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Dog

e-magazine

The

Planet

MARCH 2011

ISSUE 3


Veterinary veterinary Practice practice Αnnetta Μichael DVM, PhD Canine reproduction specialist Golden retriever breeder (affix Goldendew ) My active involvement to the cynological happenings started in 1995 when I obtained my first Golden Retriever. My interest in selective breeding revealed the lack of specialized veterinary services in the reproduction sector in Greece. This was the reason that after I completed my Veterinary Studies, I have decided to study in depth reproduction matters, in order to offer specialized services to any serious breeder: • Artificial insemination (endoscopic intrauterine, intravaginal) • Semen freezing and chilling • Semen banking • Semen evaluation • Fertility problem solving • Surgery of the genital tract • General veterinary services

«Veterinary

for breeding soundness»

Dr Annetta MICHAEL, 74 Mygdalias Marini road, PO Box 40005, 19014 Kapandriti, Attiki Tel.: 22950-53144 – Mob.: 6937-315957 – E-mail: goldende@otenet.gr

Design by the dog planet e-magazine

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INDEX Shows and more DFS Crufts 2011 Results............................................. 8 Greek Shows 2010: Photo Flashback........................................................... 22 Junior handling.............................................................. 42

Breeders’ corner Message in a bottle.................................................... 52 Under the Judge’s eye............................................... 58 European Show Schedule 2011............................ 64

Photos by Stathis Youvanoglou, onEdition 2011 www.thedogplanet.gr contact us at: e-mail: sy@thedogplanet.gr Athens, Greece

No content can be re-published without written permission by the publisher. Photos and articles published are not returned. All opinions in the articles signed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers. The name and logo of the magazine are protected by copyright.


EDITORIAL

We’re writing about amazing dogs, wonderful people, conformation shows and many more interesting things about dogs. I absolutely must mention the event that affected the entire world, the earthquake in Japan. The earthquake and the following tsunami have literally eliminated thousands of lives in Japan. These are the events that make you see life from a different point of view. A catastrophe that destroyed human lives but affected everything else alive, as well. A typical example are the two dogs in the photo. Two dogs that survived through this hell. It’s amazing and incredible how the one standing will not abandon his wounded friend. Frightened though they may be, they await patiently for someone to come save them. These two dogs are setting an example of basic values long lost among us humans… For those interested, here’s the link to the wonderful friendship of those two dogs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uct9Kzjw9XY&feature=related I, for one, am amazed…


SY

Stathis Youvanogloy

Dog Studio Creations Book now a studio photography session for your dog on a location of your choice

Call us 211 770 99 59 / 6972 33 43 96


S h o w s a n d m o r e


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Shows and more

s t d uf f s ts f d r u C Cr s s f t s s d uf d f ft r u r Cf s C s t d uf f s ts f d s r f u C Cr dru s f

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f d

f u

f d

t f u

r r C C s s s fs t f t f d d uf u r r C s sC f d u s s f t r d uf C r C sd f s fts d f s t u u f u Cr Cr best in show Judge: Dr Paolo Dondina

Best in Show

SH CH VBOS THE KENTUCKIAN Flat Coated Retriever Owner: MR J M IRVINE

reserve Best in Show Reserve Best in Show SOLETRADER PEEK A BOO Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Owner: MRS S ROBERTSON

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Shows and more

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Gundog Group Judge: Dr Ron James

SH CH VBOS THE KENTUCKIAN Flat Coated Retriever Owner: MR J M IRVINE

SH CH STANEGATE SPARKS WILL FLY (AI) Irish Water Spaniel Owner: MRS J L CARRUTHERS

SH CH LUJESA TOUCH THE SKY JW Cocker Spaniel Owner: MISSES A & S KETTLE

LINIRGOR MACTAVISH Golden Retriever Owner: MRS I & MISS L FRATER & DUNBAR

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f t f f f d u ru ru C C s s s t d f s ft d f uft u r r C s C f d u s s f t r d uf C r C d f s fts d f s u u r r C C f d

Hound Group Judge: Mrs Eleanor Bothwell

SOLETRADER PEEK A BOO Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Owner: MRS S ROBERTSON

IR CH ASHAHNI AMIR Afghan Hound Owner: MRS C BOLLARD OCALLAGHAN

CIB/SE/NO/FI/DK CH BORZOWSKI'S PHENOMENON Borzoi Owner: MRS L HAMEL

IT CH SOBERS INGRID Whippet Owner: MR P & MRS B PRIMAVERA & AHRENS PRIMAVERA

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s u t r d uf C r Cd f s fts f s t f d u u r r C C s s s f t s d uf d f ft u r r C C s s s s f ft f t f d u u s f

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Pastoral Group Judge: Mrs Jo Bispham

CH ELMO VOM HUNHNEGRAB German Shepherd Dog Owner: MR J G CULLEN

CIB/EST/FIN/LT/LV/RUS CH PILGRIMAGE SNOW BALL Samoyed Owner: MS Y & MRS K CHEN & USPENSKI

CH/DK/NO/VDH/INT CH THORNAPPLE AFTERSHOCK Australian Shepherd Owner: MISS B WOHLICHE

NUCH LUXCH NORDV-10 BEW-10 KIMURA'S JENSEMANN Norwegian Buhund Owner: MRS C SONBERG

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f t f f f d u ru ru C C s s s t d f s ft d f uft u r r C s C f d u s s f t r d uf C r C d f s fts d f s u u r r C C f d

Terrier Group Judge: Mr Phillip Greenway

CH TRAVELLA STARLORD Wire Fox Terrier Owner: MR V MALZONI JNR

CH/AM CH LONGVUE JACKPOT OF SAREDON Airedale Terrier Owner: MRS J AVERIS

CH HUBBULLS THE PROMISE Staffordshire Bull Terrier Owner: MR B & MRS A TROW

RAGUS JAZZ KING Norwich Terrier Owner: MRS L A CRAWLEY

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s u t r d uf C r Cd f s fts f s t f d u u r r C C s s s f t s d uf d f ft u r r C C s s s s f ft f t f d u u s f

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Toy Group

Judge: Mr Richard Haynes

CH PAMPLONA BRING ME SUNSHINE Bichon Frise Owner: MR M COAD

CIB/NORD CH CHIC CHOIX MARKEY LIFAR Lowchen (Little Lion Dog) Owner: MR I OJALA

N/S/DK/FIN/NORD/RUS/LV/LT/BALK CH TANGETOPPEN`S UNBREAKABLE NEWS Pug Owner: MR B E LOKEN

DK/SE/INT/SK CH SOFFIES QUEEN BEE WW09 Pomeranian Owner: V JACOBSEN

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Utility Group Judge: Mr Terry Nethercott

