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SA CH EF

MEDIA

ISSUE 06 | 2018

The Of ficial Voice of the South African Chefs Association

MOLECULAR GASTRONOMY

Deconstruction Cuisine is a Culinary Movement

PACKAGING THE PLANET Convenient Solutions that Serve Planet and People


www.fishgate.co.za_BOM_8121

N OW

PRE

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C

LEANED

The s e mu ssels we re in the o c ean J U ST A W H I L E AG O.

If it’s fresh, live, local mussels you’re after, look no further than Blue Ocean Mussels. Our farm in Saldanha Bay harvests daily from as early as 6 o’clock, and by the afternoon, live mussels are already en route to restaurants around the country. So then, maybe it’s time to freshen up your menu with some real West Coast flavour! Contact us at info@blueoceanmussels.com so we can hook you up with some of our mussels.

C L ASS I C B E LG I A N M U SS E L S SERVES: 2 | PREPARATION TIME: 10 minutes | COOKING TIME: 10-12 minutes | DIFFICULTY: Easy

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

• 50 ml olive oil • 1 onion, chopped • 1 shallot, chopped • 2 garlic cloves, crushed • salt and pepper • 10 g parsley, roughly chopped • 15 g thyme, pulled off the stalk • 15 g fennel or dill, roughly chopped • 1 kg fresh mussels, scrubbed and de-bearded, or 400 g local frozen half-shell mussels, thawed • 150 ml dry white wine • 60 ml cream • bread or skinny fries and mayonnaise, for serving

1. Heat the olive oil in a saucepan and sweat the onion and shallot over a low to medium heat for about 5 minutes. 2. Add the garlic, salt, pepper and chopped herbs. 3. Add the mussels and wine and bring slowly to the boil – steam until the mussels have opened. 4. If using half-shell mussels, cook for 4-5 minutes. 5. Add the cream and mix well. 6. Serve hot with bread or fries and mayonnaise.

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WELCOME

FROM THE KITCHEN

OF THE PRESIDENT

STEPHEN BILLINGHAM

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warm hello to my fellow chefs, colleagues and friends in industry. I trust the first quarter has seen an uptick in your business and bottom line. As mentioned in the last issue, a new President of the SA Chefs Association will be elected at the AGM to be held towards the end of the first quarter of 2018. After eight years at the helm of the Association, I look forward to offering all of my support and assistance to the incoming president and ensuring continuity and consistency in the professionalism of this fine organisation. Great excitement surrounds the generous donation from BCE Foodservice Equipment of several hundred thousand rands’ worth of

equipment to three top graduates of the Enterprise Development Programme, as well as the kitchens of the Tsogo Sun Centre for Culinary Excellence. Partnerships and sponsorships like this are an investment in entrepreneurship and the future of young chefs and their businesses. They impact beyond the individuals concerned to create employment. We are deeply grateful to BCE for their visionary leadership. The Gauteng Committee held a successful meet-and-greet cocktail function on 19 January at the Park Inn by Radisson Hotel in Sandton. Chefs networking with chefs over a cold beverage is just what we like to see – well done to all committee members for organising, the venue for hosting, and all of those who attended. Preparations are heating up for the Food & Hospitality Africa powered by Hostex exhibition from 6-8 May at Gallagher Convention Centre in Midrand, Johannesburg. The Skillery, home of the SA Chefs Association during the show, will be a hive of activity, education, demonstration, competition and food. We look forward to seeing you there – pop in and say hi, watch

the action, win a few prizes, learn about products and the latest trends, and enjoy the delicious cuisine. The SA National Culinary Team – aka Team Masakhane – under Manager Trevor Boyd had their first practice for 2018 during the weekend of 17-18 February at The Palace Hotel at Sun City. They are preparing for the 25th IKA/Culinary Olympics 2020 taking place in Stuttgart, Germany from 14-19 February 2020. Finally, it is with heavy hearts that we bid farewell to the legendary Paul Bocuse, who died on 20 January 2018 in France at age 91. This great chef left his mark on the global culinary industry with nouvelle cuisine and ran his exceptional Michelin three-star restaurant in Lyon right to the end. He was a great friend of the SA Chefs Association and many of my colleagues count him as a friend. He will continue to inspire us all with his innovation, determination and joie de vivre. In the immortal words of Monsieur Paul, “Work as if you are going to live until you're 100 and live as if you're going to die tomorrow.” Culinary regards, Stephen

SA CHEFS PATRONS

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SA CHEF MEDIA

SA CHEF MEDIA ADVERTISERS 1000 Hills Brewing Company PAGE 49 AL & CD Ashley PAGE 37 Blue Ocean Mussels (Pty) Ltd Inside Front Cover B-well Inside Back Cover, PAGE 04 Chalmar Beef PAGE 40 Château Gâteaux (Pty) Ltd LANCE GIBBONS

KATIE REYNOLDS-DA SILVA

Outside Front Cover, PAGE 17, 20-21

SA CHEF CONTACTS

Cover Image: Château Gâteaux © Demos Photography | Stylist: Lisa Clark Styling Published by: SA Chef Media, a division of Film & Event Media

Publisher Lance Gibbons lance@sachefmag.co.za Editor in Chief Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@sachefmag.co.za Designers Sheree Steenkamp, Lauren Smith, Caitlin Perrett Writers Susan Reynard, Kim Crowie, Contributors Brian McCune, Jodi-Ann Palmer, Stephen Hickmore Production Manager Aayesha Parker aayesha@filmeventmedia.co.za Traffic Manager Tamlyn Peters tamlyn@filmeventmedia.co.za

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Database Manager Ricky Ortell info@filmeventmedia.co.za Digital Manager Cheri Morris digital@filmeventmedia.co.za Business Development Manager Wendy Navarra wendy@sachefmag.co.za Business Development Manager Boitumelo Motloung boitumelo@sachefmag.co.za Business Manager Coleen Tapson coleen@sachefmag.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 21 674 0646

SA CHEFS

President Stephen Billingham General Manager Thomas Overbeck Financial Manager Jason Pitout Membership enquiries Precious Maseko Culinary Workshops enquiries Yejna Maharaj SACA Certification Elsu Gericke info@saca.co.za | www.saca.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 11 482 7250

Checkers Food Services PAGE 41, 47, Outside Back Cover Darling Sweet cc PAGE 19 DMG Exhibition Management Services (Pty) Ltd PAGE 29, 38-39 Kokoro PAGE 11 Lynca Meats PAGE 09 Mac Brothers Catering Equipment PAGE 05, 31 McDonald’s PAGE 32-33 Makro PAGE 53 Peppadew International (Pty) Ltd PAGE 13 Red Sky Brewery PAGE 49


CONTENTS

01 PRESIDENT’S LETTER 02 CREDITS AND ADVERTISERS

06 MOLECULAR GASTRONOMY

Deconstruction cuisine is a culinary movement, with many chefs drawing innovation and inspiration from it. Susan Reynard explores.

04 LOCAL CHEF WINS INTERNATIONAL AWARD 06 FOLLOWING IN FERRAN’S FOOTSTEPS 14 PACKAGING THE PLANET 22 GET YOUR CRAFT CHEESE GAME ON 26 ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME: CHANGING LIVES

14 FOOD PACKAGING

Packaging solutions that serve the planet are closer at hand and easier to adopt than you think.

27 HANS BUESCHKENS BOOSTS YOUNG CHEFS 28 FROM SANDTON WITH LOVE 30 THREE CHEERS FOR CONNIE 34 FAREWELL TO PAUL BOCUSE, THE LION OF LYON 36 RESTAURANT SHOWCASE 42 TRENDING ON FIRE

22 ARTISANAL CHEESE

Get your craft cheese game on as this trend grows in popularity and accessibility.

44 CHEF SHOWCASE: FRANK DANGEREUX 48 CRAFT BEER: CONJURING UP THE PERFECT BREW 50 ARE CHEFS STILL SEXY? 52 OIL POACHED SALMON: RECIPE 54 JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES 56 REGIONAL SHOWCASE: CAPE WEST COAST

34 FAREWELL TO THE LION OF LYON

The passing of one of the greatest chefs, Paul François Pierre Bocuse, has saddened the worldwide culinary industry.

60 NUTRITIONAL AND DIETARY EFFECTS OF FRYING OILS 62 EVENTS TO DIARISE 64 THE LAST WORD WITH BRIAN MCCUNE 03


NEWS

LOCAL CHEF WINS

INTERNATIONAL AWARD The start of 2018 proved to be a memorable one for local Chef and first-time author, Nompumelelo Mqwebu.

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so well received and recognised by such a prestigious competition and organisation. These awards have been a real highlight for me on this incredible journey of which there have already been so many highs. Probably the most important thing about being recognised by the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards is that this award will hopefully shine a spotlight on South Africa and the amazing

n early January 2018 Mqwebu received confirmation from The Gourmand World Cookbook Awards that her cookbook launched late last year in South Africa, titled Through the Eyes of an African Chef, won the national award for the South African region in the categories of First Book AND Self Published. “It is such an honour for my first-ever cookbook to have been

local products we have for local and international consumption, which are underutilised and in some instances not even known. I cannot thank enough all the individuals and companies who have supported me with this project; in particular Vanessa Wilson and her team at QuickFox Publishing who helped me get this book selfpublished,” Mqwebu enthused. www.throughtheeyesbook.com/#buy

CHEF TIAAN ON B-WELL’S ELITE FRYING OIL

“Being a Chef, there are many things that are important to me, such as putting out quality food using quality ingredients. B-well Chef is a fantastic high quality cooking oil, with an extended frying life of up to 11 days if used under the right conditions. Using this oil definitely saves lots of money in the long run. With a high smoke point, this product makes for ideal frying conditions and a great tasting end result. B-well Chef is also very high in Omega 3 which adds a great health benefit, ensuring you only give the very best to your customers.”

CHEF TIAAN LANGENEGGER; WINNER AND JUDGE OF THE KYKNET TV COOKING SHOW KOKKEDOOR 2013.

Tel: +27 (0)28 514 3441

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|

Email: info@bwellfoods.co.za

|

Web: www.bwellfoods.co.za


0860 111 MAC | www.macbrothers.co.za

LIVE COAL COOKERY Cooking over an open fire is the oldest and most primitive method of cooking known, with glowing red flames and smoky ambers mostly lending themselves to grilling and broiling. It has also become the most trendy and exciting way for chefs to prepare food in industrial kitchens due to the high heat, amazing flavour profiles and effective cooking methods produced.

WHY MAC BROTHERS GRILLS? • Fabricated and handcrafted in South Africa from the best hard wearing materials The Grill is insulated, made from heavy-gauge steel • No electricity or gas required. Simple to use and clean. • The units are versatile, they are available in a variety of formats to suite your requirements. Customised intergral branding solutions available • Choice of fuels: can be fired by good quality charcoal or hard wood. Reaching exceptionally high temperatures for exceptional results.

“FIND YOUR FIRE”

• Creativity – The addition of flavour to food through the cooking process • Excellent distribution channels throughout the whole of Africa– wherever you are, we will find you. • Aesthetically appealling – look good to cook • Easily retro-fitted into any kitchen • Competitive on price. Contact us directly for pricing information

CAPE TOWN (HEAD OFFICE)

JOHANNESBURG

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FEATURE

FOLLOWING IN

FERRAN’S FOOTSTEPS

Molecular gastronomy as a culinary movement – aka deconstruction cuisine – informs the preparation and presentation of many top chefs. Susan Reynard reports.

RESTAURANT MOSAIC © DYLAN SWART

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FEATURE

MICHELIN MAN OF MYSTERY Ferran Adrià is the chef who is most associated with the molecular gastronomy movement at his restaurant in Spain, El Bulli. His mantra is “creativity is not copying”. He took the then brave and risky decision in the mid 1990’s to move away from traditional French and

FERRAN ADRIÀ

nouvelle cuisine into what later became known as molecular gastronomy. Ingredients were subjected to all

F

erran Adrià is considered the father of molecular gastronomy. His cuisine had its heyday in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Fast forward to 2018 and many chefs have come through this era with more than a nod to Ferran’s brilliance, bravery and bold approach to recipes in their own culinary repertoire. Deconstruction cuisine, the preferred term, requires a solid basis in the basics of cooking before play can begin.

DECONSTRUCTION

Award-winning chef Richard Carstens from Tokara Restaurant outside Stellenbosch is a huge fan of Ferran. He was fascinated by the techniques and learned all he could about the cuisine as it was unfolding overseas, buying Adrià’s original cookbooks in Spanish plus a dictionary to unlock the secrets in the recipes. He explains, “I read about Ferran Adrià in the late 1990s, about savoury ice cream, blurring the lines between savoury and sweet. My restaurant manager and sommelier at La Provencal and Lynton Hall, Germain Lehodey and I worked together for about nine years. He saw the whole beginning of my journey with deconstruction cuisine. My first savoury ice cream in 1999 became a signature of mine: gorgonzola ice cream with poached pears,

manner of experimentation and

honey and walnuts. We tested and offered tasting samples to people before we served it as a dish.” Richard recalls another signature dish, “Five ways with trout”, in which the fifth element is a smoked salmon ice cream. A variation of this dish is served in his restaurant almost 20 years later, proving that Ferran’s futuristic take on cuisine remains part of the diner’s current lexicon. Gorgonzola ice cream is now made with honeycomb, walnut crumble and yoghurt. Smoked salmon ice cream has evolved into “Baked Alaska of rainbow trout”, with citrus salsa, cucumber, rainbow trout caviar and a ginger soya mirin sauce. “The first foam we made was a pinotage foam out of a cream gun served with ostrich at Lynton Hall. That’s when I started exploring and doing a degustation menu that changed every single night. Foams, airs, alginates, calcium lactates – people thought it was all chemicals but these are all plant based, so not that Frankenstein!” says Richard. He was transfixed by transforming the shape and texture of ingredients. He and his team examined the science of the process but also how to really distil the essence of an ingredient. “It’s not deconstruction and reassembling, like the philosopher Derrida discusses, but a freedom of creativity and a free flow of ideas.

scientific analysis as he sought unexpected sensations, evocative flavours and innovative textures. He pioneered foams and spherification in foods that were equal parts science and whimsy. His restaurant, which achieved three Michelin stars, closed in 2011 as he moved closer to the research and development side of this type of cuisine. The BBC reported at the time: “The restaurant was unconventional in many respects - it was shut for lunch to give staff time to develop new dishes - and reservations in the 50-seat venue were acquired mostly by lottery. Dinner consisted of a set menu comprising some 40 small dishes costing about 250 euros (£220) [at the time of closing]. It was five times named best restaurant in the world by the San Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurants produced by Restaurant magazine, based on the opinions of some 800 chefs, critics and industry experts. The accolade though was not one with which Mr Adria entirely concurred. ‘It is not the best restaurant in the world because that does not exist, but it is today the most influential place in the world in terms of cuisine, and especially when it comes to creativity.’” The BBC reporter added, “The restaurant, which specialised in molecular gastronomy, opened for only six months of the year and, despite its reputation, never turned a profit.”

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FEATURE

CHEF RICHARD CARSTENS

CHANTEL DARTNALL, RESTAURANT MOSAIC AT ORIENT BOUTIQUE HOTEL ©LISA HNATOWICZ

What Ferran Adrià wanted to create was a new language of food,” Richard notes. He recalls cauliflower couscous, seaflavoured emulsion thickened with Ultra-Tex, pickled ginger with coconut air. By the end of 2003 he served his first air: “I used to love beautifully plating a dish and then covering it with an ‘air’,” he adds. Richard’s cuisine has evolved and while he still maintains a modernist approach to dishes, he does look at how he can produce a purer flavour of an ingredient. He recommends young chefs master the art of proper emulsification, thickening, gelification and how to distil the essence of something after they have mastered classic cuisine.

BOTANICAL

ALCHEMISTS INFUSION, RESTAURANT MOSAIC © DYLAN SWART

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Chantel Dartnall, another multi award-winning chef/patron of Restaurant Mosaic at Orient Boutique Hotel outside Pretoria. Her cuisine is as beautiful as it is innovative. “I would say multisensory cooking is the term that best describes our food and menu philosophy at Mosaic, but when it comes to molecular cuisine it is important to understand that there is a continuous reinvention, not only in cuisine but also in other disciplines because mankind cannot stagnate and must have evolution,” explains Chantel. “This was the case when Ferran Adrià created el Bulli and a new way to look at food and cuisine emerged. As with all things in life, the newness is less bright and the concept of molecular gastronomy is declining across the globe. I truly can’t say that we practice molecular gastronomy at Mosaic, although my kitchen brigade is comfortable to implement and use any of the molecular philosophies.


FEATURE

WHEN IT COMES TO MOLECULAR CUISINE IT IS IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THAT THERE IS A CONTINUOUS REINVENTION, NOT ONLY IN CUISINE BUT ALSO IN OTHER DISCIPLINES BECAUSE MANKIND CANNOT STAGNATE AND MUST HAVE EVOLUTION.

I still believe that the encompassing term that we prefer in describing us and the cuisine that we represent is ‘botanical’, which embraces a respectf ul approach to nature and the fullness of what nature has to offer - even down to the beneficial properties if an individual ingredient.” Chantel says her core focus is

to represent “Nature’s natural nuances” and in every menu they create, this is always the driving force. They continuously explore new methods and techniques to bring out the purest flavours of the ingredients. She notes, “Everything new is a challenge, not only because of the newness but also because of the

uncertainty of success, but if you are attune to yourself and you are confident and centred in your beliefs, any subject becomes one with your philosophy and it all becomes easy, as if the cosmos itself provides you with a continuous stream of broadband ideas.” Although Chantel doesn’t cook in a molecular fashion, she does use spherification as a culinary process on the current menu, where sodium alginate and calcium lactate are used to shape a liquid into a beautiful sphere. This requires minimal equipment and they use a silicone mould to shape the spheres and a slotted spoon to remove these liquid droplets from the algin bath.

