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ONLINE CREATIVE MAGAZINE

ISSUE 3 | SEPTEMBER 2015 THE EYE CREATIVE


This issue is a celebration of the voice of creativity. The team at The Eye have worked hard to take you on this journey with us, which will make you cry, laugh, stare in awe and most of all - make you question what you’re doing to make a change. We questioned EVERYTHING when we put together this issue; what our voice was saying; what we could be doing differently; how we were going to convey the strength of the voices within our pages... You will notice that there is no Editor’s note this month, and that’s because this issue is the most important message that we can deliver. Why? Because creativity is our greatest voice... so how are you using yours?

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@Frances_Cannon

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Jenna Paige Designs

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Frances Cannon

CONTENTS 52.

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The Street’s Barber

BANKSY Dismaland

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Nowhere Creek

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ORC Apparel

ON THE COVER Photo: Livia Milazzo @liviamilazzo Model: Nasir Sobhani (The Street’s Barber)


The Kind Body Co Organic Coffee Body Scrub. Moisturising and Nourishing


CONTRIBUTORS AMY FARNWORTH Writer, Traveller, Soul-Searcher Our favourite & only international creative super star Amy, is yet again killing it with her articles this month! Check out her blog Chasing Amy Lou. www.chasingamylou.com

GRACE BREWIN Freelance Costume Designer, Writer Owner & Founder of Belle Regalia; a unique jewellery line, Grace is a Melbourne based creative with a passion for creative writing, books and on the side, is also a freelance Costume Designer. @belleregalia etsy.com/au/shop/BelleRegalia

CHRIS MELBOURNE Creative Director, Writer Self-confessed dreamer and owner of many shoes, Chris is back this month with his witty and hilarious coffee reviews. ...Oskar totally steals the spotlight in this pic. AWWW x IG: @chris.melbourne


BRAND NEW RECORD COMING SOON Featuring the single ‘ Cages’ ‘there stands a house in my street where the lowly go to meet and the lost are never far away from company’


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F O R TI CK ETS A N D I N F O V I S I T TH E VA N N S. C OM . A U

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Founder, Editor in Chief Samii Lund samii@theeyecreative.com

ADVERTISE WITH THE EYE CREATIVE

Consulting Creative Director chris melbourne info@theeyecreative.com

GENERAL ENQUIRIES

advertise@theeyecreative.com

info@theeyecreative.com

SUBMISSIONS Contributing creatives to this issue can be seen on page 9. The Eye Creative has tried to mention all photographers showcased throughout the images in this magazine & on our social media channels. If we have mistakenly missed the opportunity to showcase a particular photographer whose image is within our magazine, please send an email to info@theeyecreative.com and we will feature said photographer in the next issue.

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The Eye Creative accepts freelance art, photo and story submissions from creatives around Australia. We may not be able to reply personally to each individual that is unsuccessful, however we will keep your work and story on file for upcoming issues or opportunities. To submit, please include your full name, business name and a sample of your work in your email to info@ theeyecreative.com.

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Written by Samii Lund

It’s not every day you find an artist illustrating her way into the hearts, minds and souls of her followers in such a way that can actually save lives. BIG CALL you say? Well, we wouldn’t be saying it if we didn’t mean it. The work of Frances Cannon, a 23 year old from Melbourne, can be described as confronting or ‘gross’ to some, but to others they’re freeing, genuinely beautiful, loud, true and HONEST. As a female, I know what it’s like to look in the mirror and pick apart my body and how I look. I’m 64kg, what the kids call ‘skinny fat’ and most of the time I’m thinking about my fat cankles or thick thighs that now touch thanks to some stress-eating I did a month ago - or even that bulge around my stomach that never used to be there that now is outgrowing my boobs (seriously, where did you come from!?) Yet, I know that this perception of myself is just that -my own perception. Frances is also human, so it’s not surprising that she once felt the same way about her own image - which is where her illustrations came to light. “I had (and sometimes still have) self-esteem issues. I always had trouble with my weight and always thought that I had to look a certain way to be considered beautiful. My drawings about self-love and acceptance have been a step forward for me, as they have helped me (as well as other people) feel more whole and happy with my body exactly the way it is. Everyone deserves to feel beautiful and loved, and an important step towards happiness is to start loving yourself.” *Applause!*

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It seems the movement for body image is largely ignored in today’s society, even though we make such a big deal out of it in the media. It is so refreshing and powerful to see such a young artist taking a stand and sharing her personal journey with the world as a way to promote self-love, acceptance of your own self and of others. Loads of people have jumped on the Frances Cannon train of body positivity (4,200 so far) one of which recently left this inspiring message for the artist: “I just wanted to share the love and let you know that your work is absolutely the best. In the time that I have been following you I feel more accepting and confident with my appearance and general attitude to naked goodness. You are doing such a wonderful thing, having your positivity on my Instagram feed really helps!” I have to say, Frances Cannon is just what the world needs - SOMEONE MAKING IT PUBLIC that it is OK to look like you, and doing it in such a quirky, creative and loving way to boot! No more of this ‘my abs are rocks’ or ‘look at my perfect, round, non-cellulite ass cheeks in this tiny bikini’ photo on Instagram. NO. My ‘fitspo’ is now ‘body positive inspo’ and you can find it here: @frances_cannon.

