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INTRODUCING THE PERSONAL PROJECT The Personal Project is a significant student-directed inquiry produced over an extended period, completed during year 5 of the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (IB MYP). It holds an important place in the MYP and reflects the student’s experience of the program. It provides an opportunity for students to produce a truly personal and creative work of their choice and to demonstrate the skills they have developed through approaches to learning. The characteristics of the Personal Project can make it a rewarding experience for all. Students may discover a sense of autonomy and confidence in their own learning, and it can be rewarding for parents and teachers to work with individual students and see their development. This handbook includes details for completing Dwight’s Personal Project. This information may also be found on our Personal Project website: https://sites.google.com/a/dwight.edu/personal-project-workspace/


WELCOME TO THE PERSONAL PROJECT! The Personal Project can be one of the most rewarding experiences for a student and their family. While the Project is meant to be a student-driven process, it can be quite challenging for students, so a supportive family and Supervisor can make a great difference. This guide is meant to help parents and guardians by providing an easy reference for questions related to the Personal Project.

What can parents/guardians do to help the student at the beginning of the process? We encourage each student to talk with family and friends about topic ideas. Successful topics build on the student’s skills and interests and therefore brainstorming with those who know the student best can help him/her to decide upon a topic that will be meaningful. The student must also consider what will be challenging, yet achievable for him/her. This is the first time that he/she may have worked on such a lengthy project, so the scope should be realistic. Furthermore, we encourage the student to consider possible community links or internationally-minded aspects that may lend a broader context to his/her personal interests.

How will the Supervisor support the student? Each student will have a Dwight faculty or staff member as a Supervisor for his/her Personal Project. The student will ask a person in the Dwight community; the Supervisor will not be assigned. This is an opportunity for the student to develop a relationship with a Dwight faculty or staff member based on the student’s area of interest. The Supervisor is not obliged to be an expert on the student’s selected topic, but will be knowledgeable about the process of the Personal Project. The Supervisor will meet with the student once per cycle to help create specifications, establish a personal timetable with deadlines, provide advice for the Process Journal, assist with reflection and analysis, give formative feedback, and stress the importance of attitudes, such as initiative. The Supervisor will contact the parent/guardian several times throughout the process to communicate the student’s progress and suggest ways to further support the student.

How can parents/guardians help the student throughout the process? The Personal Project Checklist on pages 44-48 has details on weekly meetings and steps throughout the process. Please note that the left side of the chart is the content listed in the Student Handbook and the right side of the chart is specific to the Parent Handbook. The right side of the chart provides specific details for parents/guardians with suggestions on how to assist the student, due dates, check-in points, and guidance on different elements of the Project.

How is the Personal project graded? The Personal Project is first assessed by the Supervisor and then by the Personal Project Committee, who will ensure accuracy of grading. The Committee issues the final IB grade that will be listed on the MYP year end report. Assessment is completed using the International Baccalaureate assessment criteria (pages 36-43). Therefore, it is important that each student is familiar with these rubrics. This handbook, as well as the student version, can be found on the Personal Project Workspace website: (https://sites.google.com/a/dwight.edu/personal-project-workspace/)


THOUGHTS ON THE PERSONAL PROJECT FROM PAST GRADE TEN PARENTS: I enjoy seeing students truly challenge themselves to learn as much as possible in a subject of their own choosing. Too often, students are told what to learn and how to learn it. For a student to have such freedom in the process and the product – and for that student to excel in those endeavors - is quite rewarding to witness. – Eric Dale, Head of Middle and Upper School

The most difficult thing in the past has been to steer students toward working on the research and documentation of the process, but the structure provided by the new guidebook has greatly helped with that problem. – Barry Gragg, Head of Science Department

As a Personal Project supervisor, I found it challenging to balance between the impulse to help by micromanaging and letting the student find his/her own path. – Michael Haber, Middle and Upper School Psychologist

The challenge and reward of the Personal Project is not exclusively about the final product but also about perception and self awareness. It is an interesting journey into the discovery of personal strengths and weaknesses and the investigations required to overcome obstacles. What I appreciated most about the Personal Project is the application for future, real life skills such as starting one’s own business. – Dagmar Trippen (parent of Julius Trippen ’15)


TABLE OF CONTENTS Personal Project Information............................................................................................................................... 2 1. Brainstorming................................................................................................................................................. 4 The Design Cycle............................................................................................................................................5 2. Areas of Interaction......................................................................................................................................... 6 3. Topic Sheet..................................................................................................................................................... 8 4. Selecting a Supervisor....................................................................................................................................10 5. The Process Journal........................................................................................................................................12 6. The Research Process.....................................................................................................................................14 OPVL Guide for the Personal Project............................................................................................................15 7. Self-Assessment #1.........................................................................................................................................17 8. Self-Assessment #2.........................................................................................................................................19 9. The Written Report...................................................................................................................................... 21 Sample Written Report..................................................................................................................................22 10. The Final Exhibition and Presentation.........................................................................................................35 11. How is the Personal Project Graded?............................................................................................................36 12. International Baccalaureate MYP Personal Project Assessment Criteria....................................................... 37 13. Personal Project Deadlines Checklist........................................................................................................... 44

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PERSONAL PROJECT INFORMATION What is the Personal Project? All grade 10 students at Dwight School are required to complete a Personal Project in the culminating year of the Middle Years Program. The Personal Project is a significant piece of work that is the product of your own initiative and creativity. You will research a topic thoroughly, create a product, and write a reflection about the process of learning and creating your product. Finally, you will share your product with the School community at the Personal Project Exhibition. Each project will reflect an understanding of the Areas of Interaction (AOI). During your time in the IB MYP, your teachers have integrated the AOI into your studies. Now it is your turn to investigate more fully by relating Approaches to Learning (ATL) and one other AOI to your topic.