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FEATURE

CHEFS ARE ALLOWING THEIR TRUE CREATIVITY TO BE FEATURED ON THE PLATES AND ALSO FOCUS ON THE ESSENCE OF INGREDIENTS: IT’S ALL ABOUT INCREDIBLE, MEMORABLE, UNIQUE EXPERIENCES.

BAKED ALASKA, TOKARA RESTAURANT

TREND WATCH

Chantel shares a few key trends in cuisine from her extensive travels to watch out for: • “Botanical Bliss”: Internationally, more chefs are moving back to a more botanical approach and away from molecular techniques. Many of the chefs well-versed in botanical cuisine continue to push the boundaries of innovation. • “Personal Perfection”: A lot of chefs are really personalising their style of cooking and this is becoming more prominent in the diversity of food that is

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currently on offer on menus around the globe. Chefs are allowing their true creativity to be featured on the plates and also focus on the essence of ingredients: it’s all about incredible, memorable, unique experiences. • “Smoke and Mirrors”: Chefs are using a lot of smoking, scorching and barbecuing on open flames techniques, in some cases even at the table (smoke captured in a little cloche which is opened at the table as it infuses a sliver of tuna or carrot carpaccio);

TOOLS OF THE TRADE Some of the ingredients and equipment used to create modernist cuisine: •

Agar-agar

Gelatine

Alginate

Calcium lactate

Soy lethicin

Kappa carrageenan

Immersion stick blender

Immersion circulator (sous vide cooker)

Siphon

Liquid nitrogen

Pacojet (if you can afford one)


KOKORO

HOW ABOUT A

DUMPLING?

Now, who doesn’t like a good dumpling? Dumplings are so versatile, you can serve them as a meal, snack, appetizer or party food.

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here are many variations, depending on which filling you choose, be it vegetable, kimchi, glass noodle, shrimp, and more these little pockets of goodness are sure to keep you coming back for more. You can steam, boil, fry and pan-fry dumplings, and eat them alone or add them to soups or salads. Korean dumplings are also very different; they are not as thick as other dumplings which make the texture and flavour of these little bags of joy far more enjoyable when steaming, frying or pan-frying, due to the fact that they are not so doughy when steaming and are super crispy when frying.

There are many variations of Korean dumplings, namely: • Son Mandu – means ‘Handmade’ dumplings • Gun Mandu – means ‘Fry’ dumplings (specially shaped for frying) • Gyoza Mandu – means ‘Half Moon’ dumplings (traditional shape) Difference type of dumpling: • Hot & spicy Vermicelli fry dumplings • Vegetable fry dumpling • Vegetable dumpling • Glass noodle & vegetable dumplings • Seafood Son Mandu • Kimchi Gyoza (Korean spicy cabbage) dumplings • And many more…

On big Korean holidays like New Year’s Day, families gather together and make dumplings while catching up with each other. However, it has now been made easier to get your hands on these amazing, traditional Korean dumplings that have been handmade and frozen for your convenience. We at Kokoro are one of the main suppliers of Korean dumplings to certain retailers like Superspars as well as well known restaurants and caterers across South Africa. Our dumplings are of the highest quality and most delicious flavours, bringing the all authentic Korean experience right to your dinner table.

OUR TRADITIONAL KOREAN DUMPLINGS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING STORES: Kokoro Rivonia – G5, Rivonia Junction Shopping Centre, Cnr of Rivonia Road & Mutual Road, Rivonia Sandton Kokoro Fourways – Leaping Frog Shopping Centre, William Nicol Drive & Mulbarton Road, Fourways

FOR WHOLESALE / RESTAURANTS / CATERING COMPANY ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT US: Head Office: 011 608 3050 B24, 5th Galaxy Ave, Linbro Business Park, Sandton RSA

info@koreanpremiumfood.co.za www.koreanpremiumfood.co.za

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FEATURE

HOMAGE TO ADRIÀ Richard Carstens held a tribute dinner to el Bulli at Lynton Hall on 30 July 2011, the night El Bulli closed in Spain. He wowed guests with his radical menu: •

White sangria suspension: Citric, papaya, cucumber and caviar

Frozen mojito cloud: Szechuan soil, almond and strawberry sorbet

Olive sfericas, parmesan marshmallow, balsamic gel and olive oil rocks

Cob, sushi cloud, miso, basil seeds, wasabi and yuzu

Passata nitro foam, olive oil paste, corn, avocado, goat’s milk cheese cream and tomato textures

Soya glazed eel, calamari crème, edamame, ponzu, enoki and gari

Chicken curry

Tomato and almond

Beef and prawn, liquid centred gnocchi, shimeji, sesame and Cantonese sauce

RESTAURANT MOSAIC © DYLAN SWART

THE HARMONY, BEAUTY AND BALANCE OF JAPANESE EXACT PLATING IS SO STRIKING, MANY CHEFS CAN RELATE TO THIS STYLE. flavouring butter that has been impregnated with the aroma of burnt hay; a bed of straw smouldering and releasing smoke to flavour little quail eggs, which are set on the straw and brought to table as an amuse bouche. To a certain extent these techniques originated from the Danish and Nordic countries but South Africa has an equally strong braai culture and chefs have been working with smoking and

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grilling foods for a long time. • “Oriental elegance”: Merging Asian flavours and ingredients into European-style dishes has become quite popular, with words like yuzu, ponzu, kombu, dashi, and mirrin featuring regularly on menus. These ingredients have become like olive oil in western kitchens. Chefs are travelling more and are exposed to a large variety of exotic ingredients. In the

Black and white

Smashed snowball

Chocolate textures

Morphings

daily search to renew menus and provide new and interesting experiences, chefs are combining these Oriental or Asian flavours with local produce. • “Perfectly Zen”: Chefs are focusing on more precise and minimalistic presentations. Each dish presented on extended tasting menus evokes a sense of harmony within the diner. It was clear that chefs are spending more time on visual presentation of their dishes which is executed perfectly. The simplicity and beauty of minimalistic plating originated in Japan, and as the harmony, beauty and balance of their exact plating is so striking, many chefs can relate to this style.


PEPPADEW ®

PEPPADEW® YOUNG CHEFS

CULINARY CHALLENGE

The Peppadew® story all began in a small farming industry in the Limpopo Province of South Africa, where the small, red piquanté pepper was discovered.

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he Peppadew® story all began in a small farming industry in the Limpopo Province of South Africa, where the small, red piquanté pepper was discovered. These irresistible red piquanté peppers, loved for their gorgeous and very distinctive spicy and sweet flavour, were first commercially grown and marketed under the Peppadew® brand in the Tzaneen region of South Africa, and are now used and loved around the world. This year, Peppadew International (Pty) Ltd is excited to announce the launch of the 2018 Young Chefs Culinary Challenge: a competition that brings the unique and versatile Peppadew® products to the forefront and provides young chefs in South Africa with an opportunity to showcase their creative culinary skills and broaden their food horizons! Peppadew® is asking young chefs to think out the box, and put forward their best 3 course menu featuring Peppadew® products as a basis for being selected to

partake in the final cook-off. In order to get our young chefs inspired, two workshops were held in February, where the versatility of the Peppadew® products were demonstrated by Chef Martin Kobald, the Vice President of the World Association of Chefs Society and a proud ambassador of the Peppadew® brand. Young Chefs have since been submitting their entries and the Top 6 finalists will be selected based on the creativity and uniqueness of their menus, and from there the final cook-off will take place. This year’s grand prize is an allexpenses paid trip to the Worldchefs Congress in Kuala Lumpur in July 2018 to attend the Billy Gallagher Young Chefs Forum: a fantastic opportunity to interact with Chefs from around the world and gain international culinary exposure. Peppadew® is a proud supporter of the food service and hospitality industry in South Africa, and this competition aims to promote cookery amongst aspiring young

chefs while providing inspiration for creative culinary thinking. The Peppadew® 2018 Young Chefs Culinary Challenge is the perfect platform for young chefs in South Africa to demonstrate their full range of culinary skills, and for Peppadew® to interact with the future top chefs of South Africa, and exhibit the taste, texture, colour, quality and versatility that the Peppadew® products are known for. To find out more about Peppadew® and the competition, including access to the Terms and Conditions and Entry Form, please visit the Peppadew® website at www.peppadew. co.za or Facebook page at www. facebook.com/PeppadewSA/.

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FEATURE

DARLING SWEET © GRANT BUSHBY

PACKAGING THE PLANET Packaging solutions that serve the planet and people are closer to hand and easier to adopt than you think. A restaurateur, a retailer and a supplier share their approach with Susan Reynard.

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he #PassOnPlastic campaign is gaining momentum among consumers worldwide. It brings into focus the next evolution of recycling, which is to minimise single-use plastic packaging altogether. Dr Harriet DaviesMostert, head of conservation at the Endangered Wildlife Trust, said recently, “We’ve heard the adage ‘reduce, reuse, recycle’, but there needs to be a ‘refrain’ in front of that: don’t just reduce it, simply don’t buy it.” Packaging is essential

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in some areas and unnecessary in others. We examine the options.

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY Ocean Basket seafood restaurants encourages their restaurateurs and patrons to be “responsible ocean citizens”. This is why, according to its website: • Ocean trash ranks as one of the most serious pollution problems of our time, affecting the health of people, wildlife and economies • Food waste is the cause of world

hunger, not poor food production • Marine life is under threat • Awareness creates change Jean Sloane, marketing manager, at Ocean Basket says the company is as responsible as it can be. “We follow SASSI principles to only serve fish on the green list, we are looking at packaging and we want to create awareness, especially for the Millennial generation as well as children coming to our restaurants. We started investigating


FEATURE

CHATEAU GATEAUX’S NEW, BIODEGRADABLE PACKAGING.

biodegradable straws in early 2017. In August, we asked people to say no to straws in pilot stores. Most people were supportive, but there are people who still want straws, so we started testing various options. Paper does not work as it becomes soggy, while more permanent metal and plastic ones are not hygienic in a restaurant environment. At last we found a biodegradable option in November 2017. The biodegradable option disintegrates after four to six weeks in the ground, but still ensures a pleasant drinking experience. These products have now been sourced and will be making their way into all of our stores over the next two to three months. Our pilot was hugely successful. Once people understood why we were changing, they were very open to the new options and wanted to engage and support the project.” Jean echoes the sentiments

inherent in the company, “It starts with deep awareness, then doing all the work investigating the options and looking at the implications. There is not just one solution: one decision may create another environmental challenge. It takes patience and a concerted effort across the whole business,” Jean notes. “And don’t over-promise or use ‘green’ as a marketing gimmick – longevity is essential.” “We are in the process of building a movement within our stores to inspire all of us to prevent plastic pollution, reduce waste, improve recycling and live cleaner, healthier lives,” she adds.

REVOLUTIONARY RETAILER

Gary Jackson is the mastermind behind Jackson’s Real Food Market (RFM), with stores in Bryanston and Kyalami, Johannesburg. He has been a retailer for many years and is passionate about sustainability. “The

first decision we took was to not sell or give away plastic bags at the till. From day one we started with paper bags that are reusable and recyclable. It’s a strong bag and it can be used for up to three months if you look after it. The paper bags cost R2.50 but we only charge customers 90c, carrying a large cost of the price of the bag. We’ve also created an incentive programme: if you bring in ten of our bags for recycling we’ll give you a free cappuccino or flat white coffee. We challenge all the national brands to do this,” he says. Gary says the next phase is to convince customers to not buy three mangos in a plastic packet but rather to purchase a reusable gauze bag. The third initiative is for customers to buy loose produce and goods wherever possible, packing items into their reusable brown paper bags at the till. “We have customers that strip down all plastic packaging at the till for the store recycle,” he notes.

15


FEATURE

WATER © CALIE DIEDERICKS

JACKSON’S PAPER BAGS © CALIE DIEDERICKS

“We’re struggling with fresh produce as it goes soft in the fridge. With items like this, at this stage, plastic is still supporting a function so it’s hard to discard as it ensures a two- to three-day shelf life. We are looking at ‘living lettuce’, vertical walls and rooftop gardens, where customers can pick vegetables just for what they need in tonight’s salad,” he explains. “The challenge is to turn South African shoppers into French shoppers, who shop daily rather than trying to buy in bulk. We are seeing a trend to smaller baskets and more frequent trips to the store, which shortens the supply chain.” Gary’s suppliers are mostly small businesses and emerging producers. “We’ve taken the onus to stay at the forefront of current technology

and if we can connect our suppliers with packaging suppliers we will. Compostable packaging is expensive but the technology is improving. These are just some of our short-, medium- and longterm solutions,” he adds. Recycling facilities are available at the stores for customer convenience. Jackson’s RFM is all about consistent messaging across the store, and that includes packaging. The in-store restaurants do not offer straws as a matter of course and if customers ask for one, supply paper straws. They also don’t sell water in plastic bottles in the restaurants, offering customers filtered water in reusable bottles for free. All wet waste coming out

CUSTOMERS ARE ASKING WHAT THEY CAN DO, AND WE’RE HELPING THEM FIND WAYS TO ASSIST IN THE ECONOMY AND THE ENVIRONMENT BY REDUCING WASTE. IT’S ALL ABOUT BECOMING CONSCIOUS CONSUMERS. EVERYONE CAN DO THEIR BIT, KNOW WHERE FOOD IS COMING FROM AND INSIST SUPPLIERS BECOME MORE RESPONSIBLE.

16

of the restaurants goes back to the farmers after it has been treated with bokashi to be turned into compost. “Our main aim is to move everybody off plastic and insist that people don’t settle for plastic bags. Customers are asking what they can do, and we’re helping them find ways to assist in the economy and the environment by reducing waste. It’s all about becoming conscious consumers. Everyone can do their bit, know where food is coming from and insist suppliers become more responsible,” he urges. “We also encourage our consumers to recycle.”

CHATEAU GATEAUX EMBRACES SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING

Malcolm Lyle, Director of Château Gâteaux, feels that business owners are increasingly becoming aware of the need to preserve our environment. “Some of our customers have also been raising questions around recyclable and disposable packaging and so all these factors combined to drive us towards finding a better solution. What is important is to acknowledge that you can’t immediately find solutions to every bad facet but to identify the big impact items and make a start on those. Almost three years ago, we identified polystyrene as the most substantial and environmentally offensive material used by our business. We embarked on a project with our cardboard packaging supplier, Wave Paper, to find a suitable solution to replace polystyrene. The solution needed to adequately match or improve on the key features of polystyrene being insulation, protection and moisture imperviousness. We conducted substantial comparative tests on all iterations until we arrived at a material and box design that delivered on all features.”


OUR NEW PA C K A G I N G IS EASY ON THE EYE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

NEW

LOOK PACKAGING In the interests of caring for the environment, Château Gâteaux has commenced a programme to eliminate as many environmentally damaging packaging material elements as is possible and practical. Eliminating polystyrene was the obvious first task given the large quantities used in packaging our products.

All polystyrene has now been replaced with 100% recyclable and biodegradable materials.

Our new packaging has been designed and tested to deliver the equivalent insulation and protective properties of polystyrene.


FEATURE

SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIER

Darling Sweet has taken as much care with its packaging as the delicious products inside. Hentie van der Merwe, product developer for Darling Sweet, explains, “When Frits van Ryneveld and I started Darling Sweet we made the decision that we will never use any materials for our packaging that cannot be recycled. Also, when we started looking for suppliers of twist-grade film to wrap our toffees we came across a supplier in Cape Town that imports Biophane film, which is made from cornstarch and is fully biodegradable, so we made the decision to use only this film right from the start. We are aware of the carbon footprint of Biophane, but the alternative would be twist-grade cellophane, which is also imported and thus with an equally sizeable carbon footprint.” He says, “With regard to researching our options during packaging development, I soon became aware of the moral

dilemma that faces probably every product and packaging developer in the food industry; the choice between a laminated film (wherein two different kinds of plastic get laminated together to increase the barrier strength with regards to moisture and air) for an extended shelf-life, but which is not recyclable, or a film made from a single type of plastic, such as BOPP (Bi-Oriented Polypropylene), which makes for a shorter shelf-life, but is recyclable. We decided to go for the latter. Our products have a 12-month shelflife and we achieve this by using a laminated film consisting of two layers of the same type of plastic, BOPP, which results in a barrier sufficient for our needs (against moisture and air) and is recyclable. The most exciting product available for our needs is the biodegradable cornstarch-based Biophane film that we wrap our toffees in. Corn plastic or PLA (polylactic acid, made from renewable resources

such as corn starch, tapioca roots, or sugarcane) is a very exciting technology that I think is the future for the food packaging industry.” Hentie says the design of their packaging is extremely important to them and they easily spend as much time on the development of their recipes as they do on their packaging. Customers are prepared to pay a little more for the peace of mind of biodegradable or recyclable packaging. This feature is used as a selling point, spreading the cost to the marketing budget.

THE OCEAN BASKET WEBSITE DESCRIBES WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A RESPONSIBLE OCEAN CITIZEN: •

The ocean sustains us with the basic elements of life; it produces half the oxygen we breathe, helps to provide the water we drink and delivers us the very core of our business success – seafood.