CH VICMARS RAVE ON JW Standard Poodle Owner: MRS S PINE-HAYNES

CH ZENTARR ELIZABETH Lhasa Apso Owner: MRS M ANDERSON

CH RUTHDALES CANDY FROM A BABY Akita Owner: MR, MS, MR & MRS BOSTOCK, ARMSTRONG & STARK

SANTOSHA THUNDERBOLT Shih Tzu Owner: MR D & MRS S M CROSSLEY

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s u t r d uf C r Cd f s fts f s t f d u u r r C C s s s f t s d uf d f ft u r r C C s s s s f ft f t f d u u s f

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Working Group Judge: Mrs Kari Wilberg

CH/IR CH WINUWUK LUST AT FIRST SIGHT Boxer Owner: MISS J & MR T BROWN & HUTCHINGS

CH/IR CH FAIRWEATHERS KNOCK OUT WITH BROOKLYNBEAR (IMP) Newfoundland Owner: MR W & MRS A DOBBIN

CH SUPETA'S OZZY OSBOURNE JW Dobermann Owner: MESDAMES S, T & S SMITH, BENNETT & MYCROFT

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CH OLEARIA BLAZE OF GOLD Rottweiler Owner: MRS M & MR C MONK & DRABBLE


f ruf d f uft r C C s s s t d f s ft d f uft u r r C s C f d u s s f t r d uf C s s r f t C d uf d f s r u C Cr f d

BEST BREEDERS

Mr P & Mrs H Monaghan Clumber Spaniel

Mrs S Ergis Dachshund (Miniature Smooth-Haired)

Mr P & Mrs C A Sandiford Gordon Setter

Mrs J Gregory Border Collie

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Shows and more

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Shows and more

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Shows and more GREEK SHOWS FLASHBACK

κ.ο.ε june

GROUP 1

GROUP 2

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2010 cac & PιPεε – GREEK BREEDS SHOW SATURDAY 19


GROUP 3

GROUP 5

GROUP 6

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Shows and more GROUP 7

GROUP 8

GROUP 9

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GROUP 10

BEST BRACE

BEST BREEDERS’ GROUP

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Shows and more BEST OF GREEK BREEDS

BEST BABY

BEST PUPPY

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BEST JUNIOR

BEST IN SHOW

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Shows and more

κ.ο.ε JUNE

cacib INTERNATIONAL DOG SHOW SUNDAY 20

GROUP 1

GROUP 2

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GROUP 3

GROUP 4

GROUP 5

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Shows and more GROUP 6

GROUP 7

GROUP 8

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GROUP 9

GROUP 10

BEST VETERAN

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Shows and more BEST BABY

BEST PUPPY

BEST JUNIOR

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BEST IN SHOW

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Shows and more

κ.ο.ε OCTOBER

cacib INTERNATIONAL DOG SHOW SUNDAY 17

GROUP 1

GROUP 2

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GROUP 3

GROUP 4

GROUP 5

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Shows and more GROUP 6

GROUP 7

GROUP 8

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GROUP 9

GROUP 10

BEST BRACE

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Shows and more BEST BREEDERS’ GROUP

BEST OF GREEK BREEDS

BEST VETERAN

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BEST BABY

BEST PUPPY

BEST JUNIOR

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Shows and more BEST IN SHOW

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Shows and more EMILY BAR O U T S AKI

junior handling For some it is «simply» a hobby, for others it is «heritage», for others it is passion and dedication while for others it is a way of life. What is for certain is that Junior Handling comprises the future of the Greek dog world. It is the toughest of «schools», which will provide all the necessary qualities to further achievements in the world of dog showing and breeding… part two Movement/Stacking

Every breed has its own way of presentation, so much in its movement and in stacking, so that the characteristics of the standard of the breed are best shown. That’s why we, as handlers, ought to know what our breed’s standard demands and have a general knowledge of all the others. In general, large breeds need running and stacking on the ground, medium breeds running/trotting and stacking on the ground or on the table and small breeds walking – slowly or faster – and stacking on the table for the judgment. There are also some breeds that require «free stacking» (Labrador 42 The Dog Planet Magazine

Retriever) some others «baiting» (Australian Shepherd) and some others have a completely different method of presentation (German Shepherd Dog) . On the move

There are 7 «moves» in general the judge may choose from. The classic ones are: Up-down, circle and triangle. The more advanced are: the «T», the «L», the «S» and the «8». The rule is that we hold the dog on our left hand, except for some of the advanced movements - where we have to change hands once or even four times – so that the judge sees the dog and not us.


ATTENTION: The judge may ask you to move together with another handler, e.g. double up and down. You must be careful to be synchronized (not one of you moving too fast and the other too slow), to keep a safe distance in between – not too much – and at the end of executing your movement you always greet your opponent. At any time, the judge may ask you to switch dogs with another handler. In this way he will be able to judge you on how well you can handle other breeds but also your ability to adapt to a totally strange dog. While you are in the middle of

executing the movement that the judge asked you to, he might change his place to see if you are paying attention to him and how you are concentrating. In this case, whatever the movement, you will finish on the side where the judge is and not where you started from. When the judge asks to see you all together in a circle (usually it happens in the beginning or at the end) if you are the first in line, you ought to start when all handlers are ready to. In the case you are handling a large breed and in front of you there’s a handler with a smaller one, you have the right to pass him and move with the normal speed you would be able to if that The Dog Planet Magazine 43


Shows and more

didn’t happen. This is why it’s best to enter the ring by the size of our breeds. Large breeds in front – small breeds at the end - to avoid causing speed «chaos»! Stacking

The dog’s stacking is the A to Z of our entire presentation because stacked we will be when the judge first looks at us and stacked for the final decision. Therefore, your whole image has to be perfect. All breeds are stacked on the 44 The Dog Planet Magazine

ground, from the biggest to the smallest. Only during the individual judging and if you have a small breed will you have to use the table. More or less, stacking is the same for all breeds with some differences depending on the standard of each breed. In general, the front legs should be parallel and in straight line with the shoulder- blade, with enough space in between them – not too much not too little, normal spaces- while the back legs can also be parallel or slightly


pulled back (depending on the standard) and a bit more space in between them than the front legs. We hold the head and the tail as our breed standard tells us to. Remember the rule: headfront-back-head. In this turn we should make our movements for a quick and successful stacking. First, with one of our hands we hold the head of the dog and with the other we fix the front legs, then we go to the back of the dog - while still holding the head (so that he doesn’t move or try to leave) and with one hand we fix the back legs, we turn to our first position, check if there are any corrections to be made and then we just hold the head and the tail (if needed). For stacking the dog on the table we follow the same procedures, only here we have to be careful where exactly to stack him. NEVER on our side or in the middle. We are presenting the dog TO the judge, so, we must stack him on the «edge», which means on the edge of the length of the table towards the judge and either at the left or the right end of the table facing outwards. ATTENTION: It is very likely that during the judgment of your dog the judge The Dog Planet Magazine 45


