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THE DOG MAGAZINE

CONTENT 12

DRY EYES HEALTH

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ILLUSTRATED STANDARD BREEDING

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JUDGING THE CHINESE CRESTED JUDGING

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ARE WE LOSING THE CORRECT CHINESE CRESTED

20 ILLUSTRATED STANDARD BREEDING

BREEDING

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MY LITTER STORY

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SHANNON ROBERTS

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PIA ADLESIC

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PAZZDA KENNEL

BREEDING

HANDLER

HANDLER

BREEDERS

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EDITORIAL

HI, Our goal with this magazine is to promote responsible breeding and dog ownership and to encourage ethical conduct and responsible breeding of purebred dogs. Our vision is to help promote responsible pet ownership and improve the quality of life of every dog show dog or pet. We make it our goal to provide the most up to date and honest information every dog

owner should know. THE DOG MAGAZINE NO. 2

May 2015 路 EDITOR | GRAPHIC DESIGN Ewa Larsson, Natasja Rutters, Sne啪ka Kuralt

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THE TEAM EWALARSSON My name is Ewa Larsson, Britisher Show Bulldogs we are situated in Canterbury, England. My kennel was established in 1992. My bulldogs live with me inside my house and are raised in a loving environment as one of the family. I believe this approach is reflected in the behaviour of my dogs. Health, a correct temperament and dogs of the highest quality are my goal. Since Spring 2006, I am on the Bulldog Club Inc committee. The Bulldog Club Inc is the oldest Bulldog club in the world, and holds the prestigious Bulldog of the Year Show. I am a Bulldog Breed Specialist Judge currently on “ B” list. I am member of : The Bulldog Club Incorporated, The London Bulldog Society, The South of England Bulldog Society, The Junior Bulldog Club. My affix “ Britisher” is derived from a noun Brit·ish·er which stands for: “An Englishman- a subject or inhabitant of Great Britain”. Please feel free to visit our website. www.britisher.co.uk

NATASJARUTTERS “A little story about who I am and what I do” We live in a small town in southern Netherlands near the Belgium border. I always loved dogs and in particular the Bulldog. And when I got my own place … there was my first English bulldog. For many years I was surrounded by the love of these beautiful dogs. At the moment I share my house with 2 French Bulldogs, who also have a wonderful character only in a smaller body With my male Ch. Carte Truffé Kangaroo Kiss ‘Sydney’ (import Finland) I regularly take part of dog shows in the Netherlands and abroad. I am a member of the Hollandse Bulldog Club and the English Bulldog Club Netherlands. Beside designing and spending time with my dogs I love to be creative, like painting and photography. For more information about my dogs www.mybulldogs.nl and work www.mdgraphics.nl

I first started to be seriously involved in Cynology, when I bought my first Rhodesian ridgeback (Cubo) from breeder Mr. Andrej Fister – Kyala kennel. Since I had had a ridgeback, I wanted to spent some time and communicate with people who own the same breed. So I became involved and was one of the founding members of Club of Rhodesian ridgeback Slovenia. I was chief of organization of our first special show for Rhodesian ridgebacks in Slovenia. The show entered more than 50 dogs, which was a very nice number for such a small country. We even got Mr. Hans Mueller as a judge, for our first club show, even though the show was not CAC awarded. Soon after, I began my apprenticeship for a Cynology judge, and in January 2011 I acquired a license to judge Rhodesian ridgebacks.

I was born and raised in Southern Slovenia, in a small town called Senovo. By education I am a graphic designer and landscape architect. Currently I am employed in Landscape and GIS Company, where I am a head of marketing and education department.

I currently own two Rhodesian ridgebacks Cubo and Cana. Cubo, his pedigree name is Myollnir Kyala, is one of the most successful show ridgebacks in Slovenia and has always makes me proud. He is 8 years old now and he is calm and mostly a gentleman. Cana (Dikeledi Ayaba) is our female ridgeback, five years old; she brings joy to my life with her silly stunts and happy nature. Cana was imported from Croatia, from Ayaba kennel.

I always felt a great love toward animals, especially dogs. Dogs and cats were always around when I was little and I guess it was meant that that part of my love in life stays with me even in my adulthood.

In my free time I make small products for dog owners, mostly for Rhodesian ridgeback lovers and do different graphic designs for all breeds.

SNEŽKAKURALT

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AUTHOR Liv Sletten

HEALTH

”DRY EYES”

KCS – Keratoconjunctivitis sicca

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Source:”Veterinær oftalmologi” – author Professor Ellen Bjerkås., Author: Liv Sletten, Translation to English by Gunn and Andy Shaw

WHAT IS KCS

KCS is one of the most common eye diseases found in dogs and is caused by a lack of tear production. The term KCS is often used as a synonym to dry eyes, something that isn’t entirely correct. KCS is an inflammation in the cornea, which is typically a secondary condition of too low or no tear production. The condition can be caused by qualitative defects (wrong composites of the tear-liquid) and quantitative defects (too little or no tear-liquid either because it’s not sufficient production or because there is something wrong with transporting the liquid to the eye). Tears are important for a healthy eye. The tears are produced in several glands in the eye and the liquid is distributed when the dog blinks. The liquid forms a protective layer on the surface of the eye and makes sure impurities do not get attached to the eye. The tears provide nutrients and oxygen to the cornea and contain components that prevent infection of the eye. If a dry eye is not applied with artificial moisture, the eye will become dry, red, soar and irritated and an eye infection will then typically be a secondary condition.

glands, injuries, nerve damage, illness, side affects of some medication (particularly sulfa drugs), surgically removing of tear glands in the third eye lid (found for example in dogs with cherry eye that has had their third eyelid and tear gland in it removed), hormonal changes (during heat, pregnancy and false pregnancy) and auto-immune illnesses (problems with the immune system). Chinese Crested is one of the breeds thought to be pre-disposed (hereditary postponed) for having low tear production.

SYMPTOMS AND DIAGNOSING: Even though dry eyes are one of the most common diseases in dogs, it is often misdiagnosed as unspecific or bacterial infection. If there is even the slightest concern whether a dog has low or no tear production, always insist on the veterinarian measuring your dogs tear production. This is a very simple procedure where you put a small strip of a special paper on the dog’s eye and measure how far up the strip moisture from the eye reach in one minute. • 0-9: Way too low/dry eye • 10-14: Low • 15 and over: Normal

SYMPTOMS YOU SHOULD PAY EXTRA ATTENTION TO:

WHAT CAUSES LOW OR NO TEAR PRODUCTION?

• One eye that is more sunken into its socket than the other

Several factors can influence the tear production. Heritage is of course a factor, lacking or underdeveloped tear

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As you can see the left eye is smaller, more sunk into the socket and and the surface is dull and cloudy , not as a healthy eye that is clear and shiny.