Why am I required to complete a Personal Project? Have you ever wanted to build a musical instrument? Discover the physics of baseball? Plan a leadership seminar? The Personal Project is your chance to do what you want to do, to show the skills that you have developed in the MYP and to apply that knowledge to your goal. The Personal Project will help you to hone these abilities and, in effect, prepare you for life.

When will I complete the Personal Project? The majority of the Personal Project work will be completed independently outside of school. You are expected to spend an extended period of time working on the project. Many students spend fifty to sixty hours on the entire project. There will be some time allocated during the advisory period and during your classes to become familiar with the requirements, answer your questions, and remind you of deadlines. The personal project is something you should enjoy doing. It will be hard work that is worthwhile.

At the conclusion of the Personal Project you will submit: The Process Journal The process journal is a tool used for documenting the process. You must show show evidence of regular use of the process journal, though not necessarily weekly. While legibility is important, quality of thinking is more important than neatness and presentation. The media can be written, visual, audio, or a combination of these. It might include both paper and electronic formats.

The Personal Project Checklist The Personal Project Checklist is a list of project deadlines and mandatory meetings with your Supervisor. You are required to have this signed after every meeting with your Supervisor. The Checklist can be found in the back of this Handbook.

The Product

The Report

This product is an original piece of work. You must define realistic specifications to measure the quality of your product.

The Report is a written document where you will review your process and reflect specifically on your learning and achievement. There is a required outline for the Report to ensure that you provide evidence for all of the assessment criteria.

Products can be an original work of art, a model, a business plan, a campaign, a community service project, an architectural drawing, an essay, a course of study, a debate, a film, or some other work.

What can I do for my Personal Project? The project can take many different creative forms. It can be: • an original work of art: painting, sculpture, movie, dance, or music • a science experiment • a piece of literary fiction, collection of short stories, poetry, novella, or play • an invention or specifically-designed object • a community service activity • a video or multi-media presentation (not to exceed seven minutes) • a presentation of a developed business, management or organizational plan for a company, concept, or community organization • a written piece of work on a social or psychological topic • any other reasonable idea

Can I do a project with a friend? Group projects are NOT allowed. Students may ask peers only for help. Students gather around their projects at the 2013 MYP Personal Project Exhibition

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BRAINSTORMING

Think about the following questions. Get input from your parents, teachers, and friends. Fill out this sheet completely and thoughtfully.

The Design Cycle You are familiar with the design cycle from your DT and IT classes. Use it to help you plan your Personal Project. INVESTIGATION

PLAN

EVALUATION

CREATE A SOLUTION

Bring this to Morning Meeting on Thursday, September 26, 2013.

1. What kind of learner am I?

2. How can I contribute to the local community? The global community?

3. How can I take care of my mental and physical health?

4. What are my responsibilities to the environment?

5. What ideas/issues/questions captivate your attention?

6. What do I enjoy doing in my spare time?

7. What are some things I do really well?

8. What are some things I would like to do better?

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AREAS OF INTERACTION: AN OVERVIEW

Environments

The Areas of Interaction provide a main focus for developing connections between the disciplines, so that students will learn to see knowledge as an interrelated, coherent whole. They provide common organizing strategies and also allow for the diversity of student needs, interests, and motivations. Teachers use all of the Areas of Interaction as an opportunity to engage students with issues affecting the environment, our health, and our community, as well as explore solutions to how humans can solve the problems of the future. The Personal Project allows students to self-direct their study of an AOI.

Approaches to Learning How do I learn best? How do I know? How do I communicate my understanding? Approaches to Learning is the key Area of Interaction in relation to the Personal Project. This area focuses on the development of study skills, critical thinking, coherent and independent thought, problem solving, and decision-making. In their individual work, students should develop: • the ability to do methodical work • a sense of achievement and self-discipline • coherent thought and expression • initiative and responsibility Within their social and cultural environment, students should develop: • the ability to communicate experiences • team spirit • open-mindedness and respect for their own culture and the culture of others

This Area of Interaction considers all the environments around us, including natural, built, and virtual. The word “environments” can refer to a variety of complex and often controversial issues. Exploring environments provides opportunities for students to see global issues in the light of local concerns, and vice versa. In the Personal Project, students may choose to explore issues such as:

ALL projects will link to Approaches to Learning. Through the process of completing the Personal Project, you will improve how you approach your learning! Link your project to ONE other AOI. You must select either Community and Service OR Health and Social Education OR Environments OR Human Ingenuity.

Note: In your personal statement, you must make a connection between your project and Approaches to Learning.

Community and Service How do we live in relation to others? How can I contribute to the community? How can I help others? Community and Service starts in the classroom and extends beyond it, requiring students to take an active part in the communities in which they live. Through the experience of service, students become aware of issues and problems that may become topics for further research and thought. Some of the skills, attitudes and values linked to this area are: • an interest in today’s world • social awareness • an altruistic attitude • a sense of awareness and self-esteem

Health and Social Education How do I think and act? How am I changing? How can I look after myself and others? Health and Social Education aims to educate the whole person and should prepare the student for a mentally and physically healthy life. It should also develop in the student a sense of responsibility for his/her own well-being and for the physical and social environment. 6

Where do we live? What resources do we have or need? What are my responsibilities?

The study of environments deals with: • the interdependence of human and other forms of life • the consequences of human manipulation of the environment • the links between health and changes in the environment • the role of virtual environments in modeling our other environments • the political responsibility of each person, region or nation

Human Ingenuity

Why and how do we create? What are the consequences? Human Ingenuity deals with the way in which human minds have influenced the way we think, interact with each other, create, transform ideas, find solutions to and cause problems. It also considers the consequences of human thought and action. This Area of Interaction allows students to explore the processes and products of human creativity, and to consider their impact on society and the way we think. Human ingenuity provides opportunities for students to appreciate and develop in themselves the human capacity to create, transform, enjoy and improve the quality of life. Students who wish to challenge their own creativity, might consider the following themes as related to human ingenuity: • the human capacity for change • the influence of men and women of genius • great scientific discoveries • the impact of inventions and discoveries on society • how systems or products develop and change over time

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TOPIC SHEET

NOTES

Personal Project: Topic Sheet 1. Selected Area of Interaction: (Remember: ALL projects will reflect Approaches to Learning, so select ONE additional AOI.)