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[The Eye] What is the biggest or most common misconception people have of you being a tattoo artist? [Adrian] I think the biggest misconception that people have is that it’s just an easy, fun job. People don’t see the amount of hours we put into every design behind the scenes before it is put on the skin. Don’t get me wrong, it is a very fun job, but it is also probably the most stressful job I have ever had. It definitely takes over your life. [The Eye] What do you think, from your experience, is a good time frail for training apprentices? Should they be paid for their time or is the traditional no payment ‘internship’ still a big thing in the industry? And how long did you train for and who was your mentor? [Adrian] I think it all depends on the maturity of the apprentice and how much they are willing to dedicate themselves to the job. I started my apprenticeship under Colin Gower at Vic Market Tattoos and was tattooing within 5 months. But i gave it everything I had and showed him how much I wanted to work. Having said that, I’ve seen people have to wait 2 years before they start tattooing due to the fact that they just don’t want to put in the effort. I wasn’t paid for my apprenticeship and I don’t think any apprentice should be. I believe everyone needs to earn their place in this industry, and also to show that they’re not just in it for money. It’s a way of gaining your mentors respect and trust. Pg. 24

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[The Eye] What’s the main influence for the aesthetic of your studio? [Adrian] I’ve always loved the industrial look when it comes to interior design. So I really wanted to run with that theme and keep the studio warm and inviting rather than it looking like the inside of a nightclub. There were a lot of man hours put in to the building which were done by me, friends and family. I had a lot of help from a few people which i will be forever grateful. Overall it took two months to renovate, and I’m continuously adding to the studio to expand. I’m aiming for the studio to be 100% complete by the start of next year. [The Eye] Name each artist and their artistic strengths (portraiture, old school, greyscale etc.) [Adrian] we have a great team at the studio. Very down to earth artists who love doing what they do. Myself - black and grey realism Aaron- colour and black and grey realism Nick - black traditional work Myles - neo trad Courtney - neo trad Corey - illustrative/realistic

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[The Eye] What’s the most requested tattoo you get? [Adrian] As all of the work I do now is mainly large custom pieces its always different. but I know a few of the other guys are sick of people bringing in the same tattoos printed off Pinterest haha, usually a feather breaking off into birds or and infinity symbol made out of their entire families names. Take note people, you’re not being original if you ask for that haha! [The Eye] What started your journey into tattoo artistry? Are there big influencers out there that inspired the career choice? [Adrian] I’ve always wanted to be a tattoo artist. I remember being 15 and drawing tribal sleeves on everyone in class (tribal was cool back then). It’s not the easiest industry to get into, especially a good studio with reputable artists. My biggest influences are the people who taught me everything I know. All of the senior artists in the studio, Colin Gower, Zane Stevens, and Louie Poupos. I still think they are some of the best artists I have ever seen. [The Eye] First tattoo? [Adrian] My first tattoo was a Japanese rising sun on my calf surrounded by smoke and Kanji. I got that when I was 20. [The Eye] What creative background do you have? Were you professionally trained or self-taught as far as art goes (prior to tattooing). [Adrian] The only professional training I have had was a 2 year airbrush course which helped me with portraiture. Other than that, everything I have learned has been off extremely talented the people around me. [The Eye] Favourite tattoo you’ve ever done or most memorable? [Adrian] My favourite tattoo would have to be a full Batman (dark knight) sleeve. [The Eye] What’s your favourite thing about being a tattoo artist? [Adrian] I love that fact that I get to wake up every day and go do what I love. Every day its something different and that’s what keeps it interesting and fun. And it’s just great going to work and being around so many people that inspire me to be better every day.

Lygon St Tattoo Co. 291 Lygon St Brunswick East (03) 8388 7169 Lygonsttattooco@gmail.com Pg. 29