The world’s beaches support ocean health and the river courses we live

USEFUL CONTACTS

alongside feed into this ocean, either

www.ewt.org.za

transporting fresh water or massive

www.ipsa.org.za

pollutants into the greater resource.

www.pacsa.co.za

Being a responsible ocean citizen

www.petco.co.za

means committing to a shared

www.consol.co.za

accountability around the right to

www.nampak.com

benefit from the ocean’s resources

www.ecopack.co.za

and the duty to conserve it for future

www.printingsa.org

generations.

www.recycling.co.za

Ocean citizenship entails adopting

www.hotelstuff.co.za

new habits at both a company and a

www.greenstuff.co.za

personal level and creating a sense

www.collectacan.co.za

of belonging within a community

www.plasticsinfo.co.za

striving to preserve the ocean and its

www.greenhome.co.za

resources.

www.green-pages.co.za

To achieve these objectives, we work

www.thechefshop.co.za

with public organisations such as

www.thepaperstory.co.za

NPOs, aquariums, science centres

www.thelastplasticstraw.org

and our restaurant outlets to promote

www.theglassrecyclingcompany.co.za www.polystyrenerecyclingnetwork.com

18

our philosophy to a wide audience,

DARLING SWEET SPREADS © GRANT BUSHBY

from patrons to media and investors.


TM

5

22

Biodegradable

PP

PAP

WRAPPER

BAG

BOX

Darling Sweet produces traditional toffees and toffee spreads in a range of exciting flavours. We craft our toffee in small batches by hand, with no preservatives nor synthetic ingredients added, ensuring a top quality ‘clean label’ product. Our production process is committed to our motto - Take Your Time!

We pride ourselves in our recyclable packaging, as well as our biodegradable toffee wrappers.

Visit our online store or find your nearest stockist at darlingsweet.co.za


Discover the decadent C H ÂT E A U G ÂT E A U X RANGE!

NEW

BROCHURE

The latest edition of the Château Gâteaux product brochure is set to inspire and delight with a mouthwatering range… and so much more! •

User-friendly guide on how to handle our products

Inspirational product and style imagery

Easy to follow ordering information

Make sure you get your copy of the NEW, BEAUTIFULLY STYLED CHÂTEAU GÂTEAUX PRODUCT BROCHURE, and have all the information you need right at your fingertips!

GET YOUR E-BROCHURE TODAY

on the Château Gâteaux website: www.chateaugateaux.co.za


ORDERING MADE EASY!

The Château Gâteaux full range is listed in a detailed, easy-to-use key at the back of the brochure. Find all the information you need including packaging configuration, case sizing, allergens and more... Tortes 2 x 24 cm

242

Caramel Velvet

2 x 24 cm

239

Southern Red Velvet

2 x 24 cm

238

Swiss Carrot Cake

2 x 24 cm

ALLERGENS

SENSITIVE INGREDIENTS

MILK

B-1

MILK

230

MILK

CASE PACK

PRODUCT

MILK

CODE

Chocolate Nostalgia

2 x 24 cm

201

Mozart

2 x 24 cm

237

Rococo Chocolate Gâteau

2 x 24 cm

216

Walnut Truffle

2 x 24 cm

MILK

246

MILK

2 x 24 cm

NEW

MILK

2 x 24 cm

Chocolate Mozart

MILK

Black Forest Gâteau

240

MILK

206 NEW

MILK

Cream Gâteaux

Granadilla Cheesecake

2 x 24 cm

208P

Passionate Lemon Cheesecake

2 x 24 cm

208S

Strawberry Cheesecake

2 x 24 cm

MILK

208G

MILK

2 x 24 cm 2 x 24 cm

MILK

Andrea’s Baked Cheesecake Baked Chocolate Cheescake

MILK

241 244

Cookies & Cream

227

Fudge Picasso

243

Mousse au Chocolat

2 x 24 cm 2 x 24 cm 2 x 24 cm

MILK

231

MILK

Mousse Gâteaux

MILK

NEW

MILK

Cheesecakes

Apple Crumble

612

NEW

3 x 24 cm

MILK

Tarts

Double Decker

24 x 88 g

371

Fudge Picasso

24 x 72 g

331

Mississippi Mud Pie

33 x 99 g

377

Southern Red Velvet

33 x 85 g

MILK

24 x 90 g

326A

MILK

Cookies & Cream

MILK

33 x 80 g

332A

MILK

24 x 72 g

Black Forest Gâteau

MILK

Austrian Choc Mousse

306

MILK

372

MILK

Individual Gâteaux

Passionate Lemon Cheesecake

24 x 110 g

308S

Strawberry Cheesecake

33 x 115 g

383

Traditional Tiramisu

24 x 130 g

MILK

30 x 110 g

308P

MILK

New York Baked Cheesecake

MILK

33 x 116 g

357

MILK

Granadilla Cheesecake

308G

MILK

Individual Cheesecakes

48 x 120 g

355

Chocolate Volcano

22 x 105 g

349

Hot Mud Pudding

24 x 150 g

350

Toffee Apple Pudding

24 x 140 g

MILK

Boston Brownie

MILK

24 x 125 g

382

MILK

30 x 121 g

Cape Malva Pudding

MILK

Apple Crumble Tart

358

MILK

362

MILK

Hot Puddings

96 x 65 g

377

Southern Red Velvet

35 x 85 g

NEW

378

White Choc Coconut Slice

96 x 45 g

NEW

384

Mini New York Baked Cheesecake

Eggs

Wheat (Gluten)

MILK

ALLERGENS

Milk (Cow’s)

SENSITIVE INGREDIENTS

Soy

Tree Nuts

Gelatine (Bovine)

66 x 30 g

MILK

96 x 45 g

Chocolate Velvet Slice

MILK

Carrot Cake Slice

380

MILK

381

NEW

MILK

NEW

MILK

Buffet Desserts

Disclaimer • We reserve the right to change, discontinue or improve recipes and decorations from time to time in line with customer demand and seasonal availability • Ingredients and nutritional information are printed on the packaging label of each product • Product specifications containing nutritional and micro values are available on the product labels • Our products are manufactured in a facility that processes tree nuts, eggs, milk, wheat and soy • Due to the handmade nature of our product, height and weight can fluctuate from time to time

OR CONTACT YOUR CHÂTEAU GÂTEAUX DISTRIBUTOR* and have a brochure delivered to you.

*For a full list of distributors please visit our website


FEATURE

LUXURY CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR BOX, THE CULTURE CLUB CHEESE

GET YOUR CRAFT CHEESE GAME ON!

Artisanal cheeses are growing in popularity and accessibility. Cheesemongers and cheesemakers share their passion with Susan Reynard.

A

t the World Cheese Awards 2017, South African cheeses (mostly craft) won a total of 11 awards: one Super-Gold, two Gold, four Silver and four Bronze. Dalewood Huguenot, a handcrafted, artisanal cheese from the Cape Winelands is currently ranked fourth in the Top 16 cheeses in the world and was named Best South African Cheese. There’s a lot to celebrate, taste and cook with from local cheesemakers and cheesemongers. Cheese is commonly made from cow’s milk, with goat’s milk cheese also popular. Cheese can also be made from the milk of sheep, water buffalo, camels and donkeys, although the latter two are not readily available.

22

GROWING CRAFT CATEGORY

The Culture Club Cheese on Bree Street in Cape Town is owned and run by husband-and-wife team Luke and Jessica. It describes itself as a “boutique artisan cheese hub and fermented foods hotspot and restaurant”. Its mix of craft cheeses is 80% locally sourced and 20% international. They say there are many cheesemakers in the country and roughly 60 artisanal cheese suppliers of note, some of which are extremely small. “This category is definitely growing, and, weather permitting, we hope this trend continues. Increasingly people are less willing to sacrifice on the quality of their cheese. Flavour profiles and ethical standpoints increasingly make chefs want to work with suppliers

who are motivated by the quality, integrity and provenance of their product, focusing on hand-crafted, preservative-free creations from small producers. They want to know that the cheese they are eating comes from happy animals that are fed on grass, and not mass produced and full of additives,” explain Luke and Jessica. The Culture Club Cheese has anywhere between 60 to 100 types of cheese in stock at any one time. The majority are from Gauteng, the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal, with several from the North-West and Free State. “We are constantly experimenting in our shop: as the only affineurs in the country (person who ages and cares for cheese), we regularly mature our cheeses for different time periods and in


FEATURE

THE CULTURE CLUB CHEESE C0-OWNER, LUKE

different sorts of bacteria and liquor to impart different flavour profiles,” they explain. A variety of wines, whiskies, beers and fruits are used to create interesting flavour profiles and biweekly pairing evenings are held for customers to enjoy pairing cheese with a range of products, including whisky, wine, beer, honey, chocolate, olive oil and even coffee.

RELATIONSHIPS RULE

Brian Dick and his wife Jo own and run Cheese Gourmet in Linden, Johannesburg. It is a corner shop in the traditional sense that has served its customers for 13 years. During this time, Linden has developed into a trendy, foodie destination but originally they set up shop as it was less than a kilometre from their home. Prior to that he sold cheese at the Irene Market in Pretoria for some 23 years. His relationship with cheesemakers, chefs, restaurateurs and his discerning clientele encompasses education, appreciation and exploration of the exceptional artisanal cheese from local suppliers. As these are by nature small-scale producers, he is able to assist with the challenge of distribution, a major issue for cheesemakers with farms in remote areas of the country. “When somebody comes here to shop they shop as an experience,

they taste before they buy. You can’t appreciate the nuances of cheese in vacuum packs,” Brian says. He visits every farm that supplies cheese to his store and he and his team relay their stories to customers. It is these unique stories that make the link between producer and consumer tangible, he notes. “We are the storyteller, we give customers a sense of ownership. We run cheese appreciation courses and are telling the story of this country through food.” Chefs are able to chat to Brian, Jo and the team about cheese and wine pairing suggestions. He says chefs working in hotels that attract international clientele are particularly keen on offering an experience of Africa on a cheeseboard. Some of the best cheeseboards on menus currently are in five-star hotels, he adds. The restaurant attached to the shop has a cheese-themed menu, showcasing how the flavour and texture of cheese as an ingredient enhances dishes. As chairman of the Johannesburg Slow Food chapter, Brian is passionate about handcrafted cuisine. He refers to the “artisan big three” of cheese, charcuterie and beer, three craft genres that have taken South Africa and the world by storm. He adds bread to this

THE CULTURE CLUB CHEESE TOWER © LAUREN PRETORIUS

holy trinity of sensory experiences that begins with mindfulness.

WEDDING CAKES AND CHEESE TOWERS

There is an inherent beauty and symmetry in a wheel of cheese. Luke and Jessica explain, “Luckily for us, celebratory cheese towers and cakes have moved up in the world and have never been so popular, particularly for weddings and big events. From a creamy camembert to a 15-month matured cheddar, or a pungent washed rind cheese to an unctuous double cream Bavarian blue, cheese towers can be real show stoppers.

TOP TEN CHEESES TO TRY The Cheese Gourmet, Brian Dick, shares his top ten picks of craft cheese you must try (listed in alphabetical order): 1. Belnori Kilimanjaro 2. Blue Moon Ganzvlei 3. Dalewood Boland 4. Dutch Goat Farm Fenugreek Gouda 5. Gonedsa Belegen Gouda 6. Healey’s Gold Cheddar 7. Klein River Mature Gruyere (Gruberg) 8. Langbaken Karoo Crumble 9. Noah’s Nutty Halloumi 10. Puglia Burrata

23


FEATURE

If you’re ready to move from a traditional and sugary sweet cake to sensual and savoury (and gluten free!), it’s a great idea because it can be used for late night and carry on to the next day (or week) post the event. We figure that for weddings, everything about the special day is personal and unique, why not the cake too? Adorned with fruit such as grapes, figs and berries, drizzled honey, even draped in ribbons as well as seasonal flowers, cheese towers give a chic twist to your typical cake and dessert.” A cake tower can be custom made for anything from 10 to 200 people.

CELEBRATE SEASONALITY

Cheese Gourmet and Culture Club Cheese owners both point out that cheese, like most food items, is seasonal. “Artisanal cheese, in particular, can change in taste and texture depending on the particular make. The key is to find a knowledgeable cheesemonger

PÉPÉ’S HEART, PÉPÉ CHARLOT

24

who can provide you with a variety of cheese that is tasting at its best, rather than try to stick to fixed ideas of what you have had in the past,” advises Luke and Jessica. Brian says the colour of cheese also changes depending on the season. The idea that cheese should be bright yellow or always available is anathema to those obsessed with quality and flavour. The variety of colours adds to the story of what the animals eat, the time of year and the level of butter fats, explains Brian. “The excellence resides and is owned by the fabulous people who make the products,” he adds. In fine-dining establishments, five-star hotels and restaurants run by creative chefs, the cheese course can be as interesting and diverse as the rest of the menu. A creative cheeseboard will consist of different cheese textures, rinds, ages and milk types. Accompaniments should be seasonally appropriate and also provide a mix of salty and

sweet flavours, incorporating a variety of fruit such as grapes, figs or citrus; nuts; different types and flavours of fermented products (sauerkraut, kimchi or pickles); olives; preserves; and honey.

DOTES ON GOATS

Pépé Charlot is an artisanal cheesemaker based in Kommetjie, Cape Town who specialises in goat’s cheese. He says, “I have always been interested in maturing cheese. Back in France almost 45 years ago my grandfather, a cheese lover like me, used to buy fresh goat’s cheese at the market once a week and mature it in his cellar. Over time with one type of cheese he was making five to six different sorts, just by turning them, touching them, caring for them: frais, demi-sec, sec and one that was so dry and hard you could not chew it, just suck it like a sweetie. Which is what he gave me before going fishing; that ‘stone’ would slowly melt in my mouth

CHEESE PLATTERS, PÉPÉ CHARLOT


FEATURE

and this is when my love/addiction for the taste of goat’s cheese started – I was seven years old.” Around 2006 he met two cheesemakers in Johannesburg and began learning how to make cheese. He taught himself about maturation, trusting his instincts, and plans to undertake a month’s internship with a notable affineur in France in June and offer these services to local cheesemakers as well as continuing to make his own cheese.

Pépé explains why goat’s cheese differs from other types of cheese:

• It has an acidic aftertaste whereas cow’s milk cheese has a bitter one. • It is a healthier option as it contains less lactose (sugar) and its lactose molecules are smaller than those in cow’s milk. • It is very close to human milk and is often prescribed to young children who cannot drink cow’s milk but still need calcium intake.

• Goat’s cheese is used both cold on cheese platters and warm or hot; unlike some cow’s milk cheese like mozzarella and emmental it won’t melt when grilled but rather softens and then burns if not taken off the heat quickly. • More chefs are using goat’s cheese in their dishes because it is healthy and fashionable and some are very creative: French dish warm goat’s cheese salad; risotto with truffle shavings, served either warm or cold; buche goat’s cheese in desserts with pomegranate and honey reduction; and in cheese soufflé and ice cream, to name few. • Top chefs in industry are among Pépé’s clients and he takes a personal interest in each and every one of their establishments, style of cuisine and goat’s cheese needs. He currently makes ten different sorts of cheese, each with their own characteristics, flavours and uses.

THE CHEESE COURSE CAN BE AS INTERESTING AND DIVERSE AS THE REST OF THE MENU. A CREATIVE CHEESEBOARD WILL CONSIST OF DIFFERENT CHEESE TEXTURES, RINDS, AGES AND MILK TYPES. ACCOMPANIMENTS SHOULD BE SEASONALLY APPROPRIATE AND ALSO PROVIDE A MIX OF SALTY AND SWEET FLAVOURS.

CHEESE EVENTS •

South African Cheese Festival: 27-29 April 2018 in Sandringham Farm, Stellenbosch; www.

cheesefestival.co.za •

South African Dairy Championships: Winners for 2017 listed on www.cheesesa.co.za

World Cheese Awards: Winners for 2017 listed on www.gff.co.uk/

awards/world-cheese-awards/ •

International Cheese Awards: 24-25 July 2018 in Nantwich, UK; www.

internationalcheeseawards.co.uk •

Local markets; food fairs; consumer shows (e.g. Good Food & Wine Show); trade shows (e.g. Food & Hospitality Africa/ Hostex; Africa’s Big 7); farm stalls; delicatessens; and reputable

PÉPÉ CHARLOT ARE GOAT’S CHEESE SPECIALISTS

retailers.

25


SPOTLIGHT

ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

CHANGES LIVES

The Enterprise Development Programme (EDP) of the SA Chefs Association, in which suppliers sponsor carefully selected township caterers to undergo six months of training at the Centre for Culinary Excellence (CCE), continues to change lives.

L

ast year saw successful groups pass through the programme sponsored by Nestlé Professional, Lucky Star, the Red Meat Industry Forum and Excella. BCE Foodservice Equipment has joined the list of partners with an initial sponsorship of R95 000 worth of equipment (crockery, cutlery and appliances) each to three deserving graduates to boost their businesses. On 18 January, the handover ceremony was an emotional affair as graduates Absalom Kotsokoane from Happy Spoon based in Pretoria, Asthandile Mautla from BKQ Cheri based in Morningside and Sindiswa Molete from Sindis Best for All based in Soweto thanked their sponsors, Yejna Maharaj from CCE and the Association for giving them this once in a lifetime opportunity. Justin Morby-Smith, MD of BCE echoed the sentiments of the day, that this is a “hand up, not a hand out”, and wished recipients much success in their businesses and a continued relationship with BCE Foodservice Equipment. Naniki noted that the initiative benefited more than the three recipients, extending to the entire eco-system around them, including staff and clients. BCE also donated equipment to the CCE to enhance training

26

and modernise facilities. The EDP was conceptualised by Stephen Billingham at his cooking school, HTA School of Culinary Art. The programme has ensured that the Tsogo Sun Centre for Culinary Excellence is self-sustaining, employs five permanent staff as well as offers a vital platform for the ongoing training of

cooks and chefs in industry. Thomas says of the EDP, “The donation of part of the programme to SA Chefs, CCE specific, was a most generous offer by Stephen in helping Billy to create a sustainable income for the CCE that was in fact struggling to launch and gain traction in the chefs’ world. This now ensures the permanent employment of five people as well.”


NEWS

HANS BUESCHKENS COMPETITION

BOOSTS YOUNG CHEFS

The regional semi-final for Africa and Middle East of the Hans Bueschkens Young Chefs Challenge 2017 was held during HACE Hotel Expo in Cairo, Egypt in November.

