terrace Road, Sebenza Edenvale, Johannesburg, 1609, South Africa. Tel: +27 11 456 9000 Fax: +27 11 456 9006

DURBAN Unit 2, Heron Park, 80 Corobrick Road, Riverhouse Valley, Redhill, Durban, 4051 Tel: +27 31 569 5216

DURBAN Unit 2, Heron Park, 80 Corobrick Road, Riverhouse Valley, Redhill, Durban, 4051 Tel: +27 31 569 5216

DURBAN Unit 2, Heron Park, 80 Corobrick Road, Riverhouse Valley, Redhill, Durban, 4051 Tel: +27 31 569 5216

AMAREX_Advert_March2018.indd 1

Betha_Advert_March2018.indd 1 3/22/18 11:43 AM

CHARCOAL_Advert_March2018.indd 1 3/22/18 11:43 AM

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3/22/18 11:43 AM


REGIONAL SPOLIGHT

NOUGAT CHEESECAKE COURTESY OF GEMELLI CUCINA BAR

GHAZAL © CHRISTOPH HOFFMAN

SANDTON’S

AMBROSIAL EATS Johannesburg’s upmarket suburb caters to the discerning palate, with a host of gourmet dishes to tempt the senses.

T

he suburb of Sandton is synonymous with style and glamour – from its upmarket shopping centres to the world-class convention centre. This is where much of Johannesburg’s business takes place, with many of South Africa’s most powerful businesspeople, politicians and influencers shaking hands and making deals. And what better way to pair business and pleasure than over a luxurious lunch or sumptuous dinner, at one of the many eateries who’ve found homes here? The service and hospitality industries in this part of Johannesburg are renowned for catering to discerning tastes, so it’s no surprise that Sandton’s eateries have refined palates in mind. Whether you’re in search of a finedining experience, ethnic cuisine, an old-fashioned steakhouse or a vibey bistro, Sandton gives you plenty of options to choose from.

FINE DINING

The majority of Sandton’s fine-dining

32

experiences are housed in the area’s lavish hotels. While these have plenty of their own merits, the excellent cuisine definitely enhances the experience.

Qunu Restaurant

Qunu offers guests a culinary adventure by combining finedining traditions with a truly African spirit. Expect bold flavours and thrilling combinations – like braised pork neck and abalone, and Wagyu steak with smoked bone marrow. Qunu has a complete menu for vegans and vegetarians, and can accommodate a range of dietary needs and requirements on demand. The comprehensive wine list allows patrons to access a range of vintage wines by the glass. Qunu is truly an unparalleled experience, so sit back under the fig tree canopy above you, and enjoy! Location: The Saxon, 36 Saxon Road More Info: www.saxon.co.za/ restaurants-bars/qunu

Maximillien

This established restaurant, situated in the gorgeous DaVinci Hotel, is famed for its Wagyu beef – the Wagyu Oxtail is unforgettable – and extensive wine list. Despite the emphasis on high-quality meat in the menu, vegetarians are also catered to: with dishes like Thai red curry and grilled black mushrooms on offer. Finish your meal off with a chocolate fondant and a coffee – or perhaps with a cigar in Maximillien’s dedicated lounge. Location: DaVinci Hotel, Nelson Mandela Square More Info: www.maximillien.co.za

Athol Place Restaurant

Nestled in one of Johannesburg’s most-lauded boutique hotels, Athol Place Restaurant offers its patrons a seasonal menu that spotlights fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. This ensures that every trip to this bespoke establishment offers a unique experience. There is a wide wine selection, and Athol Place


REGIONAL SPOLIGHT

CAJUN CONFIT QUAIL - MAXIMILLIEN, DAVINCI HOTEL

also prides itself on the number of locally-brewed craft beers on offer. Whether you come for breakfast, lunch or dinner – you are bound to leave satiated. Location: Athol Place Hotel & Villa, 90 Pretoria Avenue More Info: www.morukuru.com/ places/atholplacerestaurant

Piccolo Mondo

From their all-day menu – which includes grills, fresh seafood and curry dishes – to the multi-course pairing menu, Piccolo Mondo caters to all tastes. The beef fillet and sea bass are particular highlights of the entrée offerings. The wine pairings are carefully selected, but the wine list gives a number of additional options for those who prefer to order a bottle. Don’t leave without ordering Piccolo Mondo’s famous crème brûlée – a showstopper that arrives on a bed of dry ice. Location: The Michelangelo Hotel, Nelson Mandela Square More Info: www.legacyhotels.co.za/ en/hotels/michelangelohotel/facilities

CASUAL DINING

If you – like many of the movers and shakers in Sandton – don’t have time for fine dining, you might enjoy a more casual meal in the suburb.

The Grillhouse

The Grillhouse is famous for its steaks and ribs, but there are seafood and vegetarian options too for those

who can’t stomach the grills. It’s best to come hungry because The Grillhouse offers steaks of up to 1KG for their dramatic T-Bone! The décor embraces a New York grillhouse aesthetic, but the menu offers South African flair, with boerewors, pap and chakalaka available as side dishes. Additionally, they are family friendly – so bring the whole crew along.

COURTESY OF CAFE DE SOL

A FEW MORE OPTIONS TO EXPLORE Café Del Sol Botanico: Wholesome, Italian food – just like ‘mama’ used to make it – served in an exquisite, gardeninspired setting. Web: www.cafedelsol.co.za Tashas: The Sandton branch of the beloved franchise is always busy and

Location: 11 Alice Lane Sandton, cnr 5th Street More Info: www.thegrillhouse. co.za/grillhouse-sandton

Gemelli Cucina Bar

If an authentic, family-friendly Italian spot is what you’re after, then you’ve found it. The founder grew up in Rome, and has combined that experience with innovative, contemporary cooking techniques. The result is a fabulous experience for the whole family. The pastas are perfectly done, and come with stunning sauces that are bound to suit every taste. And the desserts – many of which are Italian classics – are simply divine. Location: Posthouse Link Centre, Cnr Main Rd & Posthouse Str More Info: www.gemellirestaurant.co.za

Wangthai

Wangthai, on Nelson Mandela Square, offers patrons delicious and wildly authentic Thai cuisine. This is a vegetarian’s culinary haven, with a range of possibilities including curries, noodles and stir fries. But

never disappoints. Web: www.tashascafe.com/locations/ johannesburg/nelson-mandela-square Wombles: An established steakhouse, housed in a beautiful colonial home. Web: www.wombles.co.za The Butcher Shop & Grill: The on-site butchery provides the freshest meat cuts at this beloved Sandton grillhouse. Web: www.thebutchershop.co.za Ghazal: The menu offers a range of North Indian cuisine, with a particular emphasis on hearty curries. Web: www.ghazal.co.za

meat and seafood eaters will also be satisfied with the wide range of classic Thai dishes on offer. The desserts are well-worth exploring – the kluay taud (deepfried banana served with honey and ice cream) is a guaranteed hit! Location: Shop 120, Nelson Mandela Square More Info: www.thaiafrica.co.za/wangthai

33


OPINION

A DAY IN

MY ”BIRKIES“

Whether you work in German, sole-cushioning Birkenstocks or safety shoes with steel toes; walk along hotel corridors or greet guests at the buffet; work on a line or look out over the open kitchen pass to the rolling Winelands of the Cape, we all have feelings – yes, even you! Jodi-Ann Pearton sums up the full gamut of emotions in a chef’s day.

T •

34

he driving force for chefs to work at optimum creativity and efficiency, day in and day out, include: Devotion: The reason we run. The reason we sweat and the reason we work more than we play, eat less than we cook and allow time to escape us as we prepare, serve and feed people we do not know. Passion: Does a passion fruit have more passion than you or one of your colleagues? Has your burner died? Or your creativity slipped through the extractor? Passion comes and goes like service. To be inspired and to persevere through these “passion fruit” moments is key. True passion is to continue. There is a head chef I have worked with who is in the kitchen every single service unconditionally. If she is not there, there is no service. She has devoted her life to the pursuit of perfection and it may look easy to the outside world, seizing a top spot on the Top 10 list and being recognised by the world in a male-dominated industry, but it is hard and tough! Love: Excitement. Yum. Delicious. The “Oh wow!” moments. When you cook your first piece of meat to the correct temperature, execute the most perfect soufflé or plate the most exquisite piece of art. Hunger: To be recognised, to

be the best and to work with the best. Also, a hunger for a decent staff meal this afternoon. So far, we seem to have outlined the feelings that represent a good relationship between partners. However, once you are in this industry you will find that the extreme, intense and dominating emotions we may experience in just one (16-hour) work day are boundless. Dark clouds, thunder and lighting hover over us as we wait, in the calm before the storm that is a fully booked service-after-service in season. Chefs have one life partner and that is the kitchen; a temperamental, skilled, and ever-changing beast. Together with the highlights, there are the challenges: • Confusion: The dockets are rolling in. Who’s calling the orders? Table 7 has what allergy? One sirloin medium. Two sirloins medium-rare. Starters out on Table 2. Can somebody refire the mains for Table 4? Flash the sides. Where is my sauce? Garnish. Quick, quick, quick! • Anger: Who made the ravioli? Why is there a bone in the filling? Garnish has run out, who went to forage this morning? “%*$#@ *&^% *&^%$!”, the head chef shouts profanities. • Frustration: ○ Fear: Who placed this order?