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Written by Amy Farnworth

If graffiti changed anything - it would be illegal” What Banksy meant by this statement is obviously up for interpretation. My take on it is that most graffiti gets ignored and therefore doesn’t impact on anything. However, if more attention were paid to the messages behind graffiti (and a lot of today’s art), then we’d be armed with a most powerful ideology, one that could be dangerous, that could rival that of the general political consensus of the 21st Century. The most controversial creative artist to come out of Britain since Tracy Emin; the most hard-hitting, reality-depicting, graffiti genius who questions our morals, our politics and our sanity, using everyday settings and blank canvases to challenge our views and make us think outside the box, has done it again. In a world where more and more people are tuning-in to the stark reality that society isn’t all rosy and sweet; where more and more people are challenging conventions and social norms; where more and more people are thinking about the alternative to what they are fed by a saturated media, controlled by one gigantic conglomerate, Banksy’s art, even though it’s been around for over a decade, is still as relevant as ever. In Dismaland, Banksy and fellow, like-minded creatives have designed something special. They have grouped together a collection of art to provide the community with an exhibition; one that’s different to anything ever done before. In his ‘bemusement’ park, Banksy has provided a disappointingly, ‘dismal’ dystopia. From being required to enter the park through cardboard, airport-style security, to being greeted by depressed staff in pink hi-viz jackets and sad looking mouse ears; from the huge, grim-looking Disney castle, the focal point of the exhibition that dominates the park, depicting the dark side of the fairytale, of modern celebrity culture - the

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harsh realism of what it’s like to be raised on a pedestal only to be shot down and feasted on by the vultures that swoop once it all goes wrong (think paparazzi and Princess Diana), to the Pocket Money Loans exhibition situated in the designated ‘children’s only zone’ which only too blatantly portrays how the payday loans system is targeting the wrong kind of people, leaving countries and communities in heavy debt; from the sculpture of a killer-whale jumping out of a toilet bowl, to the balloons on sale that read “I am an imbecile”; from a post-riot model village, to a display depicting refugees in overflowing boast as targets in a game of battleships; Dismaland is everything I expected it to be: an artistic hub of chaos, anarchy, sarcasm, an escape from mindless escapism; and something that will hopefully breed more creativity, inspire others and guide us to an alternative way of thinking about art. Although his art is controversial, Banksy is a source of inspiration for every creative soul out there. Yes he creates art to shock; yes he creates art that screams, “Look at this message I’m trying to get you to understand!”, and yes, he has made a hell of a lot of money from it, but he also provides us with something else. He shows us that as creatives we should strive to be expressive in whatever form we can. We should think outside the box, we should delve into our deepest creative realms, using our thoughts, our dreams and our fears to create something unique, something that will make people speak up, listen, pay attention and show an interest in the world. Banksy creates for society. He creates for the underdog. He creates for the working class. He creates for the world. He also creates for communities; and that’s where I think Dismaland fits perfectly into the theme of this month’s issue. Banksy didn’t just decide to open his bemusement park on a derelict pier in Weston-Super-Mare, Somerset, for no reason. He didn’t just randomly stick a pin in a map of Great Britain and decide to wreak havoc on the unsuspecting residents of whatever town the pin punctured. No, Banksy chose Weston-Super-Mare for a reason - he saw a broken down, old, rotting pier in a seaside town that only gets the majority of its tourists during the summer and Pg. 37


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wanted to help. Placing a depressing exhibition in juxtaposition to what should be a cheery holiday destination is pure genius. His project has resulted in a local petition to ‘save the pier’, something I signed while queuing to enter the park at 11am on Monday 7th September. It has also boosted traffic to the town and will continue to do so for the five weeks it remains there. And we still don’t know who he is! If art is expressive, if being creative can change the world and help communities; if it can virtuously give something back, if it can provide alternatives to those who may not be creative themselves then Banksy and his fellow artists have achieved it. That’s why it’s so important that as creatives ourselves, we continue to strive for something other than self-promotion. We should aim to change lives, we should aim to use our designs, our art, our music, our writing, our sculptures, our time and our passions to help others see what we, as creatives, already have in our vision.

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We should aim to change lives, we should aim to use our designs, our art, our music, our writing, our sculptures, our time and our passions to help others see what we, as creatives, already have in our vision. Pg. 41


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Written by Samii Lund Mesmerising is the first word that comes to mind when viewing the work of 24year old, Melbourne artist, Jenna Paige. Our eyes will wander along her brilliantly loosely constructed artworks whilst our minds dance freely in a calm ocean of imagination for hours without knowledge of time nor space. It’s a great way to pass the time at the office, although it’s an even better way to relax at home after a hard day’s work (of staring at Jenna’s artworks & drinking coffee - it’s a hard life). In the words of Shrek, my favourite ogre, “[artists] are like onions, they have layers” - nothing truer my green & funny friend... and that goes for artists more than anyone! Jenna’s journey to artistry came about after trying to fit within a box for far too long. Creative minds are not often made to fit within a box (only a very rare few are - we are yet to meet one). After studying Communication Design for 4 years and following the very tight rules of perfection within design and computer generated artworks and files, Jenna’s brain went -well, a little mad and we couldn’t be happier that it did! “I would come home and express my emotions and feelings onto canvas and I could be as messy as I liked!” from this, those mesmerising artworks you see here, were borne. Painting to Jenna, is what art is to most creatives, it’s a form of mediation and therapy. “It calms me and keeps me central. It calms me and keeps me central. Like most I have been through heartache and misery and rather than sit and lose my mind in my thoughts I take out all my emotion on my canvas. I truly believe if I didn’t put all my energy into my paintings so many years ago I may have lost my mind. My artwork saved me and kept me balanced.” Mostly Jenna’s artworks are created using acrylics and inks and then finished with a liquid varnish gloss, which is in the Resin family - leaving the pieces as “shiny as a new car”. It is evident through the use of lose brush strokes and a sense of freedom within the rhythm and balance of Jenna’s work, that the inspiration has had to stem from somewhere organic and true. Pg. 46

