Page 1

ISSUE 04 | 2016

+ THE BUSINESS OF

DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING Spotlight on Alison and Miners Shot Down

+ PRODUCTION COMPANIES IN AFRICA An Industry Audit

+ BOOK OF NEGROES

SA/Canada Co-Production Sweeps Awards


CONTENTS / 01

www.thecallsheet.co.za

02. A Chat with

02 08 12 15

bouffant Director Gordon Lindsay

BOUFFANT’S GORDON LINDSAY

bouffant’s star director on making commercial magic.

04. Dark Tower begins production in Cape Town

05. The Book of Negroes Sweeps Canadian Screen Awards

06. South African Box

Office Report 2015

08. The Business behind Documentary Filmmaking

THE BUSINESS OF DOCCIES

Kim Crowie unpacks Alison and Miners Shot Down in exclusive case studies.

12. 2016 SAFTAs

Award Winners

14. Of Kings And

Prophets Cancelled

15. Production

Companies Working in Africa

20. Truck Hire

and Specialised Film Trucks

24. Opportunities 25. 14th shnit

SAFTAS 2016 WINNERS Turn to page 12 to see all the winners from the South African Film and Television Awards.

International Shortfilmfestival

26. Indies & Shorts 27. Sasani’s Eileen

Sandrock on Broadcasting The Voice SA

28. ATFT: Help or

AFRICAN FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES

We report on the production companies growing the industry in Africa.

Hindrance?

30. Rwanda: Plotting

a New Course to Filmic Success

32. Events to Diarise 34. Associations News 36. Directory of Advertisers


02 / SPOTLIGHT

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GORDON LINDSAY One of bouffant’s star directors on fine-tuning the creative concept, and having fun with the job.

Latest ad by Gordon Lindsay | www.bouffant.tv/gordon-lindsay/

Watching your latest ad, I felt that it was very in tune with the elements. I’m not sure it was a conscious decision to give a nod to the elements specifically, but I tried to make the commercial feel very grounded. I wanted to make the images and performances feel very honest and then try to give the images an original feel by focusing on camera movement and looking for different angles and ways to tell the story within each scene. We had to convey a fair amount of story within each scene: some we found we could tell in a single frame; and others required more energy, so we approached those differently. Overall I wanted it to feel big, even in the “small” frames and I think we achieved that, whilst still getting the message across and retaining a balance in its tone, both in the visuals and the edit.

What was the original brief, and how long did it take to finalise the creative concept? The initial brief was rich and very clear, but gave me enough room to put my own interpretation on the idea. It took about two weeks to get to the final creative approach, but the overall idea didn’t change much. What changed was the way we represented the ideas in the script. I wanted to illustrate childhood imagination in the most honest way I could and that meant leaving the scenes slightly open-ended. I think childrens’ imaginations are so creative that it doesn’t take much more than an ordinary event for them to imagine the extraordinary. This goal of trying to get inside the kids’ imaginations informed how the scenes played out alongside the script and voice over. Take us through your directorial process. Do you have

a set process, or do you adapt the way you work to each job? My process for each job is much the same, but it does need to be relevant to the job at hand. It starts with the script/brief, which I’ll spend some time living with to figure out how to solve the communication and brand considerations. Once I find my angle, I put together a treatment which becomes the plan that we work from. This is where the majority of decisions are made, both in the storytelling and in the technical and practical approach. I think overall I like to have things pretty much figured out before we shoot - I am a bit of a control freak - but always try to leave a bit of room on the day to find magical moments you can’t plan for on the day. The same goes for the edit and post. Have a plan, but be open

to finding things along the way. I try to enjoy the process as much as possible, it’s a fun job and I’m lucky to have it. About Gordon Lindsay Gordon began his directing career at Velocity Films and has since collaborated with many of the country’s top agencies. In 2014, he joined newly appointed Executive Producer Peter Carr at bouffant, where his advancing career and aptitude for creating for visuallydriven content has helped the company develop into a leading brand in the industry. He has directed campaigns for prominent brands like Mc Donald’s, KFC, Hunters and Penguin Random House, as well as award-winning music videos for leading South African artists.

AGENCY INFO Agency

Owen Kessel Leo Burnett

Executive Creative Director

Donovan Bryan

Creative Director

Angela Galinos

Agency Producer

Sally Walland

PRODUCTION COMPANY Production Company

Bouffant

Director

Gordon Lindsay

Producer

Leanne Kumalo

Exec Producer

Peter Carr

Director of Photography

Timothy Pike

Production Art Director

Lauren Wilensky

POST PRODUCTION INFO Editor & Company

Ricky Boyd, Deliverance

Visual Effects Company

Bladeworks

Music Company/Composer/Sound

N/A (Music) Producer, Louis (Audio)

Post Production Online

Blade Works

Post Production Offline

Deliverance


04 / NEWS

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DARK TOWER

BEGINS PRODUCTION IN CAPE TOWN

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eep your eyes peeled for some famous faces in Cape Town. Matt hew McConaughey and Idris Elba are set to star in a fi lm adaptati on of Stephen King’s

lauded Dark Tower series. Producti on will take place at Cape Town Film Studios with Moonlighti ng as the local producti on company. According to Wikipedia,

“Gunslinger Roland Deschain (Idris Elba) roams an Old West-like landscape in search of the dark tower, in the hopes that reaching it will preserve his dying

world”. McConaughey will play the Man in Black, who is intent on stopping the Gunslinger from reaching the tower. Shooti ng will begin towards the end of April.

SOUTH AFRICA AND THE NETHERLANDS The Fort Hosts SANEC Panel Discussion on Co-Production Treaty between South Africa and the Netherlands.

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ixo Mayimele, CEO of the South African Netherlands Chamber of Commerce (SANEC), the key intermediary for companies, organisations and entrepreneurs doing business or seeking to do business in and between the Netherlands, South Africa, the Benelux and the South African region (SADC), approached The Fort, a Johannesburg-based hybrid agency that services the creati ve, content, production and post-production needs of businesses, brands and advertising agencies, to host a panel discussion around the co-production treaty signed by South Africa and the Netherlands in December 2015. The treaty seeks to enhance and facilitate the co-production of films and other creati ve media productions between South Africa and the Netherlands,

stimulating the audiovisual industries and the development of cultural and economic exchanges in both countries. Both countries consider audiovisual productions that are realised in co-production within the established framework as national films. The treaty allows qualifying coproductions to access financing possibilities in both countries. The panel discussion was hosted by The Fort at Drawbridge Studios, a studio facility that caters for domestic and international productions and a division of The Fort, at its offices at 37–41 Homestead Road. Shukri Toefy, CEO of The Fort, moderated the panel that consisted of David Selvan, a South African Producer, Lehlohonolo Mokhosi, Deputy Director of Film & TV at the South

African Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Terrence Khumalo, the Film Certi fication Manager at the National Film and Video Foundation, and Jeroen-Louis Martens, Head of Cultural Aff airs for the Embassy of the Netherlands. The panel, themed around opening doors and breaking down walls, took the opportunity to discuss the inner-workings of the co-production treaty. On how the treaty would benefit each country, Terrence Khumalo said that “co-productions usually use the analogy of a marriage, and in a marriage both partners are expected to contribute” and that the treaty “created the possibility for future synergies between South Africa and the Netherlands”. Andile Mbeki went on to explain that “filmmakers have a lot of ideas but it’s difficult to take them

forward. The partnership within ourselves and the National Film and Video Foundation and Department of Trade and Industry will definitely make it possible for us to explore this.” The panel also gave in-depth understanding to the audiovisual project process to equip filmmakers with information to enable them to make and share great stories with audiences. Said Shukri Toefy, “[the coproduction treaty] is about storytelling and building global narrati ves. The content that we produce is about audiences and connecting with them.” A video recap of the panel discussion will be hosted on The Fort’s YouTube page at www. youtube.com/thefortgroup, and full video coverage of the event on the NFVF website at www.NFVF.co.za


NEWS / 05

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THE BOOK OF NEGROES Canadian-South African co-production sweeps Canadian screen awards.

The Book of Negroes , Unit Stills Photography by Joe Alblas © Conquering Lion Pictures, Out of Africa Pictures

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he Book of Negroes, the Conquering Lion/Out of Africa Entertainment, Canadian-South African co-production, dominated the Canadian Screen Awards, taking home 11 awards including Best TV Movie or Limited Series, three Best Acting awards for Aunjanue Ellis, Lyriq Bent and Shailyn Pierre Dixon, and Best Direction (Limited Series). South African crew was well represented by Costume Designer Kate Carin who won for Best Costume Design, Robert van de Coolwyk for Best Production Design or Art Direction, Philip Miller for Best Original Music Score and Derek Mansveldt for Best Sound. Out Of Africa Entertainment’s

Lance Samuels said “We are extremely thrilled and proud to be recognised with so many awards at the Canadian Screen Awards. It proves once again that South African crew and cast are as good as any in the world”. The series was filmed on location in South Africa and was an official Canadian/South African co-production. The series employed over 110 South African crew members and 70 South African actors had various acting roles in the series. Samuels, who served as executive producer on the series added, “Thanks needs to go to the Department of Trade and Industry. Without the department’s continued support of the film industry, through its film and

The Book of Negroes , Unit Stills Photography by Joe Alblas © Conquering Lion Pictures, Out of Africa Pictures

television rebate incentive, shows like this would be impossible to make in South Africa”. Samuels also thanked all the South African cast and crew that worked on the series for all their hard work and dedication to the series. The Book of Negroes stars Academy Award®, Golden Globe® and Primetime Emmy® winner Louis Gossett Jr., Academy Award-winner Cuba Gooding Jr., Aunjanue Ellis, Lyriq Bent and Shailyn Pierre Dixon. It is executive produced by Damon D’Oliveira (What We Have, Lie with Me) and Lance Samuels (Strike Back, Inescapable, Bang Bang Club) from Out of Africa Entertainment. Other executive producers include Daniel Iron (Cairo Time, Away From Her).

The Book of Negroes depicts the extraordinary life journey of Aminata Diallo – an indomitable African woman who cuts a swath through a world that is predisposed to underestimate her. Kidnapped by slave traders in West Africa and subsequently enslaved in South Carolina, Aminata must navigate her way through the American Revolution in New York, the isolated refuge of Nova Scotia and the treacherous jungles of Sierra Leone, before ultimately securing her freedom in England at the dawn of the 19th century. The Book of Negroes was produced in association with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Black Entertainment Television.