T

he SA Chefs Association entered chef Ryan Chinnappen into the semi-finals, to compete to represent the continent. He trained under the association’s competitions director and MD of the Food Design Agency, Jodi-Ann Palmer. After a tightly contested event, Ryan came second, with Mahmoud Korany from Egypt winning the event and the opportunity to represent the region in the finals to be held during the Worldchefs Congress & Expo 2018 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in July 2018. Aprian Herlambang from UAE came in third place. Also competing were chefs from Qatar and Jordan. Jodi-Ann, one of the country’s top competition chefs, won the semifinals and finals of the competition in 2006, taking home a gold medal. She says, “The Hans Bueschkens Young Chefs Challenge is one of the biggest, internationally-recognised competitions in the world and carries great privilege and esteem for young chefs. It exposes contestants to individual competition standards and training schedule, which is different to team competitions. I competed and won in 2006 and wanted to give another young chef this opportunity. As competitions director I pushed hard to motivate

RYAN’S DISHES: •

Starter: Chakalaka flan, with deepfried sea bass, gravalax style sea bass, mango salsa Verdi, pickled vegetables and potato paper

Main: Sous vide beef fillet and cheek, with Indian crack rock, sautéed spinach, butter curry puree, banana chutney, vegetable reduction and coriander yoghurt gel

Dessert: Hertzoggie, with lemon shortbread, kiwi consommé, Dilmah tea crème praline and French

RYAN CHINNAPEN

to the board to send a young chef.” As the competition involves a pre-planned menu and not a mystery basket, Ryan’s training involved a lot of repetitive cooking, with the menu playing to his strengths and cooking talent. He was part of the team that competed in the African Culinary Cup in Mauritius in September. Influences from those dishes were present in this competition, as well as a special new dessert. Jodi-Ann says the key skill in preparing for this event is cooking the dishes over and over again, perfecting them and completing the task within the given time-frame. It also required

meringue shards

working with ingredients available in Cairo, which she helped to source. Stephen Billingham, president of the SA Chefs Association, says of the competition, “This competition is about developing South Africa’s culinary landscape and keeping us abreast of global standards. In some small way, the competencies learned and the feedback from the judges are brought back home into the Association. It also provides an opportunity to broaden the contestants’ global knowledge and skills and to give an opportunity to a deserving member of the Association.”

27


NEWS

SANDTON CHEFS CIRCLE LUNCH

FROM SANDTON WITH LOVE

The Sandton Chefs’ Circle met on 12 December 2017 at Investec Bank, with lunch hosted by executive chef James Faldo, to celebrate another year of camaraderie and networking and to donate toys and books to a worthy cause.

T

he society of head and executive chefs from the Sandton and surrounding areas meet for lunch every six to eight weeks to form and build friendships and to share knowledge and information. As at previous lunches during 2017, the chefs were required to bring a new or used book or toy to be donated to charity, which last year was the St Lawrence Children’s Haven in Krugersdorp. At this final lunch of the year, some 10 to 15 children received early Christmas presents as well as hotdogs, pizza, ice cream and cooldrink. This was the 20 th lunch held by the Circle since it formed in 2013 and during that time more than 300 items have been donated to charity. The Association’s Gauteng regional committee, headed up by Raynor Damons of Famous Brands,

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donated an additional R10 000 in cash from money raised by the committee throughout the year. Stephen Billingham, president of the SA Chefs Association, says the Sandton Chefs’ Circle was conceptualised with a core mission of simply connecting chefs. In this busy node, it is not uncommon for chefs in properties across the road from one another to not have met. These meetings encourage relationship building and knowledge sharing in areas such as education, suppliers, human resources and industrial relations. There are approximately 25 chefs in the Circle and the average lunch involves 15 to 20 chefs. Stephen says, “It has never been a cooking competition, but as you can imagine the food served by the establishment is always spectacular.” He adds, “I would like

to encourage that chefs in other major cities do similar. It is not an SA Chefs Association initiative but rather a chefs’ friendship circle.” Pictured at the final lunch of 2017, back, from left : Elsu Gericke (SA Chefs Association); Alan Bridge (Protea Balalaika); Kabelo Segone (HTA); Gerard Vingerling (Sandton Sun); Raynor Damons (Famous Brands); Adrian VigusBrown (Melrose Arch Hotel); David Keir (Fedics); Peter Mabena (Sandton Convention Centre); Heinz Brunner and Manfred Muellers (SA Chefs Association Honorary Past Presidents.). Front, from left : Jacques Etsebeth (Protea Balalaika); Ian Kehoe (Garden Court Sandton City); James Khoza (Sandton Convention Centre); Stephen Billingham (HTA); Stuart Cason (Hilton Sandton) and his son Jaydon.


AFRICA HOSPITALITY WEEK 24 - 26 June 2018, Gallagher Convention Centre

3 SHOWS, 100s OF GLOBAL EXHIBITORS, 1000s OF PRODUCTS VISITORS FROM 35 COUNTRIES, 180 SPEAKERS, 25 EXPERT INDUSTRY ADVISORS

EXTENSIVE 3 DAY PROGRAMME AWARDS

CONFERENCES

COMPETITIONS

• Africa Hospitality Talent Awards

• Hospitality Leadership Forum

• Life Achievement Awards

• Food Leadership Forum

• The Southern Africa Housekeepers League of Champions • Inter-Hotel Culinary Cup • Global Pizza Challenge

FREE TRAINING • • • •

FEATURES

Barista Mixology Food Hygiene Farmers Day

Sweet Street Liquid Africa Live demonstrations Hotel Runway

www.africahospitalityweek.com Organised by:

Powered by:

Knowledge Partners:

Strategic Partners:

Media Partners:

• • • •


SPOTLIGHT

THREE CHEERS

FOR CONNIE!

Connie Butler retired at the end of 2017 after 23 years working for the SA Chefs Association at head office.

mammoth task that has involved 1 787 youngsters from disadvantaged backgrounds undertaking culinary training at schools around the country during the past seven years.

Connie lists among the highlights of her career:

CONNIE BUTLER

S

ince Connie joined the team in 1995, there have been four presidents (Billy Gallagher, Heinz Brunner, Martin Kobald and Stephen Billingham), six managers (Allison Smith, Carol van Zyl, Vanessa Naude, Ben Gannan, Graham Donet and Thomas Overbeck) and five offices (Fedics in Rosebank, Fedics in Randburg, Southern Sun’s offices in Sandton City East and West Wings and STH). Connie has been the friendly face, smile and always helpful financial manager, also working on administration related to membership, helping at events, shows and dinners, and even helping to hang pictures and memorabilia in the various offices the Association has occupied. Towards the end of her career with the Association she was bookkeeper and in charge of financial administration for the National Young Chefs Training Programme (NYCTP), a

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• Working with Billy Gallagher on the World Chefs Tour Against Hunger fundraisers and making sure that all the funds were administered. • Moving to and helping set up the present offices at STH. • Heinz Brunner sending the whole office to Fancourt in George to attend the National Team dinner. • Working with Billy, raising money to set up the Skills Kitchen, and making sure that all funds and donations were correctly accounted for. • Graham Donet organising a surprise 15th anniversary lunch for her in the Skills Kitchen. • Receiving the President’s Award from Stephen Billingham in 2016.

remains busy and enjoys quality time with her husband Butch and family, especially her two gorgeous grandchildren. “I’m settling into our new home, which we moved to recently, and I enjoy interior decorating and gardening.

STEPHEN BILLINGHAM Having first been involved in the South African Chef Association as far back as 1995 I have always had a special place for Connie (Con). Her warmth and gentleness is addictive and she has always been extremely calm even in the most pressured of times, but more importantly and what’s most impressive, is her pin-point accuracy for detail and perfection in the field of accountancy. Every slip, invoice and statement was always accounted for and accurate. Connie had the pleasure (I think) to work with most of the Association’s Presidents and General Managers and became and still is a great asset when it comes to the history and heritage of our Association, as she has the knowledge and history of more than half of the Association’s existence. I sincerely hope that Con will

She understands that working with chefs can be a surprise a minute. “The craziest thing I ever did with our move from Sandton City to our offices at STH was moving a big three-tier cake through the shopping centre in a trolley to the staff parking on my own and transporting it to our new offices without breaking it. This cake was made by Café Mozart to celebrate the SA Chefs Association’s 25th anniversary.” As with many retirees, Connie

be available for the odd phone call should I, the next President, or in fact anybody connected to the Association need to draw upon this wealth of knowledge, history and experience. On behalf of myself, the Board of Directors, Regional Chairpersons, Young Chefs Club and the 9 500-strong membership base, we would like to wish Connie and Butch a fantastic retirement shared with their children and grandchildren. Connie Butler has surely cemented her place in our Association’s noble history.


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LIVE COAL COOKERY

WHAT MAKES BERTHA UNIQUE? • 100% designed in Britain and manufactured under license in Cape Town, South Africa. That means craftsmanship. • Unique ‘tall’ design means it takes up less space in the kitchen and excellent ergonomics • Versatility – elongated ‘cooking chamber means a range of cooking temperatures, from bottom to top.

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• Excellent distribution channels throughout the whole of Africa wherever you are, we will find • Aesthetically appealling – look good to cook • Hinge door to the left or to the right. • Swing door mechanism • Easily retro-fitted into any kitchen

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McDONALD’S

McDONALD’S SOUTH AFRICA SUPPORTS KEEPING FAMILIES TOGETHER

Supported by McDonald’s South Africa, Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) South Africa provides a safe home, comfort and care to families of sick children receiving specialised treatment.

R

MHC is a non-governmental, non-profit organisation that creates, finds and supports programmes that directly improve the health and well-being of children and their families across the world. In 2013, supported by McDonald’s South Africa’s Franchisees, RMHC South Africa opened the doors to two Ronald McDonald Family Rooms. The rooms were built to take care of the mothers of sick children receiving specialised treatment at the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital in Soweto. To date, these Family Rooms

32

have had more than 50 000 families come through their doors. The mothers of the sick babies at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and medium risk neonatal ward at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, who are usually from Soweto and other areas of Johannesburg, are provided with a comfortable place to rest, regroup and engage with other mothers in similar circumstances. They are also provided with hot meals and refreshments throughout the time they are caring for their babies at the hospital. In 2017, after three years of hard work, RMHC launched its first

27 bedroom Ronald McDonald House in South Africa and Africa at the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital. Located in Parktown, the House is on the top floor of the hospital. It includes a kitchen, dining room, library, games room, meditation room, children’s playroom, TV room and a lounge. The House was built to provide accommodation for families with sick children, at little to no cost, while their child receives critical medical care at the hospital. Every project that RMHC South Africa has embarked on, has been a labour of love that has required funding, skills and infrastructure.


McDONALD’S

The importance of community, business and government support is critical to ensure that every family that goes through the RMHC programmes is taken care of in the best way possible. “We want to see RMHC spreading throughout South Africa to ensure families are kept close during one of their most trying times. To achieve this, we need to ensure that we have well-run programmes. As we expand, we want to ensure that every Family Room or House has the right infrastructure for that particular hospital and community and that we have the right skilled people to care for our families,” said RMHC South Africa chairman, Siphiwe Reggie Skhosana. McDonald’s South Africa provides majority support for operational costs including corporate and individual donors and volunteers that give generously of their resources (human, time and money) to ensure that families stay together and close to the care they need when they have a sick child. McDonald’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Greg Solomon says RMHC is at the core of the business because McDonald’s is a family brand that children and families interact with daily.

“The Ronald McDonald House Charities is a great opportunity for us to invest in the people and the community that continues to love McDonald’s food for the past 22 years. As a brand that has continued to be a beacon of happiness and value to families in the country, it was important for us to invest in an initiative that will impact the people we see and serve every day in a meaningful way. We believe that health is a fundamental area that impacts every person’s life – especially a family. The question then was: If we are not providing medicines and hospitals, how can we bring hope and keep families together in a way that depicts our values and

objective as a business? The answer: RMHC. Through the programme, we are impacting the lives of children and leaving a legacy. That is why we are so passionate and committed to ensuring the RMHC programmes succeed.” McDonald’s South Africa donates fifty cents of every Happy Meal purchased at their restaurants across the country to fund and support RMHC programmes. All the change placed into Donation Boxes at all McDonald’s restaurants is donated to RMHC. So, the next time you get your McDonald’s meal, help keep families together by donating your change or visit www.rmhcsouthafrica.org for more information.

EVERY PROJECT THAT RMHC SOUTH AFRICA HAS EMBARKED ON, HAS BEEN A LABOUR OF LOVE.

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TRIBUTE

PAUL BOCUSE:

FAREWELL TO THE LION OF LYON

The death of one of the greatest chefs, Paul François Pierre Bocuse, caused great sadness among the culinary industry worldwide.

H

e was born on 11 February 1926 and died on 20 January 2018 at age 91, in both cases in Collonges-auMont-d’Or near Lyon, France. He was reported to have undergone triple bypass heart surgery in 2005 and had Parkinson’s disease. His restaurant, L’Auberge du Pont de Collonges, usually referred to as simply Paul Bocuse, is a landmark in the culinary world. He has won numerous awards, written several books and is revered as a chef instrumental in changing the direction of French and global cuisine. Paul is survived by his wife Raymonde and their daughter, Françoise Bocuse-Bernachon, as well as by his son, Jérôme Bocuse, from his relationship with Raymone Carlut.

TRIBUTES

With so many tributes pouring in to commemorate this great chef’s life it is impossible to share them all. A few that capture what he meant to chefs in South Africa:

Billy Gallagher: In his book, Lettuce and a Lady’s Breast, Billy describes their first meeting, “I was amazed at how open and friendly Chef Paul was and began to realise that not only was he a fantastic chef, but also a very warm and friendly human being.” Together with management at Southern Sun (now Tsogo Sun) and colleagues in industry, Billy was instrumental in persuading Paul Bocuse to visit 34

PAUL BOCUSE

South Africa and become involved in the fine-dining restaurant, the St James, in the then new Johannesburg Sun & Towers hotel in 1985. This included the restaurant’s chef, Alain Thomas, training at the famous chef’s restaurant in Lyon for four months and serving a special Paul Bocuse menu. “This was the beginning of a friendship that would last a lifetime. We now had one of the world’s greatest chefs assisting us with our premier restaurant, the St James,

which would feature genuine items from Lyon and have the stamp of Paul Bocuse,” writes Billy. “It was also arranged that the maestro would visit twice a year to ensure that his exacting standards were being delivered in keeping with his excellent name.” Chef Paul attended the official opening and prepared his trademark truffle soup for the 600 guests who attended the gala banquet, including Harry Oppenheimer and the who’s who of society at the time.


TRIBUTE

Heinz Brunner: “Monsieur Paul, what can one say what has not been said? He was the Chef of the Chefs no doubt. I have never met a more humble, passionate chef than Mr Paul. He lived the life and food was his life. I had the pleasure in meeting Mr Paul on numerous occasions. The one memory which I will treasure for the rest of my life is the one when the master honoured us and attended the first ever WACS (World Association of Chefs) Congress held in Johannesburg 1988. The last day before his departure, Billy Gallagher and I hosted Monsieur Paul and his disciples which accompanied him on the trip to a farewell lunch. The venue was the coffee shop at the Johannesburg Sun. I remember it like it was yesterday: we had a long table for the 14 of us, Mr Paul was sitting at the head of the table, Billy on the right and me on the left of him, followed by the other famous French chefs. Now you can imagine how intimidating it is for a chef to cook for this calibre of chefs, not to mention the world’s best known Chef Bocuse. Billy asked Mr Paul what we should we have for lunch. He looked at Billy and after a while in his French English, he said, “Mon ami Billy, 14 entrecôte (sirloin), pommes frites (chips) and a few bottles of red wine”. Wow, this is the three-star Michelin chef of the chefs?! To me it just sums up what this chef was all about. Give me a simple, perfectly cooked steak and chips, good wine and company and I am as happy as can be. Rest in peace, Monsieur Paul, and thank you for all you did for the chefs around the globe.” Manfred Muellers: “I had the

privilege of meeting the legendary Maitre Paul Bocuse and spend some time at his world-renowned restaurant in Lyon in my early years. He was indeed recognised as one of the most successful culinary geniuses and greatly

NOT ONLY WAS HE A FANTASTIC CHEF, BUT ALSO A VERY WARM AND FRIENDLY HUMAN BEING. respected internationally. RIP Maitre Paul. You are missed already.”

Philippe Frydman: “I had the

privilege of not only meeting the man but having lunch and a private tour of his kitchens in 1987 with Billy and Linda Gallagher. What impressed me the most was his calmness and the fact that all of his awards, recognition and stardom never went to his head. He knew how to talk to chefs of any grade and get the respect that he deserves, not by fear but by respecting others. He knew what he wanted and that was all for him. Deliver or just go. I remember in 1989, during the second Bocuse D’Or,

MONSIEUR PAUL’S JOIE DE VIVRE 1. His family have been restaurateurs in France since 1765. 2. He had a tattoo of a rooster on his left shoulder, tattooed by an American soldier during World War II. 3. During World War II he fought with the Free French Army in the Resistance and was wounded by German machine-gun fire. 4. He was the founder of nouvelle cuisine in the 1970s, but later described it as “not enough on your plate and too much on your bill”. 5. He is widely considered one of the first celebrity chefs. 6. His eponymous biennial competition,

Billy and I went to see him at the show around 1pm and whilst we were talking to him, one of his assistants came to see him and told him that Mumm could only deliver the Champagne by 7am the next morning and not that afternoon by 5pm as originally promised. Without shouting he told his assistant to phone Moët and have them deliver NOW and told her to let Mumm know they were no longer required. Mumm managed to deliver by 4pm that day. The other highlight was the walkabout at the market at 4.30am before the start of the competition. He spoke to all the stall holders, however big or small, and they all called him Mr Paul.”

prepare exceptional dishes within five hours and 35 minutes before a live and lively audience. Judges are some of the best chefs worldwide. South Africa has sent several top chefs to compete in this competition over the years. 7. French Interior Minister, Gérard Collomb, referred to him as “the Pope of gastronomy”. 8. A sign on the door to the kitchen in his restaurant reads, “Silence - we’re cooking”. 9. He held a Michelin three-star rating for more than 50 years. 10. He said of his career, “It has brought me everything”. 11. He said of his life: “I adore women and we live too long these days to spend a

Bocuse D’Or, was launched in 1987

whole life with only one. I work as if I will

and is considered one of the most

live to be 100, and I enjoy life as if the

prestigious international culinary

next day will be my last.”

competitions with huge media coverage.