2. What is your topic and why is this of interest to you?

3. What will be the final product (For example: a book, painting, presentation, video – not to exceed seven minutes etc.)? You will need to display this at the final exhibition. What will your display include? (All of these elements will be part of your final product.)

4. How will you know that your product is successful? For example: Will you need to get feedback, or present your project to an audience? These will be part of your specifications.

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Please submit this Topic Sheet during Morning Meeting on Thursday, October 3, 2013. 1. Is your topic really interesting to YOU? This will be a long process, so select a topic that interests and challenges you. 2. Is your topic too broad? Your topic must allow for specific investigation of a single topic. If the topic is too broad you could feel undirected and/or overwhelmed. 3. Have you shared your topic with others? Your family and friends should agree that your topic reflects your interests and will challenge your abilities. 4. Is the goal realistic? While you should feel challenged, this is also the first time you have completed such a large project. Create realistic goals! 5. What happens after I submit this topic sheet? Next, the Personal Project Committee, consisting of Dwight faculty, will review all topics. Students will be permitted to begin once their topic is approved.

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SELECTING A SUPERVISOR

NOTES

Your Supervisor must be a Dwight faculty member or administrator, who will make him/herself available to meet with you. It is YOUR responsibility to take the initiative in organizing, recording, and reflecting on the meetings.

My topic was approved. Now, what do I do? 1. Carefully read how the Supervisor will help you, and how they will not. 2. Respectfully ask a faculty or staff member from Dwight School to support you through your Personal Project experience. 3. Explain your topic and product ideas to them. 4. Do they have the availability to work with you on this Personal Project? 5. Determine a weekly meeting time and place with your Supervisor. 6. Complete the form at the bottom of this page and submit to the Personal Project Coordinators on October 15, 2013 7. Remember to bring your process journal and this handbook to every meeting.

Your Supervisor WILL • Help you create specifications for your personal project • Assist you in establishing a timetable with deadlines • Review the assessment criteria with you • Provide advice on how to organize and use a process journal • Explain the importance of personal reflection and analysis • Give formative feedback • Stress the importance of positive attitudes such as initiative, willingness to correct or perfect your work, responsibility and a sense of organization • Review the requirements for academic honesty.

Your Supervisor WILL NOT • Be obliged to make up a meeting you have missed • Necessarily be an expert on your topic • Seek out experts for you You may seek additional guidance and support from experts in the field, provided your Supervisor believes it will help you with your Personal Project experience. Please be neat and use scissors to cut here Student: __________________________________ Supervisor Name: __________________________ Supervisor Signature: _____________________________ Regular meeting time with Supervisor: Day: _________________ Time: ____________

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THE PROCESS JOURNAL

3. Steps to Achieving the Goal

The process journal is a tool used for documenting the process. You must show evidence of regular use of the process journal, though not necessarily weekly. While legibility is important, quality of thinking is more important than neatness and presentation. The media can be written, visual, audio, or a combination of these. It might include both paper and electronic formats.

• Explain each task you completed to create the final product and exhibition display.

The Process Journal must be divided into four sections.

• Evaluate the quality of the product at different stages of the process.

These sections directly correspond with the final Written Report and are designed to facilitate the process. Listed below are the four required sections and suggestions for entries that might be included in each section. Students should write in their journal during their meetings with their Supervisor, as well as at least one additional time each week.

• Describe your goal, including the essential question, final product and what your display will look like at the final exhibition. • Explain what inspired you to select this idea. • Explain which Area of Interaction is linked to your project. • Explain the steps you will take to complete research and to create the product. • Describe what others will learn through your project. • List the specifications that will determine if your project is successful. • Make a time line that will help you to accomplish your steps. • Before and after winter vacation make a revised time line to meet your goals. • After winter vacation, reassess your specifications and explain if they are still accurate or if you need to revise them. • Continue to add check-off lists, calendars and other planning devices to this section.

2. Sources and Applying Information • See the Research Process section of this handbook. • In this section you will keep notes from your sources. • Begin by listing the information that you already know, as related to your project. • List questions that will need to be answered through research in order to complete a thoughtful project. • Prior knowledge alone does not provide sufficient depth or breadth of inquiry for the Personal Project. • Explain how you applied research information throughout the project as you decided what actions to take.

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• Explain how you are focusing and expanding on your essential question. • Through out the process, explain how you are meeting your specifications. • Justifying decisions made during the process. • Evaluate the outcome or product using the specifications.

4. Reflecting

1. Goals and Specifications • List your brainstorming ideas.

• Include documentation of the process, including: screenshots, sketches, outlines, emails, photographs, and models.

Must I keep a Process Journal? Yes, this is a required component of the Personal Project, and mandated by the International Baccalaureate. Why keep a journal? The Personal Project is has many components and the Journal will help you to remember these details. When writing the Report, you will take directly from the Journal. Words of advice: “Bring your journal to every meeting and writing something about each meeting. Don’t wait for the end to make up stuff!” – Cristina Perez, ’14 “Do not put things off! Listen to your Supervisor and follow up on due dates. Yes, it may seem stressful, but it’s only to help you.” – Julia Reidbord, ’14

• Reflect on your approach to learning. ¡

Explain how you stay organized. Is the method you started with the same method you ended with?

¡

Explain how you stay motivated.

¡

Explain how well you did research and how you could improve this skill.