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06 / SPOTLIGHT

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Tell Me Sweet Something Š Courtesy of UIP

2015 BOX OFFICE REPORT T

he 2015 box office revealed a remarkable year for theatrical releases in South African cinema industry. Gross box office saw an impressive growth of 36%, even though there was a price hike on cinema tickets by exhibitors. Cinemas in South Africa typically saw price increases, with Ster-Kinekor and Times Media implementing an increment every year due to economic instabilities. Box office revenues recorded a solid upward trend with all theatrical revenues adding up to R1.19-billion in 2015. This was due to popular releases of films such as, Fast & Furious 7 which was the top earner grossing R89.9-million, Star Wars: The Force Awakens was the secondhighest grossing film taking R51.5-million for the eight weeks it was on circuit. Minions, which

grossed R50-million in 12 weeks was among the top earning films. Locally produced films performed significantly well, a total of 22 local films were released with a box office earning of R69.2-million which accounted for 6% of gross box office. The top three local films that performed well at box office were Schuks! Pay Back the Money grossing R17.6-million, Ballade vir ‘n Enkeling grossed over R9-million and Mooirivier took R7.2-million. Still on locally produced films, there were few combinations of genre with comedy being the highest-grossing genre, earning R28-million with only three titles; in second place was drama with 10 titles released, earning R22-million, and romance had four titles released taking R13-million of the box

office revenue. Multilingual films were the most popular accounting for 14 titles released and taking 65% of the gross (R45-million) Afrikaans/English (Schuks! Pay Back the Money) earned R17.6-million (25%). IsiZulu/ English language films followed in third place earning R4.2million (6%), those included Tell Me Sweet Something , Ayanda

and Hear Me Move. South Africa has become steadily more popular in recent years as an international filming location. The country continues to meet growing international demand for its attractive locations. Some of the international feature films shot on location in South Africa and released in local cinemas were:

BOX OFFICE REVENUES RECORDED A SOLID UPWARD TREND WITH ALL THEATRICAL REVENUES ADDING UP TO R1.19-BILLION IN 2015.


SPOTLIGHT / 07

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ONE OF THE KEY SUCCESS FACTORS IN DETERMINING THE KIND OF FILMS MOVIEGOERS ARE MOST LIKELY WATCH AT THE BOX OFFICE IS THE GENRE CLASSIFICATION. • Avengers: Age of Ultron was one of the most anticipated titles which had few scenes shot in Johannesburg inner city and Sandton • Mad Max: Fury Road, another moderate hit at the box office had scenes shot at the Cape Town film studios • After shooting both District 9 and Elysium in SA, Neil Blomkamp returned again with Chappie, a science fiction film also shot in Johannesburg inner city and other parts of Soweto. A number of local films were well received by the international audiences. Local Afrikaans film Die Windpomp won the Audience Award for Best Foreign Film at the 2015 Long Beach International Film Festival in New York, competing against over 50 internationally acclaimed films. Thina Sobabili won the coveted Audience Choice Award at the Pan African Film Festival (PAFF) 2015, which took place

in Los Angeles. Miners Shot Down continues to garner international recognition. The film, supported by the National Film and Video Foundation, won Best Documentary at the International Emmys. Necktie Youth, another local drama, won both the best South African feature award and the international jury award for best director Sibs Shongwe-La Mer at the Durban International Film Festival (DIFF). One of the key success factors in determining the kind of films moviegoers are most likely to watch at the box office is the genre classification. The most popular genre in 2015 with the highest earnings was Action claiming 20% of box office gross (R245-million), a huge improvement from 6% in the previous period. Action/Adventure was the second-highest grossing genre with 17% (same as 2014), and Animation earned 17% (same as 2014) respectively.

Marvel’s Avengers Age of Ultron © Marvel 2015, Photo by Jay Maidment

Jabz, Bonko Cosmo Khoza in Necktie Youth . Photo by Hanro Havenga © Images courtesy of Tribeca Film Festival

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08 / FEATURE

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THE BUSINESS BEHIND

DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING Most filmmakers will tell you that the documentary world is both a wonderfully gratifying and incredibly difficult space to work in. Kim Crowie explores the opportunities and challenges in this sector.

Miners Shot Down © Uhuru Productions

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aking a documentary is often a long an arduous process, but those on the frontline will argue that it’s a necessary part of the film industry. Documentary filmmakers are some of the first to use new technologies and distribution models to get their productions to audiences, and they explore real life stories in visual detail. South Africa’s documentary scene is one of the most developed in Africa, with many local filmmakers garnering critical praise and awards for the people and stories they portray.

TRENDS IN THE INDUSTRY

Hybrid documentaries are surfacing as a clear trend, says Uga Carlini of Towerkop Productions, the company behind Alison. A hybrid itself, the film is an example of a medium that’s becoming

more and more popular. Some argue that weaving traditional nonfiction filmmaking together with fiction elements deviates from the truth of the story, but in an International Documentary Association (IDA) article, filmmaker Jonathan Cauoette disagrees: “A documentary is a nonfictional film that conveys to an audience the truth of a matter, and if it does that effectively, it hardly matters what style or form is used.” Another trend has been Call for Action documentaries, says Rehad Desai, director of awardwinning Miners Shot Down. These films involve the audience as early as possible, even going so far as to feed into the creative process itself, as well as distribution. “The filmmaker is actively involved in finding his audience and partnering from an early stage,” Desai explains, “Experience

shows the earlier the better.” Content is important, not always the platform, according to Al Jazeera English’s Manager of Documentaries, Ingrid Falck. “There is a plethora of platforms for watching video these days but ultimately it’s the content that really matters. Whether in long form, short form, on digital, social media or TV platforms, people are hungry for good stories and good story-telling. Al Jazeera documentaries are aired on TV but also can be watched on our website, plus we put great effort into short cut-downs for social media. Darryl Els, Festival Director for Encounters Documentary Film Festival, is fascinated by the way we consume media in the twenty-first century. He believes this will play a huge role in creating new audiences for documentary

makers in the future. “What bodes very well for us as an industry is Miners Shot Down and what Desai has achieved with that film, both in terms of the international recognition but also the way in which it has been built into what it is. It really speaks to what a film can achieve. These types of films are having a real-time impact on our lives. Funding is never easy for documentaries, but it’s always important that we have that visibility.” And now with Africa becoming a hub for mobile innovation, no doubt doccie makers will be experimenting in that realm – if they haven’t already begun.

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Despite the many exciting trends, the reality is that funding and support structures remain an


FEATURE / 09

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issue. Support is very limited for new entrants into the sector, says Desai, with the only real place they can turn to being the National Film and Video Foundation, which provides production funding to about 10 projects per annum. “The film schools do not generally seem able to turn out students who on graduation are able to stand on their own two feet,” he adds. “Hardly any local film production houses specialise in documentary, and are generally not in a position to bring on board talent in sufficient numbers. I believe the only way we can build the voices of our budding documentary filmmakers is providing space and equipment and back office advice where required, where people can incubate their film ideas in a safe and supportive environment over a two to three year period. Until we have a few incubators up and running, the chances of developing a cadre of committed talent in the documentary filmmaking field will remain slim.” Carlini agrees that South Africa’s doccie landscape is a difficult place to work in – but that goes for most places across the world in this sector. “Just like anywhere else, there are only so many funds that can only help a handful of projects yearly. It’s about so much more than just the obvious. The support structures worldwide can be counted on two hands and all the filmmakers are after them.” Al Jazeera’s Falck says that despite the issues, South Africa’s industry seems “prett y healthy” overall. The network is committed

to creating content from Africans for Africans, and this is clear through their Pitching Session at Encounters Documentary Film Festival, running for four years now. “The overwhelming response demonstrates that this pitching session resonates with the filmmaking community in South African and the region. We are especially delighted that the nine selected projects featured filmmakers from Uganda, Mali, Kenya, South Africa, Tunisia, Somalia and Zimbabwe, showing the wide reach of the Pitching Forum on the African continent.” Kill All But the Crows, a SA-Somalia co-production, was commissions for two 24 minute films from the selection. Shorts online is a great opportunity for growth says Els. “It allows us to think outside of the traditional commissioning structures. We know there are issues with broadcasters when it comes to creating room for new voices and talents to come through. What I’m trying to do with Encounters is partner with a publisher around creating a few short, online documentaries and then allowing that to get to a new audience. And that can start to build careers.” He says new media and technology are definite areas to be explored in the documentary space. “Encounters will be venturing into the virtual reality space. It has a kind of wow factor for people, it’s a great way of energising audiences, and it’s great that it questions a documentary film at so many

The Dream of Shahrazad by Francois Verster won numerous awards © The Dream of Shahrazad

levels – ethically, aesthetically. What’s really interesting for our particular context in South Africa and Africa in general is that it isn’t a technology that’s been dictated to, we could take this technology and work it to our own end.”

INDEPENDENT VERSUS COMMISSIONED

Although both independently made and commissioned documentaries have their pros and cons, more and more opportunities have arisen in the commission and acquisition fields as a result of a number of networks – news and other – bulking up their digital offerings for content consumers. Lee Hobbs, VP of Channels for Emerging Business at Discovery Networks CEEMEA, says Discovery is “really focused on big productions right now.” This is demonstrated through Racing Extinction, which aired on the channel at the same time across the world in December. “We have a number of big cinematic films

coming up this year, including Sherpa which was nominated for a BAFTA. In terms of African production companies, we really welcome big ideas that are scalable and feel global and ambitious.” Falck says that Al Jazeera English is currently working with Big World Cinema, who produced the hugely popular My Nigeria, to produce follow-up My Cuba. “We have also made significant investments in several large co-productions, including a new film by a leading South African filmmaker,” she says. With the rise of branded content, it has become more and more difficult to figure out who and what is truly authentic. Els says although commissioned work might bring in the money, certain things are inevitably compromised when you’re answering to someone else. But, in the end, a wonderfully rich, real-life story is told. And if it manages to change people’s perceptions of the world, the job has been done well.


10 / FEATURE

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CASE STUDY:

DOCUMENTING THE STORY BEHIND ALISON

DOP Georgia Court on set with actress Christia Visser: Alison © Stills Courtesy of Anne Kruyer, Fineheartworks

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ost South Africans were shocked when the news broke in 1994 – a young woman was abducted outside her home by two men. She was raped, stabbed and disembowelled before being slashed in the throat 16 times and left for dead. No one expected her to survive, but she did. She went on to inspire the world with her story through her novel I Have Life, and has since worked with Uga Carlini of Towerkop Creations to make a documentary of her tale.

FORMING THE CONCEPT

Uga says when she first heard Alison’s story in 1999, it was embedded in her memory. “What really got me, though, was the reaction to her from everyone around me. I became adamant that the day would come where I would love to share her story – and the real her behind that

story – with the rest of the world. Not the motivational speaker. Not the voice in I Have Life because that’s already there, but everything else.” In 2011 they finally met and the rest, as she says, “will hopefully be glorious history”.