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“Mother Nature has so many gifts that she gives to us and I would say Blue is inspired by what I believe is mothers natures best gift of all and that’s the ocean. Sometimes I think people get so caught up in their lives that they forget how many great qualities this earth gives to us. I like to think I am bring the ocean to them in case they are too busy to embrace the real thing or unable to access the real thing due to their location.” The layered rhythm of Jenna’s artworks identify her as one of the most talented acrylic and resin artists in Australia, not to mention - extremely sought after! Not only does Jenna paint her way through life, she also dabbles in graphic design for selected clients, creating logos, branding images and more! Want to know more? Check out Jenna’s website www.jennapaige.com.au. EYE CREATIVE

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Written by Amy Farnworth

Once every so often, without really searching, you come across someone whose actions pull on your heartstrings; someone whose creativity, generosity and selflessness has the power to impact lives and to provide some much needed goodness and love in this world. Enter Nasir Sobhani, or as he’s otherwise known, The Streets Barber. The 26-year-old Japanese-Canadian-Australian is one of the most inspiring creatives I’ve come across in my short time writing for this magazine. A Barber by trade, modest Nasir spends the majority of his spare time (when he’s not playing basketball with his brother or watching re-runs of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air) taking to the streets of Melbourne, providing free haircuts to the homeless. His work is something admirable, beneficial and is definitely not just about the personal gain or self-satisfaction that so often surrounds such random acts of kindness. Three years ago, Nasir entered rehab. He was a cocaine addict, and could easily have been out on the streets himself; could easily have slipped through the net and descended into a downward spiral of self-destruction. Luckily though, he had an extremely supportive family plus an amazing set of philosophies from his Baha’i faith that helped keep him on track. “I owe everything to my faith in God, rehab and my family. If it wasn’t for these three things I wouldn’t be sober today.” His haircuts and stylings, while incredibly important, are perhaps not as fundamental as the time he spends with his ‘street clients’: the conversations he has, the stories he listens to, and the support he provides.

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At the very heart of his work, the basic premise behind these free haircuts is a kindness and empathy that only he understands - by providing those less fortunate, those down on their luck with something as simple as a new ‘do’, he has the power to instil confidence in those who struggle to hold down jobs, land interviews, or get taken seriously because of their appearances. Not only that though, the people he gifts with his services are the people who deserve a chance in life, just like the rest of us. By listening to his clients he provides a kind of counselling service; that little bit of support that could alter someone’s day, someone’s week, or even someone’s year. “There is definitely not enough help out there for the homeless because there are still many people living on the streets, and some of them are isolated from the community and lots needs to be done in order to change that. Having said that though, I try to focus on the positive side - if everyone just spoke to people living on the streets every once in a while and made them feel loved and respected, it goes a lot further than raving about how governments should do more. WE have to do more, and we can. There’s so much beauty and joy in reaching out, and it’s pretty easy too.” Despite having a huge fan base (Facebook, Instagram, YouTube), and despite receiving some amount of ‘celebrity exposure’, being featured on the cover of MX Magazine and appearing on The Project, Nasir remains perfectly grounded: “This initiative is not about money or fame. I don’t charge my street clients and I refuse to take their money if they offer it. I refuse to accept. Some of them find other ways of showing their gratitude which brings me so much more joy than money ever could.” Pg. 55


Treating his kindness as a base for financial gain or fame would completely defeat the object of his creative intentions. The Streets Barber is non-for-profit and Nasir wants it to remain that way; anything else and it would feel like the soul had been sucked from his humble generosity. “It’s amazing to feel the love and support from all different angles. I never thought it possible to get this amount of response when I first started all this about a year ago, but it brings me closer to my aim to encourage others to arise and help others in whatever capacity. At the end of the day, it’s not about me, it’s about the haircuts; it’s about realising that everyone has needs and everyone has talents and when we connect them we build community and family.” And it’s not just Nasir who takes this kind of approach to creativity; there are others who have been doing similar stuff around the world which he says makes him very happy and gives him a source of inspiration. There’s no catch to Nasir’s work. His main influence in serving the community comes from the Baha’i faith. Baha’i’s believe that one way of serving God is by serving the community and striving to benefit others with our actions. It’s about showing that you’re striving to view the world as one family and to work for the unity of humanity. “My clients aren’t just homeless people to me; they are my brothers and sisters and if my family needs a haircut, I’ll give them one.” Speaking to Nasir was somewhat of a humbling experience. He is such a genuine human being with great creative intentions that I couldn’t help but be moved by his overwhelming positivity and philosophy. Everyone, at some point in their lives has or will experience a random, selfless act of kindness; whether it be a smile from a stranger or having a door held open for you - there’s so many ways to be nice and give something back without harbouring an ulterior motive. “Kindness is everywhere - we just need to be able to see it.” And with that, I don’t think there’s much more I could possibly say. Pg. 56