Shows and more

will ask you to show him its bite. Don’t do it in a rush, showing only the front bite or opening his mouth wide. Take your time, with smooth movements and after you have shown the front bite, then you must show the bite on the right and left side dividing the gums of the dog with your fingers. Only when you have finished showing all 3 sides are you done with the procedure. There are breeds (e.g. Setters, Cockers) that during the judgment or while being stacked on the ground, must have their leash off – without of course letting him go. After we have stacked the dog we can remove the leash with gentle and calm movements and place it on the ground or around our neck. The judge will really appreciate this behaviour of 46 The Dog Planet Magazine

ours because he will not have to do it himself while examining our dog. Please note that to do this, we must have total control of our dog and make sure that he obeys, if not we should avoid it. If we have stacked the dog and we can clearly see that everything is well placed and the dog is not moving we don’t HAVE to keep correcting a foot, only because we want the judge to see that we are doing something. 99% the dog will get irritated and he will move on his own will and then off we go again from the beginning! When the judge is judging our dog we should avoid disturbing him by having our hands exactly on the point where he wants to put his. If, for example he is judging its head, you don’t have to hold it


at the same time. When he has finished, you may put your hand back. Remember, our «job» is to make the job of the judge as easy as possible, and not to make it even more difficult. When the judge moves behind us, of course he is not doing it to see our back! He wants to see the other side of our dog, so what’s more logical than turning around accordingly? The dog must NEVER be hidden. This can happen at any time – keep your eyes open!

Personally it took me three years till my first win, but I never thought of giving up. There was love, willpower and determination. I just knew that one day my turn would come… One day your turn will come too… (* Please note: the article is based on the Greek Junior Handling standards only.)

After the ring

If you come out the ring as a winner, everything is really nice and rosy. You will definitely want to take part again and win more trophies and re-live this experience, again and again. What happens though if you come out and you’ve lost, you’re sad and maybe embarrassed about a mistake you might have made? 80%, the first time you enter the ring you won’t win. Very likely neither the second nor the third time. Do not let it get you down; don’t put the blame on the dog or the judge. There must have been a reason for this. The first times should be seen as experiences. To get to the point where you win doesn’t only take doing all the things you’re asked in the ring correctly. The judge must see that extra something that will make you stand out from all the others and to achieve that it takes a lot of work from your side and love for what you’re doing. How exactly you will achieve this and how long it will take depends on you and your abilities. The Dog Planet Magazine 47


ADVERTISEMENT PUBLISHITY PRESENTATION CENTERFOLD Advertising should not be a difficult process. A lot of people think it’s difficult and time consuming, in order to place and advertisement in a e-magazine. We tried to make it easy, so that you can show your dogs and achievements through our pages. Among them, you can find the space you wish for. Full pages, ¼ of a page, even a whole centerfold for your advertisement. Stathis Youvanoglou Publisher

FULL PAGE 1/2 ORIZONTAL

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We welcome you to our magazine and we are at your disposal for any information concerning your presentation in our pages e-mail : sy@thedogplanet.gr


DEADLINES – PRICES Our magazine is published every month. Your advertisements must be sent one month before the publishing of the issue you wish your advertisement to appear in. Deadlines and publishing dates can change according to the shows’ schedule. We will keep you informed on any change in publishing dates

Price list 2011 Monthly advertisements Centerfold

100 euro

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35 euro (special offer for clubs)

B Cover and Back page

100 euro (by order only)

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10 euro

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Prices include publishing in both Greek and English versions. The above mentioned prices are without VAT and design.

Annual, six-month and trimester offers available. Do not hesitate to contact us for more information. Contact info: Τel: +30 2117709959, mobile: +30 6972334396 e-mail: sy@thedogplanet.gr


b r e e d e r s’ c o r n e r


Breeders’ corner message in a bottle

BASIC GENETIC CONCEPTS by John Armstrong From: «The Canine Diversity Project»

part two Dominance

If, for a particular gene, the two alleles carried by an individual are not the same, will one predominate? Because mutant alleles often result in a loss of function (null alleles), an individual carrying only one such allele will generally also have a normal (wild-type) allele for the same gene, and that single normal copy will often be sufficient to maintain normal function. As an analogy, let us imagine that we are building a brick wall, but

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that one of our two usual suppliers is on strike. As long as the remaining supplier can supply us with enough bricks, we can still build our wall. Geneticists call this phenomenon, where one gene can still provide the normal function usually met by two, dominance. The normal allele is said to be dominant over the abnormal allele. (The other way of saying this is that the abnormal allele is recessive to the normal one.) When someone speaks of a genetic


abnormality being «carried» by an individual or line, they mean that a mutant gene is there, but it is recessive. Unless we have some sophisticated test for the gene itself, we cannot tell just by looking at the carrier that it is any different from an individual with two normal copies of the gene. Unfortunately, lacking such a test, the carrier will go undetected and inevitably pass the mutant allele to some of its progeny. Every individual, be it man, mouse or dog, carries a few such dark secrets in its genetic closet. However, we all have thousands of different genes for many different functions, and as long as these abnormalities are rare, the probability that two unrelated individuals carrying the same abnormality will meet (and mate) is low. Sometimes individuals with only a single normal allele will have an «intermediate» phenotype. (For example, in Basenjis carrying one allele for pyruvate kinase deficiency, the average life-span of a red blood cell is 12 days, intermediate between the normal average of 16 days and the average 6.5 days in a dog with two abnormal alleles. Though often termed partial dominance, in this case it would be preferable to say there is no dominance. To carry our brick wall analogy a bit further, what if the single supply of bricks is not sufficient? We will end up with a wall that is lower (or shorter). Will this matter? It depends on what we’re trying to do with the «wall» and, possibly, on non-genetic factors. The result may not

be the same even for two individuals that have built the same wall. (A low wall may keep out a small flood, but not a deluge!) If there is the possibility that an individual carrying only one copy of an abnormal allele will show an abnormal phenotype, that allele should be regarded as dominant. Its failure to always do so is covered by the term «penetrance». A third possibility is that one of the suppliers sends us substandard bricks. Not realizing this, we go ahead and build the wall anyway, but it falls down. We might say that the defective bricks are dominant. Advances in the understanding of several dominant genetic diseases in man suggest that this is a reasonable analogy. Many dominant mutations affect proteins that are components of larger macromolecular complexes. These mutations lead to altered proteins that do not interact properly with other components, leading to malfunction of the entire complex. Others are in regulatory sequences adjacent to genes and cause the gene to be transcribed at inappropriate times or places. Dominant mutations may persist in populations if the problems they cause are subtle, not always expressed (see below), or occur later in life, after an affected individual has reproduced. Expressivity and Penetrance