THE BUSINESS BEHIND THE SCENES

We all make mistakes along the way, but, says Uga, you need your first ‘yes’ – your first bit of money on the table – before you can go any further. “This came in the firm of a very supportive NFVF. They have been cardinal in the making of Alison and in giving us our first ‘yes’. That enabled us to make a promo.” They were then selected for Durban FilmMart, but it was solid, full-time work from 2012 to 2014 to develop the production and get it financed. “And of course you are dealing with real people who have jobs

and who, unlike actors, don’t do this for a living (except for Alison),” Uga explains, “So it was quite something making it all fit. The other baggage challenge with this project specifically was the CGI and animation element. Nothing was straight forward, nothing was traditional and everything felt just a little more complicated. Not to mention the fact that we made two versions – an English version and an Afrikaans version.” In postproduction they realised it was far more complicated than they originally thought. “But hell, what a learning curve for all involved. No one saw coming exactly what it entailed and I must just say of everyone working on this project, they went the extra mile over and over again. A true testament of how there is no “I” in filmmaking.” In addition to the many challenges they faced were the Eskom power cuts during which many of the interviews were shot. Carlini was also pregnant with her second son during the film’s entire production process – giving birth the day after Alison was signed off.

WHAT WE CAN LEARN

Each film is different, as are its production processes, and Alison is a great reminder of this. The film was filled with complexities, including an eight month post-production process that was initially meant to be 1.5 months. Having said that, what’s truly great about it (besides, of course, the story), is that this film was done entirely by women. “Towerkop Creations

specialises in female-driven heroine stories. Some of our core crew and key players were females: Director, Producers, Screenwriter, DOP, Composer, theme song, 2nd Production Coordinator, Production Accountant, Bond Company, Insurance Company, Focus Puller, Illustrator, two of our Animators, Makeup Artists, Stills and the list goes on,” Uga says.

ALISON IN NUMBERS • 4: Four main companies

were key in the financing of this film: kykNET Films, the Department of Trade and Industry, the National Film and Video Foundation, and Waterfront Film Studios.

• 2.5: It took 2.5 years to

develop the documentary.

• 6: Alison was in its

pre-production phase for six months.

• 1: Alison was in production for one month.

• 8: Although initially meant to last 1.5 months, Alison was in post-production for eight months.

• 8: Alison will be released in Woman’s Month – August, the eighth month of the year.


FEATURE / 11

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CASE STUDY: HOW MINERS SHOT DOWN

MADE SA LISTEN

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inner of the 2016 Doc Impact Award, Miners Shot Down is a riveting film revealing the truth about South Africa’s most devastating massacre since Apartheid. In August 2012, police opened fire on a group of striking miners killing 44 and injuring 78, with many shot in the back and at close range. Directed by Rehad Desai and produced by Anita Khanna, Miners Shot Down has received critical acclaim across the world. It won the 2015 International Emmy, 2015 SAFTA Best Documentary Feature, and One World Human Rights Film Festival Jury Award in 2014.

CREATING A CAUSE WORTH FIGHTING FOR

Miners Shot Down has successfully done what many other doccie features often fail at: creating a long-term campaign that not only keeps the film in the public eye, but places the right amount of pressure in the right places. It’s also a cause Desai fell into – he hadn’t planned on telling this particular story and was instead making a film about inequality in the sector when an unprotected strike broke out at Lonmin mines in Marikana. The rest, as they say, is history. Since then, the campaign has followed the government inquiry, has created a support structure for the lost miners’ families, and through the film has served as a driving force in upholding justice for the families and victims.

HOW THE CAMPAIGN WORKED

The team addressed the issue in an aggressive manner on

multiple planes, with a most efficient way of reaching the South African public: television broadcast. But when both the SABC and eTV refused to broadcast the film, they created a campaign that engaged the media, grassroots organisers, international communities, local leaders and the general public. This eventually paid off in early 2016, with eTV broadcasting multiple times – although the SABC has yet to come on board. “People were moved and wanted to take action. People discussed how joint action could be taken and how the film could be rolled out under a united front,” General Moyo, a Community Activist said. Their priority was also keeping the massacre in the news consistently. This led to the General Secretary of the country’s largest trade union, the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) publicly saying, “The detailed look at the Marikana Massacre provided by Miners Shot Down has prompted NUMSA to take a revolutionary stand against such repression. We can never allow this to happen again.”

WHAT WE CAN LEARN

Ultimately, the film has become part of a forensic case that forcefully indicts the police, the government and Lonmin for their roles in the most deadly display of state violence in over 20 years. Creating this kind of longevity in the name of justice doesn’t happen overnight, and as Anita Khanna told us in the Callsheet’s December edition, a documentary filmmaker needs thick skin to navigate this world.

Miners Shot Down © Uhuru Productions

MINERS SHOT DOWN IN NUMBERS • 10: The film has

travelled to 10 festivals including New York African Film Festival, Cannes Film Festival, Sheffield Doc/Fest, Durban International Film Festival, FESPACO and International Emmys World Television Festival.

• 10: Miners Shot Down

received ten awards including International Emmy, SAFTA, FESPACO Best Documentary, Encounters Special Choice and Cinema for Peace Justice Award.

• 12: The film has screened

on twelve channels internationally including Al Jazeera England and US, Afridoc on DStv, TV3 Spain, NHK in Japan RTS in Switzerland and Ikon in the Netherlands.

• 61 879: Prior to the South

African broadcast n 11 January 2016, the trailer had 61 879 views, and 129 729 views post-broadcast.

• 6 MILLION: Miners

Shot Down was seen by approximately 6 million viewers per broadcast in South Africa.

• 1 439 897: Between

October 2015 and January 2016, the Amandla. Mobi Twitter campaign to pressure broadcasters to air Miners Shot Down reached 1 439 897 people, resulting in 8 800 shares.

• 289: The number of screenings in South Africa.

• 133: The number of

international screenings that took place in 23 countries.

• 7 000: Over 7 000 DVDs were sold in South Africa in 18 months.


12 / NEWS

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SAFTAS 2016 WINNERS CATEGORY

WINNER

FILM/TV PROJECT

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actor in a TV Comedy

Bongani Madondo

Kota Life Crisis: Season 2

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actress in a TV Comedy

Linda Sebezo

Gauteng Maboneng

Best Achievement by a Lead Actor in a TV Comedy

Mandla Gaduka

Gauteng Maboneng

Best Achievement by a Lead Actress in a TV Comedy

Robyn Scott

Those Who Can’t

Best Achievement in Directing in a TV Comedy

Krijay Govender, Joshua Rous, Segomotso Keorapetse

Ga Re Dumele: Season 4

Best TV Comedy

Z A News: Puppet Nation (Both Worlds)

Z A News: Puppet Nation

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actor in a TV Drama

Deon Lotz

When We Were Black: Season 2

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actress in a TV Drama

Charmaine Mtinta

Matatiele

Best Achievement by a Lead Actor in a TV Drama

Siyabonga Radebe

Saints and Sinners: Season 1

Best Achievement by a Lead Actress in a TV Drama

Ntathi Moshesh

Saints and Sinners: Season 1

Best Achievement in Directing in a TV Drama

Rolisizwe Nikiwe, Zuko Nodada

Matatiele

Best TV Drama

Umlilo (Quizzical Pictures)

Umlilo

Best TV Presenter Non-Fiction Variety

Katlego Maboe

Expresso Morning Show

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actor in a TV Soap

Samson Kumalo

Isibaya: Season 3


NEWS / 13

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CATEGORY

WINNER

FILM/TV PROJECT

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actress in a TV Soap

Maggie Benedict

Ashes to Ashes

Best Achievement by a Lead Actor in a TV Soap

Vusi Kunene

Isibaya

Best Achievement by a Lead Actress in a TV Soap

Leeanda Reddy

Isidingo

Best Achievement in Directing in a TV Soap

Eric Mogale, Siyabonga Mkhize, Heather Cooke

Rhythm City

Best TV Soap

Rhythm City (Quizzical Pictures)

Rhythm City

Most Popular TV Soap

Skeem Saam

Skeem Saam

Special Recognition award for Contribution to Persons with Disabilities

Rhulani Baloyi

-

Special Recognition award for Contribution to Provincial Development

UGU Film Festival

-

Best Student Film

Jabu (The Animation School)

Jabu

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actor in a Feature Film

Marius Weyers

Dis Ek, Anna

Best Achievement by a Supporting Actress in a Feature Film

Tina Jaxa

While You Weren’t Looking

Best Achievement by a Lead Actor in a Feature Film

Mduduzi Mabaso

For Love and Broken Bones

Best Achievement by a Lead Actress in a Feature Film

Fulu Mughovani

Ayanda

Best Achievement in Directing in a Feature Film

Sara Blecher

Dis Ek, Anna

Best Feature Film

Dis Ek, Anna (Palama Productions)

Dis Ek, Anna

Fulu Mugovhani in Ayanda © Ayanda


14 / NEWS

www.thecallsheet.co.za

OF KINGS AND PROPHETS CANCELLED AFTER TWO EPISODES

T

he show was one of the many ABC has lost to the Tuesday 10pm time slot including Lucky 7, Killer Women, Mind Games and most recently Wicked City. Of Kings And Prophets opened with a dismal 0.8 Live+ same day rating in adults aged 18 to 49, below Wicked City’s underwhelming start at 0.9 last year, marking a new low for a non-Friday series premiere on one

of the USA’s biggest networks. Its slot has been replaced with Shark Tank offshoot Beyond the Tank for the remainder of the season. Although the show was originally scheduled to air Sundays at 10pm late last year, the network ended up pulling and retooling the drama, replacing it with Quantico. When it finally did air in its new time slot behind Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD, it began with a thud and after dropping to a mere 0.5

in US ratings, the network had no choice but to cancel it. ABC has burned through over a dozen dramas in the Tuesday-at-10 slot, according to Variety, with their best luck in this time period being with crime procedurals. It is also one of ABC Studios’ biggest undertakings, from the building and dressing of a sound stage in Stellenbosch to the hilltop city of Gibeah in Durbanville.

When the Callsheet visited the set last month prior to its airing, most of the executive producers and production heads were confident in the network’s excitement for the show, and were hoping for the green light on a second season. Whether Of Kings And Prophets will air through other distribution channels, such as Hulu, or will ascend to TV heaven remains to be seen.

SA’S FILM ECONOMY:

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY

Prolific Producer Vlokkie Gordon and Animation SA’s Nick Cloete and Wendy Spinks share their expectations for South Africa’s film industry.