• • •

Reason: Why would you do this to us? ○ Oblivious: Common sense is not common to everyone. ○ No: Unfortunately, you need to make a plan and the kitchen will not complete this ridiculous order. Said no chef. Ever. ○ Truth: Thank you for talking to Table 4 about the delay. Disappointment: Sometimes it is what it is. Silence: Recover; retreat. Courage: “Last few dockets to go, let’s end strong!” shouts the head chef. Anticipation: “Yes Chef!” yells the entire team, including the scullers, in unison; a sort of deep, growl-like war cry we were forced to practice in school. Confidence: “Let’s combine the orders for Table 3 and Table 1? Can we go together? Garnish, you ready? Sauce? Grill, how long?” Relief: It’s up to pastry now.

Outside at around about 11pm, once all the prep is packed and labelled, the sections wiped down and the pass lights are switched off. A moment is shared between colleagues, a team of people who have become a family over a staff drink (in this case a glass of wine in the Winelands) and all is well for the next six hours, until tomorrow morning: Fatigue.


LEGACY GROUP

WINE PAIRING WITH

STANLEY GRANGER

Head Sommelier at the Legacy Group indulges SA Chef mag with a wine-pairing challenge.

THE SA CHEF WINE-PAIRING CHALLENGE: Katie Reynolds-Da Silva, editor of SA Chef magazine, must correctly identify the recommended wines to accompany Maximilien’s signature dishes.

Dish 1: Cajun Confit Quail with black jasmine rice, wild tomato, lightly pickled berry and nasturtium leaf. Editor’s guess: This dish makes me think of a crisp, chilled Sauvignon Blanc, which might complement the berry flavours. Stanley’s feedback: 100% correct in the berry flavours. I would highly recommend De Toren Fusion V 2015 which is a classic Bordeaux blend. It’s got an attractive nose of red and black fruit, oak spiced but light on the Tannins. It is ultra-fine with moderate/medium acidity. Dish 2: Pan-fried Buttermilk Squid Tentacles with chilli and garlic pasta, preserved lemon and truffle oil. Editor’s guess: A nice unwooded Chardonnay perhaps? The undertones could align nicely to the buttermilk. Or perhaps a Chenin Blanc? Stanley’s feedback: I would definitely throw something in the mix here like a Southern Right Sauvignon Blanc, which could add a delectable flavour. It is well balanced on the nose and exotic with flavours of melon and apple, which on the palate is rich and creamy with tangy acidity with a nice savoury finish. However

a Haute Cabriere Chardonnay Pinot Noir would go down well – a delicious blend of Chardonnay and Pinot with its red berry fruits which adds structure and balance, with an abundance of peach and litchi flavours presenting themselves. Dish 3: 200G Aged Wagyu Beef Fillet with vanilla potato macaroon, parmesan pearls and barley risotto. Editor’s guess: When I think Wagyu beef, I think of a smooth and rich red wine, like a Cabernet Sauvignon from one of the Cape’s finest wine farms. Stanley’s feedback: I definitely agree with you - Anthony Rupert Optima 2015. On the palate it is filled with succulent black cherry and blueberry flavours, making it complex and rich, but without being too aggressive. A beautiful blend of Cab Sav, Merlot, and Cab Franc aged in French oak barrels. Dish 4: Braised Lamb Neck with root vegetable textures and herbed polenta. Editor’s guess: Lamb always feels quite heavy to me, so I would like to pair it with something flavoursome but quite light, such as a Pinot Noir. Stanley’s feedback: Lamb is a winter dish and always reminds me of cold winter days; a Pinot Noir would go down very well. I would

200G AGED WAGYU BEEF FILLET

suggest a Rust en Vrede Pinot Noir. It has tobacco and herbal details that are well balanced with the rice and elegant spicy liquorice. Dish 5: Butter Chicken Curry with tomato sambals, roti and Indian pickles. Editor’s guess: I almost never drink when I eat Butter Chicken! I adore the flavours so much I never stop to think about what I should be drinking. This dish has me stumped. Stanley’s feedback: (laughs) So, this is one of our most famous Signature dishes that you simply can’t get enough of. You just want more. I recommend the Rupert & Rothschild Baroness Nadine Chardonnay with phenomenal nutty flavours and a citrus blossom aroma. It has creamy and bitter flavours, rounding it up with a lingering lemon zest finish. It is definitely worth trying when you order this curry. www.legacyhotels.co.za

35


FEATURE

PORK-READY FOR

ITS CLOSE-UP

Pork is a versatile, healthy, often misunderstood meat. Experts explain how to make it the star of the menu. Susan Reynard reports.

P

ork is a versatile meat but often misunderstood. Marieta Human and her colleagues from the South African Pork Producers Organisation or SAPPO have been working closely with chefs, retailers and formal producers across the country to help showcase the versatility of pork. As the mouthpiece of commercial pork producers in South Africa, SAPPO serves local pork producers by participating and cooperating within the organised agricultural fraternity; liaising with various sectoral organisations, role players within the supply chain of the meat

industry, the government and international interest groups on behalf of pork producers; and facilitating, representing and supporting all South Africa’s pig farmers in their quest for profitability and sustainability. The organisation spends millions of rands helping informal pig farmers to raise their standards through training and join the formal market to gain access to larger markets. Marieta says chef training in the use of pork is an important part of SAPPO’s work. It all starts with buying quality pork. “You can’t expect a high-quality end dish if you buy just on price,” she says. Important to know when it comes to handling pork is hygiene, as well as how to

make pork crackling, ensure meat isn’t dry, browning, extract flavour, make gravy and present beautifully. “Pork is the one meat you can be the most creative with, but is often misunderstood,” she maintains. The increase in popularity of Asianstyle cuisine worldwide has lead to growth in the consumption of pork. In South Africa some 2.8 million pigs farmed in the formal sector are slaughtered each year. However, South Africa lags behind its international counterparts in terms of consumption, as some 44% of the population do not eat pork for religious or cultural reasons. This is changing all the time thanks to SAPPO’s ongoing

© KAROLINA SZCZUR VIA UNSPLASH

36


FEATURE

SAPPO SERVES LOCAL PORK PRODUCERS

FLAVOURS The producers of Angostura believe

BY PARTICIPATING AND COOPERATING

its Aromatic and Orange bitters

WITHIN THE ORGANISED AGRICULTURAL

cocktail recipes. When added to

FRATERNITY; LIAISING WITH VARIOUS SECTORAL

the flavour of other ingredients

ORGANISATIONS, ROLE PLAYERS WITHIN THE

in dishes. The company produced

SUPPLY CHAIN OF THE MEAT INDUSTRY

add interest to dishes as well as food, Angostura often intensifies and may help counteract acidity a cookbook in 1960 called “The Secret of Good Taste” and a collection of these recipes may be found at www.angosturabitters. com/food-recipes/.

education, training, marketing and creating of awareness surrounding the benefits of pork. Marieta notes that chefs keen to make their name in industry often have distinctive pork dishes on the menus. SAPPO is one of the sponsors of the Distell Inter Hotel Challenge, launched in 2013. It presents the candidate chef with the best pork dish with the Purple Ribbon Award, a bursary award worth around R15 000. Many young chefs in top hotels have wowed the judges with their pork recipes and inspire fellow chefs to get creative with this most versatile meat.

Caroline McCann of Braeside Meat Market says, “I am impressed by the pork industry. A lot of these guys have come together and instead of seeing each other as competitors, they see each other as collaborators in industry. They have a 360 Quality Assurance programme to improve their bio-sustainability record. The cohesive voice of pig farmers encourages newcomers, which helps to grow the pork industry.” She says free-range pigs remain the domain of small-scale farmers, many of whom are doing a good job, rather than large-scale operations as pigs are prone to illness.

Two that take pork to the next level are: •

Bitter honey ham glaze – A glaze made using honey, lemon juice and Angostura bitters.

Pulled pork sliders – A mixture of chilli powder, salt and Angostura bitters is rubbed onto the meat before it is browned on the stove top, and the sliders topped with a sauce consisting of Angostura bitters, tomato sauce, dark brown sugar, cider vinegar, chilli powder and garlic.