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Explain which resource was the most useful. Did this surprise you? If so, how can you use this type of resource in the future?

¡

Describe a method of time management that worked well for you.

¡

Explain your meetings with your supervisor and how these were helpful, or could have been more helpful.

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Describe how you learned to communicate more clearly with others, and learned to take initiative.

• Explain your link to your chosen Area of Interaction. ¡

Refer to the AOI pages.

¡

List all that you learned about your “essential question.”

¡

Describe how your display at the final exhibition will communicate these ideas.

¡

Explain the feedback you received from others and if others brought new ideas to your topic.

• Reflecting on the topic. ¡

Explain how you have met the specifications.

¡

Explain how your thoughts about your topic have changed.

¡

Explain how your ideas about yourself have changed, as a person, or local/global citizen.

¡

Describe how you will/will not pursue this topic in the future. Be specific.

“Pick a Supervisor who will push you and keep you on task. Pick a subject you love and also try something new. Organize your time! Remember, with the LaGuardia research paper and the Personal Project in the winter, it gets crazy. During Winter Break you have to do stuff!” – Georgina Salter, ’14

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RESEARCH PROCESS

Read all of the following steps before beginning: Step 1: Planning In your journal, answer the following questions: • What do you know already? • What do you want to know more about? • What are key terms and critical questions to guide your research? Ask the Librarian and Supervisor for advice.

Step 2: Locating and Gathering In your journal, explain your process as you complete the following: • Visit the Dwight Librarian. Where does the Librarian advise you begin your research? • Speak to a specialist. This might be a neighbor, a relative, a company representative, or more. If you do not know a specialist, who might introduce you to a specialist? • Find a website that is reliable. • Which books are helpful? • Which newspapers have relevant articles? • Are there magazines and journals that focus on your area of interest? • Find documentaries or movies that might provide information. • Is there a Dwight student who previously completed an exemplary project on this topic. • Visit a museum that is most relevant to your subject.

Step 3: Selecting and Assessing: the Annotated Bibliography Assess the sources’ reliability in an annotated bibliography using OPVL (origin, purpose, value, and limitation). Your annotated bibliography should include the following for each source: • First, a full MLA citation. ¡ Try using www.easybib.com to keep track of your sources. • Next, a short paragraph in OPVL format. Follow the instruction below: ¡ This short paragraph will later be cut and pasted in to the “Selection of Sources” section of the Written Report.

Origin, Purpose, Value, and Limitation (OPVL) is a technique for analyzing sources. Follow the guide below when creating your ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY: ORIGIN: The more you do know about where a document is coming from, the easier it is to ascertain purpose, value and limitation. Ask yourself the following questions: • Who is the author? • When was it published? • Where was it published? • Who published it? PURPOSE: This is the point where you start the real evaluation of the source and try to figure out the purpose for its creation. You must be able to think as the author of the document. • Why did the author create this piece of work? What is the intent? • Who is the intended audience? Who was the author thinking would receive this? • If someone asked what this source is about, what would you say? VALUE: Now comes the hard part. You must determine, based on who wrote it, when/where it came from and why it was created. Next, determine the value of this source for your project. • How does it fit into your research question? How does it help you shape your argument? • Is the author reliable? Are they well educated in the field? Do they have extensive experience? • Is this source well researched? LIMITATION: This is probably the hardest part. The task here is not to point out weaknesses of the source, but rather to say: at what point does this source cease to be of value to your research? Being biased does not limit the value of a source! If you are going to comment on the bias of a source, you must go into detail. Who is it biased towards? Who is it biased against? What part of a story does it leave out? • What about this source hinders your research? • Does this author only present part of the story/research? • Is this source inaccurate in anyway? • What does the author leave out and why does he/she leave it out (if you know)? Sample “OPVL” Paragraph The origin of this source is a journal that was written by __________ in _________ in ________. Its purpose was to ____________________ so _____________________. A value of this is that it gives the perspective of ______________________________. However, a limitation is that ___________________________, making ___________________________. This guide is adapted from “A Guide for Using Primary Source or Original Source Documents.” Minnesota Humanities Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 June 2012.

Step 4: Research and Works Cited • Create a works cited following MLA format. ¡ Try using www.easybib.com to keep track of your sources. • Take notes in your process journal. Every time you open a book, read an article, consider a web page or talk to a specialist, you must gather bibliographic information, copy quotes, and summarize information. 14

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Step 5: Organizing and Communicating • Take notes in your journal. • Read over your notes and highlight the relevant information. • Organize your idea in a clear and logical way. • Write your plan in your process journal and share with you supervisor. • Revise the plan as needed.

Step 6: Reflecting and Evaluating In your journal, answer the following questions: • How did your research help you to make decisions? Give several examples. • How did your research expand your understanding? • What did you do well while doing research? • What obstacles did you have to overcome while researching? • Is there anything in your research process that you would do differently next time?

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SELF-ASSESSMENT #1 Name: ___________________________________________

Due Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Supervisor: ____________________________________

Why do I need to complete this form? By taking time to selfassess your progress, you will learn about your strengths and weaknesses. More importantly, you will learn to make positive changes that will help you grow.

Project Title: ___________________________________

To whom do I submit this form? Share this completed form (or completed as much as possible) with your Supervisor. Complete it in advance of your meeting so that you may discuss the answers together and brainstorm about improvements. What do I do with this form? Save this form and include it with the Journal and final Written Report. The results from this Self-Assessment and #2 Self-Assessment will help you to intelligently reflect and write about your development during this process.