S

outh Africa’s Rand has plummeted steadily over the last year or so, leaving us wondering how this will affect the film industry. We, like the other exporters, are excited by the weaker Rand,” says Vlokkie Gordon. “I believe with the quality of the South African work being put out there and now several productions getting creative recognition for it, we will be overrun with requests for projects to be shot here.” Last year they budgeted at an exchange rate of R12 to $1. These days, they can budget at an exchange rate of R15 to $1, creating a 1.5% saving. “This could just be the savings you

need in order to get your project green lit,” Vlokkie explains. Wendy Spinks is just as optimistic about the situation. She cites SA’s cheap TV license fees, PwC’s positive media outlook for 2015-2019, and a video game growth forecast to reach R3.6-billion by 2019 as examples of an upward trajectory. “This means that service work on international productions in film, VFX or TV is naturally going to be more lucrative,” she says. ASA Chair Nick Cloete has a more sombre view point. “The rating downgrade would result in higher borrowing costs, decreasing profits and trimming equity returns for state-owned and private

companies. To offset the budget deficit, our government will be faced with one of two choices: raise taxes or cut spending. In all likelihood, the former option will be preferred over the latter,” he explains. “As a result, for multinational companies impacted most, the outsourcing budget for corporate and commercial animated service work is likely to shrink, as is typical in times of economic downturn.” Spinks adds that financing and producing locally will remain challenging, particularly when competing on a global stage. “Co-productions will likely become a more widely used funding model as the money shrinks and

collaboration will be likely be more prevalent than in the past. So I predict more content (of a lower production value) being produced and aimed at the African market.” “The main thing is still the bottom line,” says Gordon, “And with the volatility of the Rand, we need a secure reliable rebate to still attract and secure the work. And the ultimate would be if we had a competitive structure in SA that we can fund the rebate upfront in order to avoid our exchange losses.” “Expect more TV series, mobisodes and features to be produced in South Africa within the coming year,” Cloete concludes.


FEATURE / 15

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PRODUCING CONTENT IN AFRICA

All you need to know about production companies creating content in Africa.

A

frica has always been a captivating place, from its many languages and cultures to its extraordinary locations and experiences. In the 21st century even more so, especially as the world turns its eye toward the continent not only for unique innovations, but also for its storytelling abilities. In the last five years the production values on the continent have grown in both quality and content, with many filmmakers coming into their own and telling stories the world wants to hear. Although South Africa remains a leader in this field with a diverse range of experienced crew and production companies to pick from, other countries are beginning to showcase their talent, too – and the world is taking notice. Nigeria’s Nollywood is a powerhouse with a thriving production sector catering mainly to the local region and sub-Saharan Africa. Filmmakers often supply local features and television content to channels like Africa Magic and GOtv, or their popular online VOD counterparts, iROKOtv and Buni.tv, to name a few. Hubs also exist in Egypt where a range of Middle Eastern content is created, Morocco with its incredible desertscapes and exotic sets, and Kenya, which is wooing internationals and is rumoured to have the next Tomb Raider instalment filmed on location. Smaller, more grassroots film sectors exist in most countries, particularly Burkina Faso, Algeria, Somalia, Uganda, Tanzania, Ghana, Namibia and

Zimbabwe. Mauritius has also begun to showcase itself as an attractive film destination, with incentives to match. Internationals are now seeing the potential of shooting their productions in Africa, with conglomerates creating partnerships that both develop the local industry and profit international distributors and viewers. Examples of this include Britdoc and Kenya’s Docubox partnering to create a Kenyan pitching event, Producer Michael Murphey’s Kalahari Pictures partnering with locals to create Kalahari Film & Media, or Triggerfish Animation Studios partnering with Disney to present the Story Lab initiative.

Tinsel © Courtesy of Africa Magic (DStv)

TRENDS IN CONTENT CREATION

Although trends for an entire continent are hard to pin down, there are a number of things that can be identified. Firstly, there’s a craving for local content, content that resonates with local audiences and grows audiences, too. Broadcasters are beginning to see real opportunities in this area, with MultiChoice Africa investing R1.5-billion in South Africa annually, and with Africa Magic having funded over 100 African feature films to date. Although funding remains an issue for filmmakers in Africa, there has been a rise in the number of co-productions and co-production treaties being explored. Most recently South Africa and Kenya have been in discussion regarding a coproduction treaty following an MoU at Cannes almost three

FESPACO film festival headquarters in Burkina Faso’s Ouragadougou (via wikimedia commons)

years ago. Terrence Khumalo of the National Film and Video Foundation pointed out at Discop Africa last year that the two countries “did not want to create a Big Brother syndrome, where South Africa, with all its infrastructure, will now take over and dominate their Kenyan counterparts,” but rather hoped that both countries could learn from each other. Online content is taking over and as more Africans are plugged in via mobile especially, this sector is set to

mushroom. Not only are African VOD platforms acquiring more content local and international, but new players are entering this sector at an alarming rate. Netflix recently launched in Africa and a number of African VOD stakeholders have upped their game and enlarged their territories of influence. Broadcasters, too, have seen the importance of having a strong presence online and, coupled with the digital migration, are tailoring their offerings accordingly.


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AFRICAN PRODUCTION COMPANIES COMPANY NAME COUNTRY

NOTABLE PROJECTS/CLIENTS

WEBSITE/CONTACTS

263 Reels

Zimbabwe

lydiasue.ellen@gmail.com

2PG Pictures

Cameroon

bptanguy@gmail.com

Aboudigin Films

Chad

Africa Wildlife Films

Sub-Saharan Africa

Afrinolly Limited

Nigeria

AFS Productions

Southern Africa

Avantgarden Films

Zimbabwe

Big Banana Films

South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Rwanda, Uganda

BBC Earth, IWC Media, BBC Current Affairs, Lime Pictures, The Moaning Life with Karl Pilkington

www.bigbanana.co.za

Big World Cinema

South Africa, South Sudan, Nigeria, Kenya

Love the One You Love, Beats of the Antonov, Al Jazeera English, Stories of our Lives, My Nigeria

www.bigworld.co.za

Bioskope Pictures

Southern Africa

Pure Blood, Sleeper's Wake, Imagine Afrika, S'camto Global, The Common Ancestor, Countdown to Freedom, 90 Plein Street, Discovery, HBO, SABC, M-Net

www.bioskope.co.za

Blue Sky Films

Kenya, East Africa, Central Africa

The Constant Gardener, The First Grader, Tomb Raider 2: Cradle of Life, The Rebound, Half the Sky, MTV, History Channel

www.blueskyproductions.tv

Bomb

South Africa, Nigeria, Tunisia

Jacob's Cross, Isibaya, Think Big, Portrait of a Young Man Drowing, Soweto: A History, In Desert and Winderness

www.thebomb.co.za

Buffy K Productions

Nigeria

Capitol Filmworks International Ltd

South Africa, Nigeria

Chromatic Pictures Africa

Kenya

www.chromaticpicturesafrica. com

Collective Productions

Namibia

www.collective.com.na

Cooked In Africa

Southern Africa, Burundi

Digital Afros

Namibia

DO Productions

Southern Africa

Docubox

Kenya

Dr Mojo Films

South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya

Elormgray Productions

Ghana

www.aboudigin.com Escaping the Great White, Drakensberg Barrier of Spears, The Zambezi Troop

www.africawildlifefilms.co.za

Heinz, Old Spice, Microsoft, Apple, Hersheys, Warchild

www.afsproductions.com

www.afrinolly.com

avantgardenfilms@gmail.com

kemiadesoye@yahoo.co.uk Jagua Nana's Daughter, Steve Rhodes, Reflections, Song of Coco, Our Husband Has Gone Mad Again

Ultimate Braai Master, Charly's Cake Angels, Global Wheeling, Cooked in the Karoo, Showville

www.capitolfilmworksint.com

www.cookedinafrica.com oshosheni@yahoo.com

419, Themba - A Boy Called hope, Lost City Raiders, The World Unseen, Son of Man

www.doproductions.com www.mydocubox.org

Diana Bada, Chad Saaiman, Tumi Molekane, The Rudimentals, Mak Manaka

www.drmojofilms.com lawrenceelorm@gmail.com


FEATURE / 17

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COMPANY NAME COUNTRY

NOTABLE PROJECTS/CLIENTS

WEBSITE/CONTACTS

Every Moment Connection Ltd

Zambia

jnbros@yahoo.com

Exxcel Media Vision

Nigeria

chikeibekwe@gmail.com

Fans Connect Online Limited

Nigeria

www.fcolimited.com

Farm Africa

South Africa, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Zambia, Botswana

www.farmfilm.tv/farm-africa

Film Crew in Africa Ltd

Kenya

www.filmcrewinafrica.com

Giant Films

South Africa, Ghana, Ethiopia, DRC, Uganda

Golden-Image Integrated Services

Nigeria

Good Work

South Africa

Gotel Africa

Nigeria

Happy Cat Films

Four Corners, Forgiveness, Guinness, Johnnie Walker, Windhoek, Amarula

www.giantfilms.tv gimage.integrate. services@gmail.com

The Boers at the End of the World, Raising Voices

www.goodworkpictures.com

South Africa, Namibia, Mauritius, Seychelles

Cold Harbour, Streetkids United, Bird Can’t Fly, Nivea, Ponds, Coca-Cola

www.happycatfilms.co.za

Incubate Productions

Southern Africa

Mondi, Transunion, Nosa, Bitco, Visa, Sitech, Sasol

www.incubatevideo.co.za

Infocos

Ghana

oobanahene@gmail.com

JR Promotions / 1Tym Productions

Zambia

paulluanga@yahoo.com

Kalahari Film & Media

Southern Africa

www.gotelafrica.com

Dredd, District 9, SAF3, 13 Hours, The Triangle, The Librarian

www.kalaharipictures.com


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COMPANY NAME COUNTRY

NOTABLE PROJECTS/CLIENTS

WEBSITE/CONTACTS

Lemon Reel Film Services

Namibia, Ethiopia, Angola, Djibouti , South Sudan, Eritrea

Nati onal Geographic, Pathe, Zodiak Meida, Magic Touch Films, Namib Films, Big Banana Producti ons, ITV, BBC

www.lemonreel.com

Magic Touch Films

Namibia

Renegade, Juice Film, Endemol, Tigress, Spiegel TV

www.magictouchfi lms.com

Marina Niava

Cote d'Ivoire

Moonlighting

Southern Africa

The Borrowers, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Skin, Skoonheid, Four Corners, Dark Tower, Resident Evil, Black Mirror, Queen of Katwe, Homeland, The Jungle Book, Eye in the Sky

www.moonlighti ng.co.za

Namib Films

Namibia

20th Century Fox, CNN, BBC, Icon, Velocity, Cape Direct, Moonlighti ng

www.namibfi lms.com

Navigator Films

Southern Africa

Zeits Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Don't Talk with your Mouth Full

www.navigatorfi lms.co.za

New Mission Films

Namibia

Ntice Mediaworks

Uganda

Old Location Films

Namibia

Icarus, FNB, MTC Namibia, Advantage Y&R

www.oldlocati onfi lms.com

On Screen Productions

Kenya

BBB World news, CCTV Africa, MTV Networks, ARD, Adelante Films

www.getonscreen.com

Out Of Africa Entertainment

Southern Africa

Bluestone 42, Strike Back, Book of Negroes, Mad Dogs, Wild at Heart, Leonardo

www.outofafrica.info

Prinz Productions

South Africa, Mauriti us, Zanzibar

Avante Garde, Westlife, Sony, Knife, FHM, Finnair, Chevrolet

www.prinzproducti ons.com

Quizzical Pictures

South Africa, Zimbabwe

iNumber Number, Rise, Nothing for Mahala, Inside Story, The Axe and the Tree, MasterChef SA, Those Who Can't

www.quizzical.co.za

Rolling Pictures

South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mauriti us, Ghana, Cameroon