© MAX DELSID VIA UNSPLASH

© MAX DELSID VIA UNSPLASH

37


FEATURE

IMAGE COURTESY OF PORK 360 © MARTIN ZIMELKA

PORK 360 UNPACKED

responsibility by offering a wide range

The South African Pork and Quality

of quality assured products that are

Assurance and Traceability Standards

produced according to standards

– Pork 360 – aims to provide high-

ranging from good agricultural

quality pork and pork products to the

practices and good manufacturing

marketplace. Pork 360 also gives the

practices to HACCP, traceability,

assurance that its pig farms and abattoirs

organically produced, welfare and

are certified against comprehensive standards relating to food safety, environment, welfare and bio-security.

environmentally friendly. 5. SAPPO: In conjunction with key players in the pig industry (including producers, abattoirs, processors,

Key tenets of the programme:

retailers and pig veterinarians),

1. Health: The health status of the

the South African Pork Producers

South African pig industry is of vital

Organisation (SAPPO) has taken

importance to the survival of the

biosecurity and consumerism into

industry and its role players at large.

consideration and developed quality

For this reason, the pig industry has

assurance and traceability standards

realised the importance of strict

for the South African pig industry. The

biosecurity on farms as a fundamental

quality assurance scheme for the pork

departure point towards a respectable health status in their industry. 2. Biosecurity: SAPPO and pig

industry is known as Pork 360. 6. Accreditation: Pork 360 has been internationally accredited through

veterinarians have put much effort

ISC certification. No producer can

into an educational drive to ensure

implement and/or participate in the

that all piggeries comply with a

system without compliance to at least

number of minimum biosecurity

the following:

measures. However, the message

Employ or have an accredited

is clear: producers not adhering to

veterinary consultant who

minimum biosecurity will in future

regularly visits, advises and

probably not be compensated if an

evaluates the farm and production processes.

exotic disease were to occur on their farms, requiring them to cull their

3. Consumers: Modern consumers

as specified in the Pork 360 standards.

want products that are affordable and acceptable, of high quality,

Have developed in-house Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

herd.

Comply with the Pork 360

healthy, welfare friendly, emotionally

standards, verified by an

acceptable, convenient and safe.

independent auditing process.

4. Retailers: Retailers are embracing consumerism and corporate social

38

(Source: www.pork360.co.za)

LOIN STEAKS, COURTESY OF SAPPO

White skinned pigs are the ones people usually think of, but these get sunburnt quickly if left outside. Caroline says there are a few indigenous breed pigs in South Africa but they have little land on which to thrive. These indigenous breeds are small framed and get fat very quickly. Warthogs and bush pigs do well because of the environment in which they live. Looking at what chefs are asking for at Braeside Meat Market, Caroline says, “Finally, we seem to be getting over everyone using pork belly – it used to be a cut you couldn’t give away!” She says chefs creating some of the best pork dishes tend to work in fine-dining establishments. In addition to the full range of pork cuts, French-trimmed rack and Swiss-style chops are popular and everyday eateries are working wonders with less expensive pork shoulder or neck cuts, slow cooked to produce the best flavour.


FEATURE

PIGS IN PASTURE Chef and charcutier, Neil Jewell, of Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant on Môreson Farm in Franschhoek, gives Glen Oakes Farm in the Overberg, run by Charlie Crowthe, a rave review for their pig farming process. Their website explains what makes their pork so special, “Glen Oakes pigs are young female pigs (gilts) that are crossbreeds of the Large White and Landrace pig, crossbred with Duroc boar. The pigs live out a natural, healthy life, grazing on pastures and feasting on grubs, acorns and roots. The process is a lot slower than mass produced pigs, taking around two years compared with around 12 weeks, and produces meat with an intense flavour profile that changes depending on what the pigs have eaten. Interestingly, pigs reared in this way have seasonal differences in

PORK LEG, COURTESY OF SAPPO

how they taste.”


SPOTLIGHT

THE SKILLERY © HOSTEX

YOUR GATEWAY TO

THE AFRICAN MARKET

Food & Hospitality Africa 2018 – Powered by Hostex

I

n today’s foodservice, retail and wholesale space, Food & Hospitality Africa is a gateway to the African market. With a footfall of over 6 600 visitors over three days in 2017 – more than 80% of whom make or influence decisions – innovation is at the top of the shopping list.

WHY ATTEND?

• Engage with new tools and technologies from around the globe • Discover hot trends through new products being launched at the show • Immerse yourself in live demos and competitions daily • Network with key industry players from every segment of the industry • Connect to sellers • Compare industry insights • Knowledge and learning • Entertainment/infotainment • Innovation • Uncover up-and-coming industry talent • Global brand engagement

40

VISITOR ATTRACTIONS

• SA Cake Decorators Guild Theatre: where the exquisite art of cake decorating will again be demonstrated along with a master cake decorators’ display. • HOST-ED: where trends-driven and free-to-attend seminars run throughout the show. • New Products Display: a showcase of products being launched to industry at the show. • The Skillery: where some of SA’s up-and-coming talent show off their abilities at a skills demonstration station designed to inspire chefs from all sectors. • Barista Champs: where SCASA will present the Gauteng regional finals of the SA Barista Championships, the Cup Tasters Event, and the popular Latte Art Championships. • Contract Furnishing Africa: Indoor and outdoor furniture, décor and lighting, and everything in between. • Drinks Cabinet: producers, brewers, distillers and brand owners engage with thousands of industry decision-makers.

• Tea & Coffee Africa: an aromatic platform for producers and distributors of hot beverages and home to the SCASA Barista Championships.

EXCITING NEWS

At an Exhibitor Briefing on 13 February 2018, it was announced that Hostex powering Food & Hospitality Africa and IFEA – the largest pan-African food and drink trade show – has been endorsed by the South African Tourism Board. For the first time, South African Tourism – the tourism marketing arm of the South African government – and the Tourism Grading Council have officially given their stamp of approval to Hostex. By doing so, the governing bodies have endorsed the tradeshow as a gateway to the African market, and a key precipitant of development within in the hospitality industry. Make sure yours is one of the hundreds of brands visitors connect with at Food & Hospitality Africa 2018 taking place at Gallagher Convention Centre from 6 to 8 May 2018.


MAC BROTHERS

COOKING SUITES “Coming together is the beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is mutual success.” To start at the beginning, we will answer one key question.

WHY IS A COOKING SUITE RELEVANT?

• Customised modular unit either bolted together or welded together in one solid piece, • Design becomes flexible with the freedom of choice. • Allowing one to create a showpiece that is visually appealing. • Complements your menu functionality. • Durable (with a 3mm thick stainless-steel top). • Easy to clean and hygienic thanks to the solid welding option. • Certified and SABS approved At Mac Brothers, innovative products designed by professionals come together for all types of catering needs. We will maximize efficiency in a minimum amount of space with cooking suites. Our very own Mac Brothers cooking suites are manufactured locally which is cost effective, with lead times of 6 to 7 weeks from placement of order to time of delivery. A local cooking suite is cost effective in general because it can be made to suit your budget as well as optimize the work flow of your establishment. In essence we have the freedom of any cooking top with any base with almost no parameters within the range. Ranges include: grills, fryers, ovens, gas hobs, induction units as well as refrigeration and storage

42

IMAGES COURTESY OF © JODI-ANN PEARTON

options with work surfaces, which are put together by the collective knowledge, skill and experience of the Mac Brothers team, who will continue to support the cooking suites with our after-sale service on all units. 1. Personalize your storage the way you want it to be for pots, pans, and equipment. 2. Put in the number of hobs you need, a grill or deep fryer according to what you will be preparing and the items on your menu. 3. Use induction tops if you do not want gas or prefer the ease and speed. 4. Organise the cooking suite according to the sections of your kitchen brigade. 5. Plan your equipment in a way

that suits your business’ needs and budget simultaneously. (Take note that if a cooking suite has been bolted together, one may adjust, move and change the set-up of the modular units according to one’s current and future needs.) Cooking suites are reliable products that are affordable — the best way to begin a journey in the Food Service industry — but they are also aesthetically pleasing and add to the visual appeal of any establishment. Your Mac Brothers cooking suite is something you can show off and be truly proud of.


MAC BROTHERS

TRENDS OF

CHARCOAL COOKERY Close your eyes and imagine: a primal combination of glowing coals, the hiss of sizzling juices and the aroma of hot meat.

H

umans have been cooking with charcoal for thousands of years. The age of coal is upon us once more. Call it a braai, barbeque or Big Green Egg the desired outcome is the same: smoke, char and intense heat. Mac Brothers equipment has taken centre stage; centre stage being our open kitchens and charcoal grills which we fabricate to your requirements. We have paved the way for chefs, restauranteurs and designers to showcase beautifully designed functional equipment in a way that highlights the focal point of restaurants to the kitchen and the eye-catching equipment within. We have an aesthetically beautiful and functional range of charcoal grills available to suit the needs of every chef and establishment.

WHY CHARCOAL IS TRENDING:

• Higher energy content per mass. • Can be easily transported. • Requires little or no preparation before use. • Burns hotter than other fuels which allows products to colour better and produces a more satisfactory char while remaining succulent within! • Hotspots are easily identified and can be easily adjusted and concentrated according to the requirements of the menu. • Natural flavour, free from chemicals, allows subtle amounts

• • • • •

of smoke to develop layers of flavour within all products. Easy to light and set up. Charcoal cooks through infrared heat. Draws out and highlights flavour profiles. The ease of cleaning and maintenance. The character of charcoal adds to the quality of ordinary meat.