(Sources: The Guardian; Grub Street; BBC;

It is an individual contest of around

The Telegraph; The Washington Post;

24 chefs from around the world, who

The Economist)

35


RESTAURANT SHOWCASE

IMAGES COURTESY OF KAHVÉ ROAD

KAHVÉ ROAD: REDEFINING

THE COFFEE EXPERIENCE

Kahvé Road in Cape Town believes that innovation, attention to detail, and product excellence play key roles in their unique sit-down café experience.

A

decadent patisserie and coffee shop located in Cavendish Square, Cape Town, Kahvé Road offers customers a singular experience thanks to a selection of delicious daily indulgences to suit the gourmet tongue. Not only is it a café, however, but Kahvé also sells a variety of coffee blends online at www.kahveroad.com, as well as has wholesale coffee offerings on a range of blends. The coffee served is made from premium beans and, they offer signature experiences like cold brew or capsule pairing, where food and beverage combinations are matched to perfection. We speak to Rithen Ramlal, Founder and CEO, to find out more.

Tell us briefly about Kahvé Road.

Kahvé Road was launched about two years ago as part of an ambitious project by my partners and I to redefine the coffee scene. South Africa has quite an exponentially growing coffee culture, as it is around the world now, so it is a great industry to be in, but a very competitive

36

industry, too. So we as a brand take product and production quality to a different extreme. It’s why we even named our brand Kahvé Road. Kahvé was discovered around eastern Ethiopia, worked its way up to Yemen and the old Constantinople – which is modern day Istanbul. The beans were brewed for the first time in the Ottoman Empire and they called this dark brew Kahvé, the original word for coffee. We as a brand pay homage to that journey of coffee from crop to perfect cup.

What is the process behind creating the perfect cup?

What we find is that a perfect cup of coffee is as much a labour of love as it is a perfect science. It’s about sourcing the best beans in the world. It’s about roasting it to perfection – a lot of so-called artisanal roasters will do light blending, and by doing so under-roast the beans and don’t extract the best flavour. Then it’s about how you grind your coffee; what equipment you use. Our espresso machine here

[at the coffee shop] is one of two in the world – and we own both of them! They combine preinfusion technology with lever technology to get the best out of the bean. We also take it to the extreme and steam our milk to just under 70 degrees so the milk protein doesn’t burn. South Africans are used to dark, bitter brews and at Kahvé Road, we believe that the perfect cup of coffee shouldn’t leave you with a bitter aftertaste. Even when I offer you our intense Babylon, that’s ranked 8/10 in terms of intensity, the intensity of flavour comes through and not necessarily bitterness.

Tell us about the café experience.

We are pushing the boundaries of café quality in terms of food. We offer a rare patisserie option – all made by us. We have a central kitchen in Woodstock and a team of 15 chefs who produce every day so that everything arrives fresh to the coffee shop daily. Another side of my business is catering and business-to-business supplies,


RESTAURANT SHOWCASE

especially on the baked good side. We are not about the super-sized portion, but we make sure there is balance in taste profiles. I’m also aware of bringing value for money, so it’s not to say that this is some pretentious, luxury place. People often say that they expect to pay R50 for our cappuccino, and it’s R27 — so prices are competitive.

What about Halaal-friendly options and other unique factors at your coffee shop?

This is a big differentiator from our competitors, as many of our Muslim customers say they are tired of the Gatsby or fried polony offerings on the market. We are a coffee brand at our heart and soul, so I don’t need to offer bacon or alcohol here. We celebrate what we do and take it to another level. And if you don’t do coffee, we also have a Kahvé cold beverage range. We have created a house tonic, a ginger ale, a rooibos cold brew and a coffee cold brew. The coffee cold brew is the biggest growth category in coffee in the United States at the moment, but it is an acquired taste. We do an on-tap experience with these beverages and it’s almost like a Guinness or beer experience for non-alcoholic drinkers. It also takes craft brewing methods to another level. All of our range has no preservatives and no sugar.

THE SCAA COFFEE FLAVOUR WHEEL

KAHVÉ’S FLAVOURFUL BLENDS Made from ethically-sourced, Specialty

offers a decadent aroma of fresh cream and hazelnuts, and flavour notes of sweet, creamy, dark cocoa. 8/10 intensity.

Grade certified Arabica beans – the best

Machu Picchu: Named after the famed

in the world – Kahvé Road’s aromas and

lost city of the Incas, this light blend draws

flavours range from intense to gentle.

on beans from Burundi, Uganda and Malawi

They occupy a selection of spaces on

to create a fresh, bright aroma, with flavour

the Specialty Coffee Association of

notes of melon and orange. 5/10 intensity.

America’s Coffee Taster’s Flavour Wheel (See figure above).

Troy: A decaf blend inspired by the epic tale of the same name, this coffee is brewed

Petra: A house blend that draws

from caffeine –free Mexican and DRC beans,

Ethiopian, Columbian and Guatemalan coffee

and has rich cocoa and aged pear aromas,

beans together, it creates a delicious flavour

followed by flavours of chocolate and

of sweet milk chocolate and berries, with

tobacco. 6/10 intensity.

an alluring caramelised berry aroma. 6/10

Chan Chan: This caffeine-free, premium rooibos tea’s sweet fynbos aroma gives

intensity. Babylon: A dark blend of coffee beans from Brazil, Indonesia and Columbia, it

way to gentle flavour notes of woody spice, caramel, and peach.

SHOP THE COMPLETE RANGE

VISIT GLOBAL K N IV E S.CO.Z A

+27 ( 0) 21 812 0810 customerservice@globalknives.co.za

SH O P N O W


AFRICA HOSPITALITY WEEK 2018

INTER HOTEL CULINARY CUP Will you be among the top hotel teams competing at South Africa‘s premier hospitality event in 2018?

F

or the first time in South Africa, the Inter Hotel Culinary Cup will take place during Africa Hospitality Week 2018. For three days, selected teams from the nation‘s leading hotels will compete at this showcase event in front of thousands of visitors. Six-member teams are made up of a team manager, four chefs (at least one pastry chef), and a team captain. Their challenge is to prepare a three-course menu from prespecified local foods and ingredients. And at least 20% of the preparation must be done on the day. This is a head-to-head competition and each heat will see two teams compete in fullyappointed kitchens, purpose built at the exhibition venue. Judges score for mise-enplace, culinary skills, presentation

38

and, of course, taste. But points will be deducted for anything less than a pristine kitchen after service. And once the judges have sampled the final menu, the prepared meals will be served to groups of VIP guests at the specially designed Pizazz restaurant in the heart of the exhibition hall.

The Culinary Cup challenge runs for all three days at Africa‘s premier hospitality event from June 24-26 in Johannesburg. Africa Hospitality Week 2018 brings together The Hotel Show Africa, iHost and Africa‘s Big 7. The cup winning team will be named at a special presentation on the final day. www.africahospitalityweek.com


AFRICA HOSPITALITY WEEK 2018

AFRICA‘S FINEST

F&B CONFERENCE PROGRAMMES Africa Hospitality Week‘s advisory board of 25 key industry professionals offer their insight and expertise to ensure the conference programmes are relevant to you

Patrick Fisher Director of Food & Beverage One & Only Cape Town

THREE SHOWS MAKE PREMIER AFRICAN HOSPITALITY EVENT THREE EXCITING EXHIBITIONS, TWO CONFERENCES UNDER ONE ROOF – SERVING SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA’S GROWING HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND CATERING SECTORS.

Blake Anderson Complex Executive Chef Montecasino, Tsogo Sun

Ashwin Jose General Manager Sun International

source everything from new ingredients, to

GET AHEAD OF NEW FOOD REGS

finished products, processing, packaging

New South African hygiene regulations

and logistics solutions.

will be introduced this year.

& beverage event since 2001, where visitors

• iHost, new for 2018, is the showcase for

The new Regulation R364 will

suppliers of innovative technologies &

affect any transportation of food and

equipment for foodservice, catering and

the responsible person – head chef

back of house operations.

or manager – will need to oversee

Africa Hospitality Week 2018 brings together

ongoing training for staff.

suppliers, buyers and thought leaders in

Christine Davidson, Vice President of dmg

South Africa from June 24-26.

events, organiser of Africa Hospitality Week

person, why not enjoy yourself at Africa

And if you are that responsbile

2018, said: “This is a a key show for the

Hospitality Week 2018 and discover the

Africa last year - up 8% year on year - the

continent as hotel room numbers are growing

new regulations?

hospitality sector is one of the continent

strongly, thanks to new investment and

biggest commercial successes... and it’s set

visitor numbers are up with a more than 70%

experts and a RSA Department of

to continue.

occupancy across East, West and Southern

Health representative to explain the

Africa this year.”

changes.

With 63 million international arrivals in

Africa Hospitality Week 2018 is set to

Organisers have invited hygiene

Africa Hospitality Week 2018 includes

Training is free and it is part

Africa’s three key exhibitions:

two conferences, which run over the three

of an extensive conference and

• The Hotel Show Africa brings global

attract more than 15 000 decision makers to

days, bringing expert speakers and panelists

demonstration programme during

exhibitors showcasing products across

from around the world to The Hospitality

the three days of Africa Hospitality

interiors, lighting and design, technology,

Leadership Forum 2018 and The Food

Week 2018, June 24-26 at The

security, catering equipment and more.

Leadership Forum 2018.

Gallagher Convention Centre,

www.africahospitalityweek.com

Johannesburg.

• Africa’s Big 7 is the continent’s leading food

39


CHALMAR BEEF

CHALMAR FARM KITCHEN

ALIVE AND COOKING

Y

ou bought the meat, now what? After calling a friend, digging out old recipe books, hours on the internet and peppering the supplier with questions; you feel no closer to preparing the perfect roast, the juiciest steak or fall-off-the-bone lamb shoulder. It’s this all-toofamiliar kitchen moment which inspired Chalmar Beef to launch the Chalmar Farm Kitchen. The Chalmar Farm Kitchen is the brainchild of Mrs Pat Wethmar, the Chalmar matriarch. From her own kitchen on the farm she shares her recipes and wisdom. Guest chef, Anja Bands, joins her in the kitchen. Together they will explore new ideas, revisit the classics and cook with the bounty of the seasons. “Our farm kitchen is a generous, happy place with so many memories. We look forward to sharing our most treasured recipes and fresh, new ideas with everyone who enjoys cooking and eating together as much as we do,” says Pat.

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HOW IT ALL BEGAN

Story-telling is as much part of Pat Wethmar’s kitchen activities as gathering family recipes and fetching herbs from her garden. The story of how she met her late husband Wimpie, founder of Chalmar Beef, is often told in this generous kitchen. The old saying ‘big things have small beginnings’ certainly holds true for their life together. Times were tough in those early days. Wimpie started Chalmar Beef in 1969 and met Pat eight years later where they lived on their farm in Bapsfontein until his passing in 2014. It’s wonderful that he saw his dream fulfilled and knowing that the next generation will build on what he started. He often spoke about having a steakhouse with a small group of friends – a timeshare of sorts where each had a key and could prepare as much steak as they wanted for their own family and friends.

A GUEST CHEF IN THE CHALMAR FARM KITCHEN Anja Bands, who joins Pat Wethmar in the Chalmar Farm Kitchen, also lives on a farm in

Bapsfontein and has a longstanding relationship with Chalmar Beef. She brings her food mantra to the Chalmar Farm Kitchen: “I believe in family meals and bringing people together at the table; I believe in old recipes with a new twist and that real flavour can only come from real food. I believe that only the best meat - Chalmar Beef and Lamb – will do”, concludes Bands.

FOOD FOCUS

January has its own rhythm in the Chalmar Farm Kitchen. It’s a time for new beginnings, with easy dinners and back-to-workand-school activities taking centre stage. Chef Anja Bands and Chalmar matriarch Pat Wethmar turn to mince for inspiration. For more information on the recipes using mince, visit our Facebook page www.facebook.com/chalmarbeef.


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SPOTLIGHT

© CATHAL MAC AN BHEATHA VIA UNSPLASH

TRENDING ON FIRE “How long?” yells the chef at the pass, to the brigade of South Africa. “We have new demands to meet, expectations to fulfil and killer dishes to send out!” - By Jodi-Ann Palmer

N

ew. Fresh. Authentic. Flavourful. Diverse. South African consumers demand to experience the colourful and fresh poke bowls of Hawaii, flavourfully balanced ramen from Japan, and expertly cooked eggs in shakshuka from Jerusalem. Globalisation has us spinning off the plate as the South African culinary community breaks down boundaries by interacting with the different cultures from all over the ever-changing globe. With access to kitchens such as Noma, Osteria Francescana and 11 Madison Park on social media, a local chef gains exposure like no other has done before him or her ten years ago. Rene Redzepi posts a picture of a razor clam and before you know it, razor clams are a hot commodity. The ordinary does not cut it any longer - not even with the sharpest Japanese knife. International influence on

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the local market has drastically changed the way we dine, the way we prepare food and the expectation of the South African consumer. South African food has long been known as a collaboration of cultures: Zulu, Xhosa, Shona, Lebanese, Jewish, Italian, Portuguese, Chinese, Indian, Greek, English and Boer traditions are living in one groot potjie pot over a rather turbulent flame. History has dictated our heritage, allowed us to absorb knowledge from our families, communities and people with whom we share our time. As we draw inspiration from our individual heritage we begin to find similarities in the way we cook and the ingredients we use, often crossing paths with someone in the industry who shares the nostalgia of a potato salad and a braai chop. With that being said, the culinary industry is boiling over with information on different cultures,

cuisines and ingredients from around the world. We now have access to information and ingredients which, up until a few years ago, we may not have known existed. “How long?” shouts the chef again. Our heritage, as South Africans, is an ideal starting point for any international trend. (The trouble is that sometimes it must be “international first”.) There is something democratic about the way we combine flavours and cooking methods from the different cultures of our country and the world. To braai is as South African as Queen Elizabeth is British. It defines our identity as citizens. Open fire cooking is an example of a South African trend that is truly and irrevocably ours. Yet, we had to wait for the “trend train” to burst into flames before we begun to see cool, local, open fire restaurants such as La Boqueria hitting our streets. “Two minutes!” replies the line cook.


SPOTLIGHT

Why is open fire cookery relevant?

The above is not new to us at all. The streets of Fordsburg are lined with Pakistani cooks and their open fire grills. Steers have coined the phrase “Flame-grilled, it just tastes better” and Spur has long been a South African “fire house.” (Say Yoh Yoh Yoh!) Using the open flame for centuries, one might argue it was in fact an African trend to begin with. Meat and flame enthusiasts have been sharing a meal under the light of the stars since before our generation could eat. Cooking with fire is more than preparing a meal to consume. The act is social, engaging and rewarding. If you have a woodfired pizza oven in your backyard, a Weber or a couple of bricks and an old grid you understand the joy of cooking on an open flame. We have heard it all before. What is it about this trend that makes our kitchens come alive? Besides the

demand from the consumer is. Staying ahead of the trends is vital for restaurants and individual chefs to remain relevant in an industry that can be ruthless and tough. With increasing numbers of people opting for the world of all things culinary, it is important to be well-researched and knowledgeable by staying ahead of the times. Not all trends are here to stay. Ask yourself about longevity, practicality, and resources before implementing a trend. However, when you find yourself gleaming with pride at your charcoal sourdough, wood fire bone marrow and chargrilled tomahawk let it be said: “Service!”

© PAUL HERMANN VIA UNSPLASH

1. It is the essence of who we are as a nation – coal runs through our veins and in our souls we have flames. Name one South African, in fact name one South African chef who does not braai. Ever. Not even once. This is our nation’s common ground, our personality. 2. The flavours – I am not even going to elaborate because we all know the taste I speak of, that smell which drifts through the air on a sunny Sunday afternoon. 3. Versatility – cooking with an open flame changes the game. Smoking, grilling directly on the coals and directly in the ash; the limits are merely the boundaries of your imagination. 4. Colour and texture – caramelised; crispy yet succulent and tender on the inside, juicy. 5. Functional and practical – high heat means quick cooking, or cook low and slow to develop sauces and different cuts of meat.

flames of course. Shall we take it a step further? Just let the coals develop. Use embers to flavour oils for mayonnaise, creams and milk to make ice creams and desserts. Combine activated charcoal into your sour dough starter or using the “smoky-burnt flavour” in tartare and cocktails. Break down the bold flavour of the braai and use it in a way that elevates and adds value to other dishes. This is how you use a trend: grab it, take it apart, study and reinvent. Braaiing is merely the fire lighter; the international open-fire trend has us all set alight. The key lies in figuring out why it is a trend, how we merge what we know already, what we are learning and what the

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CHEF SHOWCASE

PISSALADIERE WITH SEA WISE JOB, BLACK SALT, THYME HOLLANDAISE - ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE FOODBARN

CHEF FRANCK DANGEREUX

GORGONZOLA PARFAIT AND ROASTED PEARS

CHEF SHOWCASE:

FRANCK DANGEREUX SA Chef Editor in Chief, Katie Reynolds-Da Silva, spoke to Chef Franck, who heads up The Foodbarn, about his food philosophy, his legacy as a chef, and more.