For a breeder, understanding the inheritance of a trait that is controlled by several genes and influenced by

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Breeders’ corner the environment can be a nightmare. Suppose, for example, that you are trying to breed apricot Poodles, but instead of getting only a single shade, your litters always have a variety of shades from pale to dark apricot. You might blame it on variable expressivity, which is just a convenient way of saying that you don’t know what other genes or environmental factors are also playing a role in determining the color. One of the classic examples of this in dogs is the variable expression of piebald spotting in beagles shown in Little (1957). The dogs all have the same Sp allele, but the colors range from black-and-tan with white feet to predominantly white with a few black spots. Penetrance is a similar term-ofconvenience (euphemism). If you are 99+ % certain that Fido carries the allele for six toes (because both his parents and all his sibs have six toes), but Fido has the normal five toes, you blame it on incomplete penetrance, try to look authoritative, and hope that no one asks additional questions. [Actually, it would probably be safer just to say that the trait is not always expressed and avoid possible embarrassment.] The difference between expressivity and penetrance is that with the former, the trait is expressed to a variable extent, while with the latter it may or may not be expressed even though the genetic makeup (genotype) of the animal suggests that it should be.

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Sex Linkage

In dogs, as in most animals, sex is determined genetically, but not by a single gene. One of the 39 chromosome pairs is used especially for sex determination. The unusual feature of this system is that the female-determining chromosome, called the X chromosome, doesn’t even look like the male-determining Y chromosome – though they are still considered a «pair» and are referred to as the sex chromosomes. (The other 38 are called autosomes.) As everyone likely already knows, females have two X chromosomes and males one X and one Y. The male normally produces an equal number of sperm carrying either the X or the Y chromosome. As his mate will be producing eggs carrying only X chromosomes, an equal number of female (XX) and male (XY) puppies should be produced. Of course, chance plays a major role and litters often don’t have a perfect 1:1 ratio. Mutations undoubtedly occur in genes that control the development and function of the ovaries, testes, and other reproductive organs, but few have been described, probably because disruption of the normal reproductive process results in infertility. However, there are also genes found on the sex chromosomes that have nothing to do with sex determination. Those found on the X chromosome have no equivalents on the Y chromosome. As a result, males have only one copy of these genes.


(Since the terms «homozygous» and «heterozygous» apply only when there are two copies, this situation is given a special name: hemizygous.) When mutations occur in these X-linked genes, the pattern of transmission of the mutant phenotype differs from that seen for an autosomal gene. If a female carries such a trait, she will not express it (as long as it is recessive), but she will pass the trait to half her sons, and as they receive no X chromosome from their father, it doesn’t matter what his genotype is – half will be affected. Half the daughters will be carriers, but as these are recessive traits, these carrier daughters will not be affected. If the problem does not affect survival and reproduction, an affected male may pass the gene on to his progeny – but only to his daughters, as his sons will get his Y chromosome, which doesn’t have a copy of the gene. A good examples of sex linkage is hemophilia A. I was recently consulted on a litter of 6 boys and 1 girl, in which 3 of the males started bleeding internally at 6 or 7 weeks and died within a week or two. Both parents and all the puppies tested clear for vWD, but testing for clotting factor VIII revealed that the affected puppies had less than 2% normal levels. The factor test does not distinguish between carriers and normal individuals well enough to give us an unambiguous diagnosis. However, because a male gets his one

X-chromosome from his mother, we can safely conclude that the other 3 males are clear. However, their sister could be a carrier, and was spayed. There are also traits that are sex-influenced, which means that their expression is influenced by the individual’s sex. This does not imply that the gene is sex-linked. A human example is pattern baldness. The gene’s expression is influenced by hormonal levels and only one copy of the baldness allele is sufficient to cause baldness in a man, whereas two copies are needed in a woman. In effect, it behaves as a dominant in males and as a recessive in females. Though half the sons of a female carrier will be affected, a heterozygous male will also pass the trait to half his sons. Thus, any trait that appears more frequently in males than females is suspect as either sex-linked or sex-influenced. If it is passed from the father or the mother to half the sons, it is likely sex-influenced. If it seems to skip a generation and the pattern is grandfather to grandson, it is likely sex-linked. Determining the Mode of Inheritance

Suppose that you have a litter in which several of the puppies appear to be less healthy than their litter-mates. Suppose that after a few weeks it is readily apparent that they are growing more slowly and appear less energetic. What

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Breeders’ corner do you do? Obviously, the first step is take them to your vet for examination. Without going into details (as this is a hypothetical example), let us suppose that, after appropriate tests, he concludes that they have a hole in the septum between the two sides of the heart that is resulting in a mixing of oxygenated and de-oxygenated blood. Quite aside from any considerations about euthanizing the affected pups, the question remains: what caused the problem? Was it simply a developmental accident, an environmentally-induced condition, or is it genetic? [I have deliberately picked a condition that may arise for any of these reasons.] As a rule-of-thumb, if only a single pup is affected, the problem has not turned up before in related litters, and the problem does not occur frequently in the breed, it is likely a developmental accident. Nevertheless, given the usual underreporting of health problems, especially those that may be genetic, a second litter between the same sire and dam might be warranted. On the other hand, if all – or even the majority – of the pups were affected, one might be more inclined to look for something in the environment that could have perturbed the normal developmental process. The majority of genetic abnormalities are recessive and, under normal circumstances, the parents are unlikely to be affected (i.e., homozygous). Therefore, if the problem is a genetic one, it is more likely that the parents will

56 The Dog Planet Magazine

be phenotypically normal carriers (i.e., heterozygous), and the expectation is that one-quarter of the progeny will be affected. While this is important to keep in mind, obtaining a proportion of affected pups in a litter that is substantially lower or higher than one-quarter is no guarantee that the problem is not genetic. Even the larger breeds produce litters of only eight or so, so you would expect only two to be affected. One or three affected would not be considered unusual, and even getting none affected is not considered sufficiently improbable to alarm a geneticist. You might well get no affected pups in one litter and four affected pups in the next! Dominant mutations having a significant impact on health will, in most cases, result in death before reproductive age is reached. There are exceptions, such as Huntington’s Disease in humans. Any lateonset genetic disease, whether dominant or recessive, represents a potential problem. At least with a dominant, you can wait for the progeny to reach an age where the problem would normally have developed, then breed unaffected animals with reasonable assurance that they are not undetected carriers. For example, if the inherited condition develops at six or seven years, you can wait until the dog is three or four years old before breeding it, then not breed any of the progeny until the parents reach seven or eight years of age.