When considering a charcoal cookery, keep in mind that different fuels and heat sources affect flavor, texture and aroma, as well as the affordable running costs, space efficiency, and the fact that a charcoal grill can form part of your kitchen’s personality.

which has inspired the likes of various new charcoal units. • The Bertha, a Mac Brothers favourite due to her smoking personality and good looks. The star of our show kitchen. • A Hearth, wonderful for making flatbreads, pizza and slow cooked meats. As the curtain closes, and our show comes to an end give the charcoal grill a quick brush, empty the ash into your compost heap (Remember recycling is cheap) and take a bow knowing that your meat has been served charred to perfection while remaining succulent on the inside.

TYPES OF CHARCOAL GRILLS THAT ARE TRENDING: • A kettle Braai • Japanese Charcoal Barbeque

43


SPOTLIGHT

MILITARY CHEFS SHINE Ever wondered how the military feeds its legions of members across the Army, Navy, and Medical Health Services? Susan Reynard and Elsu Gericke unpack the career paths of chefs across the South African National Defence Force.

T

he South African National Defence Force (SANDF) has among its members a chefs brigade that does the military proud. Despite the specialised units in which they work, these chefs face many similar highlights and challenges of their counterparts in civvy street. We go behind the scenes. Civilians join the SANDF by applying for Military Skills Development System (MSDS). The MSDS is a two-year voluntary service system which aims to help young people gain skills which may assist in future employment. Young recruits are required to sign up for a period of two years, during which they will receive military training, further functional training and skills training. The recruit can choose in which service they want to be placed, namely SA Army, SA Air Force (SAAF), SA Navy (SAN) or SA Medical Health Services (SAMHS). Military professional training begins with Basic Military Training. During the first year, members are recruited by the corps directorates in the Defence Force. They receive functional training, such as Hospitality Services, and after two years they may be offered a contract in the Core Service System (CSS), if there are vacancies. CSS members may be promoted if a higher rank post is vacant and they are course qualified.

MILITARY KITCHENS

There is no difference between a military kitchen run by the South

44

African National Defence Force (SANDF) and any civilian kitchen that caters for a group of people. Specifications and equipment requirements are again dependent on the number of troops to be fed and equipment used is commercial, available from local catering suppliers. In addition to the base kitchens, field kitchens are utilised when deployed in an area where a base kitchen is not available or in the immediate vicinity. These kitchens are portable and can be transported and setup on any terrain. There are currently two types: a 75-man cooker with a four-plate gas burner and a 250man mobile stove which consists of an oven, three gas burners, flat top griller and hot water tank. It also includes a small work surface. Pots are custom-made for the unit. The SANDF is in the process of acquiring new field kitchens and its associated equipment.

COMPETITIONS

The SANDF has participated in various cooking competitions and has done exceptionally well. It also hosts the internal Chef of the Year (COTY) competitions between the four services, run on a four-year cycle. Each service conducts a COTY competition annually for the first three years to determine the best service chef and during the fourth year of the cycle, the SANDF competition is held to determine the best chef overall, which each service fielding three competitors. This year is the fourth in the current cycle, and an overall SANDF COTY will be held. The aim of the competition is to acknowledge the excellence of SANDF chefs; motivate chefs to continuously strive for higher standards; emphasise the important role that the chefs fulfil in the SANDF; and


SPOTLIGHT

showcase the skills, creativity and initiative of SANDF chefs. SANDF chefs are encouraged to participate in other external competitions (national and global) to showcase their ability against their civilian counterparts.

CASE STUDY: GREG FORBES

Training Manager: Warrant Officer, SA Navy Catering School, Maritime Warfare Training Centre, Queen Street, Simons Town Greg applied to join the SA Navy in 1977. He underwent an aptitude test and medical examination and began six months basic training at SAS SALDAHNA in 1978. Skills required included discipline, use of military hand guns, physical training, parade work and precision drilling. Hospitality Services was his functional course of choice and he was allocated a base or unit (kitchen) and accommodation. His first year of chef’s training included a basic firefighting course and as a member of a ships’ company he was required to complete a ships’ knowledge acquaintance book which allowed him sea and danger allowances. After a year he was promoted to Able Seaman and two years later to Leading Seaman. He completed the Second Chef Course (12 weeks) and continued as a shift worker at his unit. “As a member of a ships company it became extremely difficult to be replaced and I decided to commence

with a life ashore. I then was promoted to a Petty Officer who will become a manager and head a team of chefs to conduct duties as chefs at a shore establishment. On completion of three years I requested to conduct the next functional course, Chefs Part 3. During this time, I was identified to become the Chief In Charge at Admiralty House, which is the official residence of the Chief of The Navy. After spending 20 years in the fleet as a sailor, I was posted at the Admiral House as the Chief Chef and since I have never looked back as a chef,” he explains. After his third chef’s course, Greg was promoted to Chief Petty Office at Admiralty House. His outlook as a chef changed and he undertook three external short courses with chefs David Higgs and Wynand du Plessis and implemented what he was taught at Admiral House. When Greg joined the navy as a youngster he didn’t imagine a life in kitchens. He enjoyed the adventure and sailed on many ships and saw many interesting ports.

THREE SQUARES A DAY

The compliment of people on board a vessel in a ship’s company varies from 50 to 120. Shore establishments may vary between 30 and 1 500. Officers’ establishments, like Admiralty House, cater for 36 people in fine-dining and 30 to 160 junior and senior officers. All the rations are procured to

a prescribed set weight and it is important to create balanced meals, Greg notes. Tasty meals are standardised throughout any military establishment and a basic 14-day meal plan is prescribed. Changes may be made to create choice menus as well as meals for members who do not eat meat. “If your ship’s company is well fed and happy then you have a well-oiled vessel with very few problems and can carry out any tasks given to them,” he adds. Greg enjoys the challenge of producing tasty meals with very basic ingredients. He has achieved the highest accolades as a Navy chef and was elected to participate in the IKA Culinary Olympics in Germany in 2004, receiving silver medals in two categories. He is inspired every day to pass on his experience and knowledge to young Navy chefs. Challenges of working in this unique environment include procurement of daily rations, speciality catering and staff shortages. “Fortunately, Hospitality Services has changed to accredited training, and with national credits it is much easier to be employed in the corporate world than former years, when everyone who left the Navy struggled to find employment due to the fact that we were not recognised in the outside world,” notes Greg. “With the training provided today, it’s much more advisable to complete all the accredited courses offered to you as you get paid to be trained. Also, you can complete a diploma certificate in the working environment which is not offered in the corporate world. On completion of the diploma you are most welcome to choose a career in either the oil rigs or passenger liners, and the hotel trade will qualify you with national credits.”

45


SWISS EDUCATION GROUP

SWISS EDUCATION GROUP As a Swiss Alliance of Hospitality Management Schools, the Swiss Education Group offers five schools in both French and German speaking parts of Switzerland, with a student body made up of 111 nationalities and 6 500 students.

E

ach school benefits from a unique location and educational experience, with a tailored hospitality education in business, culinary, tourism, and/or interior design! Amassing over 30 years of experience in hotel management and culinary arts education, Swiss Education Group’s core educational values are based on the excellence of the Swiss hospitality tradition, with a considerable focus on the practical aspects of hotel management. • César Ritz Colleges Switzerland: Hospitality, Tourism & Entrepreneurship • Culinary Arts Academy Switzerland: Entrepreneurship, Culinary Pastry & Chocolate Arts • Hotel Institute Monteux: Hospitality & Business Management • IHTTI School of Hotel & Design Management: Hospitality & Interior Design • Swiss Hotel Management School: Hospitality, Events, Resort & Spa • Swiss Education Academy: Summer Short Course in Hospitality, Culinary or a Language (French and/or German) Bachelor degree, Postgraduate diploma and Master programmes are available at all of our hotel management schools and culinary school in a variety of subjects and specializations. All programmes offers students the opportunity to complete valuable work experience

46

through internship placements in Switzerland and worldwide.

NURTURING STRONG INDUSTRY RELATIONSHIPS

Swiss Education Group has developed long-standing relationships with the world’s leading hospitality players, including hotel groups, independent properties, catering and events companies, the banking industry, as well as airlines and cruise lines from around the world. Namely: • Hilton • Hyatt • Marriott • Disney World • The Ritz Carlton By spotting a need to unite students and recruiters under one roof, the Swiss Education Group launched the International Recruitment Forum in 2009. This takes place twice a year (March & October) in Montreux, Switzerland. It is available exclusively to all Swiss Education

Group schools’ students looking for jobs and internship opportunities. You will have the chance to network, interview, participate in round tables and workshops, benefit from the wise words of our keynote speaker and much, much more! Did you know that 1 in 11 jobs worldwide is now related to the hospitality industry? Our evergrowing industry accounts for 9% of worldwide GDP and 6% of the world’s exports. Choosing hospitality equals a dynamic, fast-moving career anywhere in the world!