What is your food philosophy? Food must be civilised without being pretentious. It needs natural tastes, smells and textures, and a firm character. It needs to look beautiful too – but what is paramount is that it is prepared with respect, savvy and love... Then it is the right food for us to eat.

What do you want your legacy as a chef to be?

To be remembered as someone who puts deliciousness first. I also hope that I would have helped influence the young guys

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and girls that worked with me to cook with abandon and passion while pushing through the real hardships of our profession.

Which ingredient is overrated?

Bad quality balsamic vinegar. Rather give me a decent red wine vinegar any day!

What do you cook when you want to show off?

To show off? Hmm… It would be more trying to nail a food and wine pairing rather than just a dish – something truly amazing

happens when a dish is washed down with the perfect pairing.

What should South African’s be eating more of? Vegetables… All of them!

When and how did you know you wanted to be a chef? From age four I knew I loved to eat, and a few years later I knew I wanted to eat delicious food as much as possible. From age 12 I started to cook, and I never stopped. It is still unclear in my mind if I cook because I love to eat, or the other way around.


CHEF SHOWCASE

CALAMARI, SEAWEED MAYO, AVOCADO, SOY SYRUP

ABOUT FRANCK DANGEREUX Franck was born in France (Cannes) and born in food. Every holiday involved a family feast and not only was his mother a phenomenal cook but so were his grandmothers. They taught Franck about going to the market and smelling the produce and choosing the finest ingredients. Franck says his earliest memories were strongly connected to food. “My gran who lived in Nice cooked delicious food for us – rabbit with red wine, cep mushrooms and prunes. Asparagus with a vinegary, creamy sauce, strawberries with homemade custard.” By his early teens he knew that he wanted to work with food and at 15 he started at the Nice Hotel School which was incredibly tough at the time. He trained at the Hotel School for three years and then trained with Roger Verge of Moulin de Mougins. By the age of 18 he started working at Michelin 3-star restaurants in Paris, and has been working ever since. As a young chef Franck was fascinated with experimenting with ingredients and the adventure was about trying different combinations, by his own admission some dishes “were disgusting!” Franck travelled to St Bart in the Caribbean where he started a laid-back restaurant at the top of a hill. Whilst working in the Caribbean he came to South Africa on a holiday in 1987 to see an uncle he barely knew and was

SEAWEED BRIOCHE, BABY SQUID, INK AND GINGER SAUCE, TARRAGON OIL

blown away by the country. It was his first visit to South Africa and the people, the mountain, the climate and the light delighted and enthralled Franck so much that he stayed for an entire month. Franck returned to the Caribbean, and also worked in Northern Africa, but South Africa and Cape Town in particular stayed prominently in his mind. After Nelson Mandela’s release, he felt that there were exciting times and opportunities in South Africa and he made his way back to his uncle. Franck started working with Franck Swainston at Constantia Uitsig. For Franck it was a new phase of his adventures as a chef. There was a gastronomical revolution happening in South Africa and Franck’s enjoyment of being in the kitchen and working with about 10 other chefs as part of the movement was a quest. Franck had grown up and his pursuit in the world of food was to achieve perfection and to cook with sensibility, simplifying his dishes to the perfect combinations. In 1996 he created La Colombe restaurant on Constantia Uitsig farm. It is no surprise that during his 10 years there La Colombe was voted restaurant of the year six times. He was placed 28th on the list of the world’s best restaurants in 2006. Franck is humble though and despite his achievements, numerous awards and an elevated status with a huge fan base and following, for Franck the pleasure revolved

around the enjoyment of cooking and having happy patrons. Franck’s next adventure was joining up with Pete de Bruin and starting the Foodbarn at Noordhoek Farm Village. Linked to a stage in his personal life, Franck had met his wife and with two boys (now 15 and 18 years old) and a lifestyle that Franck had always dreamed of, the move to Noordhoek was and still is an exciting challenge. The Foodbarn was partly motivated by spending time with his family; partly motivated by riding and training his horses and partly based on a new phase of his career. Having left the world of fine dining, Franck wanted to bring his experience and food savvy and introduce better food to a broader audience of people. As Franck says, “I want fine dining brought to the streets – the more people know about the ingredients of a dish and the more exposure people have to better food, the more people will want to eat well.” Franck’s latest quest is to share his knowledge with other people and create a culture of unpretentious but fine dining. Franck has shared this knowledge with his passionate team and staff and now is sharing that with the public. Look out for Franck’s cooking demonstrations which run during the winter month, live in the restaurant on Wednesday nights.

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CHEF SHOWCASE

FARMED COB TARTARE WITH WALNUTS, SCALLOP, COCOA BUTTER

ASIAGO, TRUFFLE AND 5 HERBS RISOTTO, GRILLED OYSTERS

THE CURRENCY OF TIME IS MORE VALUABLE THAN MONEY IN SO MANY WAYS TO FRANCK, AND LIKE ALL PEOPLE DOING REAL THINGS, CREATING TIME TO ENJOY THE THINGS WE LOVE AND NOT RUSH IS WHAT LIFE IS ALL ABOUT.

À LA CARTE MENU MAIN COURSE

STEAK AU POIVRE Sirloin served fat on, with mash fritter and classic pepper and brandy sauce ~ Mullineux Syrah 2015

GRILLED SUSTAINABLE FISH Fresh mussels, duxelle and ricotta dollari,

KAROO LAMB RACK

edamame beans, mussel velouté with chives

Roasted with crumbs and sliced, petite

~ Yardstick Chardonnay

pissaladière, rich garlic jus ~ Restless River Cabernet

FISH “NOISETTE”

Sauvignon 2014

Sustainable fish pan-fried, celeriac mousseline, croutons, tender leaves and

OFFAL: TRIPE

hazelnut butter and balsamic syrup

Slow braised ox tripe with sheep trotters,

~ Chris Alheit Cartology 2016

tomato, chilli and Tunisian spices ~ Duncan Savage Red (Syrah, Grenache,

RISOTTO (VEGETARIAN)

Cinsault) 2016

Green asparagus and summer herbs with asiago and mustard seed mascarpone

POLENTA FRITTES (VEGAN)

Optional: prawns

Polenta frittes, chickpea tagine, mild

~ Buitenverwachting Husseys

harissa, cinnamon oil

Vlei 2009

~ Chris Alheit Cartology 2016

GOATS CHEESE FRITTER, TOMATO TERRINE, BASIL AND CHILI CARAMEL

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SALTED SHORTBREAD, CARAMELISED APPLES, CINNAMON ICE CREAM

Sharing is caring but have no fear, he will still be waking up in the middle of the night with new ideas for an exciting combination for a new dish so keep visiting as the menu is continuously changing with the seasons and the “midnight dishes” from Franck’s head. The Foodbarn is very conscious about local support and all ingredients are sourced locally where possible (with a maximum 100km radius of Cape Town). Franck believes in supporting the people who work around him for the long-term sustainability of our people and our planet. Franck Dangereux – chef extraordinaire is loving life in Noordhoek and at Noordhoek Farm Village. He spends time with his family, he rides and trains his horses, he lives two minutes from work and he loves what he does and loves sharing that. Perhaps Franck’s greatest challenge is one that we all face in our day-to-day living and that is time – the currency of time is more valuable than money in so many ways to Franck, and like all people doing real things, creating time to enjoy the things we love and not rush is what life is all about.


SAVOUR THE SUMMER WITH THIS EASY, CHEESY SALAD Kasselshoop Cheese Makers in Stilbaai are handcrafting some of SA’s most interesting flavoured, colourant-free cheeses. Try the unique flavour of their nettle white Cheddar in this fresh, delicious Nettle-Infused Cheddar & Parma Ham Salad. INGREDIENTS: •

180 g Kasselshoop White Cheddar with Nettle and Onion Marmalade

150 g asparagus

Salt and pepper

80 g baby spinach leaves; washed

70 g Parma ham

1 avocado; peeled and sliced

50 g almonds; roughly chopped

Olive oil; to dress

Balsamic glaze; to dress

METHOD: 1. Blanch asparagus in boiling water for 1 minute and then refresh in ice-cold water. 2. Season with salt and pepper and divide between two plates. 3. Scatter each plate with the baby spinach leaves. 4. Slice the cheese and add it to the salad together with the onion marmalade (included in the pack), Parma ham and avocado. 5. Scatter salad with chopped almonds and drizzle lightly with a little olive oil and balsamic glaze just before serving.

NEED INGREDIENTS?

Call 0861 SAVING or go to www.checkersfs.co.za

PAIR WITH:

A crisp, refreshing Chenin Blanc from our exclusive Oakridge wine range.

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QUALITY SUPPLIER TO THE HOSPITALITY & CATERING INDUSTRY


FEATURE

CONJURING UP

THE PERFECT BREW Kim Crowie speaks to two local brewers to find out why the craft beer sector is buzzing, and what it takes to break into this niche business.

U

nique, quality brews are worth their weight in gold – both for the brewer and the drinker. And in SA, there are craft breweries to rival the best of them. Two such companies, Red Sky and 1000 Hills, give us a unique peek into their exceptional flavours and ethos. 1000 Hills, formerly known as Porcupine Quill Brewing Co, is the older of the two, established in 2009. It forms part of the 1000 Hills Chef School where advanced students learn the art of craft beer brewing. Their most popular beer with the female market is a strong Belgian ale – surprising as it sports an ABV of 9%, proving that “you don’t have to be a bearded hipster to enjoy craft beer,” says Trevor Maarschalk. Red Sky has been dedicated to hand-crafted beer-making since its inception in 2013. They are one of the only breweries mashing in a wine barrel, and have just launched two new easy-drinking beers on the market: the Gripen Lager and the Messer Schmitt Weiss. They’re also expanding into Johannesburg and Mpumalanga. I spoke to Trevor of

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1000 Hills, and Gemma and Clinton Steyn of Red Sky to find out more.

What does it mean to be well-versed in the art of craft beer brewing?

1000 Hills: In true craft tradition, we prefer not to follow any particular style too closely but rather experiment with our own styles. Most of our beers follow a pale ale style. This particular style covers a range of flavours and appearances and suits how we brew our beers.

Which of your beers are most popular?

Red Sky: We find that there is a beer for every personality, the Avenger Pale Ale is a nice easydrinking all-round enjoyable and popular ale, while our award-winning Vampire Porter has a diehard following from the craft beerdrinking community, we cater for those who enjoy beer but suffer from gluten intolerance with our Goshawk Gluten free beer and have been privileged to collaborate with Beyerskloof winery in creating a wine beer blend, the Pinotale.

Extraordinary flavour plays a key role in craft beer. How do you ensure your beer has the flavour people are looking for?

1000 Hills: Our recipes have been developed over time by experimenting and making many test brews. Our range covers a light and easy drinking pilsner, through a variety of ales to a strong and dark style ale. Each Belgian recipe has a different malt bill, drawing speciality malts from across the globe. Hops are where the focus is from a flavour and aroma perspective; here we are fortunate to have access to a locally grown hop variety from the Oudtshoorn region that delivers amazing fruity aromas. Think litchi, passion fruit and stone fruit when sipping our IPA. Red Sky: Our beers are hand crafted, and we tend to have a wider selection due to being able to brew smaller batches. We strive to create a craft beer for every palate, and being a microbrewery, we have the flexibility to play around with our yeast, malt and hops. The unique flavour profiles found in craft beer are not added but rather brewed out using high


FEATURE

quality ingredients and methods. Our flavours are also more concentrated because greater care is taken in not sparge it out. The aromas of the hops that are being imported differ substantially from mainstream labels.

How do you set yourselves apart from the rest?

1000 Hills: As our brewery is part of 1000 Hills Chef School, we are spoilt with many exceptional palates that lend a hand in developing recipes. Our five main beers labels cater for most tastes, but there is an exciting new label being launched soon which

covers seasonal brews which will push the limits to the max. The main ingredients needed to be a proper craft brewery are guts, determination and a whole heap of passion. Red Sky: Choose your style and stay true to it, with so many options available it can get difficult not to get swept up in all of the trends. Of course we don’t mean that you shouldn’t play around, but establish and perfect your core range first. You need be the master of your craft!

What trends have you noticed? Red Sky: Sour beers seem to

be gaining momentum, as well as breweries collaborating with other breweries. 1000 Hills: The most exciting thing for us is the number of food and beer pairing events that are taking place across the country. This is a new trend that explores the complementary or contrasting flavours of dishes and the paired beers. This space was traditionally taken up with wine, but beer offers in our opinion a far wider range of differing tastes, which can pair extremely well with a carefully selected dish.

RED SKY BREW

Born out of enjoying a refreshing cold one while watching the red African dusk approaching. Red Sky Brewery is situated in the Helderberg basin and is a real South African micro brewery: handcrafting quality brews perfect for every occasion. Well known for our award winning porter, gluten-free beer and a speciality wineinfused beer in colaboration with the Beyerskloof winery. Visit our brewery, watch our master crafters at work, support the local community and enjoy a fantastic tasting experience. Unit 2, 9 Industria Road, Mansfield Industrial Park, Gordons Bay, 7140 T: +27 79 644 0981 / +27 82 888 7622 E: lendl@redskybrew.co.za / clint@redskybrew.co.za

1000 HILLS BREWERY

Established in 2009, 1000 Hills Brewery forms part of 1000 Hills Chef School in KZN. This brings a unique approach to brewing – with flavour top of mind. In pairing food with beer, flavours can complement or contrast each other to build a rewarding dining experience. Spicy food works well with hoppy beers while braais and malty beers match. Our fun range of ales varies from the standard 4.5% ABV to the hearty 9% ABV “Foreign Exchange Student”, and they can of course be enjoyed on their own too.

Brew

Brew

2 Wootton Avenue, PO Box 15, Botha’s Hills KZN, 3660 | Opening hours: Friday, Saturday and Sunday - 8:30 am to 4:00 pm T: +27 31 777 1566 E: trevor@craftbrewers.co.za www.1000hillsbrewery.co.za

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OPINION

ARE CHEFS

STILL SEXY? By Stephen Hickmore.

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Š JENNIFER PALLIAN VIA UNSPLASH

S

ome five years back, I read a study which asked 2 000 people what they believed was the sexiest profession for a prospective partner. 27% said that Chefs are sexiest. Yes, sexier than pilots, doctors, firemen and of course, lawyers. Chefs were top of the sweetheart tree. I have played this useful statistic to encourage young people to become Chefs. I mean, lets be frank, those long working hours and poor pay need some mitigating factors to encourage millennials to join the foodie world. But my chef friends, things are beginning to slip. The latest research by dating site Tinder, reveals that Chefs no longer feature in the top ten sexiest jobs. I was horrified to see that lawyers, doctors and even accountants rank higher. Frankly, you have let it slip in the past few years. In my opinion, a prospective suiter still finds the profession irresistibly sexy. Indeed, the skills and techniques used in cooking are similar to the art of seduction, don’t you think? Sensitivity, passion and an adventurous appetite? The seductive sizzle of a pan as things start to get hot, the change of pace as a rich, smooth, glistening chocolate sauce drizzles over a slowly melting vanilla ice cream. A sharp breath of desire as she bites into a strawberry mille feuille. The moan of ecstasy as the puff pastry flakes on her lips. But I digress.


OPINION

It’s seductive to watch a person cook, it shows a softer and more vulnerable side to a soul. Cooking is an ancient and mysterious ritual of many a past epoch, climaxing in an edible fantasy to be devoured with a gentle understanding of beauty. Cooking is undeniably sexy. I am getting lyrically saucy I know. Let’s get back to my point. Chefs, why have you let it slip? Once featuring top of the sexy careers to crashing to the same level as used car salespeople, politicians and self-obsessed male models.

HERE ARE MY TOP FOUR REASONS:

The rise and fall of the celebrity chef – It’s a simple matter of over

exposure. One cannot avoid cooking programmes on TV. MasterChef, My Kitchen Rules, Iron Chef and anything with the terminally unsexy (in my opinion) Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsey. Even Nigella has lost her once voluptuous appeal. Today’s celeb chefs are destined for the cutting-room floor to join the once great Fanny Craddock, Floyd and the Galloping Gourmet. The deluge of Culinary TV is, quite honestly, boring. These days any self-respecting life partner will turn and run at the very sight of chefs whites, even if it adorns the hottest body. Sprinting away, a la Usain Bolt, from a life of crushing monotony. Publicity is ruining your once unassailable provocative mojo.

Long hours – Chefs are married to the kitchen. This is most unattractive to any individual you pledge to put above all others in your life, till death do us part. The kitchen is a seductive affair, that Valentino, that Liz Taylor, that Christian Grey. Maybe you’re trapped in a love triangle that only a change of profession can solve Money –Some people marry for love and are attracted by things that are beautiful character traits. But, lets be honest, potential partners are still keen on financial security. Compared to a lawyer, doctor, pilot or accountant, a Chef is likely to have a lower salary. To put it bluntly, when Jeffrey the candidate attorney and Julia the Maxillofacial surgeon are flashing around their high-value black credit cards, the average chef is trying to pull the last coppers out of his or her pocket. The truth is, according to the latest surveys, people are attracted to a partner with a steady job, good prospects and financial security. That is perhaps the reason why your buddy at the law firm or your BFF at the auditing company are getting all the dates. Fact of life. Flowery language – Yep, the

kitchen is no place for the overly sensitive. It amazes me that chefs can create food that inspires romantic poetry, beautiful music, and whimsical art. But, are completely incapable of threading a sentence together without a random expletive! Take

my advice, F bombs do not maketh for successful dating. Also, insisting that your partner replies to your inspired bedroom propositions with “Yes, Chef” is likely to tempt violence rather than passion. Chefs, all is not lost. Fret not thyself. Please don’t go out and search for a new job in a, so called, “sexier” career. The good news is, the unattached and eligible rank ‘cooking’ at the top of their most desirable commodities in a lover. Rest assured, no matter how many gastronomic courses the accountant goes on or how many Nigella books the pilot reads. No matter what fancy schmancy kitchen aids Dr Julia buys or how many episodes of Bake off Advocate Thabo watches; these half-baked dilettantes will never be able to inspire, entertain, seduce and satisfy with the same culinary poise and coolness of a professional chef. Give yourself a break occasionally and stop working so hard. Tell everyone to watch re-runs of Top Gear (boring car programme on BBC Prime) and not cooking shows. Learn some new words that don’t rhyme with duck, I find reading the odd book good for the ol’ vocab. I find the word Zabaglioni and fillet Mignon decidedly sexy, but that’s just me I guess. Finally, ask your boss for a raise (no innuendo intended). Then I promise you that Professional Chef will be top of the sexiest careers before you can say croquembouche.