Volkswagen, Orange, Cesar, Oskar

www.rollingpictures.co.za

iniava.marina@gmail.com

www.newmissionfi lms.com

No matter what type of production, there is really only one choice in Namibia…

nathan.savage@gmail.com

No matter what type of production, Nothere matter what type production, is really only of one choiceNoinmatter Namibia… No what type of productio there is really only one choice there in Namibia… is really only one choicethe in

www.namibfilms.com


FEATURE / 19

www.thecallsheet.co.za

COMPANY NAME COUNTRY

NOTABLE PROJECTS/CLIENTS

WEBSITE/CONTACTS

Sabido Productions

Southern Africa

Otelo Burning, Birdmen Chronicles, Felix, Slice of Life

www.sabidoproducti ons.co.za

Sunbow Productions Ltd

Nigeria

topeogun@gmail.com

Sydef Productions

Cameroon

elvistoh@yahoo.com

TC Pictures

Zimbabwe

tapiwachipfupa@gmail.com

Tiktak Production

Reunion

Transit Films

Egypt

True Vision Production Ltd

Tanzania

World Bank Tanzania, Maisha Plus, Tanzania Broadcasti ng Corporati on, ITV, TVZ, B-Connected

www.truevision.co.tz

Underdog

Southern Africa

Rough or Smooth, Black Beulahs, Big Brother South Africa, Big Brother Africa 1, Broadcast HIV Africa

www.underdog.co.za

Universal Grace Production

Mali, Togo

Cinemas d'Afrique, Terre Jaune

www.ugraceprod.com

Velocity Afrika

South Africa, Mali, Cameroon

Hennessy, Axe, Isibaya, Revlon, Bosch, Ster Kinekor, Heineken,Altel, P&N Bank

www.velocityfi lms. com/velocity-afrika

Vert M Prod

Reunion

Plein les Yeux, Culture la Kour, Salon de la Maison, Boubon Interim

www.vertmprod.com

Videovision Entertainment

South Africa, Kenya

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, Sarafi na!, Cry, the Beloved Country, Kite, Mr Bones, The First Grader, Remember, Shepherds and Butchers

www.videovision.co.za

Visual Asili Limited

Kenya

peggy.mbiyu@gmail.com

Zumhoo Studios

Cameroon

www.facebook.com/ zumhoostudiowork, agborobed@gmail.com

Les Muselés de La République, Lumière sur la Cathédrale, Transport Scolaire, Temps d'Avance, Margooyaz, Ma Réunion

www.ti ktakprod.com hossamelouan@gmail.com

Disclaimer: Although there are many successful television content production houses in Africa’s motion picture landscape, due to space constrictions The Callsheet is only able to include the major companies involved in this line of work.

Documentary Reality Television Production Company Namibia Helping you tell your story

+264 (0)64 463371 o matter what typeelle@magictouchfilms.com ofTel:production, ere is really only one choice in Namibia…


20 / FEATURE

www.thecallsheet.co.za

Š Value Film Fleet

TRUCK HIRE

AND SPECIALISED FILM TRUCKS Keep on trucking, by Imogen Campbell

N

ot every truck can blast its way into cinematic stardom, driven by the hero or heroine of the film dodging bullets, landmines and other road users. However, the status of the burly transport truck is indisputable when it comes to its utility on a movie set. The robust truck designed for its role to haul props and equipment, sometimes over vast distances, is an

invaluable leading member of the support cast and vital to execute logistics. The Callsheet spoke to industry insiders to find out what they were using the trucks for, some interesting assignments and how they were modified for the film industry. Which sectors in the film industry you service? Which one generates the most requests for trucks?

Debbie Roux, Sales Manager, Areyeng Rentals: Our Johannesburg office has focused more on feature films, but going forward with our new Cape Town office, we will cater for stills productions companies, as well as TV commercials. Jonathan Cotterell, Chairman, Kempston Truck Hire: Kempston services all sectors of the film industry including features, commercials, series

and all the supporting arms of the industry like catering, wardrobe, unit, set dressing, art, etc. Sandy Phin, Business Development Director, Imperial Truck Rental: We service both commercials and features. I would say it is an even split during our season. In winter it is mainly features that keep us busy in Cape Town.


FEATURE / 21

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Gary de Valle, Regional Sales Manager Bidvest Van and Truck Rental: We mainly supply on feature films and commercials. Margie Welch, Senior Sales Executive, Value Logistics: For Value Film Fleet, feature films are the predominant clients. Anneliese Spann, Manager, Spartan Film Division: We service both the commercial and feature side of the industry. Features carry us throughout the year, whereas commercials have a boom period which generates a huge portion of our revenue in a small window period (season). What is the split between national and international production requests received? Debbie Roux: Up until now we have been very

much involved with the local Afrikaans movies and have supplied vehicles for Vir Altyd, Modder en Bloed, Pad na jou Hart and more specifically Film Factory, doing a lot of films with them, and other TV productions like Getroud met Rugby, Sterlopers, Buurtwag and many more. Jonathan Cotterell: The production houses that we deal with are local. They in turn often do a JV (joint venture) with overseas production houses and many of the commercials being shot in South Africa are for the overseas markets. There are various production houses that are affiliated or have branches in other countries. Shannon Fairman, Branch Manager, Kenings Car Van And Truck Hire: Our requests only come from local productions companies.

FEATURES CARRY US THROUGHOUT THE YEAR, WHEREAS COMMERCIALS HAVE BOOM PERIOD WHICH GENERATES A HUGE PORTION OF OUR REVENUE IN A SMALL WINDOW PERIOD (SEASON).

Sandy Phin: Our main feature companies do international productions and the smaller companies do local productions. I would say is a 90% international market and 10% local market that we service in Cape Town.

using two drivers to get truck and equipment to Cape Town to be ready at Grand West Casino the following evening.

Margie Welch: I would estimate it to be a 65/35 split (65% being international shoots).

Jonathan Cotterell: The vehicles are used for anything from location scouting to catering to towing loos and fans and moving generators, basically anything that happens pre-production, during production and post production. Many of our vehicles and even some of our staff have been on hire and have been utilised in the commercial or in the feature.

Anneliese Spann: It is hard to split both international and local productions, as we only work through local service companies. Looking at the work they do, I would say we do more international work than local work.

Shannon Fairman: We normally only supply our 8 ton enclosed trucks and these are normally used for lighting or wardrobe. We also supply other companies that actually equip the vehicle before it goes to the film company.

What are the trucks mostly used for? Is it to transport equipment, props, make-up or other uses? What is the most exciting or over-the-top request you have received?

Sandy Phin: Set dressing, props, action vehicles, wardrobe and as a catering unit. A non-film, but still unusual request Imperial Truck Rental received was to assist with the Two Oceans Aquarium conservation programme. They had to transport a female ragged-tooth shark and her companion back to the ocean after a four-year stay at the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Gary de Valle: Equal split on feature films and commercials (Nationally only).

Debbie Roux: The trucks are mostly used to transport lights, camera gear, props and also panelvans fitted with rails to transport the wardrobe. One specific request was waiting for Afrikaans Is Groot at Morelettapark to finish, packing after the show on Saturday night, and then

Margie Welch: The truck and vans are used to transport,


22 / FEATURE

www.thecallsheet.co.za

© Areyeng Rentals

© Areyeng Rentals

© Spartan Truck Hire

lighting equipment, camera equipment, props, greens, set dressing etc. Then we have the specialised mobile wardrobe, camera/dark room, production office vehicles. The most interesting request we had was for Mad Max Fury Road: where we had to build

mobile workshops for the bikes and rubbish trucks, on another shoot we had to convert the interior of a 15 metre trailer into an American apartment /home gym. Anneliese Spann: Our requests range from lighting,

THE MOST INTERESTING REQUEST WE HAD WAS FOR MAD MAX FURY ROAD: WHERE WE HAD TO BUILD MOBILE WORKSHOPS FOR THE BIKES AND RUBBISH TRUCKS.

unit, set dressing, grips etc. which are generally all your equipment trucks. I can’t say I have had any over the top requests because nothing really surprises me anymore, it just becomes more interesting and more challenging. This is why we love the film industry so much, as they keep us on our toes.

vehicles; a panelvan fitted with a table and chair and mobile air conditioner unit.

How can the trucks be adapted for specific film industry needs? Please comment on the newest and latest development in modifications of the trucks that are available.

Sandy Phin: We supply rack and roll trollies for lighting and grips trucks. Wardrobe rails for quantums and crafters as well as shelves for crafters and sprinters.

Debbie Roux: There has been quite a demand for DIT

Jonathan Cotterell: Wardrobe vehicles are kitted with change rooms, mirrors, lighting and rails for hanging the garments. Camera vehicles are fitted with dark rooms and shelving used as desks.

Gary de Valle: We have special shelving only and find that more than suffices.


FEATURE / 23

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© Bidvest Van and Truck Rental

WE TRY OUR BEST TO GIVE THE CLIENTS WHAT THEY NEED. WITHOUT THEM WE WOULD HAVE NO PURPOSE AND WE REMIND OURSELVES OF THIS EVERY DAY.

Margie Welch: Certain departments require special shelving for the equipment; we, as a rental company have the only trucks that can transport

the big Techno Cranes. We have also built a production/ unit truck split. Value Film Fleet try to build trucks according to the customer’s

specific requirements on long-term projects. Anneliese Spann: There are so many different needs that require specialised rigging. The risk in rigging these trucks is that you can’t use them for anything else, so one now looks at having removable rigging. A lot of guys have become quite ingenious doing this. For your smaller vehicles and 8 tonners we have shelving and rails that are easily taken in and out of the vehicles. This, however, caters more for

the commercials. Our Film Division is designed purely to cater to this industry so we can focus solely on their unique needs and demanding schedules All of our vehicles are fully equipped with radios, air conditioners and tow bars as per the clients’ requests. This is due to the crew having to spend so much time in their vehicles and they would like them all to have a comfortable ride. We try our best to give the clients what they need. Without them we would have no purpose and we remind ourselves of this every day.