CONTACT A SOUTH AFRICAN AMBASSADOR TODAY! Email: info@swisseducationsa.com Tel: +27 71 826 0226 / +27 11 870 4260 Web: www.swisseducation.com/en/


KOKORO

IT’S ’ TIME FOR A CUPPA AND A PICK ME UPPER! KOREAN PREMIUM TEAS

South Korea is famous for many quality products for a multitude of different reasons. The country takes pride in ensuring that all the food and beverage products it produces are made with the highest-quality ingredients and the lowest quantity of sugar. This is not just because they prefer it that way, it’s because the government has made it law in order to ensure that its citizens are consuming healthier food items due to the high stress and cancer rate in the country. One of the many great products to come out of this magnificent country is its teas. South Korean teas are some of the best in the world, not only can you have your traditional cup of tea with a traditional tea bag, you also get teas in jam form which are highly nutritious and delicious as well. These teas come in a variety of flavours, however there are

48

three types of jam teas that stand out from the rest due to their flavour and benefits:

Plum Jam Tea

This team has a rich exotic plum flavour which is absolutely delicious yet subtle on the palate as well.

Citron Jam Tea

This team is made with bits of Citron fruit (including the peel itself) and is rich in Vitamin C. Citron fruit is very much a citrus fruit similar to an orange or nectarine however is richer in flavour.

Ginger Jam Tea

This tea is made with whole bits of ginger and is fantastic for coughs and colds. One cup of this tea will make one feel better due to the natural medicinal properties that you get from a typical ginger root. It has a sharp yet delicious flavour that will open up your sinuses.

EASE OF USE These teas are so easy to make, just one heaped teaspoon of your favourite tea mixed in a cup or mug of boiling water, then stir and you are good to go – it is that easy and that delicious! These teas are available at the following Korean Food Stands at:

• BELAIR SUPERSPAR • HORBART SUPERSPAR • BROADACRES SUPERSPAR And also: • Kokoro Rivonia – Rivonia Junction Centre

C

• Kokoro Fourways – Leaping Frog Shopping

M

Centre • Kokoro Pretoria – Brooklyn Centre (751 Jan Shoba Street)

Y

CM

MY

Give our delicious teas a try and give your life the delicious warmth it deserves! It is served with hot or cold water even with soda water and also can be used as salad dressing! Tel (Head Office): +27 11 608 3050

CY

CMY

K


NEWS

HSC NOW A NATIONAL BRAND The LSC group are proud to announce the merger of its two hospitality staffing brands, HSC and Foundation.

H

SC, the hospitality solutions company, has grown exponentially over the past five years and is now the leading brand for hospitality staffing in South Africa” says Phillip Meyer, CEO of LSC Group “The HSC brand is synonymous with service excellence and innovation, now is the time to have one national identity” continues Meyer. HSC is the largest supplier of full-service staffing solutions to hospitality industry in South Three the streams Chef's Ad - July 2017 copy.pdf

1

Africa and are famous for the quality of their people. “Our commitment to continual training and development make each HSC team member stand out” says Chantel Bellora, National Director of Hospitality HSC. “Our team members are the core of our business and we look forward to continued development of teams nationally” adds Bellora. “The merger with Foundation Cape Town and the opening of our new operations 2017/08/02 11:16 AMin Durban,

means that HSC is now a truly national South African company.” HSC started serving the industry in 2004 with a small team and now employs over 4 000 people of all skill levels. HSC are known for the effectiveness of their Chefs, Waiters, Bar Staff, Supervisors, Butlers and Rock Stars! Helping their partners achieve their business goals, saving costs and raising standards. HSC has offices in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban

Three Streams Smokehouse (Pty) Ltd

Leading processing facility and supplier of salmon, trout and a variety of premium seafood products to the food service industry in South Africa. We pride ourselves on the quality and innovation of our products. We trace our fish from egg to plate as you should know the journey your food has travelled.

Tel (+27) 21 551 1448 | christelle@threestreams.co.za | www.threestreams.co.za |

Three-Streams Smokehouse


FUTURE FOODS SERVICES

FOOD PRODUCTS

HOW DO REACH YOUR TABLE?

Welcome to Future Food Services, a respected national sales and marketing agent in the food service industry. Linking the manufacturer or importer with the food service distributor, and creating brand and product awareness in the hospitality market.

CLIENT TESTIMONIALS Future foods has been part of Primolito’s

Future Food Services has helped us grow

for many years, they have take many of

our business in the food services industry

Future Foods has been part of the

our brands ie: TASCA, to the market and

in leaps and bounds since we teamed

success story of Lakeland Food

created a market for us to pack various

up with them. They are professional,

Company, growing its footprint into the

private label products for the industry.

committed and have a terrific hands-on

foodservice market. Their reputation

Roberto Vasconcelos – Primolito’s

approach which is so desirable for the way

within this fickle market is impressive,

we want to build our brands and products.

which has helped us become a

Basil Moutafis – Baxtons

significant player in a very competitive market. Genie and her team have a very

Future Food Services has contributed tremendously to our Food Services

good understanding of how the

division. Not only did they open new

Teaming up with the FFS team has

foodservice industry works, with

doors to a whole new customer base,

been one of the best decisions Empire

long-standing relationships with all the

they played an integral part in the

could have made. With their knowledge,

major players in this industry. Frans

increase of double figures in this

experience and expertise of the food

Bekker – Lakeland Food Company

department. Their dedication and

services industry, they have grown

professionalism is nowhere else to

the Nuts and Dried Fruit category

be found in the industry. What they

exponentially, placing us right at the

promise, they deliver. They are handling

forefront. They are not just a service

Joekels Tea Packers recently approached

all our sales, orders and general

provider, they’ve become part of the

Genie from Future Food Services to assist

enquiries from the food services trade.

family. Gerhard van der Westhuizen –

with driving our Catering Food Service

To put it simple, they are an integral

Empire State Trading

tea brands. We are confident that with her

part of our business, which we will

drive and expertise she will contribute to

not be able to go without. Thank you

growing our tea brands nationally. Tracy

for your dedication and efforts! Pieter

Barter – Joekels Tea Packers

Schoeman – SOILL

Contact Génie if you would like to learn more about Future Food Services: Cell: 082 456 6084 Tel: 071 432 8785 Email: genie@futurefoods.co.za Website: www.futurefoods.co.za

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OPINION

IF YOU CAN’T STAND THE EGO,

GET OUT OF THE KITCHEN There’s nothing wrong with an ego. We all own one. They vary in size from small and humble to big and exalted. They can be massaged, manipulated, difficult to control and often shattered. Egos are delicate, and there’s no ego more fragile than that of a Chef. – by Stephen Hickmore

A

ttend a gathering of Chefs from around the world and one can witness more gongs than the Lord Mayor of London, more medals that Usain Bolt, Colonel Gadhafi and Idi Amin put together. A procession of preening peacocks weighed down by awards and accolades. I guess the shinier the piece of metal the more important one is? In my humble opinion, this is proof that the need for recognition and status marches in pace with a passing parade of massaged yet fragile egos. Chefs are cooking, not saving lives! Is the simple feeling of putting great food on a plate that people love not enough? Overinflated self-importance in the culinary world is almost an expected character trait. On one level, we love the selfconfidence, the drama and the temper tantrums. As a bystander, this is entertainment. But, if one is trying to manage a business and good public relations as well as retain a great team of staff, a Chef’s ego can be a recipe for disaster. I admit, I am not immune to a lust for recognition, I love a good pat on the back like any grandiose narcissist. But, as a long-suffering, yet resilient, recruiter I do occasionally award myself a Purple Heart for services to embattled Chefs who have become the victims

52

of their own warped sense of self. Over my career I have heard many stories from Chefs who have damaged their careers due to their inability to control that little ego devil. Like the time when a Chef walked out because the manager did not understand that a burger on the menu was beneath his artistic brilliance, even though there was demand from customers. True story.

I LOVE A GOOD PAT ON THE BACK LIKE ANY GRANDIOSE NARCISSIST. BUT, AS A LONG-SUFFERING, YET RESILIENT, RECRUITER I DO OCCASIONALLY AWARD MYSELF A PURPLE HEART FOR SERVICES TO EMBATTLED CHEFS WHO HAVE BECOME THE VICTIMS OF THEIR OWN WARPED SENSE OF SELF.


OPINION

TOO FEW GOOD EGO TRAITS WILL REVEAL A CHEF WITH A LOW OPINION OF SELF AND A LACK OF CONFIDENCE.