THE SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES USED IN COOKING ARE SIMILAR TO THE ART OF SEDUCTION, DON’T YOU THINK? SENSITIVITY, PASSION AND AN ADVENTUROUS APPETITE? THE SEDUCTIVE SIZZLE OF A PAN AS THINGS START TO GET HOT,THE CHANGE OF PACE AS A RICH, SMOOTH, GLISTENING CHOCOLATE SAUCE DRIZZLES OVER A SLOWLY MELTING VANILLA ICE CREAM.

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RECIPE

OIL POACHED SALMON Olive oil poached, cured salmon with a melange of baby vegetable, citrus gastrique and lemon puree. Recipe by Jodi-Ann Palmer.

TYPE OF DISH: APPETIZER SALMON: • 4 x 100g salmon fillet portions

PR EP TI M E: ES 60 M IN UT TI M E: CO OK IN G ES 10 0 M IN UT SE RV IN G: LE 4 PE OP

• 250g coarse salt • 60g castor sugar • 5g fennel seeds • 3g coriander seeds • 5g black pepper, coarsely ground • 1 lemon zest • 45ml good quality cognac • 60ml fresh dill, chopped • 25g olive oil

SPICE CRUST: • 2 lemons, zest

LEMON PUREE:

• 15ml fennel seeds, toasted

• 6 lemons

BLACK GREMOLATA MAYONNAISE:

• 5ml mustard seeds, toasted

• 25g butter

• 2 whole eggs

• 8ml black pepper, coarsely ground

• 250g water

• 5ml cognac mustard

• 5ml smoked salt

• 50g castor sugar

• 5ml white wine vinegar

• 5g salt

• 6 cloves fresh garlic • 30ml squid ink

1. Mix together the rock salt, sugar, spices, lemon zest, cognac and chopped dill. 2. Place this salt mix over and under the

with a peeler. 2. In a small pot cover the lemon zest with

• 400ml vegetable oil • 8ml salt • 5ml white pepper

salmon fillet portions in a tray and

cold water and a pinch of salt. Bring to

• 90ml parsley, finely chopped

leave to marinate in fridge for one hour.

boil, strain off and rinse under cold water.

• 40ml lemon zest

3. After an hour rinse the salmon fillet under cold running water and then

Repeat this process three times. 3. When this is done cover the zest with

1. Place the eggs, mustard,

pat dry. Leave uncovered in the

water and castor sugar, bring to boil then

vinegar, garlic cloves

refrigerator until you cook it.

reduce heat to simmer and cook out for

and squid ink and blend

40 minutes.

thoroughly with a stick

4. Wrap each portion tightly in cling film after rubbing in olive oil and then vacuum them. 5. Cook in a water bath at 41 degrees celcius for 13 minutes. 6. Refresh in an ice bath immediately after removing from the circulator. 7. Before serving dust with the spice mix.

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1. Remove the zest of all the lemons

4. Strain off the zest keeping the cooking liquid. Place the zest in a thermomix with

blender. 2. Gradually add the oil until a

the butter, 50ml of cooking liquid, 10g of

thick emulsion is created.

lemon juice and a pinch of salt. Mix at 90

3. Season well with salt and

degrees celsius medium to high speed for approx 10 min. Pass through a fine sieve. Cool down on ice and place in a piping bag.

pepper 4. Stir the parsley and lemon zest through the mayonnaise.


RECIPE

VEGETABLES:

1. Peel the radishes carefully and

• 4 spears green asparagus, peeled • 40g green peas, blanched and peeled • 4 micro carrots, peeled and blanched

sugar dissolves and reduces to a

2. Heat all the pickling ingredients together and bring to a gentle

• 40g yellow corn kernels, smoked

2. Cook over medium heat until the

halve them.

thick syrup, about 10 to 15 minutes. 3. Remove from the heat and place in a

boil.

heatproof bowl so the mixture stops

3. Remove from the heat and

cooking.

cool slightly. 1. Cut the stalks of the asparagus into thin, 4cm rectangles and slice the

4. Place the radishes in this mixture for as long as possible.

TO SERVE: PEA FRONDS 1. Brush the mayonnaise down the

top of the spear into 3 thin slices.

centre of each plate and carefully

Blanch in salted water and then

BLACK CITRUS GASTRIQUE:

place the salmon to the left centre

refresh.

• 1 orange, zest

of the stripe with a dusting of the

2. Slice the carrots into thin slices

• 80ml orange juice

length ways and set aside all

• 60ml champagne vinegar

vegetables for plating.

• 1 bay leaf

spice mix on it. 2. Carefully plate the various garnishes and vegetables on either

• 5ml green pepper corns

PICKLED RADISH:

• 1 star anise

• 8 micro radishes

• 125ml sugar

• 125ml cider vinegar • 80ml water

side of the salmon. 3. Pipe dots of lemon puree on the plate amongst the vegetables. 4. Dot gastrique amongst the vegetables.

1. Combine citrus zest, juice,

• 80 sugar

sugar, spices and vinegar in a

5. Garnish with pea fronds.

• 15ml pickling spices

saucepan.

6. Serve at ambient temperature.

Proudly worn by Miles Kubheka - Entrepreneur, Chef and Founder of Vuyo’s Restaurants

The BAKERS & CHEFS™ uniform range is manufactured and designed to meet the high demands of the restaurant and commercial food services category. Long and short-sleeved standard and executive jackets come in a range of colours, plus the traditional blue-and-white checked and the ‘fashionable black’ chefs pants. Included in the range are bibs and bistro aprons. The BAKERS & CHEFS™ high quality range has got you covered. Available in all Makro stores except PMB

Visit us online for an extended range

makro.co.za


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OPPORTUNITIES Your next business opportunity or dream job could be right here…

© HELENA YANKOVSKA VIA UNSPLASH

MARKET CATERERS PASTRY CHEF

Market Caterers is a busy events company catering to events in the corporate, sporting, leisure and concert sectors, among others. They are currently searching for a skilled and passionate Pastry Chef to support the team. The ideal candidate will have previous experience, enjoys working in a busy environment, and is capable of taking direction well. They are also able to multi task efficiently. The company’s head office is situated in the south of Johannesburg, near Turffontein race course.

Requirements:

• High school diploma • 3+ years’ culinary experience • Previous experience managing a pastry kitchen preferred • Able to read and follow standardised recipes • Strong knowledge of proper food handling procedures • Able to work as part of a team in a busy environment Please send your CV and written references to Stephen Ferreira at Stephen@marketcaterers.co.za.

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HEAD BARMAN AT ICONIC HOTEL

The Boardroom Recruitment seeks a skilled and experienced Head Barman for a luxury hotel in Cape Town. Potential candidates should be presentable, well-spoken and motivated team leaders with a minimum of 2-3 years’ experience with large, 4 or 5 star properties. They will be responsible for dayto-day running of the bar, staff, training, stock control, reports, etc. Candidates will also maintain a thorough working knowledge of beverage menus, and be able to advise guests on selection, as well as promote additional beverage sales accordingly in a professional and courteous manner.

Requirements:

• 2-3 years’ previous experience • Excellent track record and stable career history • Excellent knowledge of wines, cocktails, and alcoholic beverages • Sound management ability and people skills Applications should include an updated CV in Word format, copies of relevant qualifications, a friendly profile photo in professional attire (shoulders and up), and written and contactable references. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. For more information or to apply, contact info@ theboardroomrecruitment.com or visit www.hoteljobs.co.za.

EXECUTIVE PASTRY CHEF AT 5* HOTEL The Boardroom Recruitment seeks a skilled and experienced Head Pastry Chef for a five-star luxury hotel in Cape Town. Education, experience and competencies should include: • A la carte, contemporary and creative • Experience in both fine dining and banqueting • Responsible for supplying all outlets from the main pastry kitchen • Oversee daily high tea • Tertiary Chef’s qualification required; sugar craft and chocolate highly preferred • 3-4 years in a senior pastry chef role • Solid management skills Applications should include an updated CV in Word format, copies of relevant qualifications, a friendly profile photo in professional attire (shoulders and up), and written and contactable references. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. For more information or to apply, contact info@theboardroomrecruitment. com or visit www.hoteljobs.co.za.


© TRAVIS GROSSEN VIA UNSPLASH

PRIVATE LUXURY GAME RESERVE CHEF

OPPORTUNITIES

The salary package is R10 000 CTC, accommodation is provided, and additional benefits will be discussed during the interview process. To apply, send an updated CV in a Word document with a recent photo and contactable references to Recruit for Africa at info@ recruitforafrica.com or visit www. recruitforafrica.com for more info.

Recruit for Africa is looking for an experienced chef to join one of their five-star lodges within a private game reserve located in the Hluhluwe area. The success candidate will be responsible for training chefs and implementing kitchen standards, stock control, administration, proactive maintenance, and a range of kitchen management responsibilities. They will prepare creative bush banqueting according to a Food Style Guide and be responsible for communication with staff what the different dishes are for various meals among other things.

FEEDEM GROUP CHEF CATERING MANAGER

Requirements:

Required Skills

• At least 3+ years of relevant experience • General knowledge of hospitality, the environment, the area, etc. • A valid South African driver’s license • Strong communication, organisational and lateral thinking skills • Must adhere to world-class hospitality and service standards • Honest, integrity, proactive and driven, with career ambitions

The Feedem Group requires the services of a Chef Catering Manager. The successful candidate will need to oversee the catering functions of the contract, and have proven culinary skills in order to be handson and innovative. They will have a love for food and an ability to be creative, and will also have good customer service and communication skills. Computer skills is also required, and having your own transport is essential. Candidates with experience in contract catering are preferred.

• 1-2 years’ experience as a chef • 2-3 years’ experience working in a communicationheavy environment The salary range is between R15 000 and R16 000 basic per month. The Catering Manager will report to a District Manager. Apply before 14 April 2018 via www. careers24.com or contact Feedem for details at Recruitment@feedem.co.za.

HEAD CHEF IN LIMPOPO

© TOA HEFTIBA VIA UNSPLASH

Femminit Recruitment is searching for a Head Chef for their client, who is based in Hoedspruit, Limpopo. Potential candidates must be SACA registered with at least five years’ experience and traceable references. Candidates should also have Matric and other relevant qualifications, and should have worked in the

© FEEDEM GROUP

hospitality industry for 5-6 years. The deadline for applications is 3 April 2018. Apply via www.career24. com or contact Femminit Recruitment on +27 (0)11 029 0909 for details.

EXECUTIVE CHEF

Hospitunity is looking for an Executive Chef to fill a position in the Eastern Cape. You will be a good match for this role if you are a strong manager and have a good grasp of kitchen controls. Potential candidates should be very organised, have a pleasant character and should love training and be an inspiring mentor.

Requirements:

• A stable work history with at least two years in each position • Good references for all previous employers • General kitchen management skills such as staff management, stock controls, food costing, etc. • Previous experience in a similar role at a fine dining restaurant • A la carte experience (preferably gastro-pub) To apply, send your updated CV in Word or PDF format to Carmen at carmen@hospitunity.com, along with a friendly, professional head and shoulders photograph, your chef’s portfolio, and reference details for your three most recent positions. If you have not heard from Hospitunity within seven days of applying, consider your application unsuccessful.

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REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT

CONVIVIUM © C+D HEIERLI PHOTOGRAPHY

CAPE

WOLFGAT © SAM LINSELL

DIE GAAITJIE RESTAURANT

WEST COAST CUISINE

A welcoming region with ocean views to boot, the Cape West Coast is home to stunning eateries, cosy foodie nooks, and seafood of note. Kim Crowie explores its hidden gems.

I

f comfort, relaxation and wholesome goodness with a whiff of sea breeze excite your senses, the Cape West Coast is an ideal getaway. With seaside restaurants galore, and warm, welcoming farm folks to greet you along the way, there’s no end to this region’s charm. The West Coast is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean in the west and the Swartland in the east. It stretches over 400km and is wellknown for its scenic beauty and abundance of seafood. Towns along this route include Saldanha Bay, Paternoster, Vredenburg, Velddrif, St Helena Bay, Langebaan, Hoefield, Darling and Yzerfontein. West Coast National Park is also located here, adding the cherry on top for this already picturesque place.

GOURMET DELIGHTS

Thanks to its location and the unique towns and villages dotting

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the Cape West Coast, a plethora of gourmet surprises are in store for travellers. These range from cosy eateries with stunning ocean views to fabulous farms with mouth-watering menus. Some of the most popular places to find a good meal are in Darling, Paternoster, RiebeekKasteel, and Langebaan.

Chicory Cheese Café

Darling’s much-loved neighbourhood café is ideal for those in search of a lazy breakfast or a leisurely lunch. In addition to its warm, welcoming atmosphere, Chicory Cheese has a vegetarian-friendly menu with freshly-squeezed juices and smoothies, and a convenient kid’s menu. Sit back and enjoy Indian spiced pancakes with curried chickpeas, a Cajun chicken wrap with roasted butternut, bacon

and tzatziki, or chorizo and eggs with marinated aubergine. Location: 5 Long Street, Darling More Info: www.chicorycheese.co.za

Die Gaaitjie Restaurant

Born out of a historic fisherman’s cottage, Gaaitjie has a warm, nostalgic atmosphere in a gorgeous beachside setting. Its eclectic menu features local produce fused with contemporary influences, complete with heaps of fresh fish and seafood to be had. Owner Suzi Holtzhausen ensures each dish is peppered with local delicacies, from oysters and mussels to water lilies and wild asparagus. The original kitchen and hearth of the cottage are centre stage, allowing guests to have a peek at the magic before it reaches their plates. Location: Sampson Street, Kliprug, Paternoster More Info: www.gaaitjie.co.za


REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT

CHEF CHARL COETZEE, RUSSELLS ON THE PORT © DANIE NEL PHOTOGRAPHY

RUSSELLS ON THE PORT

Mama Cucina

A gorgeous little Italian restaurant in Riebeek-Kasteel, Mama Cucina offers fresh, innovative food together with a lovely selection of wines from the valley and further afield. Expect unique pizzas with toppings like aubergine, pulled lamb and Black Forest ham, as well as salmon trout salad and mixed berry panacotta. Mama Cucina’s blackboard menu changes daily, but includes the likes of beef short rib gnocchi, banting lamb burger, and saffron prawn ravioli. Location: Sarel Cilliers Street, Riebeek-Kasteel More Info: www.mamacucina.co.za

Piekenierskloof Mountain Resort

This incredible venue in the Cedarberg Mountains is certainly a getaway to remember. The facilities boast a beautiful, spacious garden, a health and wellness spa, mountain biking and zip-line experiences, as well as a bountiful playground area for kids. Kloof Restaurant on the property offers a welcoming, no-nonsense menu and a lovely wine list, and is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Location: N7 Piekenierskloof Pass, Citrusdal More Info: www.piekenierskloof.co.za

THE WEST COAST IS WELL-KNOWN FOR ITS SCENIC BEAUTY AND ABUNDANCE OF SEAFOOD. Russells on the Port

A lovely seaside venue, Russells on the Port offers gourmet West Coast seafood, lamb rump and crispy pork belly, and has its own vegetable garden for fresh produce. Head Chef Charl Coetzee brings contemporary and seasonal

A FEW MORE DINING OPTIONS Pearly’s: Langebaan’s longest established

dishes to life at Russells, and has something for more casual diners, too, such as wood-fired pizzas and flatbreads. Not to be missed are Russells’ homemade ice cream and sorbets in summer months. Location: 1 Bronwen Avenue, Port Owen, Velddrif More Info: www.russellsontheport.co.za

whipped up by Chef Sandi Collins. Location: Darling Web: www.marmaladecat.co.za

restaurant offering anything from seafood and salad to pizza and stir fry.

The Noisy Oyster: The vibrant seafood

Location: Langebaan

restaurant offers up honest cuisine and, as

Web: www.pearlys.co.za

the name suggests, delicious oysters. Location: Paternoster

Strandkombuis: Located near the historic

Web: www.facebook.com/

saltpans, this rustic, seaside restaurant

noisyoysterpaternoster

is ideal for those in search of home-baked goodness.

The Square Spoon: This Mediterranean-

Location: Yzerfontein

style venue serves a fusion of Afro and

Web: www.strandkombuis.co.za

Portuguese flavour – a feast for the senses.