“Setting your scene with quality vehicle rental!”

We pledge to you that we will put your needs first at all times and guarantee the best and most trusted service that one can find! JHB: 012 760 1900 - 082 334 6278 | CT: 021 511 2333 - 076 821 2284 | Web: www.spartantruckhire.co.za


24 / OPPORTUNITIES

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OPPORTUNITIES These invaluable skills will help separate the intern from their peers, both on paper and in practical application. The funding from the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) will ensure the intern isn’t distracted by the need to make an income outside of the ACT offices, enabling them to fully immerse themselves into the internship and all it has to offer. Interested graduates can apply here: bit.ly/1MdlAw1. The due date for applications is Friday, 8 April 2016. For more information about the Arts & Culture Trust (ACT), please visit www.act.org.za

ISSA RAE WANTS YOUR WEB SERIES © Issa Rae

MZANZI WOMEN FILM FESTIVAL CALLS FOR ENTRIES Inspired by the 1956 Women’s March to Pretoria in South Africa in a fight against Apartheid. Mzansi Women Film Festival will be hosting its 3rd edition in 2016 of films by women and about women. Headlining the festival is short, feature films and conversations/workshops. This is in the spirit of celebrating women filmmakers, inspiring and empowering women, encouraging the spirit of engagement, collaboration, cocreation for a better and informed society and paying homage to the founding women of our arts. The dates of the festival are 5 - 7 August 2016. The festival accepts films of mixed genres such as: • Documentaries • Drama • Animation

• Experimental and films shot on mobile phones Closing date for submission is 31 May 2016 and entry forms are available on www.mwfilmfestival.com

ACT TO OFFER PAID INTERNSHIPS The Arts & Culture Trust (ACT) is calling for applications for a six-month full-time internship funded by The National Lotteries Commission (NLC). This Johannesburg-based opportunity will see the successful candidate gain handson and significant practical experience, as they work closely with the ACT team on their Scholarships Programme between May and October 2016. ACT is seeking a young graduate with a keen interest in arts administration and the performing arts. The internship will offer training that will build upon the intern’s

theoretical knowledge in an applied setting, which will contrast theory with practice. The internship is designed to refine the writing, verbal and analytical skills of the intern, while fostering a sense of professionalism. A strong work ethic and industry best practice will also be imparted on the chosen graduate. “In addition to gaining valuable relevant experience, the internship is a stepping stone to establishing a career in the arts. The networking skills and access to information and knowledge hold great potential for an eager young arts administrator,” says Pieter Jacobs, the Chief Executive Officer of ACT. Throughout this six-month long opportunity, the intern will be challenged to contemplate matters relating to project implementation, logistics, financial management, marketing, monitoring and evaluation, data collection, analysis and reporting.

Issa Rae is a prolific content marketer and producer, garnering over 25 million views and close to 200 000 subscribers on YouTube. She’s made the Forbes 30 under 30 list twice, and is known for her hit series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl. She’s worked with Pharrell Williams, Tracey Edmonds, and Shonda Rhimes for ABC where they’re currently developing a half-hour comedy for HBO. Oh! And she wants to partner with YOU. If you have two or three episodes – shot and edited – of a scripted or unscripted web series, this is your chance. Issa Rae Productions is looking to create partnerships with fresh, new filmmakers. Send your links to submit@issarae.com with a subject line of New Series. Include the name of your series and a synopsis. Please note no unlicensed music, graphics, or copyright infringements will be permitted. For more information on Issa Rae productions, visit www.issarae.com.


SPOTLIGHT / 25

www.thecallsheet.co.za

14TH SHNIT INTERNATIONAL

SHORTFILMFESTIVAL 5-16 OCTOBER 2016

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hnit International Shortfilmfestival is a transnational cultural event that lights up the planet with truly exceptional short films. An open minded festival full of heart, shnit refers to each showcasing city as a playground. Bern is the most important playground since the festival was founded there. The other international playgrounds are Bangkok, Buenos Aires, Cairo, Cape Town, Hong Kong, Moscow and San José. More than 40 000 filmmakers and film fans of all sexual orientations, from all races and walks of life, in every corner of the world make their way to

shnit playgrounds annually. During 12 days, shnit showcases more than 200 short films of all genres and styles, not seldom triggering festival careers that can go as far as an Academy Award. Just as impressive, the festival awards its best and brightest talents with $100,000 USD in cash prizes. Since shnit is a truly global experience, the festival culminates with the international awards ceremony shnit finale in New York. In an exclusive ambiance alongside invited guests, the winners are bestowed with the award The Flaming Faun. Exclusively focused on the art

of the short film, shnit provides a remarkable international platform for great films that attracts award winning short filmmakers from across the globe. Last year’s festival welcomed entries from 138 countries, offering a staggering panoramic view of global cinematic talent. Success at shnit is an achievement – and an unforgettable experience for even the most seasoned festival participant. Do you want to be part of the 14th edition of shnit International Shortfilmfestival? Then submit your short film now for the international Competition shnit 2016!

General Conditions: Registration Deadline: 1 June 2016 Films completed after: 1 June 2014 Maximum running time: 40 minutes (including credits) Genres and country of production: all Entry accepted in two categories: International competition (early deadline 1st March 2016) National competitions* *No entry fee. Submission to National competition automatically qualify for consideration for International competition. Eligible countries: Argentina, China, Costa Rica, Egypt, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland and Thailand.

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INDIES AND SHORTS Kim Crowie brings you a roundup of the independent films and shorts that have caught our eye this month.

© Exodus , Written & Directed by Kyle Lewis (Images Copyright 2016 Makhado Makhado Agency)

MINERVA’S LILIES

A highly abstract, four-minute film by Amirah Tajdin and Casimir, Minerva’s Lilies is an ode to childhood, with distant memories always lingering along the edges of your hearing. It speaks to the women we are, the struggles we have endured, the inner child who has to be put aside – left only with fragments of the expectations placed upon us. It’s also a film of vibrant colours, intimate close-ups and vivid imagination. Bountiful floral wreaths and ancient eastern sounds take us on an exotic journey of the mind, culminating in immense hope. “Still

Minerva’s Lilies by Amirah Tajdin © Casimir TV

they love” the narrator tells us, still they “place magic inbetween the folds of their tiny hearts.”

ORISHA’S JOURNEY

A rediscovery of West Africa traditions, Orisha’s Journey is a delightful short by GhanaianAmerican animator Abdul Ndadi. Steeped in African myth, the story follows a little girl called Orisha who doesn’t believe in fables – until she finds herself smack-dab in the middle of one. After meeting a lost flower spirit, she must then journey to the Walking Forest and return him. This adorable little tale has a Pan-

African feel and aims to provide characters children of colour can relate to and identify with. “The recurring icons in almost all of the shots are variations of the Ghanaian Sankofa symbol. It means to learn from the past and to return that which was lost. I believe you cannot completely define who you truly are, if you are not grounded by your roots,” Ndadi told OkayAfrica recently.

EXODUS

A three-part short film culminating in a triumphant Riky Rick blessed by an eerie, landfill Sangoma of sorts, Exodus is a visual

Orisha’s Journey © Abdul Ndadi

explosion of beauty, pain and bizarre Africana. Written and directed by Kyle Lewis, the film is designed to showcase five tracks from the award-winning rapper’s gold-selling album Family Values. It’s an ambitious move away from the traditional music video format, and one which Lewis has excelled in creating. From concept to execution it is fresh, woke and kaleidoscopic in its treatment. It shies away from traditional hip-hop imagery, setting up a fantasy story with Site C in Cape Town’s Khayelitsha as its gritty backdrop. Its use of effects is brilliant, as is the incredibly tight editing, hinting at a dark, pulsing and multi-faceted story at play just below the surface. The three chapters – Neverland, Rise and Power – weave a beautiful and intricate musical tale, opening with a Peter Pan daydream and culminating with Riky Rick swathed in Game of Thrones furs juxtaposed against a harsh background of rubbish dump filth. This is Lewis’ second collaboration with Riky Rick after FUSEG topped 1 million views on YouTube. The film was co-produced by A Dirty Soul and Arcade Content.


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EILEEN SANDROCK

OF SASANI STUDIOS ON BROADCASTING SOUTH AFRICA’S HOTTEST NEW SHOW, THE VOICE Please explain the process of broadcasting The Voice. Each series of The Voice is recorded in blocks: 1. The Blind Auditions 2. The Battles 3. The live TX at the end Between each shoot block, the set is changed and rebuilt for the next block, so the studio and support areas are locked out for the duration of the production term. How have you adapted your studio space to suit The Voice? The design of the new studio complex was complete and the construction had already commenced before The Voice confirmed at Sasani, but yes, under normal circumstances we would build and design the studio specifically to the production’s requirements. In this case, to accommodate The Voice, Sasani needed to make a fairly substantial investment. The specifications provided by the format holder are quite specific, and whereas we amended certain elements, the end result was

the development of a stateof-the-art technical solution at Sasani. The elements include: Full HD control room: • 12 x LDX Grass Valley cameras, which are full HD, 1080i cameras. The control room has the capacity for 16 cameras. • Audio: Soundcraft Vi 3000 – digital audio with 5.1 surround sound for recordings and live transmission • We record to file, up to 32 audio channels and 12 video channels • The system is designed for collaborative editing on a shared storage system The complex, in which we house The Voice has the following: • 800m2 studio – fully sound proofed • A set store area of 600m2 • Office and support infrastructure of approximately 1 000m2 – which includes dressing room complete with en-suite bathrooms, kitchens, makeup room and production offices, and this complex is supported

by a 1.2MW generator The total square meterage of this new complex, including all the support infrastructure is 4 096m2 What are the challenges unique to this show? Space is always a challenge. Whereas the new complex is large, the major challenge is still space specifically to accommodate the large audiences required for The Voice. What type of shows are best suited to your studios? Sasani specifically designs and builds “multipurpose” studios to suit different types of productions. We currently have five daily

The Voice © Sasani Studios.

soaps, and of course The Voice, so the studios need to be able to accommodate all different genres, whether it is soaps, game shows, music and variety shows etc. We have a total of 6 800m2 of studio floor space, which is made up of 12 studios ranging in size from 64m2 – 1 027m2. We do have a beautiful new 600m2 studio that is still available to the industry. This studio is perfectly sound proof. We recently housed Lip Sync Battle Africa and The Voice in adjacent studios, and the sound proofing proved to be perfect. I think we should thank our acoustic consultant, Ivan Lin, on an excellent job there.