• Eyes that don’t look clean and bright • Eyes looking red or soar • Reoccurring eye infection • Nose cartilage looking dry or cracked

TREATMENT AND PROGNOSIS: • Treatment of the condition is somewhat dependent on the cause. • If the condition is caused by problems in the immune system, it is most likely that both eyes are affected even though it might start in only one eye. This will last throughout life. • If the dog has one normal eye and one with low or 14 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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no tear production and this does not change over time, it is most likely that the cause is missing or underdeveloped tear glands on the eye with low or no tear production, and will last throughout life. • If the cause is hormonal changes, the tear production will usually normalize in calmer hormonal periods. • If the cause is medical treatment, the tear production will usually normalize after some time after finishing using the medication, but not always. If it’s suspected that the tear production is affected by illness, medication, hormones etc, it is very important that you retest the eyes after some period of time to clarify if this is the case.


A r t i c l e | Dry eyes

Dogs eye with Keratoconjunctivitis sicca Photo Curtsey: www.animaleyecare.com

No matter what the cause or how long it lasts, it is necessary to treat the condition until it clears or throughout life. Keeping the eye clean and moist is of upmost importance for the dog’s wellbeing. To maintain a dog with low or no tear production is mainly a question of good routines, and is not a major or time consuming task. Bitches with low tear production often experience a drop in tear production when in heat because of hormonal changes. When a dog with low or no tear production is going to be outside in hot or windy weather, it’s a good idea to drip the eyes a few extra times during the day with moisture. The same procedure should be followed during winter when the air inside tends to get hot and dry. If a dog with dry eyes (and generally all dogs) are put under anaes-

Xeromycteria (dry nose) in an 8-year old Cairn Terrier with neurogenic KCS of the right eye. Source: How an Ear Infection Can Cause Dry Eye, Noelle La Croix, DVM, Dip. ACVO, www. vmcli.com

thetic or is sedated, the eyes will need lots of moisture added. Anaesthetic / sedation seems to affect the eyes and make them drier. In some cases they have done surgery, transporting saliva from the saliva glands to the dry eye, but this have been found to have very varying affects, and even if the results tend to be promising at first, it usually subsides over time. Saliva also has different components than tears. It is also an option to remove an affected eye if treating the eye by cleaning and adding artificial tears does not give a wanted result.

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A r t i c l e | Dry eyes

suitable for eyes. Let the dog blink a few times so the water rinses the eye. Use a q-tip and remove any impurities or puss that might be on the eye. Drip the eye with Optimune (medicine). Wait 5-6 minutes and drip the eye with Lubrithal (artificial tears). Both eyes should always get this treatment even if only one eye is affected. Throughout the day, make sure the eye is clear and moist and add Lubrithal when needed. If there are impurities or puss on the eye at any point during the day, drip the eye with the salt water solution and apply Lubrital. If the dog is squinting or one eye appears smaller than the other, apply Lubrithal. Evening: Same procedure as morning. If you do a good job keeping the affected eye moist and clean, the dog with low tear production will seldom experience problems, but if an affected eye is not looked well after, it can cause eye infection, terrible pain and in worst case scenario blindness. If the eye gets red and sore, contact a veterinarian and get medication for infection if needed. Remember that even if a dog is treated for infections, the daily routine looking after dry eyes should be followed as normal.

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Dogs with one or both eyes that are dry, should not be used in breeding. Combinations known to have produced dry eyes in one or more offspring, should not be repeated. Combinations close in relation with combinations known to have produced dry eyes, should not be bred. If a dog/bitch keeps producing offspring with dry eyes in several different combinations, it should be considered if this dog/bitch should be removed from breeding. The same goes for all dogs where dry eyes are highly represented in close relatives.

MISCELLANEOUS Sometimes you can tell that something is wrong as soon as they open their eyes. It could be that you find inflamationlike puss in the eyes when they open. Mostly these puppies get treated for eye infection. It is known that the puppies tear production is at the earliest finished developing by 6 months old. Because of this, any treatment involving antibiotics on young puppies should only be used if absolutely necessarily (This ideally goes for all puppies under 6 months). This is because antibiotics are known to affect tear production negatively, and it appears that by treating puppies with antibiotics you can permanently destroy the puppy’s tear production fully or partially. Be very careful at keeping the eye clean and moist to hopefully prevent having to use antibiotics, but if this does not help, you might have to treat for eye infection.


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AUTHOR Jakko Broersma

THE CHINESE CRESTED Illustrated Standard With an explanation of Teeth and Coat by Lorraine Chippindale – Chinaroad 20 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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Article prepared by Judy Horton - (All Breeds judge) for the VicJudge’s website Australia

HISTORY OF THE BREED The Chinese Crested is believed to have evolved from the African hairless dogs. These dogs were traded among merchants and sailors thereby making their way to ancient port cities around the world. The Chinese, who seemed to favor dogs of smaller size, selectively bred the African hairless to a smaller size and continued an active trade. Explorers, as early as the 1500s, found these dogs in ports throughout Central and South America as well as African and Asian cities.

slightly but never pointed, lean without flews. Nose a prominent feature, narrow in keeping with muzzle. Any colour nose acceptable. Head presenting graceful appearance, with alert expression. Lips tight and thin; An ideal crest begins at the stop and tapers off down neck. Long and flowing crest preferred, but sparse acceptable.

GENERAL APPEARANCE - A small, active and graceful dog; medium to fine boned, smooth hairless body, with hair on feet, head and tail only; or covered with a soft veil of hair. Explanation: The Chinese Crested is found in two varieties, Hairless and Powderpuff, and both types can be found in the same litter. The main difference between the two varieties is the hair coat, of course, but the Powderpuffs can also have a drop ear, which is not permitted in the hairless variety. The Powderpuffs are not subject to as many genetic defects as their hairless siblings and need to be retained in the breeding pool to maintain the health of the hairless Cresteds. CHARACTERISTICS - Two distinct types of this breed; Deer type, racy and fine boned, and Cobby type, heavier in body and bone. HEAD AND SKULL - Slightly rounded and elongated skull. Cheeks cleanly chiselled, lean and flat, tapering into muzzle. Stop slightly pronounced but not extreme. Head smooth, without excess wrinkles. Distance from base of skull to stop equal to distance from stop to tip of nose. Muzzle tapering T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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Explanation: The head is wedge shaped when viewed from above. The skull itself is gently arched across the occiput from ear to ear. The stop is slight but distinct. The head is clean and free from wrinkle. EARS - Set low: highest point of base of ear level with outside corner of eye. Large and erect, with or without fringe, except in Powder Puffs where drop ears are permissible. 22 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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EYES - So dark as to appear black. Little or no white showing. Medium size, almond in shape. Set wide apart.