The Marmalade Cat: This quaint restaurant

Location: Paternoster

in Darling serves an extensive menu

Web: www.facebook.com/TheSquareSpoon

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REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT

FANCY A DRINK? Black Eagle Brewing Co Founded in 2014, Black Eagle offers a variety of tasty, classic beer styles with a unique twist. The company has a taste room in Langebaan, with brews that include the Vonkel, a Berlin-style beer, Weskus Brekfis, a Belgian witbier brewed with honey and spices, and Sirene, a malty, artisanal brew. More Info:

www.bebc.co.za cheers@bebc.co.za

WOLFGAT © SAM LINSELL Darling Brew A must-visit for craft beer fundis, Darling Brew has a unique taste room overlooking its microbrewery, as well as a restaurant serving beer-paired meals. They have 17 brews with fascinating names including The Golden Tail, Rooibok, Slowbeer, and Blood Serpent. More Info:

www.darlingbrew.co.za tasteroom@darlingbrew.co.za Darling Wine Route Darling’s location near the Atlantic makes its vineyards ideal for the production of cool-climate wines. Some of the best-known estates worth visiting in this region are Groote Post, a stunning 18th century farm producing the only Cap Classique in the region, and Darling Cellars’ extensive range of wines. Not to be missed are Cloof Wine Estate’s delectable tasting room lunches and award-winning Crucible Shiraz, and Ormonde Private Cellar, whose wines – like the easy-drinking Alexanderfontein – have great depth and distinctive bouquets. More Info:

www.grootepost.co.za www.darlingcellars.co.za www.cloof.co.za www.ormonde.co.za

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The Royal

Old-world dining at its best, The Royal has a unique setting with seven designated eating areas to choose from, including a 150-yearold colonial pub, a lounge area, and a vast ‘stoep’ to relax on. De Stoep menu offers delightful platters with the likes of rock oysters, smoked springbok carpaccio, gorgonzola, brie and stilton, as well as a decadent dessert platter complete with Dutch apple tart, chocolate cheesecake and rooibos ice cream. Location: 33 Main Street, Riebeek-Kasteel More Info: www.royalinriebeek.com

Voorstrandt Restaurant

A quaint, 114-year-old tin house at the ocean side in Paternoster is home to Voorstrandt Restaurant. Offering sumptuous and soulful seafood meals, some of this venue’s plates include Malay seafood curry, tempura and peri-peri prawns, and a range of other fresh catches – from crayfish and mussels to calamari and fish of the day. Location: Strandloper Street, Paternoster More Info: www.voorstrandt.com

Wolfgat

A decadent coastal dining experience, Wolfgat’s menu is full of indigenous inspiration. Its seven courses draw creative genius from its beach and bush surrounds, with Chef Kobus van der Merwe putting together predominantly seafoodbased dishes, complemented by local seaweeds, veldkos, venison, and fresh garden pickings. Wolfgat has a seasonal tasting menu, with some elements taking weeks to prepare. The exclusive venue only books up to 20 diners per sitting, ensuring it stays as sustainable as possible. Location: 10 Sampson Street, Paternoster More Info: www.wolfgat.co.za

WEST COAST WAY FOODIE ROUTE The West Coast Way Foodie Route is an ideal place to start for anyone who’s unsure of the best places to visit in this region. It covers 14 places with a plethora of food hotspots to explore, such as Ormonde Wines, Club Mykonos, Langebaan Country Estate, Russells on the Port, Velddrif Bokkomlaan, HeronsRest, and Thali Thali Game Lodge. For more information, visit

www.westcoastway.co.za.


REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT

CONVIVIUM © C+D HEIERLI PHOTOGRAPHY

MARVELLOUS MARKETS

This wonderful region of the Western Cape offers visitors all manner of markets and stalls thanks to its abundance in homesteads and fresh produce. Farmer’s markets along the West Coast have anything from fruit and veg to artisanal food and homeware – and they provide a friendly face to cheer you on your way, too.

Camphill Country Market

Set on a beautiful farm in Dassenberg, the Camphill Country Market offers a wide selection of goods including Camphill’s own fresh produce, baked items, herbal workshops and fragrant lotions and soaps. Visiting stallholders create a fabulous market mix. When: The first Sunday of every month More Info: www.camphill.org.za | info@camphill.org.za

Die Plaasmol Farm Stall

About 5km outside Hopefield on the R45 you’ll find Die Plaasmol. This hidden gem is an eatery, farm stall, nursery, petting zoo and pub, so there’s something for everyone who stops by. Visitors to their restaurant

can expect homemade pies, freshly baked breads, and a host of hearty stews. When: Open 7 days a week More Info: www.plaasmol.co.za

Elkanah House Schoolyard Market

Elkanah House in Blouberg hosts a monthly community market filled with mouth-watering bites. Artisanal foods – cheeses, charcuterie and bread – abound, as do activities and workshops. In winter they have cosy log fires, and in summer there’s plenty of space for al fresco dining. When: The last Saturday of each month from 9am – 1pm More Info: www.elkanah.co.za

Groote Post Country Market

Take in the fruit of one of the Cape’s finest wineries together with arts and crafts, gifts and a feast of food. Located in Darling, the market offers a wide selection of gourmet produce, as well as Groote Post’s specially produced Rosé and ice-cold Darling Brew. When: The first Sunday of the month in summer More Info: www.grootepost.co.za

Vygevallei Farm Stall and Wine House

This delightful farm stall has a wholesome menu that includes the likes of lamb and chicken curry and waterlily stew. It also offers freshly baked bread, homemade butter and cheeses, pasta, preserves and delicious local wines – not to mention a small farmyard to entertain the kids. When: Open 7 days a week More Info: vygevallei@gmail.co.za

CHEFS’ CONVIVIUM From the Latin root word for feast, banquet, or more broadly, living together, Convivium is an annual event that takes place in Kalmoesfontein in the Swartland. Showcasing food, chefs and producers in the most primal and unpretentious way possible, Convivium is all about creating great food – and eating it. The 2018 event, which took place in early February, featured chefs like Christiaan Campbell, Neil Rankin, Michael Cooke, Giles Edwards, Michelle Theron and many more, as well as speakers like Manuela Gray, Peter Lebese and Kenan Tatt, David Cope and Andy Fenner. The one-day programme is filled with talks, workshops, forage walks, and interactive tastings. For more information, visit

www.conviviumtable.co.za.

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FEATURE

NUTRITIONAL AND DIETARY

EFFECTS OF FRYING OILS Dietary fats play several important nutritional roles. These, combined with a modern diet, are a major source of energy.

60

Š GABRIEL GURROLA VIA UNSPLASH

T

aste is the most important factor when selecting food. Hence the development of secondary aromatic hydrocarbons play a very important part in frying and the distinctive taste of frying. Dietary fats are a source of essential fatty acids (EFA), and there are two families of fatty acids, namely n-3 and n-6 oleos. Linoleic acid accounts for more than 50% of fatty acids which are found in most frying oils. Dietary fats are a carrier of fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, K and carotenoids. Oils are also a rich source of phytosterols which are known to reduce serum cholesterol’s levels. The largest part of the bad press is around implications in the etiology of chronic disease, with particular reference to cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as cancers, diabetes and hypertension. Current recommendations focus on the types of fat in the diet, namely saturated and trans fatty acids. Current allowable dosages in the daily diet are 25-35% of energy. Although there has been an emphasis on the amount of saturated fat intake, the decrease from 1970 to today has been slow. This has lead to the mandatory labels regarding trans fat content. The industry has turned to high oleic acid oils like sunflower, canola and soybean oils to help improve the CVD affects.


FEATURE

TASTE IS 90% OF FOOD SELECTION, FOLLOWED BY NUTRITION, FOOD SAFETY AND COST. FATS AND FRYING ARE © SEBASTIEN MARCHAND VIA UNSPLASH

ASSOCIATED WITH TASTE, TEXTURE AND PALATABILITY, HENCE SUBSTITUTES PLAY A ROLE IN SELECTION.

The most popular oil is currently sunflower, due its economical high yield for the farmers. Used frying oil has both a nutritional and physiological effect on diet and has had extensive research done on the subject. There is a complex array of reactions within the oil, from a nutritional point the nonvolatile degradation products will develop polar compounds which has been limited to 25% globally. The assessment of these metabolic and toxicological reactions have a multitude of reactions which makes analytical evaluation complex and difficult. The literature reviewed finds a general agreement that the compounds found in used frying oil can impair their nutritional value and can be harmful. Overall, the nutritional studies lack analytical data to establish valid relationships between the alteration of compounds

present and the extensively evaluated effects on health.

Physiological effects of trans fats and cyclic fatty acids:

Frying is a complex process that involves lipids, water and temperature. Trans fats have been red-flagged by the dietary world: heating oils over 200°C will produce isomeric and cyclic compounds and the removal is part of improving the health benefits of frying oil. Nutrition of non-nutritive fats have become an important part of diets as economic conditions improve and parallel to that is the increased use of frying and oil consumption. The resultant effect is a population that has an obesity issue globally. Fat substitutes can be divided into three groups: Carbohydrate based, protein based and lipid based.

Taste is 90% of food selection, followed by nutrition, food safety and cost. Fats and frying are associated with taste, texture and palatability, hence substitutes play a role in selection. Fat substitutes are considered macro ingredients, so specification and purity are vitally important. Reduced fat intake will help improve health globally. This subject has just begun to understand factors like safety, absorption, stability, and calorie intake increase to compensate for the reduced fats. In summary, we can safely say a reduced intake of fats is essential to a healthy lifestyle, and the fat types we use for frying will add value to frying foods and satisfy the taste buds. The author Wayne Thorne is a director of Don’t Waste Another Drop, a company that specialises in frying oil filtration and frying equipment.

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EVENTS TO DIARISE

NOVEMBER MARCH

COFFEE AND TEA RUSSIAN EXPO 15 – 17 Moscow, Russia

APRIL

PRO WEIN 18 – 20 Dusseldorf, Germany

MALAYSIA INTERNATIONAL HALAL SHOWCASE 4–7 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

ANUGA FOODTEC 20 – 23 Cologne, Germany

FOODEX AFRICA 4–7 Khartoum, Sudan

WORLD OLIVE OIL EXHIBITION 21 – 22 Madrid, Spain

COFFEECON NEW YORK 7–8 New York, USA

INTERNATIONAL RESTAURANT AND FOODSERVICE SHOW 4–6 New York, USA

EUROGASTRO 21 – 23 Warsaw, Poland

FOOD FEED AND FUEL IN A RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD 9 – 12 Cape Town, South Africa

VINEXPO NEW YORK 5–6 New York, USA

SWEET KOREA 22 – 25 Seoul, South Korea

FOODEX JAPAN 6–9 Tokyo, Japan

PROFOOD TECH 26 – 28 Chicago, USA

WHISKEY MESSE NUREMBERG 3–4 Nuremberg, Germany SOWETO WINE FESTIVAL 3–4 Soweto, South Africa OLIO CAPITALE 3–6 Trieste, Italy

FNB MPUMALANGA WINE SHOW 8–9 Nelspruit, South Africa INTERNORGA 9 – 13 Hamburg, Germany FOOD EXPO GREECE 10 – 12 Athens, Greece PRINTPACK EXPO 11 – 13 Algiers, Algeria SNAXPO 13 – 14 Atlanta, USA GASTRO TRADE FAIR 14 – 16 Helsinki, Finland

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WORLD TRAVEL CATERING AND ONBOARD SERVICES 10 – 12 Hamburg, Germany THE HOTEL SHOW SAUDI ARABIA 10 – 12 Jeddah, Saudi Arabia SEOUL INTERNATIONAL WINES AND SPIRITS EXPO 12 – 13 Seoul, Korea VINITALY 15 – 18 Verona, Italy INTERNATIONAL BAKING EXHIBITION 16 – 18 Shenyang, China INTERNATIONAL CHEESE TECHNOLOGY EXPOSITION 17 – 19 Milwaukee, USA INTERNATIONAL FORUM OF FOOD INDUSTRY AND PACKAGING 18 – 20 Kiev, Ukraine


EVENTS TO DIARISE

AFRICA FOOD MANUFACTURING 21 – 23 Cairo, Egypt NATURAL & ORGANIC PRODUCTS EUROPE 22 – 23 London, United Kingdom GLOBAL SEAFOOD EXPOSITION 24 – 26 Brussels, Belgium SOUTH AFRICAN CHEESE FESTIVAL 27 – 29 Stellenbosch, South Africa MALAYSIA INTERNATIONAL TEA AND COFFEE EXPO 28 – 1 May Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia AGRFOPEX NIGERIA 28 – 2 May Kano, Nigeria

MAY TOPS WINE SHOW DURBAN 3–5 Durban, South Africa AGROFOOD ETHIOPIA 3–5 Addis Ababa VIETNAM INTERNATIONAL CAFÉ SHOW 3–5 Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam

INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND HOTEL EXPO 10 – 12 Makassar, Indonesia ETHIOPIA AGRO FOOD EXPO 10 – 14 Addis Ababa AFRICAN FORUM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE 10 – 15 Cotonou, Benin

FOOD AND HOSPITALITY AFRICA 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa

INTERNATIONAL IMPORT AND EXPORT FOOD AND BEVERAGE EXHIBITION 14 – 16 Shaghai, China

HOSTEX 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa

VITAFOODS EUROPE 15 – 17 Geneva, Switzerland

IFEA 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa

INTERNATIONAL FOOD INGREDIENTS / ADDITIVES EXHIBTION AND CONFERENCE 16 – 18 Koyo, Japan

TEA AND COFFEE AFRICA 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa THE DRINKS CABINET 6–8 Johannesburg, South Africa FOOD NIGERIA EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCES 9 – 11 Lagos, Nigeria SEOUL INTERNATIONAL SEAFOOD SHOW 9 – 11 Seoul, South Korea BAKERY CHINA 9 – 12 Shanghai, China

WORLD EXPO OF BEER 18 – 19 Frankenmuth, USA INTERNATIONAL CAKE SHOW AUSTRALIA 18 – 20 Brisbane, Australia INTERNATIONAL FOOD EXHIBITION PHILIPPINES 25 – 17 Pasay, Philippines THAIFEX WORLD OF FOOD ASIA 29 – 2 June Pak Kret, Thailand

INTERWINE BEIJING 10 – 12 Beijing, China

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© WWW.UNSPLASH.COM, PHOTOGRAPHER: PAVEN TRIKUTAM

CAFEX 19 – 21 Cairo, Egypt


THE LAST WORD

FIVE THINGS I LEARNT FROM FRED!

BRIAN MCCUNE

O

ne of the world’s great chefs recently passed away and he brought back many memories. It was of course Paul Bocuse, a giant on the world culinary stage and someone with whom I had spent some time. In the mid-eighties I was appointed opening Executive Chef of the ground-breaking Johannesburg Sun and Towers. Three restaurants included Suki Hama which introduced the teppanyaki style of dining to South Africa and the St James which introduced Paul Bocuse to South Africa. Despite his stature as a leading 3-star Michelin chef, a worldwide icon and so called “Father of Nouvelle Cuisine”, very few South Africans outside of the chef’s fraternity knew anything about Bocuse. It was a bold move by Billy Gallagher to engage the services of this unknown, and then to tirelessly promote him so that by the time of his first visit to Johannesburg he was feted as the super star that he was! Of course there was a frantic

64

scrambling of PR, media and food commentators to find out exactly who this giant was and it even extended to the very top of the Southern Sun management team demanding briefings, all desperate to appear fully informed. Billy and I were bemused by all these antics and developed our own little in-joke: everytime Paul Bocuse’s name came up in conversation we would always grin knowingly and refer to him as Fred Bocuse. Yes we said, his name is Paul but his friends call him Fred – no-one ever dared to call him Fred to his face. Hosting Fred on his visits to Johannesburg and sitting with Billy and the maestro in his kitchen in Lyons I was privileged to learn many lessons which shaped my culinary thinking. Firstly - If you’re gonna sell something give it a catchy name. Fred beat the drum of the forward thinking Nouvelle Cuisine and profited greatly. There was little new about the new cuisine, it had in fact been practised since the fifties at La Pyramide, the restaurant of the man who taught Bocuse, Ferdnand Point and the name had even graced a culinary tome published the previous century. But Fred gave it the catchy name and chefs have been copying him since with mottos like California Cuisine, Molecular Gastronomy and even Rainbow Cuisine. Lesson two – One trick ponies don’t last. Consistency is the key to success. Bocuse’s temple to French gastronomy, L’Auberge du Pont de

Collonges, outside the city of Lyon in southeastern France, has held three stars – without interruption – since 1965 in the Michelin guide, the bible of gastronomes. Lesson three – If you’re gonna stick your name above the door then make sure you put in the hours. In a 2011 interview with The Associated Press, Bocuse said he slept in the room where he was born above the dining rooms. “But I changed the sheets,” he added with his characteristic wry humour. Lesson four – Make sure you’re comfortable with your song sheet. “In cooking, there are those who are rap and those who are concerto,” he told the French news magazine L’Express before the publication of his 2005 biography. He added that he tended toward the concerto. And finally – Make sure you’ve got a great wingman to cover your back. Fred travelled the world self promoting and drumming up business but the guy who cooked your meal was a brilliant chef called Roger Jaloux, himself a Meilleur Ouvrier de France. There are Freds everywhere and there are Rogers everywhere who allow the Freds to be Freds! Bocuse never forgot the value of Jaloux but unfortunately many of the Freds nowadays have ignored the value of their Rogers! Brian owns the Food Biz, a Cape Town based food consultancy, and instead of working spends his time telling other people how to work. Contact him at www.thefood.biz, foodwizard@ iafrica.com, 082 492 9239


ninety9cents 32007T/E

AN EXTENSIVE RANGE OF

GOURMET

CHEESES DELIVERED DAILY? THAT’S HOW WE ROLL

You’ll be spoilt for choice with our range of over 400 cheeses, which our fully refrigerated fleet of trucks will deliver straight to your door. That’s not just great service, it’s Checkers Food Services.

SA Chef Issue 6  

SA Chef Magazine is the official voice of the South African Chefs Association (SACA). In our sixth edition, we explore molecular gastronomy,...

SA Chef Issue 6  

SA Chef Magazine is the official voice of the South African Chefs Association (SACA). In our sixth edition, we explore molecular gastronomy,...

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