For a dominant mutation that is rare, most crosses will be between a heterozygous affected individual (Aa) and a normal one (aa). The expectation is that one-half the progeny will be Aa. Should both parents be Aa, one-quarter of the progeny will be aa (normal) and threequarters either Aa or AA. Sometimes, the AA progeny will be affected more severely, or even die before birth. Doing the necessary crosses to establish the mode of inheritance can be an expensive and time-consuming task, to which is added the thankless prospect of putting down sick puppies and finding pet homes for the remainder. Consequently, test matings are seldom done on a scale sufficient to produce numbers that can be subjected to statistical analysis. [One notable exception is the monumental study by Bourns on day-blindness in Alaskan Malamutes.] One alternative to test matings is retrospective analysis of the pedigrees of affected animals. As one generally needs a number of related animals occurring over several generations, the problem will likely already have become fairly common. The accuracy of such analyses is directly affected by the number of relatives for which data exists–a strong argument for the open exchange of information between owners, breeders, veterinarians, and researchers.


Breeders’ corner MARIA DEKARISTOU

under the judge’s eye Born 25-05-1956 in Athens, she has studied business tourism and interior decorating. She has one daughter and 2 grandchildren. As a child, she grew up with dogs.

Her kennel is named «KAMARI MOU» and she breeds English Cocker Spaniels, Papillon, Phalene and Pomeranian. Web site: www.kamari-mou.webs.com She has owned Groenendal Belgian Shepherds, Boxer, St. Bernard and Japanese Spitz. She was one of the founders of the Spaniel Club of Greece, founded in 1996, and has been repeatedly elected as its President since its foundation till the present day. She is also Secretary of the British Sheepdog Club of Greece. She is a founding member of the Retriever Club of Greece and a member of the Kennel Club of Greece, the Athens Canine Society, the «London Spaniel Society», «The Cocker Spaniel Club», amongst other clubs both locally and abroad. She was the speaker at the seminar

58 The Dog Planet Magazine

regarding «Rage Syndrome» at the «Star Dogs» school for dog trainers. She is an all breed judge (all rounder) and is authorized to judge finals and best in show. She has judged many times in several countries: Greece, Ireland, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Norway, Holland, Estonia, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Ukraine, Russia-Eurasia 2010, Bulgaria, San Marino, Italy, Latvia, Serbia, Australia and South Africa. She also had a regular monthly column in the Greek dog newspaper «TOP DOGS» (which specialized in dog shows) as well as in the Greek dog magazine «Our Dogs and Us» where she wrote articles dealing with breeds, shows, judging, handling etc. and is also a member of the WDPA (World Dog Press Association).


INTERVIEW WHAT PROMPT YOU TO BE A JUDGE?

I am one of the five initial judges who started off shortly after the enactment that, in order to become a judge in Greece, one has to pass the required exams. Being a «bookworm», I wanted to obtain the written material so as to increase my knowledge and that’s why I applied, without being sure I wanted to take the exams. The fact is I never really wanted to be just a judge, I wanted to be a good judge and I had to make sure that I would make it. This was a big challenge for me. I deeply believed and I still do, the judges perform a very important task, since, with their choices, they determine the future of the breeds. So, I had to accept the challenge. WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA FOR AVALUATING A DOG?

Having judged a great number of dogs of different breeds in many countries, I’d say that four things are of great importance to me: CHARACTER – TEMPERAMENT, MOVEMENT (e.g. the unusual movement of Springer Spaniels that we rarely see nowadays in the ring, the rolling movement of the Bulldog, the leisurely one of the Borzoi with the lowered head, the proud one of the English Setter, the elastic and swift movement of the Afghan Hound), THE PROPORTIONS

(e.g. between the head and the muzzle, between length of body and height at the withers), and the SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE BREED (e.g. the long phalanx of the toes and the lack of prosternum of the Chinese Crested, the 45 degree angle of the ears and the lack of undercoat of the Papillon, the membranes between the toes of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, the sweet expression of the Golden Retriever that melts your heart, the otter tail of the Labrador Retriever, the round look of the Pomeranian with the tiny paws, etc.). I also try to always look at a dog with a positive eye, without being fixed on the negative points, if those aren’t extremely serious. WHAT IS IT THAT CATCHES YOUR EYE AND ATTENTION TO A SPECIFIC DOG AMONGST OTHERS IN THE RING?

Some of the dogs, although very few of them, have kind of a «star», an «aura», call it as you may. It’s as if they talk to the judges and say: «Hey! Look at me! I’m beautiful and I came to win!» Those dogs cannot go unnoticed and they immediately attract the eye of the judge. It’s most probable though, that there won’t be such a dog in the ring. In that case, after I have examined all the dogs of the same class and provided that

››

The Dog Planet Magazine 59


Breeders’ corner INTERVIEW they all have excellent temperament, the dog I will place first will be the one with the less faults and the best movement. A good judge is always able to justify their choices. A judge with a good «eye» can easily distinguish the good quality dog. WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU: VISUAL OR PHYSICAL EXAMINATION?

They are both equally important. It’s self-evident that you cannot know what’s hidden underneath a rich and well-groomed coat. We are often surprised, for example, by a hunchbacked Poodle, lack of chess depth in Cocker Spaniels etc. However, a lot of faults can be hidden by a well presented dog, that will definitely be seen in movement, because that’s where the expert eye of the judge can see it all. HOW IMPORTANT IS THE PRESENTATION AND TEMPERAMENT OF THE DOG, FROM THE JUDGE’S POINT OF VIEW?

A simple good presentation is enough, however what’s most important to me is the temperament of the dog. Most of the times a dog has been dismissed by my ring was due to its temperament. Growling, aggression or fear are unacceptable in all breeds, e.g. a Cocker Spaniel with its tail between

60 The Dog Planet Magazine

its legs is not a good representative of the breed. HOW MUCH DOES THE HANDLING OF THE DOG AFFECT YOUR JUDGEMENT?