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Written by Samii Lund I recently visited what is arguably the ‘most famous’ beach in Australia for the first time. Yes-OK. I know what you’re all thinking. Can I be called an Aussie if I haven’t already visited Bondi in my 26 years on this earth?

ORC is the first real crack for at showing the world not only what Ollie is passionate about, but also showing just a slither of what he is capable of achieving.

Growing up around the beach and the surf holds within it great memories and an eagerness to create something bigger in life. “A brand based on Australian surf culture is a way for me to express myself through the designs and clothing.” With only a few years under his belt as a founder and director of such an adventurous and thriving brand, Ollie still gets overwhelmed when seeing people in the general public wearing his shirts. “It’s one of the best feelings; seeing someone out there that has no ties to you, appreciating your work and enjoying it just like It was such an incredible day. As I read through you had hoped.” If you can’t get an idea of the Ollie’s email and his story, I sat back on the vibes this brand is putting off just by reading grassy hill looking over the beach, taking in this and looking at their images, get online and every aspect of his story and soaking in the good let your ears soak in the sounds of local vibes, which no doubt, he would be accustomed Sydney band ‘Sticky Fingers’ known for their to every single day. Rubbing shoulders with “no-f*cks-given” attitude as well as the tunes surf-dudes (totally up with the lingo) every day from the salty sea dogs ‘Sons of the East’ and and being inspired by some of the industry’s main influencer of ORC & artist ‘10YRWAR’ best in music and fashion, there’s no wonder (Matthew Charles). this brand has boomed out of the gates like a hungry greyhound. GOOD VIBES, mate-ship, sustainable materials, surf-culture focused, laid-back attitudes and in Back in Ollie’s Uni days, the fire behind the ORC the very near future even artist collaborations dream ignited after an inspiring and - there is nothing stopping this kickarse clothing eye-opening day shooting at Sydney Fashion brand from going universal. Week for genius Aussie label, Aje. “After being there and seeing them put such a great show It won’t be long until we’re tripping down the together, I really wanted to give my dream a steps of the bus right onto the front entrance to crack. Beforehand, I had had thoughts of an ORC store, ready for our organic brew served working on a project like this but never knew right there in store whilst browsing through all really where to start. After Sydney Fashion Week the ORC Apparel goodness and lusting over the I just realised I should bring together both my range of vintage surf-board’s - lets be honest... passions - surfing and fashion”. wishing we knew how to surf. Although it seems like it’s been a simple journey, every entrepreneur and/ or creative can understand the long yards you have to drag through and hard work that’s involved in starting up a brand of any kind - and that’s no exception for this young lad from Melbourne. Well, I thought so. That is until I stumbled off the bus (literally fell off the step onto the pavement), and landed in what feels like the most Aussie spirited place on earth (beside maybe Uluru - but that would be a whole different article.) The day I landed on the beautiful beach of Bondi, was the day I received an email from Oliver Condon, the founder of surf-culture brand ORC Apparel. Coincidence? I think not.

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CHOCOLATE MOUS by Emily Como Parade Cafe Mentone, Vic

This indulgent dessert is perfect when enterta Spring is here and summer is coming! Serves 2 100grams chocolate 2 eggs 50grams sugar 250ml cream

Place chocolate into a heatproof bowl over a pan of gentl water Stir until melted Beat eggs and sugar with a electric beater for about 5 mi pale While mixing gradually pour in melted chocol In a separate bowl whip cream until firm peak Carefully fold cream into chocolate mix Whisk 1 egg white until stiff Gently fold egg white into chocolate mix Pour into individual glasses Chill for a few hours before serving You could serve this along side a bowl of mixed berries of cream! YUM Pg. 70