Approaches to Learning

Unsatisfactory Satisfactory

Good

Excellent

Contacted Supervisor on a regular basis Sought help when necessary Worked independently Organized time effectively Met deadlines Effort

MYP Assessment Criteria

Criteria Domains

Maximum Achievement Level

A

Use the Process Journal

4

B

Define the Goal

4

C

Select Sources

4

D

Apply Information

4

E

Achieve the Goal

4

F

Reflect on Learning

4

G

Report the Project

4

Achievement

Self-Assessment #1 continued on the next page... See pages 39-45 for descriptions of the different achievement levels. 16

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In your journal, write the following questions and give a thoughtful answer. Be sure to review this with your Supervisor and have them sign off that this was completed.

1. Title of project:

2. Area of Interaction:

3. Guiding question:

4. How much time did you spend working on/completing your project? (estimate) ____hours

5. How have you documented the process?

6. What is the greatest strength of your project?

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SELF-ASSESSMENT #2 Name: ___________________________________________

Due Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Supervisor: ____________________________________ Project Title: ___________________________________

Approaches to Learning

Unsatisfactory Satisfactory

Good

Excellent

Contacted Supervisor on a regular basis Sought help when necessary Worked independently Organized time effectively Met deadlines Effort

7. What do you need to do better? How will you improve this?

8. What have you learned through your research? Which source was most useful and reliable?

9. What is the greatest difficulty you had in completing your project?

10. As related to your area of interaction, what new ideas have you learned?

MYP Assessment Criteria

Criteria Domains

Maximum Achievement Level

A

Use the Process Journal

4

B

Define the Goal

4

C

Select Sources

4

D

Apply Information

4

E

Achieve the Goal

4

F

Reflect on Learning

4

G

Report the Project

4

Achievement

Self-Assessment #2 continued on the next page... See pages 39-45 for descriptions of the different achievement levels. 18

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In your journal, write the following questions and give a thoughtful answer. Be sure to review this with your Supervisor and have them sign off that this was completed.

1. Title of project:

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THE WRITTEN REPORT

The Written Report is an analysis of your process and a reflection on your learning throughout the Personal Project. The length of the personal project report must be a minimum of 1,500 words and a maximum of 3,500 words, not including appendices and works cited.

How complete is your Written Report? Title Page (Criterion G)

2. Area of Interaction:

3. Guiding question:

❏ Student Name ❏ Project Title ❏ Length (word count) ❏ School Name ❏ School Year

Table of Contents (Criterion G)

❏ Title of sections and sub-sections of your project with corresponding page numbers

4. How much time did you spend working on/completing your project? (estimate) ____hours

5. How have you documented the process?

The Goal (Criterion B)

❏ Identify and explain a topic based on personal interest ❏ Justify one focus AOI as a context for the project ❏ Outline a clear, achievable, challenging goal ❏ Clearly explain and define the specifications used to evaluate the project’s outcome

Selection of Sources (Criterion C)

6. What is the greatest strength of your project?

❏ Explain the varied, relevant source used to achieve the goal ❏ Evaluate the sources

Application of Information (Criterion D)

7. What do you need to do better? How will you improve this?

8. What have you learned through your research? Which source was most useful and reliable?

9. What is the greatest difficulty you had in completing your project?

10. As related to your area of interaction, what new ideas have you learned?

❏ Explain how you transferred and applied information to make decisions, create solutions, and develop understandings in connection with the project’s goal ❏ Provide several examples

Achieve the Goal (Criterion E)

❏ Evaluate the quality of the product ❏ Evaluate the outcome against the specifications for success

Reflection on Learning (Criterion F)

❏ Thoroughly reflect on how completing the project strengthened your knowledge of the topic and Area of Interaction ❏ Thoroughly reflect on your development as a learner

Helpful hints Proofreading is essential. How do we know if our writing clearly communicates our ideas? By asking family or friends to proof-read your Written Report, you will begin to know if your ideas are complete. Remember: high levels of learning and achievement always requires help. You will begin writing the Written Report in January. Notice the deadlines for the written Report. You will complete an outline and AT LEAST one draft of the Report before Friday, February 25. Plan ahead. Through the Personal Project you will learn that completing large tasks take longer than expected. So, build in extra time to work on this essential writing.

Works Cited (Criterion G)

❏ Demonstrate consistent organization using MLA format

Appendix (Criterion G)

❏ Include all documentation of the process

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THE FINAL EXHIBITION AND PRESENTATION Once the project is complete and submitted to your Supervisor, you will have an opportunity to share your work at a group exhibition. The exhibition is scheduled for the end of April, and is on the School calendar. Attendance is mandatory. The whole community will be eager to see what you have completed, so here are steps to consider for a successful display: • What is the best way for you to share your project? • What would facilitate a discussion (Would a poster with pictures help you to create a meaningful talk)? • Do you want people to read a part of your project? Which part? • Would you ask your audience some questions before you show the product? What questions? What information would you give them before? After? • How will you engage your audience? • Can you make your presentation hands-on? How? In your journal, answer the following question: 1. What is the form of your Personal Project? (video – not to exceed seven minutes, event, picture book, artwork) 2. About how much time would it take someone to review your project without explanation from you? (For example: you have a seven-minute video, or it would take a person fifteen minutes to read your twelve-page paper, etc.) 3. In what ways will you present your project? (Give a talk, ask the viewer to read copies of your book, show a slide show, refer to images on a poster, show your video.) Give details of how you plan to use your presentation time. 4. What equipment or additional materials do you need to prepare your presentation?

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12

HOW IS THE PERSONAL PROJECT GRADED?

THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE MYP PERSONAL PROJECT ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Your project will first be graded by your Supervisor and then by the Personal Project Committee, who will ensure accuracy of grading and who will issue the final IB grade. Assessment is completed using the International Baccalaureate rubrics, so it is important that each student is familiar with these grading tools. It is recommended that you refer to the criteria in these rubrics to help you focus your efforts throughout the process of your project. Discuss the grading with your Supervisor so you understand what is required from the beginning. Below is a list of the overall criteria and where the information should be located in the final product. Refer to the following pages for a more detailed description of each criteria. Read these pages carefully and often.