I am quite lenient with the handling of the dog, it doesn’t have to be perfect, a well presented dog is enough for me. I am very tolerant with the beginners and the stressed ones but the «smart» ones irritate me, e.g. those who try to show the slope of the back of the American Cocker Spaniel by stringing up the lead in movement, resulting in the front legs of the dog not touching the ground. Then, I just ask them to move the dog with a loose lead and there comes out a non-sloping back. I also detest double handling and I never allow it in my ring. HOW DO YOU CHOOSE YOUR WINNERS?

I choose them following the exact demands of the breed standards. I choose the dog with the fewer faults since the perfect dog hasn’t been born, yet. I also dislike the over typical dogs. Now that I mentioned type, I can hardly understand how, some judges, under the easy answer «I like this type» choose, for example, an English Cocker Spaniel with a long loin and a sloping back when the standard calls for a square dog, compact with a


straight topline. That one is a wrongly built dog. This is not a matter of type preference, but the standard to which the dog must conform. HOW OBJECTIVE CAN A JUDGE BE ?

It’s only natural for a judge to be

››

Stathis Youvanogloy P HO T O G R A PHY / V I DE O

Design by the dog planet e-magazine

SY

objective as well as subjective. It’s a matter of one’s character, temperament, ambition, moral principles etc. However, sooner or later, the subjective ones are badly talked of and dog owners tend to lose faith in them by not entering

6972334396 / 2117709959 youvanoglous@hotmail.com

The Dog Planet Magazine 61 The Dog Planet Magazine 61


Breeders’ corner INTERVIEW their dogs under them. Moreover, due to this, the clubs refrain from asking them to judge at their shows, preferring those judges that attract more entries. IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS A JUDGE SHOULD HAVE?

Knowledge, willingness to study, morals, politeness, positive thinking, passion for dogs, respect for people who are experts and have a lot of years of experience and success in a given breed, either as breeders or judges, modesty. Not to act like a know –it- all. WHAT WOULD YOUR ADVICE BE TO SOMEONE WHO WANTS TO BE A JUDGE?

To be willing to spend time and money in studying thoroughly the breeds they’re interested in, to buy a lot of

e-magazine

Dog

books and DVDs, to visit the major shows abroad, to try and obtain some of the expertise of breeders and judges around the world, which is easy to do nowadays through the net. These are the elements for someone to become a good judge and not just qualify. If one lacks the will to do the above mentioned, then they should do something else with their lives. One should also have a strong stomach and be able to endure, e.g. be aware that they will make a lot of enemies – among those who will lose under them (evidently not everyone can be the winner). A lot of words will be spoken against them, but they should remain indifferent. They should always do the right thing, following the exact demands of the breed standards, without being influenced. They should judge only the dogs and not the owners or handlers.

There is room in our magazine for your own advertisement. Whether you are breeder or not you can NOW be advertized in our magazine's pages. Our pages are available to all clubs, in order to be able to publish all the announcements of their shows and their results.

Για περισσότερες πληροφορίες επικοινωνήστε μαζί μας στο info@thedogplanet.gr 62 The Dog Planet Magazine


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Breeders’ corner

64 The Dog Planet Magazine


EUROPEAN SHOW SCHEDULE austria

Graz Wieselburg Salzburg Klagenfurt Klagenfurt Oberwart Innsbruck Innsbruck Tulln Wels Baku Baku Baku Baku

From 26/02 09/04 21/05 18/06 19/06 16/07 13/08 14/08 24/09 03/12

azerbaidjan From 14/05 15/05 15/10 16/10

Mouscron Hoogstraten Antwerpen Genk Liège Mechelen Leuven Kortrijk Bruxelles Minsk Minsk Minsk Minsk Minsk Minsk Minsk Minsk

BELGIUM

From 29/01 26/02 16/04 25/06 23/07 20/08 29/10 19/11 17/12

BIELORUSSIA From 06/03 07/03 04/06 05/06 10/09 11/09 26/11 27/11

Until 27/02 10/04 22/05 17/07 25/09 Until Until 30/01 27/02 17/04 26/06 24/07 21/08 30/10 20/11 18/12 Until -

BRITISH OVERSEAS TERRITORY OF GIBRALTAR

Gibraltar Gibraltar

From 17/09 18/09

Until -

2011 Sofia Sofia Bansko Bansko Dimitrovgrad Dobrich Dobrich Sofia Sofia Asenovgrad Asenovgrad Shkorpilovtzi Shkorpilovtzi Shkorpilovtzi Albena Albena Albena Albena Albena Albena Bansko Bansko Bansko Pleven Pleven Sofia Sofia Zagreb Zagreb Zadar Zadar Varazdin Varazdin Umag Umag Split Split Osijek Osijek Zagreb Zagreb

BULGARIA From 15/01 16/01 19/02 20/02 20/03 26/03 27/03 26/04 29/04 13/05 14/05 06/06 08/06

BULGARIA From 10/06 01/08 03/08 06/08 09/09 10/09 11/09 30/09 01/10 02/10 22/10 23/10 13/11 10/12

CROATIA

From 05/03 06/03 30/04 01/05 21/05 22/05 04/06 05/06 22/07 24/07 17/09 18/09 19/11 20/11

Until Until Until -

The Dog Planet Magazine 65


Breeders’ corner Limassol Limassol Paphos Paphos Nicosia Nicosia

CYPRUS

From 12/03 13/03 21/05 22/05 08/10 09/10

CZECHIA

Brno Brno Ceske Budejovice Prague Litomerice Brno Mlada Boleslav Ceske Budejovice Prague Fredericia Hillerod Valby Vejen Vejen Vejen Vejen Bjerringbro Herning Herning Kajaani Turku Vaasa Lahti Lappeenranta Tampere Helsinki Hamina Kotka Rovaniemi Kokkola Oulu Oulu Helsinki Tornio

From 05/02 06/02 23/04 14/05 22/05 25/06 27/08 08/10 05/11

DENMARK

From 12/02 07/05 18/06 28/07 29/07 30/07 31/07 17/09 05/11 06/11

FINLAND

66 The Dog Planet Magazine

From 08/01 22/01 09/04 22/04 23/04 07/05 21/05 21/05 18/06 25/06 02/07 16/07 17/07 23/07 23/07

Until Until 24/04 15/05 26/06 28/08 09/10 06/11/ Until 13/02 08/05 19/06 18/09 Until 09/01 23/01 10/04 23/04 25/04 08/05 22/05 22/05 19/06 26/06 03/07 24/07 24/07

Pori Kuopio Joensuu Hameelinna Eckerö Seinäjoki Jyväskylä Jyväskylä Helsinki Helsinki