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brilliant brissy

–beats, eats and treats


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Written by Amy Farnworth As Maria von Trapp once said (before she was Maria von Trapp may I add): “Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start.” Well, I ain’t no Julie Andrews; I don’t have a voice like hers and I’ve never been to Austria. However, I have been to Australia, and instead of The Sound of Music, this is the Sound of My Travels. Even though my passion for travel was ignited many moons ago over in the good ol’ US of A, my passion for writing really took a hold when I came to Australia, so I feel it only right that we begin in the city I first visited - Brisbane. Brisbane, Brissy, Bris-Vegas; or as it’s affectionately known to some - Boring Brisbane. NOT my words exactly, but unfortunately it is the words of fellow backpackers, seasoned travellers and a few hastily judgemental people I’ve met on my Australian adventure so far. At first, I echoed these sentiments, finding Brisbane a tad dull and lacking in atmosphere; with a small city centre and seemingly limited tourist attractions. How wrong I was. It wasn’t until I left Brisbane and became acquainted with my old friend, ‘retrospect’ that I wholeheartedly changed my mind. Brisbane, dear readers, is BRILLIANT. Now, I was lucky enough to have a great network of friends ready and waiting for me once I reached the capital of Queensland (former school mates and old travelling buddies) so exploring was made a tad easier and when I look back, I could see I felt quite at home in Brisbane. From the dingy depths of the bars and clubs in Fortitude Valley and Chinatown (Rics Bar is definitely worth a visit), to the abundance of new shops in the up and coming Queen Street Mall (they’re getting an H&M very soon-yes!!!); from spending the year-round warm days lounging by the Lagoon at the idyllic Southbank, to perusing the streets and eats in the West End, Brisbane really does have something for everyone. The music and arts scene in Brissy just now is BOOMING! QPAC offers some of the best musicals and theatre productions to rival those of Sydney and Melbourne; the Science Centre boats fantastic exhibitions; and the Gallery of Modern Pg. 74

Art is a contemporary hub that any artsy culture-vulture would be proud of. Southbank parklands offer free gigs on Sunday afternoons (think local artists and reputable musicians); the Riverstage hosts some of the most talked about artists from Australia and beyond (Alt-J, Chet Faker, Florence and The Machine, Tame Impala anyone?); The Powerhouse and Showgrounds play host to festivals and art events all year round and the Motor Room in the West End’s Boundary Street Markets provides locals and tourists with free music and street food in eclectic abundance, every weekend. With all this to choose from it’s difficult to think there could be more, right? Wrong. There is: Brisbane’s Suncorp Stadium hosts Soccer, Rugby and other sporting events throughout the year (albeit Brisbane Roar could do with a bit of a boost). The famous Colour Run has taken place in the city and more recently the Bridge to Brisbane race was held. And if you’ve never heard of The Gabba then you can’t call yourself an Aussie. If that’s not enough to get your juices flowing and if you still think Brisbane is small and boring then you really should consider the mighty suburbs - from Paddington (one of Brisbane’s best and treNdiest places to live: the Balmain of Sydney) to New Farm, right through to The Eat Street Markets on Hamilton Wharf (which I advise ANYONE to go to - you will come away not needing to eat for at least a week), Brisbane is deceptively artsy, secretly hip, and definitely on the rise. My time in Brisbane was tainted by a travellers exceedingly high expectations and an unwillingness to accept patience when it came to finding a niche or a backpacking Mecca. With the Sunshine Coast only an hour or so away (Mooloolaba beach, Caloundra, Noosa); Springbrook National Park on its doorstep; Moreton and Stradbroke Islands a short ferry ride out; and the Gold Coast and Byron Bay a couple of hours south, Brisbane is though, probably the city I felt most comfortable in. It might not be Melbourne and it’s no Sydney, but it is seeing a tourism boost; it definitely got my creative juices flowing and it’s the place my writing took on a whole new direction. Brisbane is boss; don’t rule it out.

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[The Eye] Since the release of Audrey (way back when!) the band has certainly come a long way. What’s the most memorable moment for you all along the journey? [John] Wow, there’s been more than a couple where we’ve had to pinch ourselves!!! Some of the festivals in Germany have been insane! And maybe even some of the funny things we’ve been able to do at home like blowing up cars in music videos or guerrilla truck gigs throughout the CBD. [The Eye] (For each of you) Have you always known you’re a creative person? (Brendan) Yes.. Since I was about 10 when my parents noticed that the noise coming from the piano was actually pretty good. [Joel] I can’t really remember a time when I haven’t been distracted and absorbed by some kind of creative project. I definitely remember writing songs and poems as a really young kid. I find that life feels really weird if I haven’t spent time creating something, so yeah I guess I have! [John]I don’t think so.. I remember a time before music. I remember being an insecure pre-teen kid who was too nervous to talk to girls let alone write songs about them. Certain people walk into your life and set you on paths.. I’ve really enjoyed figuring out life as a creative person. It’s a true roller coaster but the rewards have been huge!!

[The Eye] Are there any creative skills you wish you had? [Joel] Dude, I wish I could dance! I’m like 99% commitment and 1% coordination. I have mad respect for people that can control their limbs and look sexy at the same time. [The Eye] Do you ever feel like you’ve exhausted your creativity? [Brendan] Yes and especially when you hear someone else create something mind blowing! I tend to think ‘how could I ever be as creative as that?’ But time and time again if you put yourself in a creative atmosphere you will come up with something worthwhile. [The Eye] When do you feel most inspired? [Joel] It’s usually late at night and usually in good company, or during or right after a good show. It goes both ways though, I made the mistake of watching live Radiohead videos right before a gig once - great way to realize how much you actually suck at everything. [John] When I’m either extremely happy or extremely sad.. There’s a twisted anarchy for creative people. There’s very infrequently ‘middle ground’. I love writing songs late at night. Or when I’m at the beach.

[The Eye] How did you each wind up down the musical path? [Brendan] I guess from an early age music became an important part of my life because it was something I actually enjoyed and was good at; much unlike school! Pg. 78

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[The Eye] What is it about the new EP Cages in your opinion, which makes it unique to other musicians? [Joel] Such a hard question to answer, but the new stuff is very grown up - I think it really reflects us as adults and really reflects where we’re each at creatively. We’re not just into writing 3 and a half minute bangers, we’re about writing great songs, that tell stories and that we’re proud of. [The Eye] What’s your favourite tune from Cages and why (what does it mean to you)? [Joel] There’s a track called Vienna with a stupidly catchy earworm of a guitar line (that Brendan wrote), and a beautiful lyric that talks about sunnier times in someone’s precious relationship (classic Johnno!). It’s one of those rare gems that sticks with you, even from the early demo stage. We’ve kept the vibe of the thing pretty well since John sang the lyric the first time so I’m pretty stoked. [The Eye] Where is the best location you’ve travelled to for a gig? You’ve toured the UK with your music, how was that? [John] The ‘best’?? Every location is only as good as the people within it’s walls. We’ve had extremely warm welcomes in some tiny rooms around the world as well as some huge arenas supporting other acts etc.. The most picturesque place to play was possibly Regensburg, Germany. It felt like we were playing in a war bunker and the streets were so beautiful. The people were equally as wonderful! [The Eye] John, you have a very ‘unique’ performing style but we have to ask, have you ever hurt yourself on stage during a live gig!? [John] All the time! It’s inevitable doing what I do.. I’ve bled, blacked out, been battered and bruised more times than I can think of. It’s all part of letting myself go on stage. Probably the worst was a gig with Children Collide in Geelong where I knocked myself clean out on a guitar amp and bled viciously on stage for the rest of the set. I had to get stitches.. not until after the show though ;) [The Eye] Who was your favorite act that you have played with at a gig/ festival? The Evermore show at the Hallam years ago was one of our favorites! [Brendan] My favorite act we’ve shared the stage with would have to be Biffy Clyro. I’d never heard of them before we were asked to play with them. But after they played one of the most intense and exciting sets I’ve ever seen (which went for over 2 hours) I was pretty into it! Their fans were some of the nicest we’ve come across too. Probably because so many of them are Scottish.

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[The Eye] Do you collaborate with any other creatives as far as your album & band artwork goes? [John] We try and stick to doing most things our self as we really enjoy every aspect of releasing tracks., The artwork is half the fun!! I tend to draw inspiration from the strangest places too. I’m really into an instagram account dedicated solely to postage stamps at the moment. It’s called ‘mintneverhinged’ You have to check it out!! [The Eye] You get a LOT of play time on Triple J lately, what’s the next goal for you guys? [John] We’re really happy the guys at Triple J Unearthed have been loving our stuff recently but if I’m to be honest, we’re just happy writing and releasing our songs to whatever small portion of people care to find it and listen. Some of my favorite acts I discovered by trawling through an ocean of material online and it’s always exciting thinking about the kid in Istanbul watching your music video for the first time. Or the 45 year old from Dubbo who likes you because you remind them of Midnight Oil.. It’s a lifelong journey this music thing so who knows where it can take us moving forward.

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Written by Grace Brewin There is something so satisfying about seeing the work of multiple artists coming together. That is just what Melbourne-based homewares brand Nowhere Creek is all about, bringing the talent of local artists onto a new platform. Formed by Angie Atkins, Nowhere Creek is a unique, vintage-inspired and intrinsically “Melbourne” homewares brand that would look right at home on modcloth.com. The name Nowhere Creek holds very dear to Angie, coming from a small farming area in North Western Victoria where her Great, Great grandparents settled when they migrated from England. As Angie said, “it holds a special place in my heart and a connection to the pioneering spirit.” On the Nowhere Creek website [nowherecreek.com.au], a pair of socks with a cat print on them sits beneath a pillowcase featuring an old school tattoo-inspired print by The Paper Beast. They might not sound at all similar but everything on Nowhere Creek’s website has been curated meticulously. Angie certainly knows her way around colour schemes, having worked as a fashion designer in womenswear for many years before starting Nowhere Creek in 2012. She also creates her own prints for the brand as well as sourcing new artists to work on homewares with. Looking at the prints seen on tea towels, cushion covers, bed sheets as well as a few clothing pieces, you can see the quality. These are not the kind of prints that will wash off after a few uses. Nowhere Creek’s prints are offered on high quality cotton linen tea towels, cotton 300 thread count bedding & cotton cushions. The prints selected for production are unique, colourful and would look fabulous in any modern Australian home with a flair for originality. In the future, Angie envisions a full lifestyle brand including clothing and accessories as well as more bedding sets on offer. Maybe a few more artists will see their prints become a part of Nowhere Creek as Angie states, “I love lots of Australian artists & illustrators, in particular The Paper Beast who I have worked with on a number of our prints... You just have to look around the streets of Melbourne to see how many good artists there are here!”

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Bean & Berry

nsw

All of a sudden, Redfern is becoming a morning hotspot and I really like new kids Bean and Berry, on the corner of Pitt and Redfern Streets.

Where? 89 Pitt Street Redfern, NSW Instagram @beanandberryredfern

Bitey espresso using Leftfield Coffee Roaster’s beans are complemented with a plethora of options - LusciousKiki lamingtons, Oregano Bakery’s cinnamon scrolls, or some bloody good breakfast options to suit all tastes. Just putting it out there - it’s a definite crowd favourite at The Eye.

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The Flinders Street Project

sa

So I counted, and I only got 9,998… Still, “Ten Thousand Spoons” an art installation by Megan Roodenrys’ dangling from the ceiling, is pretty damn cool overseeing Stewart Wesson’s new place on the favourites list, The Flinders Street Project. The Maple French Toast with whipped mascarpone, almonds and preserved cherries won my vote, and the coffee comes quick.

Where? 276 Flinders Street, Adelaide Instagram @theflindersstreetproject

Best thing is you’ll never be short of a spoon.

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Brio Emporium

qld Okay, so I drink a lot of coffee… Aaaaand I’m told this isn’t great for my health... So I’m pretty happy I know some friendly people at Brio Emporium in Broadbeach!

Where? Shop 5 2623 Gold Coast Hwy Broadbeach, QLD Instagram @brio_emporium

Adorning the shelves are healthy breakie boxes, slow-cooked broths, snack bars and plenty of system-boosting munchies that are all gluten-free, with vegan, vegetarian, paleo and dairy-free options too. Oh, and the Bulletproof Brain Octane coffee beans and oils are pretty good too!

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Urban Projuice

vic

Talk about allergy-friendly heaven. As a gluten & lactose intolerant human, I couldn’t have been happier to stumble across Albert Park’s new cafe digs just off the main drag. Filled with brightly coloured acai bowls, beautiful salads and the aroma of freshly brewed coffee and matcha lattes - it’s a hipster/ new age/ raw-enthusiasts paradise!

Where? 315 Montague Street, Albert Park, Melbourne Instagram @urbanprojuice

It’s even set in an old townhouse. Now THAT’s ambience.

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GLOSSARY Frances Cannon Pages: 2-3, 14-21 IG: @frances_cannon http://francescannon.bigcartel.com Lygon Street Tattoo Co. Pages: 22-33 IG: @lygonsttattooco 291 Lygon St Brunswick East, VIC (03) 8388 7169 Lygonsttattooco@gmail.com Adrian: @adrian_monello_tattoo Banksy: Dismaland Pages: 34-43 IG: @banksy All images taken by @chasingamylou Jenna Paige Designs Pages: 44-51 IG: @jennapaige_designs All images taken by @jennapaige_designs www.jennapaige.com.au The Street’s Barber (Nasir Sobhani) Pages: 52-61 IG: @thestreetsbarber Baber at @Medusa_hairsalon Bookings : 03 9449 7737 Photo Cred: IG: @noahthommo IG: @sb__photo IG: @liviamilazzo

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ORC Apparel Pages 61-69 IG: @orc_apparel Photo Cred: IG: @andy_diprose IG: @sea_bass www.orcapparel.com Como Parade CafĂŠ (Recipe) Pages: 70-71 IG: @comoparadecafe Red Ink Pages: 76-83 IG: @redinkrock www.facebook.com/redinkmusic Nowhere Creek Pages: 84-89 IG: @nowherecreek www.nowherecreek.com.au nowherecreekhome@gmail.com Bean & Berry Page 90 IG: @beanandberryredfern 89 Pitt Street, Redfern NSW The Flinders Street Project Page 91 IG: @theflindersstreetproject 276 Flinders Street, Adelaide SA Brio Emporium Page 92 IG: @brio_emporium Shop 5 2623 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD

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The Eye Creative www.theeyecreative.com info@theeyecreative.com

@theeyecreative /theeyecreative @theeyecreative

The Eye Creative | September 2015  

Issue #3 of The Eye Creative is here! We explore the voice of creativity – making you laugh, cry and question everything! Dive on in and let...

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