Or when a prominent Chef had his contract ended because he would not cook a steak that was on the room service menu for a hotel resident eating in the restaurant. Or when a temper flares too often, with trainees are bouncing off walls in the kitchen and with no junior manager safe from the rampaging ramifications of a chefs shattered sense of self. “If you can’t stand the heat, let go of the

© FABRIZIO MAGONI VIA UNSPLASH

ego” Or at least control it. Owners of businesses and senior managers hold Chefs to the same high values as all other employees these days. Selfcontrol is important. A Chef does not have any special concessions. So, if one steps too far over the line the unemployment line is a short walk away. A white jacket is not an immunity cloak. Self-esteem is a good ego trait; self-confidence, individuality, character and personality are equally good. It’s the extremes to watch out for either side of the spectrum. Too few good ego traits will reveal a chef with a low opinion of self and a lack of confidence and a poor self-image. The opposite spectrum is a highly charged egomaniac who thinks the world revolves around him. I don’t like chefs to be normal though, I think they must be slightly mad with a large dollop of personality and with a need for recognition that keeps them sweating in the kitchen until the last person leaves spouting rave reviews. I would want a Chef who cares enough to lose their temper occasionally, and passionate enough to constantly look at new trends. Self-promoting enough to get people through the doors. Bonkers is often the bed mate of creativity so I reckon that’s OK as long as there is a strong base of calm, efficiency, business acumen, listening ability and genuine team work. I would not want an accountant personality type cooking for me as much as I would not want a Chef personality type doing my tax return. So, Chef, I would rather you were a little loco thanks. But loads of gongs, medals and a wall of framed certificates. A bit narcissistic don’t you think? Or am I jealous?

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RECIPE

GINGER FRUIT CAKE

ON E UN IT: W EIGH T OF g 10 0g -1 50 PR EP TI M E: ES UT IN 30 M TI M E: CO OK IN G 1 HO UR

Recipe by Jodi-Ann Pearton.

METHOD:

2. Allow this to reduce and thicken. Be sure to not burn it.

FOR THE GINGER FRUIT CAKE: 1. Preheat the oven to 160°C.

FOR THE TONKA MOUSSE:

2. Grease a baking tray.

1. Beat cream cheese and 1/4 cup

3. Cream the butter and the sugar together until pale. 4. Add in the eggs one at a time.

1/4 cup sugar and Tonka bean

6. Sift in the self raising flour and the

extract in large bowl with

7. Add in the salt, spices and the dried fruit and combine it well. 8. Pour in the hot water to get the desired consistency. 9. Transfer the mixture to a greased

INGREDIENTS:

baking tray. 10. Bake till a skewer comes out clean.

GINGER FRUIT CAKE: 125g Sugar

FOR THE MACERATED BERRIES:

125g Butter

1. Add the berries and the sugar in a pot

3 Eggs

250g Molasses

750g Self raising flour

7g Baking powder

60g Maraschino cherries

80g Sultanas

80g Dried apricots

10g Cinnamon

15g Ginger

5g Salt

250ml Hot water

MACERATED BERRIES: 350g Mixed berries, frozen

50g Sugar

TONKA MOUSSE: •

120g Cream cheese, softened

½ cup Sugar, divided

1 ½ cups Heavy cream

1 Tbsp Tonka bean extract

54

electric mixer on medium speed until stiff peaks form. Add 1/2 of the whipped cream mixture to cream cheese mixture and fold until well blended, gently stir in remaining whipped cream mixture. 3. Refrigerate until needed.

smooth and creamy. 2. Beat heavy cream, remaining

5. Pour in the molasses. baking powder.

JODI-ANN PEARTON

of the sugar in large bowl until

on low heat.

Note: When berries are in season fresh berries can be used.


SPOTLIGHT

ABSORB FLAVOURS AND INFO AT

ANNUAL WINE FESTIVAL The Juliet Cullinan Standard Bank Wine Festival, now in its 28th year, is coming up in June. Susan Reynard asks founder Juliet how the festival and food and wine pairing have changed during the past three decades.

J

uliet Cullinan’s eponymous wine festival is now in its 28th year, under the sponsorship of Standard Bank for the past 18 years. A lot has changed in the world of wine since the first festival, and much has stayed the same – quality, a sense of story and passion for South Africa’s world-class wine industry. Juliet continues to handpick wineries that represent the Cape’s finest vintages. The winemakers are the biggest draw cards; they are on hand to discuss the nuances of their wines and share knowledge of terroir and tastes with oenophiles, sommeliers, cellar masters and amateur enthusiasts. Around 50 winemakers from boutique and award-winning brands are showcased each year, ensuring an intimate and upmarket event. Based abroad, Juliet travels to South Africa regularly to visit the winelands and chat to winemakers, sommeliers and creative cellar masters. We caught up with her at The Peech Boutique Hotel in Johannesburg. She shares her thoughts on the evolving wine industry: “I started the wine festival to provide a platform for the winemakers in the Cape to showcase their excellent wines in Johannesburg. At that time, winemakers seldom left their farms

56

of South African wines that makes them so appealing. They pair better with food and you don’t have to search for the intensity of fruit. In international blind tastings, South African wines often win awards as they have a depth of flavour yet are refined and elegant.

JULIET CULLINAN AT THE PEECH HOTEL

and when we asked them to wear a suit, they wore the one from their Matric dance! I gave them the opportunity to meet a great market in Johannesburg that was always a bit more knowledgeable than other areas. At that time, people I knew bought imported wine as they were inexpensive and quality South African wineries were just beginning to prove themselves. “When I taste wines internationally, I like the subtlety of French wines but there is something about the richness and complexity

“Wine and people must always be seen together. Our biggest wine markets can influence how and why we create certain wines, as can major influencers in industry. • The Napa Valley winemaker Robert Mondavi, known as the ‘father of American wine’, aimed at creating a Californian world-class wine to rival those from Europe. He built the first new winery after prohibition, begun perfecting techniques in the vineyards and cellar, and specialising in food and wine pairing. • Robert Parker was the most influential American wine critic. His love of big, full oaked wines encouraged Bordeaux producers to change their winemaking techniques to the fuller upfront flavours and the world followed suit. His 100-point rating dictated tastes and escalated international prices. • The British wine critic, journalist and wine writer Jancis Robinson conveys love, admiration and


SPOTLIGHT

wisdom in her assessments for the Financial Times, her website www.JancisRobinson. com and freelance press, which is probably why she was elected as advisor to the cellars of Queen Elizabeth II. In 1980, John Platter launched the first detailed guide to the cellars in South Africa and continues to be the most concise source, detailing wines from over 900 producers. UK based wine personality Tim Atkin has released his 6th South Africa Special Report on leading wineries and writes glowingly on the quality and potential of Cape Wines. Cuisine of the 1980s was influenced by French chefs with the late, great Paul Bocuse leading the field with creamy sauces and butter. In those days the food wasn’t as finely tuned, fresh and chiselled as it is today. Australian fusion cuisine in the 1980s and 1990s was influenced by Asian countries and cultures with Tetsuya and Neil Perry becoming the first iconic chefs. In Los Angeles, inspired by Italian, French and Mexican cooking, Wolfgang Puck and Roy Yamaguchi launched Californian fusion cuisine. This created an interest in matching wines with spicy food.

“Winemakers in South Africa in the 1970s, like Jan Boland Coetzee, Jan du Preez, Ross Gower and Gerhard ‘Hempies’ du Toit, went to Germany to learn to make wine and were influenced by a country where there wasn’t enough sun so sugar was added to boost higher alcohol levels (a process called chaptalisation). While they learned to make steely, flinty German wines, many returned to South Africa to make the classic big, full, rustic red wine of the time. Nowadays,

Cape reds are fruit-driven and softer in intensity of flavour. “People have to be educated through food and wine pairings, sommeliers, festivals and their own explorations. Peter Finlayson started making wine for Tim Hamilton Russell in an elegant, refined, French-style with a South African terroir. The wines had clean flavours and the intensity and weight of fruit was good, with subtle weight of oak integrated into the flavour. I really believe he was leading the market in many ways and yet at the time, people didn’t understand. His son Peter-Allen makes the wine Crystallum, which has intense fruit underpinned by elegant oak in a New World wine. “These young winemakers, many of whom had parents who exhibited at the first Juliet Cullinan Wine festival, are not making different wines to their fathers so much as a different style altogether. What this new generation is doing with their wines is completely different and you can appreciate both categories of superb wines. They are replanting, choosing different places to plant (terroir) like Hermanus and Swartland, and generally looking at wine in a different way. The late Tim Hamilton Russell planted Pinot Noir to great objections in the market. The current wine flavours show the global influence of different grapes, blends and flavour profiles we haven’t experienced before. These wines are riper and cleaner, sometimes a little bit toasty and they’re elegant with finesse. “Boutique wines and winemakers today have stories and personalities to share. People are more confident to experiment and trust their palates. In earlier days, big brands brought surety from big, bulk producers to satisfy the masses. A whole host of the new winemakers, mainly from the Swartland, are bringing

something new to the market and they are like new artists. They don’t mind whether you like their art or not, they’re doing it for themselves. They’re playing with the flavours and seeing how they develop, and what happens when you do different things with the wine – it’s new and exciting. “Chefs are also in this space. They’re creating dishes for the artistry, not for competition in the marketplace. Like the winemakers, they’re having fun, playing with new flavours and colours. They are developing alongside each other; in the case of winemakers they are artists rather than farmers. What is far more challenging about being a winemaker is wine is a living thing; it continues to change and they will only discover if their experiments have paid off five years later, whereas chefs get to see the reaction of diners immediately. “The festival is a controlled environment, all about tasting, experimenting and asking questions, absorbing flavours and information. I see people coming in and meeting the winemakers, the brands come alive, people talk with animated gestures as they make new discoveries and learn something new. I absolutely love it! I’m always looking for new producers and excited to see the latest vintages from returning winemakers.”