Criterion A: Use the Process Journal Maximum: 4 Students should be able to demonstrate organizational skills showing time and self-management, communicate and collaborate with the supervisor, and demonstrate information literacy, thinking, and reflection. Achievement Level

Title of Criterion

Where this information can be found

Criterion A

Use the Process Journal

Process Journal

Maximum 4

Criterion B

Define the Goal

Report

Maximum 4

Criterion C

Select Sources

Report

Maximum 4

Criterion D

Apply Information

Report

Maximum 4

Criterion E

Achieve the Goal

Product and Report

Maximum 4

Criterion F

Reflect on Learning

Report

Maximum 4

Criterion G

Report the Project

Report

Maximum 4

Points

4

The student demonstrates well-developed: • organizational skills through time and self-management • communication and collaboration with the supervisor • information literacy, thinking and reflection.

3

The student demonstrates satisfactory: • organizational skills through time and self-management • communication and collaboration with the supervisor • information literacy, thinking and reflection.

2

The student demonstrates some: • organizational skills through time and self-management • communication and collaboration with the supervisor • information literacy, thinking and reflection.

1

The student demonstrates minimal: • organizational skills through time and self-management • communication and collaboration with the supervisor • information literacy, thinking and reflection.

0

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

Total: 28 The Personal Project points will be converted into an IB grade, using the IB Boundary Scale.

Level Descriptor

Score

IB Grade Boundaries IB Grade Boundaries 1 0 – 5 5 17 – 21 2 6 – 9 6 22 – 24 3 10 – 13 7 25 – 28 4 14 – 16

The Personal Project IB grade will be recorded on your academic transcript.

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Criterion B: Define the Goal

Criterion C: Select Sources

Maximum: 4 Students should be able to identify and explain a topic based on personal interest, justify one focus area of interaction as a context for the project, outline a clear, achievable, challenging goal, and create specifications that will be used to evaluate the project’s outcome/product. The specifications for the product/outcome created by the student, in consultation with the project supervisor, are used to evaluate the success of the project. These student-created specifications for their product/outcome link to criterion E, in which the student evaluates his or her outcome/product.

Maximum: 4 Students should be able to select varied, relevant sources to achieve the goal and evaluate sources. Evidence will be seen in the body of the report and the bibliography.

Achievement Level

Level Descriptor

4

The student: • justifies effectively the topic of interest, the focus area of interaction and an achievable and appropriately challenging goal • creates appropriately rigorous specifications for evaluating the project’s outcome/product

3

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The student: • describes clearly the topic of interest, the focus area of interaction and an achievable and appropriately challenging goal • creates satisfactory specifications for evaluating the project’s outcome/product

2

The student: • outlines superficially the topic of interest, the focus area of interaction and an achievable goal • creates specifications for evaluating the project’s outcome/ product, however they lack definition

1

The student: • identifies the topic of interest, a focus area of interaction and a limited goal • creates minimal specifications to evaluate the project’s outcome/product or none at all

0

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

Achievement Level

Level Descriptor

4

The student: • selects a wide variety of relevant sources to achieve the goal • demonstrates well-developed evaluation of sources

3

The student: • selects a satisfactory variety of relevant sources to achieve the goal • demonstrates satisfactory evaluation of sources

2

The student: • selects some relevant sources to achieve the goal • demonstrates some evaluation of sources

1

The student: • selects very few relevant sources to achieve the goal • demonstrates minimal evaluation of sources

0

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

Score

Score

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Criterion D: Apply Information

Criterion E: Achieve the Goal

Maximum: 4 Students should be able to transfer and apply information to make decisions, create solutions and develop understandings in connection with the project’s goal. Students interpret the information from sources they have researched and selected. By thinking about the information, students develop a broader context for their inquiry; identify questions and issues for their project and solve problems. Students may have researched information relating to techniques, which can be discussed in the context of this objective.

Maximum: 4 Students should be able to evaluate the outcome/product against their own specifications for success. The final level awarded is decided in collaboration with the supervisor. It is crucial that the specifications are developed by the student before completing the project (see Criterion B). The student must discuss any changes in the specifications that took place during the process in his or her report.

Achievement Level

Level Descriptor

4

The student demonstrates well-developed: • transfer and application of information to make decisions, create solutions and develop understandings in connection with the project’s goal

3

The student demonstrates satisfactory: • transfer and application of information to make decisions, create solutions and develop understandings in connection with the project’s goal

2

The student demonstrates some: • transfer and application of information to make decisions, create solutions and develop understandings in connection with the project’s goal

1

The student demonstrates minimal: • transfer and application of information to make decisions, create solutions and develop understandings in connection with the project’s goal

0

40

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

Score

Achievement Level

Level Descriptor

4

• The student evaluates the quality of the outcome/product. • The outcome/product is of high quality and meets most or all of the specifications.

3

• The student evaluates the quality of the outcome/product. • The outcome/product is of satisfactory quality and meets many of the specifications.

2

• The student evaluates the quality of the outcome/product. • The outcome/product is of limited quality and meets some of the specifications.

1

• The student evaluates the quality of the outcome/product. • The outcome/product is of very limited quality and meets few of the specifications.

0

Score

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

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Criterion F: Reflect on Learning

Criterion G: Report the Project

Maximum: 4 Students should be able to reflect on how completing the project has extended their knowledge and understanding of the topic and the focus area of interaction and reflect on how they have developed as a learner by completing the project. This criterion addresses the quality of ideas expressed not the quality of language used.

Maximum: 4 Students should be able to organize the project report according to the required structure, communicate clearly, coherently and concisely, within required limits, and acknowledge sources according to recognized conventions. This criterion will include judgments about presentation, writing (or speaking) conventions, mechanics, grammar, word choice, voice, audience, for example.