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ATFT: HELP OR HINDRANCE? We dig into the achievements and industry movements of the Association for Transformation in Film and Television since its inception in 2013. This is part one in a two-part series.

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he Association for Transformation in Film and Television, better known in the industry as the ATFT, has been operational for the last two years led by Mayenzeke Baza, Sifiso Khanyile, Tshego Molete and Pascal Schmitz. In early 2016 the association announced Schmitz leaving the body to work on other projects. The ATFT went on to announce their new Export Accelerator Programme based on current governments export initiati ves. This will help develop, prepare and fasttrack production companies into the international arena. “I’m very happy about the ATFT,” says Pascal, “The Accelerator is the legacy I will leave behind. What’s going to happen is by next year, they’re no longer going to take black filmmakers that apply, but only export-ready companies. Before, it was just about getting exposure. Now it’s about who has gotten traction; who is going on holiday and messing around. I think it’s had a huge impact on the industry, they understand what the international market is looking for, they’ve grown their companies, and the next few workshops are going to have results.”

DEALING WITH TOUCHY SUBJECTS

Transformation in South Africa is always a difficult subject, especially when it comes to creating a truly transformati ve society free of racial inequality. This has been clearly evident in the ATFT’s short history,

with a number of individuals and organisations criticising the body’s ability to facilitate opportunities for filmmakers of colour. One of the most vocal has been Denis Lillie, formerly of the Cape Film Commission. “There are many who say positi ve things about the ATFT but frankly, I’m very disappointed in what they’ve done.” He says they met him in Cannes under the pretext of discussing how the CFC and DFA could work together and he went through what he did. “Three months later they launched the ATFT and they were doing all the same things we did in terms of trade missions and association training but in doing that, they’ve excluded certain people with disabilities, and the white filmmakers,” Lillie says. “I don’t have a problem with transformation, but I do have a problem with discrimination. And I do have a problem with how they were going about it under the banner of South African Indies. There are many people who don’t want to be branded under SA Indies and some of the black filmmakers we were working with decided to take their own stands at these markets and promote themselves as their own organisation.” That said, despite a number of bodies including the CFC working towards creating opportunities for black filmmakers, the Western Cape remains one of the least transformati ve of South Africa’s film hubs, with a sore lack in opportunities for filmmakers of colour. Some, like X Con Films, receive the bulk of their commissioned work from

internationals or other regions of SA like Gauteng. Munier Parker, who heads up X Con, says initially he was sceptical about the ATFT, but soon saw their vision and the importance of the role they wanted to play. “They are dealing with the same problems from 20 years ago,” he explains. As one of the few fully black-owned production companies in Cape Town, he has seen first-hand the impact they’ve made, and says despite his respect for the CFC, no other industry body has seen the same results. “The ATFT came and said we’re going to take black filmmakers to market and especially in Cape Town there was a reaction to that,” Schmitz says. “A large portion of the white population doesn’t like to hear about the empowerment of the black people in this country.” Tariq Khan of Oomph! Animation, who attended MIPCOM in 2015, believes these issues are being raised by people who are either envious of the ATFT’s achievements or who stand to lose their stake in the market should the ATFT succeed in their mandate. “I feel personally they [ATFT] are the only ones implementing transformation in the industry,” he says, “Their

mind-sets are different to those of government organisations of this nature. For the ATFT, it’s not just about local, but about local reaching internationals. They’re very forward thinking individuals. And I can tell you from experience their workshops are extremely helpful. Otherwise you’re wet behind the ears and a waste of money.” Monica Rorvik, Head of Film and Media Promotion at Wesgro agrees, saying, “I think there’s a big negati ve force and people like to stir when anybody new steps in. I have to say that actually, the ATFT was needed.” Many of the ATFT’s film companies have gone through Wesgro’s generic Exporter Development Programmes aligned with the national Industrial Policy Action Plan. “This Accelerator is new, essentially they really want to measure and help companies. They’re looking at the projects they’re taking into market and finding out how to strengthen them with mentorship, pitching practice, looking at the company structure with the Business Canvas Model type of framework. I think the legs are all here.” Mayenzeke says things haven’t all been rosy. “As an organisation, people don’t understand what

BEFORE, IT WAS JUST ABOUT GETTING EXPOSURE. NOW IT’S ABOUT WHO HAS GOTTEN TRACTION.


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this transformation is all about, and we purely made a decision to help producers of colour so others gave us a lot of flak. Some thought we were racists, some thought we were distributing racism. Black producers hardly have capital so we started an organisation to focus on that,” he says. Baza adds that they have had some chancers, with about a 60-40 split between those who worked and those who didn’t, but as the organisation grew, processes were put in place to avoid issues like this. “Now people have seen what we’re all about and it’s one of those things where people don’t understand everything and want to question everything. As an entity we are purely results driven. Everything we did was to the point to book.”

THE RESULTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES

Despite this, there is an overwhelming sense of gratitude from filmmakers on the ground

who have had the opportunity to visit festi vals and markets as part of the SA Indies delegations. Most have had great experiences at international events that have catapulted their careers forward. Says Rehad Desai, Director of Miners Shot Down, who attended Sheffield Doc/Fest as part of an ATFT delegation last year: “The ATFT provides an essential service for emerging and established filmmakers alike. Understanding how the world of documentary works is incredibly important if you are setting your ambitions high. The ATFT programme provides insights into the what, when and how of such markets.” A company with notable achievements post-market visits is Gambit Films. After attending Cannes Film Festi val and other markets, the sevenyear-old company now has a strong direction for the future, an ongoing production slate of up to ten films, a co-produced

soap opera for local television (Suidooster), and is currently working on producing two films in 2016 – one with Kalahari Film & Media, after meeting them for the first time on their way to a market with the ATFT. The association has also been instrumental in creating a path of access and connections with internationals, says Bradley Joshua, their business manager. This has been invaluable in developing their business, he explains. “The positi ve thing for me about going to markets with ATFT is creating that access and with that access and the knowledge that comes with it, I’ve come back much more confident in making Gambit Films a successful business, not only locally, but also internationally. Having gone to markets I realise that we, within our organisation, have the ability to compete on a global level.” In addition, the ATFT has provided a base for recognition

BLACK PRODUCERS HARDLY HAVE CAPITAL SO WE STARTED AN ORGANISATION TO FOCUS ON THAT. of South Africa as a film brand, with organisations like the Gauteng Film Commission working with the delegations on occasion. According to the GFC’s Marketing Manager Puisano Phatoli, the body was involved with the ATFT for representation at various international festi vals film festi vals and markets, but this year, due to budgetary constraints they will not continue the relationship.

Stay tuned for part two in The Callsheet Issue 5.


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© Shutterstock

Mountain gorilla in Musanze © Giles Breton

Kiryi, Province du Nord, Rwanda © Peter Lindgren

RWANDA PLOTTING A

NEW COURSE TO FILMIC SUCCESS Imogen Campbell explores Rwanda’s wealth of natural locations and other film attractions.

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his East African country is the ninth smallest in Africa, roughly the size of Haiti or Hawaii. It is bordered by Great Lakes Region neighbours, Democratic Republic of Congo to the west, Uganda to the north with Tanzania and Burundi to the east and south respectively. Rwanda, known as the “Land of a Thousand Hills”, is determined to shake off the shackles of its past. It is defined as a low-income country with an agrarian populace more familiar with the

medium of radio. The nascent film industry flourished from the time radio experienced its nadir - during the genocide of 1994. With virtually no international media coverage, the vacuum was filled by radio-transmitted propaganda culminating ultimately in the atrocity. Rwandans are still deeply distrustful of media and the film, Hotel Rwanda – thought locally to be inaccurate - has done nothing to change perception. Robust efforts have been made

to promote a sterling image of the country and worldwide it is known as light on the continent due to social reforms. There is a governmentapproved narrative about the genocide and how to depict it. Rwandans agree that this should be the government’s duty to prevent another catastrophe. In 2015, an official enquiry in Rwanda called for proceedings to be taken against the BBC as a result of the documentary Rwanda: The Untold Story.

FILM HISTORY

Pre-genocide, the film Gorillas in the Mist ; the Dian Fossey account to save the gorilla, focussed the world’s attention on Rwanda. Another notable film partially shot there was King Solomons Mines in 1950. Post-1994 most films and documentaries have had a genocide theme. The first feature film made about the genocide was 100 Days, co-produced by Eric Kabera of Rwanda Cinema Centre (RCC). Others


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CLIMATE The climate, described as a pleasant tropical highland, varies from region to region due to altitude. It has a long rainy season between March and May with the dry season between June to September. Average Min and Max Temperatures in Kigali, Rwanda 30°C 15°C

Hotel Rwanda © Blid Alsbirk 2004, United Artists

include the 2010 Earth Made of Glass, A Sunday in Kigali and Sometimes in April. On a lighter note and a departure from the genocide theme is the 2010 Africa Unite, a film depicting Rwandan children travelling to South Africa for the World Cup. Filmmakers have expressed a desire for a move from genocidethemed movies to reflect a modern Rwanda. However, they are limited in what they can shoot due to lack of funding. Government is keen to fund international productions, as it bolsters its image, but does not really fund local filmmakers. To compensate for this and often to adhere to sponsors’ requests, their resultant projects end up being more educational in scope. Rwanda has few locations for viewing films, notably Century Cinemas located in Kigali. Television sets are uncommon and Rwandans still use radio and mobile phones for communication due to cost and mobility. Therefore, filmmakers feel that the general population does not understand filmmaking. Rwanda Cinema Centre is one of the few institutions that deliver formal film education.

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Eric Kabera is the president of the Rwanda Cinema Center, which is now better known for organising the annual travelling Rwanda Film Festival, nicknamed “Hillywood”.

FILMMAKERS HAVE EXPRESSED A DESIRE FOR A MOVE FROM GENOCIDE-THEMED MOVIES TO REFLECT A MODERN RWANDA.

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FILM FORECAST

Kivu Ruhorahoza also started his career with the RCC and is a skilled Rwandan filmmaker. His 2010 film, Grey Matter, was screened at the Tribecca Film Festival and garnered many accolades. His second film, Things of the Aimless Wanderer has also been well-received. A renowned industry stalwart, Joel Karekez, crafted the The Pardon, which won the Golden Impala award at the Amakula Film Festival in Uganda. It has been reported that Leonardo DiCaprio and Michael Bay are planning to produce a movie about the Rwanda national biking team. Orlando von Einsiedel, Virunga director, is set to direct. I Am Able is a recent documentary based on the life of Frederick Ndabaramiye, a survivor of the Rwandan genocide and was screened at the Frozen River Film Festival.