FACT FILE Date: 5 and 6 June 2018 Time: 17h00 to 21h00 Venue: Park House Events, 7th Floor, Hyde Park Shopping Centre, Johannesburg Cost: R220 per person (over 18s only) Book: www.webtickets.co.za Info: www.julietcullinan.co.za Handles: #jcsbwinefest #JulietCullinanStandardBankWine Festival2018

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NEWS

CHEF PROPRIETOR, SCOT KIRTON (RIGHT) AND HEAD CHEF JAMES GAAG (LEFT)

ALL IMAGES © CLAIRE GUNN PHOTOGRAPHY

EXCITING CHANGES

AHEAD FOR LA COLOMBE

La Colombe Chef Proprietor, Scot Kirton is pleased to announce the appointment of current Head Chef, James Gaag, as Executive Chef.

J

ames has headed up the La Colombe kitchen for the past four years, and at the young age of 29, has proved himself to be one of the leading innovative chefs in South Africa. He has lead the committed team in the kitchen faultlessly, and we are delighted to appoint him in this prestigious role,” says Scot. Scot will be acutely involved along every step of the way, as La Colombe has some exciting renovation plans on the immediate horizon. He will be working daily with the chefs

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from La Colombe, Foxcroft and La Petite Colombe, and remain hands-on in the kitchens, to ensure the standards that the world-class La Colombe Group is renowned for. La Colombe will be closing for six weeks for a major revamp on the 28th May. There is much anticipation, as long-standing ex-La Colombe Sous Chef, Jess van Dyk, will be returning to La Colombe as Head Chef, with Keegan Brathewaite stepping in as the Sous Chef. James Gaag comments, “It is fantastic to finally realise my

dream of running La Colombe. Taking over the reins is something I have aspired to for the past eight years. I’m extremely excited for this new and exciting chapter, and the challenges which lie ahead.” When it comes to food, James believes that a balance of flavour comes first. Food needs to be immediately delicious and inviting, not overthought, overworked or overcomplicated. Flavour is paramount and key in making great food, and also running a great kitchen. www.lacolombe.co.za


© HOLLY STRATAN VIA UNSPLASH

© EPICURRENCE VIA UNSPLASH

OPPORTUNITIES

OPPORTUNITIES Your next business opportunity or dream job could be right here…

CULINARY JOB OPENINGS ON ROYAL CARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL CRUISES

Since its inception in 1968, Royal Caribbean International has developed a reputation for outstanding service and an incredible array of fine-dining options. Its onboard crew of over 10 000 dedicated Food and Beverage team members upholds this reputation with the legendary Gold Anchor Service, all while delivering the ‘wow’ factor to over 100 000 guests every day! Also known for its innovation, Royal Caribbean International has brought cruise ship dining into the 21st century, with concepts ranging from steakhouses and Italian bistros to five-star restaurants. Guests can now delight in a plethora of options that have never before been seen onboard any cruise ships. Bars with 360-degree views and ones that elevate several decks are just some of the unique beverage concepts that have garnered Royal Caribbean’s Food and Beverage

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team several top industry awards. If you are passionate about working in the hospitality industry and enjoy providing guests with outstanding service and a memorable vacation experience, please inquire about how to begin an exciting Royal Caribbean Food and Beverage career.

• Teppanyaki Chef • Chef de Partie - Pastry • Specialty Restaurant Chef de Cuisine • Chef Pastry & Bakery • Chef Tournant • Pantry Cook Assistant • Chef de Cuisine • Pastry Chef

Culinary Job Openings:

For more information or to apply, visit www.royalcareersatsea.com.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Baker Butcher Pastry Cook Sushi Cook Buffet Cook Chef de Partie Chef de Partie - Baker Chef de Partie - Butchery Chef de Partie - Pantry Chef de Partie - Sushi Commis Cook Food and Beverage Administrator Pantry Cook Executive Chef Executive Sous Chef Junior Sous Chef Sous Chef Galley Steward

EXECUTIVE CHEF – US$ PACKAGE

A 5-star hotel, part of an international group, is looking for an Executive Chef to join their team. The hotel has multiple food and beverage outlets, and needs a Chef with international experience, particularly in other countries in Africa. There are promotional prospects within the group, and the package offered is in the region of US$4 000 nett, plus accommodation. Apply through www.hospitality. co.za or send your CV to hickmore@hospitality.co.za.


OPPORTUNITIES

F&B MANAGER – US$ PACKAGE

A coastal 5-star hotel, part of large international group is searching for a Food and Beverage Manager. Multiple food and beverage units need a professional who is able to produce high-quality products, and who is strong on controls and costings. They should also have experience working in other countries in Africa. The package offered is US$3 000 nett, plus accommodation. Apply through www.hospitality. co.za or send your CV to hickmore@hospitality.co.za.

BANQUETING MANAGER

One of the most beautiful venues in Johannesburg is in search of a Banqueting Manager. The successful candidate will cater to top level functions, weddings, and conferences in a lovely setting. They will work alongside a very professional team. Applicants should be experienced in this position, and should have the ability to pay close attention to detail, as well as bring an energetic atmosphere to the role. They will ultimately maintain and improve the service. The salary is R25 000 per month, and the position would suit an assistant on their way up. Apply through www.hospitality. co.za or send your CV to hickmore@hospitality.co.za.

RESTAURANT MANAGERS, SANDTON

Two terrific venues, both beautiful rooftop settings, are in search of Restaurant Managers. Both have great views and a great vibe, and need modern managers with vision, who has both team-building and customer-service skills. The salary is R25 000 per month. Apply through www.hospitality. co.za or send your CV to hickmore@hospitality.co.za.

5-STAR SOUS CHEFS

It’s the season for Sous Chefs! 5-Star outlets are in search of 3 Sous Chefs to fill positions in their venues, two of which are hotels, and one a modern function space. The company also has a position available for a Sous Chef in a buffet restaurant. The salary is R18 000 per month. Apply through www.hospitality. co.za or send your CV to hickmore@hospitality.co.za.

HEAD CHEF FOR TRENDY RESTAURANT GROUP

A luxury hotel and restaurant group is looking for a Head Chef for one of their properties. Their role is to ensure the smooth running and management of the kitchen, to ensure food costs are kept in line, to do menu planning and development, to ensure staff are well-trained and performing to standard, and to maintain kitchen hygiene. The salary is between R20 000 and R30 000 depending on experience. This fulltime job is located in the Western Cape on the Atlantic Seaboard.

Minimum Requirements:

• 5 years previous restaurant Head Chef experience in a busy establishment • Cooking qualification • Highly creative • Ability to lead and train a team • Ability to work well in a high pressure environment • Stable track record with contactable references • Own reliable transport Please apply with your CV, a recent photograph and your salary expectation on www.hoteljobs.co.za.

SOUS CHEF UAE

Sous chefs are needed for large UAEbased group food division (Dubai or Abu Dhabi). Candidates must have a strong kitchen operational background, management skills,

food-costing controls and menuplanning abilities. They must also be creative and be able to come up with healthy recipes. They should be a team leader, able to motivate junior staff and manage them accordingly. Their job is also to ensure the kitchen meets health and safety requirements, must be well spoken, well presented and passionate about the industry. This is a great opportunity to work in the booming economy of the UAE, with many opportunities for growth and development within the group. Accommodation, flights and a visa will be provided.

Skill

The successful candidate must have working knowledge of continental foods, knowledge of Arabic ethnic foods, some bakery knowledge, as well as catering and restaurant operations.

Personality

The successful candidate must have an eye for detail and be particular on food standards, be healthconscious, ideally a non-smoker and be hands-on in kitchen.

Experience

3 to 4 years’ experience as a sous chef, with a 4 or 5-star property background

Basic requirements

Must have a valid South African or European passport

Salary

6 000-8 000 AED (roughly R18 00024 000 depending on exchange rate) To apply, email a copy of your CV in Microsoft Word format along with a profile photograph and a copy of your passport to william@chefsrecruit.co.za. If you have not received a response within 72 hours, please consider your application unsuccessful.