Achievement Level

4

3

2

42

Level Descriptor The student demonstrates well-developed: • reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and focus area of interaction • reflection on how he or she has developed as a learner by completing the project The student demonstrates satisfactory: • reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and focus area of interaction • reflection on how he or she has developed as a learner by completing the project The student demonstrates some: • reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and focus area of interaction • reflection on how he or she has developed as a learner by completing the project

1

The student demonstrates minimal: • reflection on how completing the project has extended his or her knowledge and understanding of the topic and focus area of interaction • reflection on how he or she has developed as a learner by completing the project

0

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

Score

Achievement Level

Level Descriptor

4

The student demonstrates: • consistent organization of the project report according to the require structure • communication, which is clear, coherent and concise and is within required limits • accurate use of recognized conventions to acknowledge sources, possibly with minor errors

3

The student demonstrates: • satisfactory organization of the project report according to the require structure • communication, which is generally clear, coherent and concise and is within required limits • generally accurate use of recognized conventions to acknowledge sources

2

The student demonstrates: • some organization of the project report according to the require structure • communication, which is sometimes clear, coherent and concise and is within required limits • some accurate use of recognized conventions to acknowledge sources

1

The student demonstrates: • minimal organization of the project report according to the require structure • communication, which is rarely clear, coherent and concise and may not meet required limits • inaccurate use of recognized conventions to acknowledge sources or no acknowledgement of sources

0

The student has not reached a standard described by any of the descriptors given.

Score

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13

PERSONAL PROJECT CHECKLIST

Second Supervisor Meeting

The table below is for MANDATORY meetings with your Supervisor, which YOU SHOULD INITIATE. You are required to bring your Personal Project Handbook, as well as your Process Journal, to each meeting to have it checked and signed by your Supervisor. Student: __________________________________ Supervisor Name: __________________________ Supervisor Signature: _____________________________

Tuesday, October 29

Regular meeting time with Supervisor: Day: _________________ Time: ____________

Due Date

Tuesday, October 15

Required Task(s)

Comments for Parents

❏ Bring Supervisor Selection Sheet to Morning Meeting to submit to Personal Project Coordinators.

The Supervisor Selection Sheet (page 10) is a signed acknowledgement of an agreement between the student and a Dwight faculty or staff member. They will decide on a meeting time once per cycle to work on the Project. Parents/guardians can help to ensure that the student has a Journal in order to begin documenting the process. For details, see pages 12-13.

First Supervisor Meeting ❏ Create a plan of action with a timeline. Tuesday, October 22

❏ How will you reach your goal? ❏ What resources will you need? ❏ How does your project link to your selected Area of Interaction?

Before Thursday, October 24

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Supervisor/Parent Communication Supervisor contacts the student’s family to introduce the Personal Project.

The student and Supervisor will create an outline for individual objectives and due dates. We encourage students to plan backwards from the final due date, March 12. The student must also consider known dates for major assessments, after school activities, and family events. An Area of Interaction (pages 6-7), in addition to Approaches to Learning, should guide the focus of the Project. The Supervisor’s role is outlined on page 10. The student should be meeting with his/ her Supervisor during the planned time once per cycle. This Dwight faculty or staff member will help guide the student and will be knowledgeable about the Personal Project assessment criteria, pages 36-43.

❏ Establish the Plan of Action and Specifications. This must include: • Project title. • Description of the goal and final product as it will be displayed at the exhibition. • Description of your inspiration. • Description of the link to an AOI. • Description of the steps you will take to achieve your goal. • List the specifications: How will you know you’ve succeeded?

Third Supervisor Meeting Tuesday, November 5

❏ Brainstorm about resources and begin an annotated bibliography. ❏ How will you document the process?

Fourth Supervisor Meeting Tuesday, November 12

❏ Approaches to Learning (ATL): Discuss time management. How do you organize tasks? ❏ What is the next step? How will you complete this?

Supervisor/Parent Communication Before Friday, November 15

❏ Explain the resources the student must find. ❏ How can the family help the child find a variety of useful resources?

Specifications will help the student to determine to what extent he/she met his/her goal. Specifications can be written as a bullet point list, including the goal, the product format, the product content, and the plan for testing different stages of the product. The student will use the Plan of Action and Specifications to later form the Written Report, “Introduction.” For an example, see the exemplar in this Handbook, pages 22-25. In the final Written Report, the goal and specifications will be evaluated by Criterion B, page 38.

The Research Process noted in the Handbook, pages 14-16, should be documented in the student’s Process Journal. We recommend that the student begin research with books and online investigation. The student should later consider interviews and other options to gather a wide variety of resources. The selection of sources will be evaluated by Criterion C, page 39. The documentation of the process should include photos and may also include screen shots, emails, drawings, rough drafts, etc. These should be included in the student’s Process Journal. All students will link their project to the Area of Interaction, Approaches to Learning, in addition to one other Area of Interaction. A student may have trouble beginning the Project, because it seems overwhelming. If the student has not started, it may be helpful to break tasks into even smaller steps. The Supervisor will update you on the student’s progress. The student may need encouragement or assistance to find resources. We recommend that the student begin with books and online investigation before conducting interviews. The Selection of Sources will be evaluated by Criterion C, page 39. For ideas, see the Research Process on pages 14-16.

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Fifth Supervisor Meeting Tuesday, November 19

❏ Complete Self-Assessment #1 and share with Supervisor. ❏ How can you stay motivated? ❏ Consider the final exhibition presentation, see instructions in HB Sixth Supervisor Meeting

Tuesday, December 3

❏ How can you strengthen your connection to your selected AOI? ❏ How can you improve your research? Seventh Supervisor Meeting

Tuesday, December 10

❏ In your journal, create a timeline for winter vacation. ❏ Consider your essential question. ❏ How are you documenting the process? ❏ Consider the final exhibition presentation, see instructions in HB.