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GETTING THERE BY AIR The main airport is Gregoire Kayibanda Airport in Kigali. Airlines that operate in Rwanda include: • • • • • • • • • •

RwandAir Kenya Airways KLM Dutch Airlines Ethiopian Airlines Qatar Airways Turkish Airlines Air France Lufthansa South African Airways Brussels Airlines

POPULATION 12,661,733 (World Fact Book) Comprised of 84% Hutu, 15% Tutsi and 1% Pygmy.

FIXERS IN RWANDA Talking Film Productions Tel: +256 792 902 991 Email: info@talkingfilmproduction.com Website: www.talkingfilmproduction.com

CONTACTS Rwanda Tourism Board Tel: +250 252 57 65 14 Email: reservation@rwandatourism.com Website: www.rwandatourism.com


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APRIL CAPE TOWN INTERNATONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL 1-2 Cape Town, South Africa SARASOTA FILM FESTIVAL 1 - 10 Sarasota, USA ATLANTA FILM FESTIVAL 1 - 10 Atlanta, USA THE WGSA 3RD ANNUAL MUSE AWARDS 2 Johannesburg, South Africa MIPTV 4-7 Cannes, France INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL NIJMEGEN 6 - 10 Nijmegen, Netherlands 21ST PALM BEACH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 6 - 14 Palm Beach, USA VAIL FILM FESTIVAL 7 - 10 Vail, USA RIVERRUN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 7 - 17 Winston-Salem, USA DAKOTA DIGITAL FILM FESTIVAL 8 Bismarck, USA 25TH ANNUAL FLORIDA FILM FESTIVAL 8 - 17 Maitland, USA

STOCKHOLM FILM FESTIVAL JUNIOR 11 - 16 Stockholm, Sweden TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL 13 - 24 New York, USA 3RD SETTING SUN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 14 - 17 Melbourne, Australia BOSTON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 14 - 18 Boston, USA NASHVILLE FILM FESTIVAL 14 - 23 Nashville, USA IMAGINE FILM FESTIVAL 14 - 24 Amsterdam, Netherlands INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE FILM FESTIVAL AND THE ROXY THEATRE 16 - 23 Missoula, USA LIFETREE FILM FEST 21 - 23 Loveland, USA SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 21 - 5 May San Francisco, USA

THE MADEIRA FILM FESTIVAL 25 April - 1 May Madeira, Portugal INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL BOSTON 27 - 4 May Boston, USA NYC INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL 27 - 1 May New York, USA SCI-FI LONDON 27 - 6 May London, UK 4TH ANNUAL PAONIA FILM FESTIVAL 28 - 30 Paonia, USA

HOT DOCS CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY FESTIVAL 28 April - 8 May Toronto, Canada ANKARA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 28 - 8 May Ankara, Turkey SYRACUSE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL’S SPRING FEST 29 - 1 May New York, USA

TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL 28 April - 1 May Los Angeles, USA

RFN UNCONFERENCE AND FESTIVAL 29 April - 2 May Glasgow, UK

HILL COUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL 28 - 1 May Texas, USA

INTERNATIONAL MOBILE FILM FESTIVAL 30 – 1 May San Diego, USA


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MAY FILMKUNSTFEST MECKLENBURGVORPOMMERN 3-8 Schwerin, Germany

FILM FEST PETALUMA 7 California, USA CANNES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 11 - 22 Cannes, France LOS ANGELES JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL 18 - 25 Los Angeles, USA

LOS ANGELES SUNSET FILM FESTIVAL 21 - 22 Los Angeles, USA BOSNIA - HERZEGOVINA FILM FESTIVAL 26 - 28 New York, USA KRAKOW FILM FESTIVAL 29 - 5 June Krakow, Poland NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 31 – 2 June New York, USA

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 19 - 12 June Seatt le, USA

DISCOP AFRICA ABIDJAN 31 - 2 June Abidjan, Ivory Coast

SOHO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 19 - 25 New York, USA

HAMBURG INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 31 - 6 June Hamburg, Germany

Marvel’s Ant-Man. Photo by Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2014

WOMEN OF AFRICAN DESCENT FILM FESTIVAL 7 New York, USA


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THE SOUTH AFRICAN SCREEN FEDERATION

GAUTENG FILM COMMISSION

WGSA (Writers Guild of South Africa) Muse Award judges Yolanda Keabetswe Mogatusi and Sean Drummond were shortlisted in an international screenplay competition. They are listed in the international category quarterfinals of the BlueCat Screenplay Competition. Yolanda’s script is Tshepa Themba, a dark comedy. She is a final round judge for the WGSA Muse Awards in the short film category. Hair That Moves, her other short film, was selected into the international Focus Features Africa First programme in 2013. Sean Drummond’s Five Fingers for Marseilles is described as a contemporary South African take on the western genre and is set in the Eastern Cape. The script had formerly been a Muse Awards nominee for best unproduced feature film. Sean, known for his work with the shnit Shortfilmfestival, was also a first round judge in the short film category of the WGSA Muse Awards this year. The competition had over 7 500 entries of which 503 were in the international category.

The Greenlight Foundation has recently partnered with the Gauteng Film Commission. Greenlight District Project is a project of the not- for-profit company which teaches offenders in prison how to write for film. It has been teaching inside the Meredale Correctional facility in Johannesburg for the last three years. Greenlight District Project is an initiative of Pippa Dyer, CEO of the Greenlight Foundation NPC. Learning to write for film forms part of the self-actualisation process for any student but even more so for an inmate. Benefits include helping them to heal, re-evaluate choices and think responsibly about their future. It also gives them a platform to communicate with society at large. In the study block where Greenlight District Project teaches there are approximately 500 offenders. They are allowed to have computers in their cells, but not all have this facility. The project is in need of support financially as well as other teaching resources.

NEW SPECIAL RECOGNITION CATEGORIES INTRODUCED TO THE 2016 SAFTAS TO STRENGTHEN THE DIVERSITY AGENDA Three new awards were added to the 10th South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs). They were added in order to recognise individuals, groups or initiatives that have serviced the industry and contributed to its growth in underserviced areas. It is also for the benefit of people with disabilities. A secondary motivation for these inclusions was to align it with the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) mandate. The Disability Recognition Award will be awarded to a significant contributor who worked to make the industry more accessible to people living with disabilities.

The Lifetime Achievement will be presented to a woman, thereby commemorating both the 60th anniversary of the Women’s March. This year also marks the 40th anniversary of the Soweto Uprising. The Best Student Film category will also be used to mark this pivotal point in South African history. Audiences were afforded the opportunity to vote for their favourite soapie. A new category has been introduced: Most Popular Soap category - different to the Best TV Soap Award where judges do the voting.


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The annual WGSA Muse Awards are presented by the Writers’ Guild of South Africa. Their primary purpose is to honour the hard work done by members in the South African film, television and entertainment world. The award ceremony will be held on 2 April at the Soweto Theatre. These awards are only open to Members of the Guild. The nominees for the awards were recently announced: Animation / Web Series: • Benedikt Sebastian – Sing-A-Gram • Julia Smuts Louw – The Case of the Disappearing Daddy • Tracy Eccles – Who is Afraid of the Big Bad Dark? Feature Film: • Tertius Kapp – Dis Ek, Anna • Trish Malone – Ayanda • Thandi Brewer - The Chemo Club Radio Drama: • Ayanda Seoka – Indlalifa’: My Heir • Jann Acutt – The Mother in Law • Matthew Kalil – In the Line of Duty

Short Film: • Eduard Frauenstein – Get a Life • Kelly Powell – Home • Tafadzwa Njovana – Anele Spec Script: • Graham Hickson – Nokia Kid • Marina Bekker – Love on the Rocks • Peter Goldsmid – Love Songs of Nathan J Swirsky Stage Play: • Callum Tilbury – Doctor Godenstein’s Man • Callum Tilbury – Fabulous Nothing • Richard Harry Nosworthy – Number One Tv Comedy / Sitcom: • Both Worlds – Puppet Nation ZA • Julian Koboekae – Him, Her and the Guys • Marina Bekker – Seepsop Tv Drama: • Graham Hickson – Power • Paul Ian Johnson – Jab • Marina Bekker – Land with a Temper

COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION SOUTH AFRICA (CPA) The Department of Labour circulated an advisory earlier this year through its regional office in Cape Town. It notified all production companies of additional requirements to be submitted when making applications to film with children. The CPA encouraged production companies to comply with stipulations in this regard. The department’s correspondence indicated that there would be an increase in inspections and enforcement. The CPA exhorted companies to be in possession of the relevant paperwork as inspectors would request them during the course of an inspection. Compliance as a priority will ensure that this industry, the only one legally allowed to employ children under the age of 15, will retain its current position.

© Scott Webb

WRITER’S GUILD OF SOUTH AFRICA (WGSA)


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www.value.co.za

25

Wizardz

+27 21 461 9334

copy@wizardz.co.za

www.wizardz.co.za

35

CONTACT US Cover Image: The Book Of Negroes © Conquering Lion Pictures, Out Of Africa Entertainment, Unit Stills Photography by Joe Alblas, African Photo Productions

Writer: Kim Crowie kim@filmeventmedia.co.za

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Assistant Designer: Lauren Smith lauren@filmeventmedia.co.za

Publisher: Lance Gibbons lance@filmeventmedia.co.za

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Production and Traffic Manager: Nazeera Hartley Roach nazeera@filmeventmedia.co.za

Executive Editor: Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@filmeventmedia.co.za

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Account Executive: Jennifer Dianez jennifer@filmeventmedia.co.za

Production and Traffic Co-ordinator: Basheera Hartley bash@filmeventmedia.co.za 57 2nd Avenue, Harfield Village, Claremont, 7708, Cape Town, South Africa Tel: +27 21 674 0646

JOIN US www.thecallsheet.co.za www.fi lmeventmedia.co.za DISCLAIMER: Opinions expressed in The Callsheet do not necessarily represent the official viewpoint of the editor or the publisher, while inclusion of adverts/advertising features does not imply endorsement of any business, product or service. Copyright of this material is reserved. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, The Callsheet and/or its employees may not be held liable or responsible for any act or ommission committed by any person, including a juristic person, referred to in this publication. It and they furthermore accept(s) no responsibility for any liability arising out of any reliance that a reader of this publication places on the contents of this publication.


2017

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The Filmmaker’s Guide to Africa 2017.

CONTACT KATHY ENGLISH BROWER: kathy@filmeventmedia.co.za / Tel. 021 674 0646


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The Callsheet Issue 4  

The fourth issue of The Callsheet places a spotlight on multiple award-winning mini series The Book of Negroes, the business behind document...

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