A r t i c l e | Chinese Crested Dog

Explanation:

Explanation:

Eyes are dark in darker coloured dogs, but may be a little lighter in lighter coloured dogs, but blue, green, grey or yellow eyes are not acceptable.

Scissors or level in both varieties. Missing teeth in the Powderpuff are to be faulted. The Hairless variety is not to be penalized for absence of full dentition.

MOUTH - Jaws strong, with perfect, regular scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Due to the hairless gene, the teeth in the Hairless may be smaller and the tiny “tusks” will extend forward, but

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the Powderpuff should have a regular canine mouth. These tusk-like teeth in the Hairless may be due to a gene that often is seen with other mostly hairless mammals, such as the wild boar and the elephant. Selective breeding may help lessen the tooth problems of the hairless. Hairless: The Hairless mouth is different from that of a Powderpuff. The teeth of the Hairless variety differ in shape from those in a normal mouth. The canines are conical and point forward; they are referred to as tusks. This is a characteristic which applies to both good and bad “Hairless” mouths. The shape of the incisors can vary considerably. Some are no more than little pegs protruding from the gums. Others are almost normal. Sometimes a full complement of narrow “pegs” can look as though they have been thrown in haphazardly. The number of teeth present can also vary. In the worst example, many may be missing, having never been present at all. Occasionally, milk teeth which showed great promise are not replaced with adult teeth; and where milk teeth have been missing, adult teeth can appear! The teeth that are present can be poorly rooted. For example, incisors may point forward like tusks, but they will certainly fall out at an early age. Pre-molars will be missing from the Hairless variety - one, two, or maybe all of them. Even a good Hairless mouth may be without first and second pre-molars, and this should be accepted as normal. Tusks and missing pre-molars are not mentioned in the Standard, but these characteristics should be 24 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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acknowledged as typical of the Hairless mouth. A successful breeding program to improve dentition will result in a mouth where all the incisors are evenly placed in each jaw. One or two pre-molars may be missing. The forward-pointing tusks will still remain, but the teeth will be of better quality, and they will not fall out in eighteen months time. An extremely “hairy” Hairless can look almost like a lightly-coated Powderpuff! They have even been referred to as “semi-coats”, which makes things even more complicated for a newcomer to the breed. In order to check whether such a dog is genetically Hairless or Powderpuff, simply look in the mouth. If the dog is genetically Hairless it will have forward-pointing tusks; if it is a Powderpuff it will have a normal mouth. Puff: The Powderpuff carries no Hairless genes, therefore it has a normal canine mouth, and their mouths are not affected by the Hairless gene mutation. At the front there are six incisors top and bottom. The canine teeth are strong and slightly curved. Behind the canine teeth are four pre-molars and two molars, in both upper and lower jaws. This makes forty-two teeth in all, in a tight scissor bite. FOREQUARTERS - Shoulders clean, narrow and well laid back. Legs long and slender, set well under body. Elbows held close to body. Pasterns fine, strong, nearly vertical. Toes turned neither in nor out. BODY - Medium to long. Supple. Chest rather broad and deep, not barrel-ribbed. Breast bone not prominent. Brisket extending to elbows; moderate tuck-up.


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A r t i c l e | Chinese Crested Dog

Explanation: The body is rectangular, measured from the withers to the base of tail slightly is longer than the height at the withers. The topline is “table top” level from behind the withers to the set-on of tail without the pin bones showing. TAIL -­Set high, carried up or out when in motion. Long and tapering, fairly straight, not curled or twisted to either side, falling naturally when at rest. Plume long and flowing, confined to lower two-­thirds of tail. Sparse plume acceptable Explanation: The tail may point forward towards the head when on the move. The tip of the tail must never turn down towards the back, or touch the topline. (Do not confuse the foward falling plume, as part of the loop) The tail itself must not curl over the back or form a ring (teapot tail).

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A r t i c l e | Chinese Crested Dog

HINDQUARTERS - Rump well -­ rounded and muscular, loins taut, stifles firm and long, sweeping smoothly into the well let-­down hock. Angulation of the rear limb must be such as to produce a level back. Hind-­legs set wide apart.

Explanation: This is a characteristic of the Chinese Crested and is fast disappearing from the breed. To ensure it remains it must be checked. Like many dogs the Chinese Crested hates to have its feet touched, so to examine them without upsetting the dog, just pick it up as you would a horse’s foot and bend it backwards. You can soon see the distance from the foot pad to the toe pads from underneath. • A cat foot will have the foot pad and the toe pad relatively close together. (Unacceptable)

• A hare foot will have the toe pads a longer distance from the main foot pad. (Acceptlable but not desired)

FEET - Extreme hare foot, narrow and very long, with unique elongation of small bones between joints, especially in forefeet, which almost appear to possess an extra joint. Nails any colour, moderately long. Socks ideally confined to toes, but not extending above top of pastern. Feet turning neither in nor out. T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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• An elongated hare foot will have even more distance from the main foot pad. (Desired)

COLOUR - Any colour or combination of colours. Explanation: All colour including parti-coloured, solids,spotted and tri-coloured are permitted. The shades can range from pale to very rich. Don’t let colour sway your judgment - judge for conformation first and foremost! COAT - No large patches of hair anywhere on body. Skin fine grained, smooth, warm to the touch. In Powder Puffs coat consists of an undercoat with soft veil of long hair, veil coat a feature. Explanation: Due to the variable expressivity of the hairless gene, it is almost impossible to eliminate sparse hair in the Crested. Selective breeding can help, but it is a feature we have to live with. (Editor’s note: The coat texture on both varieties is soft, silky and 28 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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straight of moderate density and length. Thick, heavy, curly or kinky coats are not acceptable. Hair on the face and ears of both varieties may be trimmed for neatness. Additional grooming to be kept at a minimum, and only to present a clean and neat appearance.)


A r t i c l e | Chinese Crested Dog

Puff: The coat of the Powderpuff causes confusion. The Standard calls for an undercoat with a soft veil of long hair. It is only in recent years that a Powderpuff coat has been given real coat care, so we are only just seeing the beauty of the mature coat. The length of the coat will vary: if the Hairless in the line have long crests, the coat will be long; if they are sparsely crested, the coat will be thinner and shorter. The coat is made up of long, soft hairs with coarser guard hairs. When the dog is young these hairs are short and look like an undercoat, but by the time the dog is eighteen months old, they grow through to create the so-called veil. In reality, this is not a very good description and it causes much confusion among judges and breeders. On a well-groomed dog the guard hairs will mingle with the main coat and they will only show if they are a darker colour, which gives a very attractive appearance. Hairless: An extremely hairy Hairless will fit the Standard, which has also led to confusion! There is another coat-type, which is seen occasionally. It is shorter and quite coarse. The ears are also smaller than normal and are erect. These types are probably the result of mixed parentage, way back in the evolution of the breed. It is NOT a Powderpuff though, it is a HAIRY HAIRLESS and will not have a normal mouth, but rather forward-pointing tusks.