From 30/07 06/08 13/08 27/08 24/09 29/10 19/11 20/11 03/12 04/12

FRANCE

From Vincennes 08/01 Bordeaux 16/01 Beziers 22/01 Troyes 05/02 Niort 12/02 Bourges 19/02 Toulouse 26/02 Toulouse 27/02 Périgueux 05/03 Montluçon 20/03 Angers 27/03 Limoges 09/04 Pau 16/04 Martigues 24/04 Amiens 30/04 Saint-Brieuc 08/05 Pontoise 14/05 Tours 22/05 Lyon 05/06 Douai 12/06 Paris (World Dog Show: FCI 100year) 07/07 Brive 14/08 Macon 10/09 Besançon 17/09 Tarbes 25/09 Avignon 01/10 Poitiers 22/10 Poitiers 23/10 Perpignan 29/10 Perpignan 30/10 Metz 05/11 Saint-Etienne 12/11 Rouen 03/12 Nantes 11/12

Until 31/07 07/08 28/08 25/09 30/10 Until 09/01 23/01 06/02 13/02 20/02 06/03 10/04 17/04 25/04 01/05 15/05 10/07 15/08 11/09 18/09 02/10 06/11 13/11 04/12 -


GEORGIA

From Until Tbilissi 07/05 Tbilissi 22/10 Tbilissi 23/10

GERMANY

From Until Nürnberg 15/01 16/01 Rheinberg 12/02 13/02 Offenburg 12/03 13/03 Munchen 19/03 20/03 Berlin 02/04 03/04 Dresden 23/04 24/04 Dortmund 06/05 08/05 Dortmund (FCI Centenary Winner Dog Show) 06/05 08/05 Neumunster 04/06 05/06 Saarbrücken 12/06 Erfurt 19/06 Augsburg 23/07 24/07 Bremen 30/07 Ludwigshafen 06/08 07/08 Leipzig 20/08 21/08 Rostock 08/10 09/10 Dortmund 14/10 16/10 Hannover 22/10 23/10 Stuttgart 05/11 06/11 Kassel 11/12 Athens Athens Athens Athens Athens Athens

GREECE

From 02/04 14/05 15/05 26/06 15/10 16/10

HUNGARY

Szilvasvarad Szekesfehervar Szekesfehervar Komarom Komarom Szombathely Debrecen Debrecen

From 23/04 28/05 29/05 11/06 12/06 16/07 27/08 28/08

Until 03/04 Until 24/04 17/07 -

Hodmezovasarhely Komarom Komarom Budapest Budapest Reykjavik Reykjavik Reykjavik Dublin Clonmel Dublin Tel Aviv Arad

Rho Padova Forli Arezzo Arezzo Ancona Gonzaga Ragusa Reggio Emilia Reggio Emilia Eboli Eboli Montichiari Chieti Chieti Alghero Livorno Terni Alessandria Ercolano Catanzaro Rende Firenze Palermo Torino

From 10/09 01/10 02/10 26/11 27/11

ICELAND

From 26/02 27/08 19/11

IRELAND

From 23/04 01/05 27/08

ISRAEL

From 07/05 22/10

Until 11/09 Until 27/02 28/08 20/11 Until Until -

ITALY From 22/01 29/01 05/02 12/02 13/02 26/02 05/03 13/03 19/03 20/03 26/03 27/03 02/04 09/04 10/04 16/04 23/04 25/04 01/05 07/05 14/05 15/05 21/05 28/05 04/06

Until 23/01 30/01 06/02 27/02 06/03 03/04 17/04 24/04 08/05 22/05 29/05 -

The Dog Planet Magazine 67


Breeders’ corner Pisa Bari Orvieto Rieti Campobasso Santa Giusta Rapallo Bergamo Capena Bastia Umbra Reggio Calabria Messina Busto Arsizio Foggia Genova Genova Cremona Verona Erba Bishkek Bishkek Bishkek Riga Riga Riga Riga

ITALY

From 11/06 13/06 18/06 03/07 16/07 27/08 10/09 24/09 01/10 08/10 29/10 30/10 05/11 13/11 19/11 20/11 26/11 03/12 10/12

KYRGYZSTAN From 09/04 10/04 02/10

Until 19/06 17/07 28/08 11/09 25/09 02/10 09/10 06/11 27/11 04/12 11/12 Until -

LATVIA (LETTONIE) From 12/03 11/06 12/06 29/10

Vilnius Vilnius Moletai Moletai Druskininkai Druskininkai Vilnius Vilnius

LITHUANIA From 19/03 20/03 28/05 29/05 05/08 06/08 17/12 18/12

LUXEMBURG

Luxembourg Luxembourg

68 The Dog Planet Magazine

From 26/03 05/11

Until 13/03 30/10 Until Until 27/03 06/11

SKOPJE

From 02/04 03/04 30/04 26/08 27/08 22/10 23/10

Skopje Bitola Skopje Ohrid Ohrid Prilep Skopje

MALTA

From 26/11

Cottonera

MOLDAVIA From 12/03 13/03 11/06 12/06 06/08 07/08 08/10 09/10

Chisinau Chisinau Chisinau Chisinau Tiraspol Tiraspol Chisinau Chisinau

Monaco (Espace Fontvieille)

MONACO

Casablanca

Until Until

22/04

23/04

From 30/04 04/06 19/07 20/08 01/10

MOROCCO From 28/05

NETHERLANDS

Eindhoven Groningen Leiden Leeuwarden Goes Oss Arnhem

Until 27/11

From

MONTENEGRO

Bar Podgorica Cetinje Danilovgrad Bijelo Polje

Until -

From 04/02 05/03 19/03 25/04 14/05 27/05 11/06

Until Until 29/05 Until 06/02 06/03 20/03 15/05 29/05 13/06


From Echt 02/07 Rotterdam 27/08 Leeuwarden (FCI European Section Show) 01/09 Maastricht 24/09 Zwolle 01/10 Leuven 29/10 Bleiswijk 05/11 Amsterdam 26/11 Wijchen 10/12 Bo in Telemark Harstad Hordaland Kristiansand Drammen Trondheim Oslo Tromso Rogaland Hamar Lillestroem Legnica Rzeszow Katowice Opole Lodz Leszno Szczecin Krakow Warsaw Sopot Bialystok Wroclaw Poznan Poznan Kielce

NORWAY

From 19/02 19/03 09/04 07/05 04/06 02/07 20/08 28/08 10/09 08/10 26/11

POLAND

From 28/01 19/02 18/03 30/04 07/05 04/06 18/06 25/06 16/07 13/08 27/08 24/09 22/10 23/10 19/11