Before Friday, December 13

46

Ask the student about their Area of Interaction and have them reflect on their guiding question. The student should be writing about his/her research in the “Sources and Applying Information” section of the Process Journal. The Application of Research will be evaluated by Criterion D, page 40. The Winter Vacation is an important time for the student to catch up and work ahead on the Project. What are realistic goals for the student to complete over vacation? How will he/she document the process? If the student is at risk of falling too far behind at this point, he/she may need to come to School on Saturday or after school to work on the Project and research.

How can you as a parent/guardian assist the student during the vacation? January and February are busy months for Supervisor/Parent Communication students, so completing work over vacation will help the student to maintain balance in his/her ❏ Progress update: What additional resources schedule after Winter Vacation. This is particularly does the student need? important for athletes and performers. ❏ How can the family help the student improve Assessment Reminder: The Selection of Sources time management? will be evaluated by Criterion C, page 39. The Application of Research will be evaluated by Criterion D, page 40. Students usually need a conversation with an adult to understand how their Project is deeply connected to their Area of Interaction and ❏ In what ways is your product linked to your guiding question. selected AOI? How has your connection grown? Ask the student to reflect and see if he/she can ❏ What new aspects have developed as a result grasp the broader impact of his/her project. of the progress of the project? Is he/she taking photos and collecting other ❏ Are you documenting your process? documentation of his/her process? If not, ❏ What other sources can support your research? ask him/her to consider what upcoming opportunities to do so. Eighth Supervisor Meeting

Tuesday, January 7

The Self-Assessment should be completed in the student’s Process Journal. The student’s answers to these questions will change as the process continues and therefore he/she will complete a second self-assessment in January. The student should consider the final Exhibition as a way to remind himself/herself of the specifications, see page 35.

Ninth Supervisor Meeting Tuesday, January 14

❏ Complete Self-Assessment #2 and share with Supervisor. ❏ Which ideas did not work? ❏ How did you try to change these? ❏ What skills have you developed?

At this point, the student is beginning to see how he/she could improve his/her process. The student needs to complete the second page of the self-assessment in his/her Process Journal. This self-assessment can help to motivate the student to give the Project more time and effort. The student must evaluate the Product against their own specifications, which may require testing the product. The Evaluation of the Product is assessed by Criterion E, page 41.

The Written Report is the precursor to the Extended Essay in grades 11 and 12, so the student must strictly follow the guidelines for ❏ Begin the Report. structure and content, page 21. ❏ What is the proper format for the Report? Documentation of the process should continue ❏ Refer to details in the Personal Project Handbook. in the Process Journal and be included in the Appendix section of the Report. Tenth Supervisor Meeting

Tuesday, January 21

Eleventh Supervisor Meeting ❏ Submit an outline. Tuesday, February 4

❏ Did you include a description of how you used your resources? ❏ Did you include an interpretation of your resources? ❏ Did you justify the chosen technique used to create the project? ❏ Did you discuss new perspectives emerging from your topic?

Tuesday, February 4

Supervisor/Parent Communication

The student may need your help to set aside time ❏ Progress update: What does the student need on the weekends to focus and complete his/her Written Report outline. to do to complete the Report? Twelfth Supervisor Meeting

Tuesday, February 11

❏ Submit a rough draft. ❏ Review assessment criteria with Supervisor. ❏ Consider the final exhibition presentation, see instructions in HB. Thirteenth Supervisor Meeting

Wednesday, February 19

For a successful outline, follow “The Written Report” guide, page 21. The biggest challenge for many students is the “Selection of Sources” using the OPVL system, page 15. Much of the Written Report should be a reflection and analysis on their process. The student should use past-tense verbs in his/her Report. Reflection on Learning will be evaluated by Criterion F, page 42. An example of a Written Report is on pages 22-34 and on the online Personal Project Workspace: https://sites.google.com/a/dwight.edu/personalproject-workspace/

❏ Review rough draft. ❏ Review link to AOI and make sure your connections are thoroughly defined in your Report.

The student and Supervisor will review the Assessment Criteria, page 37-43, so that he/she fully understands how he/she will be graded. The student should consider any last minute items for the Exhibition, including any materials he/she has to present (posters, handouts, videos, etc.). The student may need another discussion about forming a deeper connection to the Area of Interaction. He/she should consider how his/her project connects to a larger community. Reflection on Learning will be evaluated by Criterion F, page 42. 47


Friday, February 21

FINAL Supervisor/Parent Communication Thoughts and recommendations.

FINAL Supervisor Meeting Tuesday, March 4

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â?? Is the Product ready for presentation? â?? Is the Written Report clear and properly formatted?

Monday, March 10

Submit FINAL Personal Project to Supervisor Process Journal, Product, Checklist, and Report. Thank your parents and your Supervisor!

Thursday, April 17

Personal Project Interviews

Tuesday, April 29

Personal Project EXHIBITION Large Gym, 3:30-5:30 pm

This is a time to get final support from families, particularly if the student has fallen behind schedule. If the student is at risk of not completing the project on time, he/she may need to come to School on Saturday or after school to work on the Project and Written Report. Review the Written Report together, including the Works Cited and Appendix. Is the student using clear, concise language in the report? Are images and other sources listed and titled in the Appendix? Are the various components of the final Product ready? The Structure of the Report will be evaluated by Criterion G, page 43.


The Team Ellen Sayers, Personal Project Coordinator esayers@dwight.edu Matt Moran, Assistant Personal Project Coordinator mmoran@dwight.edu Shelby Levin, Middle Years Program Coordinator slevin@dwight.edu Bishop Sand, Assistant Middle Years Program Coordinator bsand@dwight.edu https://sites.google.com/a/dwight.edu/personal-project-workspace/

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Dwight is an IB World School

291 Central Park West New York, NY 10024 | 212.724.6360 | dwight.edu

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