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EVENTS TO DIARISE

NOVEMBER MAY TOPS WINE SHOW DURBAN 3–5 Durban, South Africa AGROFOOD ETHIOPIA 3–5 Addis Ababa

INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND HOTEL EXPO 10 – 12 Makassar, Indonesia ETHIOPIA AGRO FOOD EXPO 10 – 14 Addis Ababa

JUNE INTERNATIONAL GREAT BEER EXPO 2 Philadelphia, USA

AFRICAN FORUM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE 10 – 15 Cotonou, Benin

INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR OF ORGANIC PRODUCTS AND AGROECOLOGY 5–9 São Paulo, Brazil

FOOD AND HOSPITALITY AFRICA 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa

INTERNATIONAL IMPORT AND EXPORT FOOD AND BEVERAGE EXHIBITION 14 – 16 Shaghai, China

TOPS WINE SHOW JOHANNESBURG 7–9 Sandton, South Africa

HOSTEX 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa

VITAFOODS EUROPE 15 – 17 Geneva, Switzerland

IFEA 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa

INTERNATIONAL FOOD INGREDIENTS / ADDITIVES EXHIBTION AND CONFERENCE 16 – 18 Koyo, Japan

VIETNAM INTERNATIONAL CAFÉ SHOW 3–5 Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam

TEA AND COFFEE AFRICA 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa THE DRINKS CABINET 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa FOOD NIGERIA EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCES 9 – 11 Lagos, Nigeria SEOUL INTERNATIONAL SEAFOOD SHOW 9 – 11 Seoul, South Korea BAKERY CHINA 9 – 12 Shanghai, China INTERWINE BEIJING 10 – 12 Beijing, China

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WORLD EXPO OF BEER 18 – 19 Frankenmuth, USA INTERNATIONAL CAKE SHOW AUSTRALIA 18 – 20 Brisbane, Australia INTERNATIONAL FOOD EXHIBITION PHILIPPINES 25 – 17 Pasay, Philippines THAIFEX WORLD OF FOOD ASIA 29 – 2 June Pak Kret, Thailand

TEA WORLD FESTIVAL 7 – 10 Seoul, South Korea FIRE & FEAST MEAT FESTIVAL 8 – 10 Johannesburg, South Africa INTERNATIONAL DAIRY-DELIBAKERY ASSOCIATION SHOW 10 – 12 New Orleans AVI AFRICA 12 – 14 Johannesburg, South Africa


EVENTS TO DIARISE

MANILA FOOD AND BEVERAGE EXPO 14 – 18 Manila, Philippines DRINKS INDUSTRY SHOW 18 – 19 Sydney, Australia AFRICA’S BIG 7 24 – 26 Johannesburg, South Africa MALAYSIA INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND BEVERAGE TRADE FAIR 27 – 29 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia CHINA INTERNATIONAL FOOD EXHIBITION 28 – 30 Guangzhou, China KNYSNA OYSTER FESTIVAL 29 – 8 July Knysna, South Africa

JULY CHINA INTERNATIONAL CAFE SHOW 5–7 Beijing, China MANUFACTURERS AND DISTRIBUTORS EXHIBITION IN BOTSWANA 5–7 Gaborone, Botswana HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL BAKERY EXPO 6–8 Hong Kong

INTERNATIONAL RICE AND GRAIN TECH EXPO 13 – 15 Colombo, Sri Lanka IFT FOOD EXPO 15 – 18 Chicago, USA DIGITAL FOOD AND BEVERAGE 16 – 17 Chicago, USA ENOLOGY AND VITICULTURE CONFERENCE AND TRADE SHOW 16 – 17 Penticton, Canada

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL BEERFEST 6–8 Seattle, USA

MALAYSIA INTERNATIONAL PACKAGING AND LABELLING FOOD PROCESSING AND BAKERY EQUIPMENT EXHIBITION 19 – 22 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

TAICHUNG INTERNATIONAL WINE EXHIBITION 6–9 Taichung, Taiwan

INTERNATIONAL SNACK SHOW 20 – 22 Taipei, Taiwan

NIGERIA AGROFOOD, FOOD AND AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGIES EXHIBITIONS 10 – 12 Lagos, Nigeria WORLDCHEFS CONGRESS AND EXPO 11 – 14 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

SAITEX 24 – 25 Johannesburg, South Africa INTERNATIONAL BULK WINE AND SPIRITS SHOW 25 – 26 San Francisco, USA THE WINE SHOW 26 – 28 Port Elizabeth, South Africa FOOD AND TECHNOLOGY EXPO 27 – 29 New Delhi, India

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© WWW.UNSPLASH.COM, PHOTOGRAPHER: PAVEN TRIKUTAM

SUSTAINABLE FOODS EUROPE 14 – 15 Amsterdam, Netherlands


THE LAST WORD

CALL YOURSELF

A CHEF?

Some days are really great, you just cruise through them and all seems right in the world but they have a nasty habit of ending in a tailspin – last Thursday was one of those days!

BRIAN MCCUNE

I

t was a reasonably productive day, the coffee tasted good and it promised to end in convivial company with some good food and wine and then the tailspin moment. I had been chatting to a fellow chef and happened to casually mention “Le Repertoire de la Cuisine” as you do. “The what?” he enquired with a totally blank look on his face. I explained that I have a little red book which is one of my constant sources of reference when there is any dispute over the traditional preparation method of a dish or what exactly the Cyrano garnish is for pork chops. This chef’s bible, Le Repertoire de la Cuisine by Louis Saulnier and Edouard Brunet is dedicated to Auguste Escoffier as the Master of Modern Cookery with their “respectful admiration” and contains over 7 000 recipe descriptions. The Repertoire is an invaluable tool for any professional chef although most

64

culinary voyeurs of modern cookery books would discard it out of hand because recipes are only listed in chef’s shorthand with no quantities or preparation notes given, and, horror of horrors there is not a single photograph! There are however over 150 different variations of cooking potatoes alone, the Lucullus garnish for quails prepared with foie gras, truffles, champagne and Madiera and various preparations and garnishes for brains, ears, feet, liver and hearts. Inside on the flyleaf of my copy, just under the handwritten (in pencil) 30 shilling price tag (it just goes to show how long I have had the book as there is no way of representing the shilling symbol on this computer) is a sketch of a heart with an arrow drawn through it, inscribed with the words... Billy Wilson loves Anne. I can’t recall exactly how I came across this little mine of information but flicking through it over the years I’ve racked my brain many times about who Billy Wilson might be and whether his love for Anne was reciprocated. Was she also a chef, perhaps working in the pastry section toiling over a magnificent Charlotte Russe or an Omelette Norvegienne, or was Anne a waitress working a summer season in some grand hotel and this was merely a frivolous holiday romance they enjoyed whilst working split shifts. However amorous escapades aside, there is no doubt that Billy Wilson took his craft very seriously, certainly seriously enough to spend what might well have been an

entire week’s wages to secure his personal copy of this magnificent reference work. And I think therein lies the problem with many of today’s tweezers and three dots of sauce chefs. They don’t take their craft seriously enough to move beyond the quest for fame and glory, the desire for column inches in gastroporn magazines, the embarassing appearances in kindergarten-quality TV shows, or soundbites with radio hosts who don’t know their ass from their elbow pasta. I’m confident that Billy Wilson never became a one trick pony just as I am equally convinced that he could tell you that fillets of sole Bercy were poached with shallots, parsley, white wine, fish stock, reduced and monteed with butter and that if you added sliced mushrooms they would become fillets of sole Boistelle, and if it was Bonne Femme you were after then you further added slices of steamed potatoes. Too much detail? Well that’s what you have to do, you have to get beyond the headline and understand the body of the story. That attention to detail is the difference between a craftsman and someone playing at it. Who cares about all this? Well I do, Billy Wilson does and so should anyone who calls himself a chef! Brian owns the Food Biz, a Cape Town based food consultancy, and instead of working spends his time telling other people how to work. Contact him at www.thefood.biz, foodwizard@ iafrica.com, 082 492 9239


With over 30 years of experience in South Africa and a range of seasoned professionals who are specialists in providing quality food services and support solutions in catering, cleaning, hygiene and hospitality, Compass Group is a partner you can count on. Our expertise is as vast and varied as the needs of our clients – and our teams put all of their know how into catering for your requirements professionally and cost-effectively while solving problems efficiently. We’re focused on finding the best solutions, providing services of the highest standards and giving you absolute quality every single time. On every level, from quality of food to service, we set ourselves incredibly high standards – and if you have great expectations, we aim not only to meet them but also exceed them.

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Profile for Film & Event Media

SA Chef Issue 7  

SA Chef Magazine is the official voice of the South African Chefs Association (SACA). In our seventh edition, we explore the craft of charcu...

SA Chef Issue 7  

SA Chef Magazine is the official voice of the South African Chefs Association (SACA). In our seventh edition, we explore the craft of charcu...

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