PORTUGAL

Porto Porto Caldas da Rainha Costa Azul Viana do Castelo

From 29/01 30/01 20/02 03/04 17/04

Until 03/07 28/08 04/09 25/09 02/10 30/10 06/11 27/11 12/12 Until 20/02 20/03 10/04 08/05 05/06 03/07 21/08 11/09 09/10 27/11 Until 30/01 20/02 20/03 01/05 08/05 05/06 19/06 26/06 17/07 14/08 28/08 25/09 20/11 Until -

Elvas Lisboa Lisboa Sintra Estoril Vila Franca Campo Braga Santarem  Arad Arad Slobozia Slobozia Satu Mare Satu Mare Timisoara Timisoara Cluj Cluj Sibiu Sibiu Constanta Constanta Targu Mures Targu Mures Bucarest Bucarest Arad Arad

From 07/05 16/07 17/07 31/07 21/08 04/09 13/11 27/11

ROMANIA

Saint Petersburg Novosibirsk Krasnodar Moscow Moscow Belgorod Krasnodar Saint Petersburg Samara Omsk Stavropol Rostov na Donu Vladivostok Irkutsk Novorossiysk Tyumen

From 26/02 27/02 02/04 03/04 16/04 17/04 30/04 01/05 04/06 05/06 25/06 26/06 16/07 17/07 10/09 11/09 17/09 18/09 08/10 09/10

RUSSIA

From 26/02 13/03 13/03 26/03 27/03 03/04 17/04 30/04 14/05 22/05 22/05 29/05 29/05 04/06 05/06 11/06

Until Until Until 27/02 01/05 15/05 12/06

The Dog Planet Magazine 69


Breeders’ corner RUSSIA

Smolensk St Petersburg St Petersburg Kursk Kaliningrad Pskov Cheliabinsk Velikiy Novgorod Ulan Ude Khabarovsk Rostov na Donu Vladivostok Sochi Voronezh Moscow Rostov-na-Donou Rostov-na-Donou Ekaterinburg Novosibirsk Saint Petersburg Saint Petersburg San Marino

From 19/06 25/06 26/06 24/07 31/07 13/08 13/08 20/08 21/08 10/09 11/09 24/09 24/09 02/10 29/10 05/11 06/11 19/11 04/12 10/12 11/12

SAN MARINO From 28/05

SERBIE

Belgrade Jagodina Kanjiza Smederevska Palanka Zajecar Indija Vrsac Kragujevac Natalinci Odzaci Vranje Nis Subotica Ada Sabac Irig Sokobanja Obrenovac Leskovac Backa Topola Pozarevac 70 The Dog Planet Magazine

From 06/03 26/03 27/03 02/04 03/04 09/04 10/04 16/04 17/04 23/04 01/05 15/05 22/05 05/06 12/06 17/07 30/07 28/08 11/09 18/09 24/09

Until 14/08 14/08 21/08 25/09 30/10 20/11 Until 29/05 Until -

Novi Sad Belgrade Trencin Presov Bratislava Bratislava Nitra Nitra Kosice Bratislava Bratislava Nitra Nitra

From 25/09 06/11

SLOVAKIA

Ljubljana Tromostovje Maribor Pohorje Bled Bled Koper Koper Vrtojba Sempeter Celje

From 22/01 18/02 14/05 15/05 04/06 05/06 23/07 20/08 21/08 19/11 20/11

SLOVENIA From 15/01 16/01 07/05 08/05 11/06 12/06 01/10 02/10 12/11 13/11 10/12

SPAIN

From Zaragoza 13/02 Granada 20/02 Valladolid 27/02 Alcala de Guadaira (Sevilla) 06/03 Gerona 19/03 Vigo 27/03 Oviedo 17/04 San Sebastian 01/05 Badajoz 07/05 Mallorca 08/05 Tenerife 15/05 Madrid 20/05 Madrid 21/05 Castellon 12/06 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria 18/06 Medina de Pomar 19/06

Until Until 23/01 20/02 24/07 Until Until 20/03 08/05 21/05 22/05 19/06 -


Portugalete Pamplona Leon Talavera de la Reina Talavera de la Reina Velez-Malaga Murcia Bilbao Jerez de la Frontera Alicante Valencia

From 03/07 11/09 25/09 08/10 09/10 23/10 06/11 13/11 19/11 04/12 18/12

SWEDEN

Goteborg Goteborg Malmo Hässleholm Stockholm-Vallentuna Vänersborg Vannas Gallivare Tvaaker Pitea Köping Ransater Ransater Ransater Svenstavik Ronneby NorrköpingHimmelstalund Eskilstuna Visby Visby Gimo Herrgard Högbo/Sandviken Sundsvall-Gardeshov Vaxjo Stockholm

Until 20/11 -

From 06/01 07/01 19/03 21/05 28/05 04/06 11/06 18/06 15/07 16/07 23/07 29/07 30/07 31/07 06/08 13/08

Until 08/01 09/01 20/03 22/05 29/05 05/06 12/06 19/06 17/07 24/07 07/08 14/08

20/08 20/08 27/08 28/08 10/09 17/09 08/10 04/11 10/12

21/08 21/08 11/09 18/09 09/10 06/11 11/12

Istanbul Istanbul Izmir Mikolayiv Donetsk Donetsk Kiev Kiev Mariupol Lviv Lviv Odessa Odessa Luhansk Ternopil Poltava Poltava Donetsk Uzhgorod Uzhgorod Simferopol Simferopol Zaporizhia Zaporizhia Odessa Vinnytsia Odessa Kharkiv Donetsk Kiev Kiev Tashkent Tashkent

TURKEY

From 22/05 25/09 02/10

UKRAINE

From 27/02 05/03 06/03 16/04 17/04 01/05 07/05 08/05 14/05 15/05 22/05 12/06 02/07 03/07 16/07 13/08 14/08 10/09 11/09 17/09 18/09 24/09 25/09 16/10 22/10 05/11 10/12 11/12

UZBEKISTAN From 23/04 24/04

Until Until Until -

SWITZERLAND

From Until Fribourg 19/02 Fribourg 20/02 Saint Gall 14/05 Saint Gall 15/05 Lausanne 15/10 Lausanne 16/10 The Dog Planet Magazine 71


SY

Stathis Youvanogloy PHOTOGRAP H Y / VI D E O

WEDDING GLAMOUR FASHION PORTRAITS PORTOFOLIO LIFE STYLE PHOTOGRAPHY 6972334396 / 2117709959 youvanoglous@hotmail.com Athens, Greece

March 2011  

The first Greek Dog Shows e magazine

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