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GAIT/MOVEMENT - Long, flowing and elegant with good reach and plenty of drive.

SIZE -

Explanation:

Bitches 23-30 cm (9-12 ins) at withers

Movement is quick and lively without a hackney or mincing gait. Topline remains level.

Weight varies considerably, but should not be over 5.5 kg (12 lbs).

Ideal height: Dogs 28-33 cm (11-13 ins) at withers

For more photographs of Chinese Cresteds visit the Chinese Crested Database Editors note: Many of the photographs above were taken off this website as examples of excellent type

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A r t i c l e | Chinese Crested Dog Standard

©J.Campin, illustr. KC Picture Library This illustration does not necessarily show the ideal example of the breed.

CHINESE CRESTED DOG FCI-Standard N° 288 16.02.2011/EN FCI-Standard N° 101 ORIGIN: France PATRONAGE: Great Britain. UTILIZATION: Companion Dog. FCI-CLASSIFICATION: Group 9 Companion and Toy Dogs. Section 4 Hairless breeds. Without working trial.

BRIEF HISTORICAL SUMMARY: The Chinese Crested Dog comes in two varieties - the Hairless and the Powder Puff. The ‘Hairless’ have a crest of hair on their head extending part way down their neck, ‘socks’ covering their toes, and a plume on their tail. The rest of their body is, as their name implies, hairless. The ‘Powder Puff’ variety is covered entirely with a veil of long soft hair. While it is difficult to pinpoint their origin, it is said that they were owned by families of the Han Dynasty of China. The Chinese Cresteds were developed at this time as guardians of the treasure houses and, in a larger, heavier form, as hunting dogs. They were seen at shows in America from 1885 to 1926 but then were rarely ever seen for some fifty years. GENERAL APPEARANCE: A small, active and graceful dog; medium-to fine-boned, smooth hairless body, with hair on feet, head T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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and tail only; or covered with a soft veil of hair. Two distinct types of this breed: Deer type, racy and fine-boned, and Cobby type, heavier in body and bone. BEHAVIOUR AND TEMPERAMENT: Happy, never vicious. HEAD: Smooth, without excess wrinkles. Distance from base of skull to stop equal to distance from stop to tip of nose. Head presenting graceful appearance with alert expression. CRANIAL REGION: Skull: Slightly rounded and elongated. Stop: Slightly pronounced, but not extreme. FACIAL REGION: Nose: A prominent feature, narrow in keeping with muzzle. Any colour nose acceptable. Muzzle: Tapering slightly but never pointed, lean without flews. Lips: Tight and thin. Jaws / Teeth: Jaws strong, with perfect, regular scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws. Cheeks: Cleanly chiselled, lean and flat, tapering into muzzle. Eyes: So dark as to appear black. Little or no white showing. Medium size, almond in shape. Set wide apart. Ears: Set low : highest point of base of ear level with outside corner of eye. Large and erect, with or without fringe, except in Powder Puffs where drop ears are permissible. NECK: Lean, free from throatiness, long and sloping gracefully into strong shoulders. When moving, carried high and slightly arched. BODY: Medium to long, supple. Back: Level.

LIMBS: FOREQUARTERS: General appearance: Legs long and slender, set well under body. Shoulder: Clean, narrow and well laid back. Elbow: Held close to body. Metacarpus (Pastern): Fine, strong, nearly vertical. Forefeet: Extended hare-foot, narrow and long. Nails any colour, moderately long. Socks ideally confined to toes, but not extending above top of pastern. Feet turning neither in nor out. HINDQUARTERS: General appearance: Hindlegs set wide apart. Angulation of the rear limb must be such as to produce a level back. Stifle (Knee): Firm and long, sweeping smoothly into hock. Metatarsus (Rear pastern): Hocks well let down. Hind feet: Extended hare-foot, narrow and long. Nails any colour, moderately long. Socks ideally confined to toes, but not extending above top of pastern. Feet turning neither in nor out. GAIT/MOVEMENT: Long, flowing and elegant with good reach and plenty of drive. SKIN: Fine-grained, smooth, warm to the touch. COAT: Hair: No large patches of hair anywhere on body. A long and flowing crest preferred, but sparse acceptable; ideally beginning at stop tapering off down neck. In Powder Puffs coat consists of an undercoat with soft veil of long hair, veil coat a feature. Colour: Any colour or combination of colours.

Loin: Taut. Croup: Well rounded and muscular. Chest: Rather broad and deep, not barrelribbed. Breast bone not prominent. Brisket extending to elbows. Underline and belly: Moderate tuck-up. TAIL: Set high, carried up or out when in motion. Long and tapering, fairly straight, not curled or twisted to either side, falling naturally when at rest. Plume long and flowing,

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confined to lower two-thirds of tail. Sparse plume acceptable.

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SIZE AND WEIGHT: Ideal height at the withers: Males: 28-33 cms. Females: 23–30 cms. FAULTS: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.


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DISQUALIFYING FAULTS • Aggressive or overly shy. • Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified. N.B.:

• Only functionally and clinically healthy dogs, with breed typical conformation should be used for breeding. The latest amendments are in bold characters.

• Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

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INFO Mary B. Napper AKC Judge #62737

JUDGING

JUDGING THE CHINESE CRESTED As a judge it is our responsibility to know as much as possible about the breed being presented to us.

Over the many years I have been involved in this sport, I have seen how judges can make a difference in the future of a breed by rewarding the flashier, showier dog regardless of breed type. To help judges unfamiliar with this breed or newly approved judges to this breed, I am going to touch on areas that, as a breeder judge, I have seen questioned or misunderstood. When your classes enter the ring, have 38 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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A r t i c l e | JUdging the Chinese Crested

them line up and take a moment to go down the line to look at the outline and breed essence. They should give the impression of refined elegance. Cresteds are a toy dog, fine-boned, elegant and graceful, they should not appear heavy or coarse. Overall balance, rectangular body, good length of neck and leg, with front and rear angulations being equal; remember balance. When examining the dog on the table, remember to be gentle. A heavy hand does not do well with most toy breeds. Also, on cold or damp day, the Hairless variety is at a disadvantage of being “naked”. Under these conditions being on a table shivering should not be mistaken for shyness and judging structure might be more difficult. With that said however, the standard states that a Crested should be “Gay and Alert”, they should display a lively, curious personality and be friendly. A Crested should not be timid and cringing away. While there are no disqualifications for size, Chinese Cresteds appear to be getting larger. Remember this is a toy breed, they should be between 11” 13”, slightly larger or smaller should be con­sidered. But what does “slightly” mean? I feel that 1/2-inch would be considered by most as “slightly”. I start my examination by holding the head and look for the wedge-shape from the top and the side (not a triangle). The cheeks should taper cleanly in to the muzzle. I prefer a well-chiseled head that shows expression and a nice pleasing almond shaped eye. I prefer a dark eye in a Crested as I believe it adds to the expression. However, the standard does state that lighter-colored dogs may have light-

er-colored eyes and the pigment of the eye rims will match the coloring of the dog. I do not judge by the pieces but consider the entire dog and overall type. When examining the bite, I use my thumb and index finger to gently lift the upper lip. The hairless are allowed to have missing teeth and will have forward slanting “tusk like” canines, do not hold this against them as it is a genetic mutation that, along with the lack of hair, also produces a lack of dentition, so missing teeth are not a fault in the Hairless Crested and perfect dentition should be appreciated. However, in Powderpuffs missing teeth are to be faulted. Both a scissors and level bite are accepted. Ears are relatively large and uncropped. They are to be carried erect in both the Puff and the Hairless. They can have the hair removed or be covered with hair. I think this is a personal preference of the breeder and I personally feel that as a breeder I look at each dog and evaluate what I want to accentuate. As a judge it makes no dif­ference to me. The body of the dog should be fine­ boned and slender but not so refined as to appear breakable or on the other hand should not be robust and heavy structured. Their brisket should extend to the elbow, ribs should be well developed and the depth of chest tapers to a moderate tuck-up at the flank. The Crested should not be barrel chested. The topline should be level to a slightly sloping croup. I don’t want an abrupt, steep croup, these are not little Afghans and to me this is unattractive. Something to remember, especially on the Hairless, if it is cold their topline may roach when actually if it were to be warmer this same specimen would T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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A r t i c l e | JUdging the Chinese Crested

have a level topline. The tail should be an extension of its spine and should be carried gaily.... This does not mean a gay tail, it means that it should curve like a saber, but does not necessarily mean up and over the back (although I would prefer that to one that is tucked between the legs). The tail should not lay flat across the back of the dog. At rest the tail is down with a slight curve at the end of the tail. My first breeds were in the Herding & Sporting groups so I like a dog that moves straight and true. This breed is very agile and should move smoothly without being stilted or hackneyed around the ring at a trot. They should go straight on the down and back and they should not paddle or pound the ground. The rear should be moderately angulated; they should not be cowhocked or have luxated patellas. When I was first introduced to this breed, I heard the term “China Skinned” to describe the ideal skin texture of the hairless. The skin should be smooth and silk like to the touch. On the hairless, furnishings may range from sparse to heavy. Don’t discard a dog just because it doesn’t have a Clydesdale like mane, plume & socks. Yes it’s flashier but look beyond the flash, is it more correct? To the exhibitors, if you are going to show me a dog with excess body hair, please do me the courtesy as to remove all of the stubble. The tail plume is only supposed to cover twothirds of the tail, it should not go all the way to the root of the tail. The Powderpuff has it’s own challenges with coat. The correct coat should be a double soft, silky and graight coat. It should not be curly, kinky or 40 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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have excessive scissoring or sculpting. The standard states that grooming should be minimal. Faces and ears do not need to be shaved, this is a preference of the exhibitor, educate yourself on the appearance of an unshaved face so you are not surprised when it is presented to you. Judges, please educate yourself to know what the untrimmed face looks like so you are not completely thrown by it’s appearance. If you want pictures of what this looks like please ask and I will be happy to have pictures of full faces emailed to you for your review.

In closing, please remember to judge all the parts as a whole, do not fault judge, evaluate the overall dog while it’s moving and above all ask yourself .... Is this a toy dog, is it fine-boned, is it elegant and graceful? Is this a Chinese Crested?


INFO Sally Johnson Sally Johnson, Independent Distributor for Zija International - http://xiomahealth.myzija.com/ Ameo Essential Oils www.xiomahealth.myameo.com Ripstixs - www.xiomahealth. myripstixs.com Xioma Dogs are ZIJA Dogs, are YOURS www.xiomakennels.com

INTERESTING

ARE WE LOSING THE CORRECT CHINESE CRESTED In our effort to win in the ring are we losing the correct type of Chinese Crested? Are we breeding what the Judges like or are we sticking to the hairless breed we began with. It seems to me that the two correct types and two correct varieties are being bred out in favour of a middle of the road dog that is; if he is a Hairless dripping in crest and plumage or if he is a Powderpuff he has is lacking the correct double coat or is massively over coated. Neither is correct for the breed, grooming seems to have taken over with dogs being groomed to within an inch of their lives, full of product, T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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A r t i c l e | Losing the correct Chinese Crested

straightening irons and scissoring. The hairless are subjected to shaving and creams to achieve that smooth skin look, unfortunately this limits most to one day of showing as on day two the skin has a fine bloom of hair. The skin of a crested should feel like soft kid leather, free from hair and blemishes and not be covered in prickles and razor burns.

We are not doing the breed a favour if turning it into a hairless dog take us hours of shaving, we are not doing the breed a favour if turning out a Powderpuff takes hours of straightening, stripping, scissoring or bulking up with chalks and sprays. The Standard is plain, “No large patches of hair anywhere on the body. Skin is fine grained and smooth, warm to the touch. In Powderpuffs coat consists of an undercoat with a soft veil of long hair, veil coat a feature” The coat of the puff should have lift as he moves, it is not silky and straight like a Maltese nor is it wooly like a Bichon. The undercoat should be just long enough to hold the veil away from the body, thus providing the movement that makes the dog’s coat appear to float, coats that hang and do not lift are not indicating that they have undercoat and by the same criteria, coats that stand away from the body do not have the correct top coat either. There should be no exaggeration in

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A r t i c l e | Losing the correct Chinese Crested

this breed; it should be presented as naturally as possible. The structure of the dog is also of paramount importance, we have two types Cobby and Deer, but we are seeing less of these variations in the breed and I believe this is because Judges do not know the Standard well enough to select a good representative of either type and therefore choose the generic show dog which is then looked at as the norm for the breed. Incorrect movement is also being awarded with dogs high stepping in front with no drive behind. Dogs who Judges have said show a lovely Pony Action. If we must compare to an equine, then at least compare it to a horse, who’s movement more typically reflects reach and drive. I have heard is stated Symmetry is balance without

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A r t i c l e | Losing the correct Chinese Crested

exaggeration; it brings pleasing proportions that result in a long flowing action, that is neither choppy nor wasteful. A dog with a short upper arm, that pounds the ground and who cannot provide the thrust behind is going to break down when asked to go more than once around the ring. It causes the movement to come from the elbow and not the shoulder throwing the dog off balance. Correct angulation behind is also important as this is where the drive comes from that propels the dog, if the hock is not vertical under the ischium then the dog will stand under itself or if it passes it then the dog has too much angulation behind often making the dog crab..

Cat’s foot

Along with this comes the loss of the Hare’s foot, rarely do we see any examination of the foot in the ring, if we are not judged on the breed’s hallmarks then we will lose them. We hear all sorts of excuses as to why we should overlook these hallmarks, but if we do not preserve them, then future generations will not be able to breed them back into the lines, they will be lost forever. The foot of a Chinese Crested should be long and supple, not round and cat like. This foot often turns slightly out on the stack, causing some judges to believe the dog is not correct, but considering the length the foot must be and the surface it is standing on this conclusion is not correct. The rarity of the Hare’s foot is one reason many Judges have not seen it in the ring.

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Hare’s foot


A r t i c l e | Losing the correct Chinese Crested

I do hope we can keep the Chinese Crested as it was intended to be, a funny, happy clown who loves to entertain, who is naturally hairless or who has an easy care coat, with all its subtleties and unique hallmarks intact.

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AUTHOR Darija Huzimec, Bionity Chinese Crested

PHOTOS Darija Huzimec, Bionity Chinese Crested Archive

MY STORY BREEDING

“NORMAL LIFE” AND NOT SO NORMAL HOBBY

Notes about the life with a litter of cresteds

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Darija Huzimec, Bionity Chinese Crested, Slovenia

This is a story from my current life and the past few weeks when our 4th Bionity Chinese crested litter came to this world. I was asked many time to share my experience how it is to be a so called ˝hobby breeder˝ since I only have 1 litter per year or less, have a regular 8-9 hour per day job, friends, hobbies and yes I still manage to raise a litter. I read lots of books about whelping but I think that no book can prepare you to the actual delivery, it just takes experience. Dogs have to be your passion, since it is not simple to adjust everything around the puppies, be without or with little sleep for weeks and still do everyday stuff. But it is possible and the joy of being able to watch the little ones grow and develop and becoming little individual personalities is simply worth it.

THE DAY MINUS 4 DAYS – OR WAITING FOR THE PUPPIES TO BE BORN (11.4.2015) After the last ultrasound the puppies were due app. end of the week. Well it is already Saturday 15 pm, and no signs of puppies wanting to leave mummy’s tummy. But my poor Indy is taking it pretty hard already, her belly is huge. Yes I know, why didn’t I take her temperature to be surer? After my last litter (3rd litter) I realized I can clearly see the signs the day my girls are due to have a litter. And with Indy taking her temperature is just not something that she enjoys (hell I supposed no dog enjoys it), so I decided not to do it. At the moment all of my three cresties Indy, Lin and Sunny are relaxing in the garden on the sun.

Photo: Bionity

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Indy 4 days before delivery

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A r t i c l e | My litter story

Photo: Bionity

Lin is Indy’s mom, she is my first crested. She gave me my first Bionity litter in 2009 and it was a nightmare delivery that ended up with C-section, one dead puppy, but 5 healthy ones. It took me 3 years to decide for another litter. But here we are, waiting for the 4th litter.

The whelping box setup in my bedroom

DAY 0, THE DAY THE PUPPIES FINALLY ARRIVED – 15.4.2015 In the morning there were no signs of Indy being in distress, so I went to work. I had my friend over so she was watching if anything should start happening before I came home. At around noon I got a call that Indy is showing signs of labor. I rushed out of office straight home and after another 3 hours the first puppy was born at 15:30. Awesome orange headed hairless boy. 52 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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Miss Indy delivered him on the middle of my bed, since the whelping box was in my bedroom and she decided that my bed is way better. This is not something I would recommend, but I had no heart to put her down before I knew the first one is out safe. Well I will not go into details with the mess on the bed,… But after the first one was out, I moved her to the whelping box. I cut the cord, clean the little fellow and he was already drinking from the milkbar. And I had time to clean up the wet sheets and pads. So less than an hour later the second pup arrived, another hairless boy, this time a black one. With both puppies the placenta did not come out immediately and the cord was just too short to cut, so I had to wait 10-15 minutes before I was able to cut the cord at decent length. And before I managed to cut the cord, already the third was on the way out, a cute little chocolate puff boy. I did the whole cleaning routine again and out pops the 4th puppy, another hairless black boy. At this stage I was thinking ok please let the last one be a girl – since I was praying there will be ONLY 5 pups and not AT LEAST 5, as the vet told me. Honestly I prefer smaller litters, it is less work with finding good new homes specially if you are picky with who you give a dog. But back to the delivery. I was giving Indy warm water with honey between the deliveries to keep her strength up. And surprise, another hairless boy, the 5th pup arrives. It was the biggest one till now. At this point I thought well ok, we have a bunch of beautiful boys that is it. In my last 3 litters I always had a beautiful true hairless female, more than one usually, so I guess now it is my turn to have more boys.


A r t i c l e | My litter story

Oh well, so we delivered the 6th boy, the second puff. And yes, he was the last one, end result is Bionity 4th litter, 6 boys – 2 true hairless, 2 medium hairless and 2 powder puff. Must I say that the first evening when with little sleep and waking up every 15 minutes to every movement and sound from the whelping box? But I am sure it is same for every breeder, with all the excitement.

Photo: Bionity

THE FIRST WEEK WITH NEWBORN PUPPIES – THE NO SLEEP WEEK

Indy with the first 5 pups, 6th is still in the belly

Indy was lying during whole whelping process and after this pup I thought it was over. Since it was already 18:00 clock and the day to pay the rent, I really had to go and do it. Yes normal life still goes on even on the day of birth. Luckily the landlord is in the other side of the house, so I just had to go around the corner. Surprise surprise, after 5 minutes I hear my friend jelling: “Hurry back, there is another one coming out!“.

I have to say it was a huge difference this time with 6 pups compared to our last litter with only 4 pups (it was the same mother). With 6 pups there is a greater chance that one of the pups wanders off and stars crying, that is pushed off the milkbar and start crying, …So the first week (and also the second one) is really about just watching the pups, taking their weight daily, taking care of mum with good food and supplements and trying not to lose nerves when the crying wakes you up 20 times a night and you know the alarm is set at 5:30 and you have to go to work. In first week I really feel I need to be around during night so I just stick it out.

THE SECOND WEEK – THE EASY WEEK... OR NOT? By this time the pups are much stronger, so with the previous litters this was an easy week. But this time with 6 puppies it was a different story. Indy had enough milk since the pups were all gaining weight at normal speed (20 grams per day). I guess it was just a little crowded at the milkbar so really frequently one pup out of 6 was making some noise. During this week I continue my rouT H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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Photo: Bionity

A r t i c l e | My litter story

The little ones at 1 week of age and mom Indy taking a nap

WE MADE IT TO 3 WEEKS (6.5.2015) The little ones got moved from the bedroom to the living room (actually they moved 1 meter) at day 21. This way they will get extra space so I can have the door of the litter box open and they can go in and out. Yes they are still very small and the movement looks like

Photo: Katja Butina

tine form the first week and the pups are cuddled as often as I have a spare second. There is something irresistible about puppies that just makes you want to hold and cuddle them. With all the previous litters I did the exercises that stimulate the development of the dogs, but with this litter I decided I just follow my intuition and no extra work was done.

The true hairless brothers 1 week old

2 weeks and growing fast

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Photo: Katja Butina

A r t i c l e | My litter story

drunk dogs walking, but still I can see on their faces that they already enjoy exploring new stuff. They already know when I am coming and they wage their little tails and run to me. Since the litter was quite big I started introducing solid food at the age of 22 days. I start feeding the pups with mixed food from day one. This means BARF, cooked food and some good quality kibbles. Naturally they just mostly tasted it, but by the end of the 3rd week some of the pups were eating really nicely although nursing at mom is still number one thing. I introduce new toys and also visitors at this time. It is never too early for socialization. I am lucky that this time the litter is in spring, the weather is perfect so the pups are also taken outside for fresh air. I could not resist so at age 3,5 weeks the first stacking pictures were taken.

THE 4TH WEEK – WHAT NEXT Well this is where my story ends. The pups are 4 weeks old, staring to eat so I offer them food 3 times per day. They

Photo: Urša Drabik

The chocolate powder puff boy – he will probably grow up to be light cream color but I hope he will have some orange tone

Finally looking like real little dogs with eyes open

are already playful with each other and I enjoy just cuddling and playing with them. Usually we will have 2-3 puppy visits a week and do all the normal stuff to provide best environment and socialization. The biggest issue is that when they are not eating or sleeping, I just can’t leave them and can play for hours with them. At week 4 they are already walking, barking a little and being miniature dogs. Sometimes I wish I could keep them in this stage for T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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Photo: Snežana Bošković

A r t i c l e | My litter story

Photo: Snežana Bošković

Bionity Merkaba – tired after first stacking

longer, but on other hand I can hardly wait to see how they will develop as young dogs. For me it is exciting to see what the breeding combination produced especially when you see the huge potential already in 4 week old pups. My last note would be, it is a huge experience to breed dogs and raise a litter. But for me it is hard to see my girls with huge belly’s and going thru pregnancy and labor. They were all great moms but after every litter I need time to decide for another litter. This is Indy’s second and last litter. I will enjoy every moment of being a second mom for the 6 little boys. Hopefully they will grow up to be good representatives of our beloved breed and have perfect new homes. But first thing first, we have quite a few exciting and busy weeks ahead with the fast growing little ones.

Bionity Marduk – not bad for first time on the table

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A r t i c l e | My litter story

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AUTHOR Shannon Roberts

HANDLING

Shannon Roberts Professional Dog Show Handler

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Shannon Roberts, www.shanshal.co.uk

I started handling show dogs back in 2007, so quite late into my Junior Handling career. My first real show dog was a Chinese crested. I was so excited to start competing in the handling classes, but it was not easy for me. I was told that I shouldn’t use a Chinese crested in the handling classes, they are too difficult and fidgety. It’s too hard to show them if it’s cold or rainy, they are a stubborn breed so I won’t win. I was told to get an ‘easy breed’ to use. I didn’t let this put me off! I started training with my Chinese crested called Lacie. To some extent, what I was told that they are too difficult and fidgety was true, she was these things but this didn’t mean we couldn’t work together and gain a partnership in which we would understand what each other would want and work as a team. I trained with Lacie most days. When I first started to enter into handling classes with Lacie, I enjoyed it;

I had to work with Lacie. She wasn’t a robot dog she did move about and fidget. At the time I was the only Junior Handler that competed with a Chinese crested. No one else wanted to work that hard with a dog. Slowly but surely we got to winning our classes together and getting noticed for our hard work we put in. The first major Handling class me and Lacie won was the Junior Handler Association (JHA) 12-16 years Toy Group Semi-Finals that takes places at Richmond Championship show. It was a cold wet, windy day so I thought me and Lacie did not stand a chance. When we were waiting for our turn Lacie had her coat on so she wouldn’t get cold. We put in our best effort and to our amazement we were placed 1st! To my knowledge the only Chinese crested ever to win this class. At the end of the class the judge said to me it’s because we worked so well as a team and even though it was wet and cold we had a partnership that he could clearly see, Lacie wanted to work for me. T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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A r t i c l e | Shannon Roberts

This win made me 1 of the Top 14 Junior Handlers in the UK. The year after our amazing win I and Lacie hand qualified for the Young Kennel Club Handling Finals at Crufts. Again I and Lacie put in our best effort that we could. To our amazement I and Lacie got 1st Place! Again I and Lacie made breed history by being the first team to win this class with a Chinese crested. I was so proud that I could do this for the breed. At this Chinese Crested Dog Club 40th Anniversary Championship show. Me and Lacie won Best Junior Handler in Show. From here, I and Lacie won most of the classes we entered or was placed in the top 3. I do not show Lacie often now as she has gained an early retirement because of how much she has done for 60 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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me so now I show her daughters and her granddaughter. Lacie is my heart dog and one of the best dogs I could have asked for, for a first show dog. I handle so many different breeds for other people and I love showing any breed but my favourite does have he be the Chinese crested. The character of the breed is what I like, you never know what they are going to do in the ring. I am still one of the few handlers that use Chinese crested in classes. I am so proud of what me and Lacie have done for the breed. Don’t ever let anyone tell you can’t do something always do what you want to do and if you take the time, patience and training you can get there.


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AUTHOR Pia Adlesic

HANDLING

Pia Adlesic Professional Dog Show Handler

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Pia Adlesic, pia_adlesic@yahoo.com, 00386 40 477 267

My name is Pia Adlesic, I come from Slovenia, but I currently live in Italy. I am from a “non-dog” family which is quite rare in a “show dog world”. To make a long story short, after begging for my first dog since I learned how to talk, I finally had a chance to buy my own by the age of 10. Of course I bought it with my allowance, which i was putting aside for years. From the

day I brought home this little maltese, I was officially infected with “crazy dog people virus”(which is not that rare at all and it’s the most common in every dog competition-shows, agillity, obedience,...). I tried numerous dog sports and I did enjoy it, but when I went to my first dog show, I knew that is it! Because my maltese didn’t have a pedigree (when I was buying him at the age of 10, I didn’t even know what exactly T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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A r t i c l e | Pia Adlesic

pedigree was), I borrowed a dog from my neighbor which was already involved in dog shows. I entered in my first Junior handling competition with a very stubborn English Bulldog that would walk just now and then. First few competitions I was really sweating to make him walk and we did train a lot at home. After him I used numerous different breeds from people I knew on the dog show as I still didn’t have my own dog with which I could compete. I became quite sucessfull in Junior Handling and represented Slovenia at Crufts two times. If I remember correctly, both years there were around 42 countries competing. One year I got selected between top 10 best junior handlers and the other year I won the Junior Handling competition! It was for sure my dreams come true and it was one of the happiest days of my life. I decided to finish my Junior handling 66 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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career after Crufts and to focus on showing dogs. After few years I moved to Italy where we breed Lakeland terriers, Wire Fox terriers and Minature Pinscher. I also have one of my favourite breeds, Chinese Cresteds. I do still show other dogs as a part of my work and it’s one of the things I really enjoy the most. The excitement, the tension, the connection with your dog, the adrenalin rush before entering the ring,... You have to have it in your blood!

And because pictures speak louder than words...I hope you can hear me now!


A r t i c l e | Pia Adlesic

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AUTHOR Eva and Jiri Linhart

PHOTOS Eva and Jiri Linhart Archive

BREEDERS

PAZZDA KENNEL 16 years

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Eva and Jiri Linhart, www.pazzda.com

Dareia Shire Pazzda

Our kennel has been founded 16 years ago, although we got our first naked dog – a Peruvian – in 1996 and our first Chinese Crested came to us one year later. Our kennel is genuinely familiar, you won’t find many dogs, and no crates or cages at all. We have only bitches, altogether we have been owning five, two of those Chinese Cresteds. We decided to own only a small number of dogs, so we can always give them the great life they deserve. Our dogs spend all of their time with us and that is surely the thing they need and want. The goal of our breed is not to produce quantity, but to unite interesting, mostly not related dogs, who could have good impact on the overall breed of the Chinese Crested Dog.

During 16 years of breeding Chinese Crested Dogs we had only 12 litters descending from 5 bitches, and during 16 years of breeding Peruvians we had 17 litters descending from 8 bitches. Except our two bitches, others were lent to our kennel for breeding purpose and their owners were happy working together with us on raising their puppies under our Kennel. Of course this kind of work requires absolute mutual trust between the co-owners, and we are very glad to have such people. Although we don’t have a great amount of litters, many Chinese Crested Dog Champions and Interchampions have been up brought from our Kennel. Our matings mostly took place abroad or with stud dogs with interesting abroad pedigrees. The founder of our breed T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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A r t i c l e | Pazzda kennel

Dareia Shire Pazzda

was C’China Modry Kvet „Cenda“. A small and happy lady, always in good mood, modern type, good coating and smooth skin. At 15 years old she still had all teeth. We couldn’t have wished any better, and will remember our first Chinese forever. China gave us some nice litters and her daughter from the D litter Dareia Shire Pazzda „Pepi“stayed with us. Pepi is a beautiful, elegant girl and she also has a great bite. She never loved going on shows but still has made some nice titles. The possibilities for mating haven’t been that good years ago, nevertheless we found a wonderful stud dog for her first mating. That one has been now almost legendary Gingery’s Krimson N’Clover, who has been absolute72 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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ly exceptional at that time. Later we added the british Moonswift line to our breed, also Lionheart and Goldenberry, Legend’s, Whispering and many other great and known Kennels. Those can be found in the pedigrees of our puppies. Until today dogs from our Kennel are shown on shows, one of the most seen at this moment is the powderpuff bitch Jaca Navarra Pazzda, who has got many Best of Breed, CACIB, also BIG and an absolute great winner of Yearling Class at this years Crufts in Birmingham. Her and the hairless male from litter I – Icelandic Gawyn Pazzda have also received the titles Winner of speciality dog show 2015 for naked dogs in the Czech Republic. What has always been of great impor-


A r t i c l e | Pazzda kennel

Icelandic Gawyn Pazzda

tance to us is the health of our bitches and their stud dogs. In times when no examinations were obligatory we already let our dogs examine for clinical eye tests and patella. Regular vet checks are also a must before mating a bitch, to make sure that she is ready for a litter. When genetically prcd-PRA and later PLL test became possible, all of our bitches got examined. It’s a pity that those test didn’t exist at the time when the breed of the Chinese Crested Dog started to boom and the number of overall litters raised to the top. So not only exterior is important in breeding, but also the health and the temperament of the dogs should be on first place. Health is the absolute priority for our breed. It is an honor for

me not to say this only on the basis of being a breeder, but also for the whole Chinese Crested Dog breeding scene in the Czech Republic under the Czech Naked Dog club, where I am president since 6 years. We succeeded in pushing through obligatory chipping, but also genetic tests for PLL, prcd-pra and regular eye examination. This is a big thing and so important for the whole breed. It really is a pity that there are people who don’t think about the consequences and the impact on the whole breed, but breed dogs for money and their own publicity. But that surely is not a Chinese Crested Dog only topic. What is also worth mentioning is the slow vanishing of true hairless dogs. Of T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 5 / 2 0 1 5

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Happy Little Susie Pazzda

course the modern type dogs are great to look at, with their wonderful hair, but it is a pity that you sometimes are not able to make a difference between a powderpuff and a hairless. Breeders should really be cautious when choosing breeding couples and thing about all aspects of such a connection. Our latest litter, litter L, where 8 nice puppies have been born celebrates its first anniversary and we look very much forward to our next planned litter. For a beautiful girl from the Avokaduh litter waits a stud dog from abroad, with whom we fell in love at first sight. We will see what this mating will bring up. And about what dog breeding should be: it should be a hobby, the joy of anticipation, fun but also responsibili74 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

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ty. This is what our Kennel stands for. We will be happy about every success, about every litter and our puppies will always stay our babies. It is such a joy awaiting the unborn puppies, being curios about the genders, colors and varieties. And the biggest reward is a great new owner, who is able to give the puppy a superb home for the rest of its life. The show career is not the must have thing, Chinese Crested Dogs can be great at different sport activities or be lazy in bed the whole day. Naked dogs are the love of our lives, the Chinese Cresteds as much as the Peruvians. I wish the Chinese Crested Dog breed a good future, great owners and very responsible breeders.


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JUDGES

AROUND THE GLOBE

PART 1

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Wendy van Oosten Breeder Owner Handler Judge

THE NETHERLANDS

wendyvanoosten@kpnmail.nl

+31 6 14160309

In 2000 I got my first Chinese Crested Dog called Cupido. Because of him I am so in love with this breed, they are so wonderfull. In 2003 the first “Happy Dancing” litter was born and we still breed this fantastic breed. I had the honour to judge them already several times in the Netherlands and next year I will judge the specialty in Sweden. I’m looking forward to this invitation. We have bred a lot of (junior) Champions already: Happy Dancing Betty Boop, Happy Dancing Eternal Elmo, Happy Dancing Fantasy Fatima, Happy Dancing GoGo Gadget, Happy Dancing Gotcha, Happy Dancing Joyful JoJo, Happy Dancing King Kashmir, Happy Dancing Kinky Kate, Happy Dancing Keeping Karma, