Page 1


Publisher’s Note At first glance it would be very easy to mistake recent issues of Connections for those of an exotic travel magazine. Our Evergreen Association co-workers sure get around, and it’s a lot of fun for us to share such a wide variety of interesting experiences and beautiful photographs. If you’ve been away on vacation - a weekend in the big city or lakeside at a country cabin, on the other side of the world or just down the road - send your photos to Connections and we’ll showcase them in a future issue. And it’s not just your travel adventures we’re interested in... we want to know all about you! Do you have an unusual hobby? A treasured family recipe? A way-cute pet (warning: Joey sets the bar pretty high in this issue)? Adorable kids? A giant tomato in your garden? Share! Email photos and stories to either Kim Harding or John Carocci, then sit back and let the accolades pour in!

- John Carocci

A DAY, A NIGHT in NEW My cousin, Sue, and I share our birthdays one week apart. For her 35th birthday, she asked if I would take her out to celebrate. I said, “Sure. Do you want to take a trip to New Orleans for a day?” Thinking I was joking, she agreed. A few weeks later, we were on a plane heading to New Orleans for an overnight trip. We arrived before 10 a.m. and it was already 96°F. Our first stop was the Roosevelt Hotel, an older establishment with an amazing façade and architecturally stunning interior. From there, we walked to the Mississippi River which was quite murky due to high water levels. The rain that had caused massive flooding in Tennessee days earlier was making its way south via the river to New Orleans. Although a riverboat cruise had been on our itinerary, we thought better of it and made our way on foot to the Garden District. My cousin—whom I found out during this adventure is not adept at reading maps— informed me that the District was only a few blocks away. She lied. We walked for what seemed an eternity, but it was worth it. The houses in the Garden District are beautiful, with definite French, Spanish

and Colonial influences on their designs and landscaping. During our tour of the Garden District, I noticed that many tree’s branches were laced with row after row of beads. The trees looked like they were dressed and ready for a night out on the town. Although Sue and I were enjoying our walk, it was getting toward twilight and we needed sustenance. We found a streetcar stop and hopped on the next available trolley. The breeze generated by the open windows was welcoming and refreshing. Making our way back to the hotel, we asked the concierge to recommend a good place to dine. He suggested the Napoleon House. We walked to the restaurant, taking in the beautiful architecture along the way. Upon our arrival, we were seated promptly in quite a lovely, little courtyard. We started with Pimm’s to drink (I highly recommend) and ordered Po’ boys. Our dinners were huge! Sad to say, we made a worthy attempt but couldn’t finish them. Back at the hotel, we jumped into the rooftop pool to cool off and, afterward, readied ourselves to head back out for a night of fun. We trekked to


W ORLEANS Bourbon Street as the evening festivities were starting and had a great time mingling with the masses and listening to great music, while obtaining beads as we made our way. Our next destination was a local landmark: Café du Monde for beignets and café au lait. I have never tasted such a wondrous creation— a doughnut-y confection…but better! Sitting in the café was a great way to end the day. The next morning was dedicated to exploring St. Louis Cemetery #1. We spent hours walking through the randomness of the aboveground crypts, each one more interesting than the last. We headed back to the hotel and readied ourselves for the airport and return trip home. My cousin and I are already making plans to return to this wonderful city. I want to thank Laura Pasquarella for providing me with her first-hand knowledge and her books on New Orleans. If you are planning a trip to this friendly city, talk to her. She is an invaluable fount of information on everything ‘New Orleans’. - Kimberly Harding


AlianzaLatina

Birthdays Jamila Banks - August 3 Avaleir Encarnacion - August 12 Carolee Corbitt - August 14 Tamika Adams - August 15 Lindsay Zasada - August 16 Christina Singh - August 19 Maisha Drayton - August 22 Patrick Hildenbrandt - August 28

Anniversaries

Under A Willow On July 2nd, Ann and Mark Stadler of Clarence hosted an evening of live music underneath the stars in their backyard. This special, intimate concert featured local favorites BABIK, Ben Woolman and Kathy Moriarty performing for an appreciative crowd. The Stadlers’ hospitality was matched only by their generosity — the evening was a benefit for Alianza Latina, raising more than $1,800! Alianza Latina is extremely grateful for the Stadlers’ kind support, as well as that of all their friends who came out and enjoyed an evening of wonderful music. Thank you! Gracias!

Ann Licata - 1 year Jessica Lehsten - 1 year Cecil Sutton - 1 year Tania Phillips - 2 years Murray Wire - 3 years Lizzie Vazquez - 3 years Justin Haag - 4 years James McClain - 4 years Kate Gallivan - 5 years Maisha Drayton - 7 years Patricia Hopkins - 7 years Cathy Alvarez - 7 years Mark Schnitzer - 7 years Richard Smiley - 11 years

Your Continued Dedication and Hard Work Are Noticed and Appreciated! – The Management Team


< JA M IE

< RI CH A RD

AT THE

BLUE HERON BY RICHARD BAER

I have to admit, I was a virgin. How did that grab you? Let me explain. I had never been to the Great Blue Heron Music Festival. Since moving to Jamestown ten years ago, I had been told many times by all of my friends that this was the event, the gathering, the party. And every year, as the event grew in magnitude to what it is today, the incredulity at my still having not gone grew in intensity as well. I mean really, Bluegrass? Zydeco? Alt-Country? CeltRock? Acoustic Folk and Polkas? Camping out in the sweltering heat, the pouring down rain, cut off from even the most basic of amenities, listening to music Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never even heard of or understood, dancing and chanting around fires and drum circles, Didgeridoos (!?!), all with thousands of people and their children who would be just as miserable as me? I tell you, I was not born this way! It all seemed just a little too bohemian for me. Well, I have to tell you, did I have it wrong; I have crossed over. Brainwashed, as it were.

I am one of them! This year, I was asked by Laurie Matson, Director of Southern Tier Services, to lead the team of usual, dedicated volunteers, Jamie Probst and Jake Smith, who had been performing outreach at the festival in the years past and we were joined by my fabulous and willing partner Doug Hetrick (HA! Like he had a choice!). I was scared and I was nervous; the seeming scope of it all would make this my largest outreach event to date. Ah, but wise were they in the ways of the hippie, and teach me they did. They helped me prepare the over 2500 safer sex packages that we would distribute; helped me prepare for the camping experience and to make lists of the things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d need; helped me understand exactly why this outreach was needed (apparently, partying in the woods makes people very sexual, who knew? Wink, wink!) So, with my car jam-packed with everything you can imagine, I set off a full day early to camp overnight on the side of the road along with Jamie & Jake.


< DOUG

< CO N D O M S

By 9:00 p.m. over 500 cars had arrived and the line stretched back over a mile behind us! If the gods that be had cancelled the whole Great Blue Heron, I still would have been a changed man after spending the evening beforehand camped on that road. There was a sense of connection, of brotherhood. The loyalty and the enthusiasm, the pride and the harmony, and the fun and frivolity; all this was apparent. Everyone said hello to everyone; people were helping each other set up their tents; folding canopies were set up; campfires and musician circles started; there were laser shows in the trees and lit-up hula-hoop performances (called poi); the Amish neighbors were getting in on the game even, out selling food and drink throughout the night (and they let me put out a condom container!!!). All of this under the most beautiful night sky and the event hadn’t even started! The next few days of the festival only proved to be exponentially greater and then some. Our campsite was located right inside

the festival gates on a main thoroughfare and I was able to watch as the greatest in human experiences unfolded before me, the building of a community. Everyone was so accepting, so helpful, and so openminded. I had help from a man I’d never met before in putting up my tent. I lent a hand to ladies who were having a hard time getting their cart of equipment up the hill and down into the woods (yes a cart, with wheels! Jamie had a rickshaw!). I can’t explain it to you, but everyone seemed to be family. And now they were my family. After getting settled and erecting a rainbowcolored umbrella stand with free condom packets for people to be able to take as they passed us by, I donned my red “Got Condoms” t-shirt and set off on my way to meet, interact and talk about sex with as many as possible. I’m normally such an introvert, I didn’t know how I was going to handle this kind of outreach (HA!, cough, gasp, choke, wheeze, giggle). I

would approach these people, alone or in clans, cautiously but optimistically. And this is the testament to the “Got Condoms” campaign; these people were guarded, understandably, but in the flash of an instant, I could see the recognition in their eyes as they saw my shirt. It was gripping; And overwhelmingly accepted. After a while, people would call out “Hey Condom Dude” or “It’s Mr. Condom!” I can’t begin to tell you all just how many times I was told thankyou for the job that I was doing or of the people who ran up to me to shake my hand, I can only tell you that it was the fuel that kept me going for the four days of the festival. It was extremely gratifying, to say the least. And as I said to them before taking my leave, which brought many a laugh, I say to you, “I Love My Job!!!” See you next year fellow Heronites! And to all of you who’ve never been so fortunate, come check it out and join the family. You won’t be disappointed.


Meet P Recently, I sat down with Patrick Hildenbrandt, our new Director of Pharmacy, to learn a little more about him. Kimberly Harding

I was in Ecuador last summer for a couple of months working as an intern for an NGO which provides medical assistance to rural communities in the Andes and in the Amazon. Here I am at Yanacocha Reserve, near Quito. This picture almost looks fake, doesn’t it? I often felt, while discovering the beauty of Ecuador, like it wasn’t real, like I was dreaming. Every new place I visited felt like it was more gorgeous than the last. Even just driving down the highway, you’ll pass a bend in the road and happen upon a gushing waterfall or a snow-capped mountain. iEcuador es mi favorito! - Jess Lehsten

Kim: Where did you grow up? Patrick: I was born in Rome, New York. I have a brother and a sister, and was born the middle child. I went to school at Rome Free Academy, which is a public school. I ran track through high school and college (hurdles), and graduated from Fredonia with a dual major in chemistry and bio-chemistry. I earned my PharmD at UB, specializing in infectious diseases. In my family, I was the only sibling to go on to higher education. Currently, I have been with my partner, Dennis, for seven years. Kim: What was your first job? Patrick: When I was young, our neighbors owned an amusement park, and I was a carny for them. It was the best job ever, and I miss not doing it. Kim: What was the make and model of your first car? Patrick: A Plymouth Sundance that I purchased with the money I earned from my carny job. Kim: Why did you become a pharmacist? Patrick: I’ve always wanted to practice medicine, but I couldn’t stomach the thought of doing dissections. Kim: Where did you work prior to coming to ACS? Patrick: When I graduated from school, I took a pharmacist position at Walgreen’s. I’d been there for nearly ten years before taking on the position at ACS. Kim: What drew you to ACS? Patrick:Jason Rein (Evergreen’s Nurse Practitioner) reached out to me. I learned that AIDS Community


Patrick This Month: Jorien Brock Services does great work in the community, and it’s an amazing work environment. Everyone is very laid back and NICE! I’m excited that the pharmacy will be generating profits from dispensing prescriptions that will go toward helping to maintain our programs. Kim: What are your favorite activities away from work? Patrick: I love boating and spending time with my dogs. (Nitro is a Boston terrier; Turbo is a Boxer.) Kim: Do you have any comment on the recently passed Marriage Equality Act? Patrick: I think it’s a very positive step. I would like to see the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) repealed next. Kim: Tell me a little-known fact about you. Patrick: I don’t like spiders. Hot Seat Questions: Sabres or Bills – Sabres (because they provide a direct economic impact downtown) Board games or Card games – Board games City or Suburbs – Suburbs Bike it or Walk it – Walk it Eat in or Take out – Eat in Paper or Plastic – Paper Four door or hatchback – 4-door Horror or Comedy – Comedy Vacation or Stay-cation – Vacation, definitely Give a hug/Get a hug – Give a hug Boxers or Briefs – Boxers

1.

2. 3.

4.

5.

I am a cornhusker by birth (from Omaha, Nebraska for you non-Mid-Westerners and non-college football fans). I have been in 48 of the 50 States (not North or South Dakota that I know of). I play the mountain dulcimer. I’m always looking for other folkies and dulcimer players. I am a Trekkie. You can come by office and check out my little office collection and “boldly go where no one has gone before.” Many of you have already met my partner Monica if you have participated in a train-

ing at the Red Cross. Monica, two of our friends, and I met Whoopi Goldberg and had our picture taken with her. 7. I love Indian food! 8. I’ve studied French, Spanish, and Arabic. 9. My favorite iphone apps are Angry Birds, Light Saber, Flixster, Public Radio, and ibooks. 10. I have always had an intense case of puppy love and want a dog in the worst way. For questions about why I do not have a dog yet, please speak with my partner. 6.


Kim Harding’s Personal Garden Parad

Joey: aka Jo-Jo, mooch, and—when he is in trouble—Joseph Patrick Frank, is our two-year old Yorkie Terrier. Joey was adopted by my family from a breeder in New Castle, Pennsylvania when he was three-months old. He is truly a member of our family and is cherished and loved more than is even possible. Joey’s favorite thing is going for rides in the car. He sticks his head out of the window—even in the middle of winter. Our love for Joey is without limits and we pray he has a very long life with us. - Nichole Sherwood

WATCH YOUR E MAIL FO


dise

OR GARDEN WALK PHOTOS COMING SOON!

NeedlePoints NEWS FROM THE SYRINGE EXCHANGE by Trish Hopkins One of the biggest concerns facing syringe exchange programs is unnecessary client deaths due to drug overdose. This is partly due to the fact that, too many times, people are afraid to seek medical help for themselves and especially their companions. The number one reason many people don’t make those emergency calls is the fear of being prosecuted. That is about to change here in New York State. Known as the “Good Samaritan” law, legislation was recently signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo (Bill S.4454B) to help alleviate some concern about possible charges a person may face for any illicit activity they may be engaged in. When an individual is witnessing a drug or alcohol overdose, their first response should be to get help for that individual, and not worry about personal ramifications. Overdose is the number one cause of accidental death in New York and even exceeds traffic fatalities. Over 1,350 people died from accidental drug overdoses in New York State in 2008 - an increase of more than 60 % from 1999. This legislation, written in conjunction with the state District Attorneys, will limit the use of evidence relating to possession of a controlled substance, marijuana, drug paraphernalia or alcohol where the evidence results from seeking treatment for a drug overdose, including where someone seeks treatment for someone else. This bill went into effect July 21, 2011. Other states that have implemented the “Good Samaritan” law are Washington, New Mexico and New Jersey. The hope is that New York will have similar success with this new law. CONNECTIONS CONTRIBUTORS PUBLISHER/LAYOUT JOHN CAROCCI EDITOR KIMBERLY HARDING CONTRIBUTORS RICHARD BAER, JORIEN BROCK KIMBERLY HARDING, TRISH HOPKINS ANDY KIENER, JESS LEHSTEN, LIYA MOOLCHAN NICHOLE SHERWOOD


Andy Kiener Do


oes a Paint by Numbers Portrait of the Evergreen Association in June, 2011 Alianza Latina Encounters with enrolled clients ................................................................. 18 Contacts with non-enrolled contacts .......................................................... 14 Pregnancy tests given ................................................................................... 9 Positive pregnancy tests ............................................................................... 3 Case Management (May) COBRA clients ........................................................................................... 421 Ryan White clients ...................................................................................... 78 New intakes (4 newly diagnosed) ............................................................... 13 Evergreen Health Services Visits ........................................................................................................ 293 New patients (7 positive, 3 negative) .......................................................... 10 Housing Subsidies .................................................................................................... 64 Total dollar value ................................................................................$22,136 First/last/security assistance ........................................................................ 4 Total dollar value ................................................................................. $1,967 Utility Assistance .......................................................................................... 2 Total Dollar Value ................................................................................... $925 Eviction Prevention Assistance ..................................................................... 1 Total Dollar Value ................................................................................... $436 Human Resources Employees ................................................................................................ 127 New employees hired ................................................................................... 1

Wellness Center Meals served ............................................................................................ 725 New intakes ............................................................................................... 20 Nutrition Food pantries distributed ......................................................................... 107 Meals provided through vouchers ............................................................ 340 Home delivered meals .............................................................................. 104 People accessing the Food Express Truck .................................................. 259 Nutritional service interactions................................................................... 45 Transportation Bus passes distributed ................................................................................ 53 Gas cards distributed .................................................................................. 34 Tokens distributed .................................................................................... 349 One way trips provided ......................................................................... 1,873 Syringe Exchange Syringes collected ................................................................................ 26,107 Syringes distributed ............................................................................. 29,633 New clients................................................................................................. 62 Clients referred to drug treatment .............................................................. 10 Testing HIV Tests .................................................................................................. 193 New positives ............................................................................................... 2 STD Screenings ........................................................................................... 61


THE HOBBY CORNER by Nichole Sherwood I love old wood pieces, be it shelves, tables or stands. However, the price of acquiring a true antique piece can dissuade one from making a purchase. I discovered a fun and beautiful way of filling my free time and my home with modern antiques. The best part of the process is that those individuals without artistic talent really can’t mess up the project. Here’s what to do: Start with any wooden piece… big or small. If it’s painted, you can keep the current paint or sand off as much as possible to get to bare wood. Choose your color (yellows and oranges work great for antiquing) and paint the entire piece. Once it has dried, take a piece of sandpaper and sand off the edges to bring the wood through as much or as little as you like. You can even take a hammer or a chain to it, adding age and character. In the final step, choose a wood stain and put a light coat over smaller sections at a time. Before the stain sets, wipe off as much of the stain as you can. The stain will bring out the wood that is exposed as well as any dings and scratches. Once it is dry to the touch and not tacky, it is ready to be displayed. This is fun because there is no way to mess it up. The more “oops” marks, the more character the piece will exhibit. I currently have 23 pieces in my home that I have done. I love going to yard sales and picking up old tables or shelves. Once they are done, they look like I paid a good penny at an antique store. You can get really creative with the colors and stencils. Don’t be afraid to play with the paint strokes which will be brought out when stain is applied. Have fun!

<<<<

Evergreen Association staff turned out in force for the annual client picnic at LaSalle Park.


Connections  

the August 2011 issue of Connections

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you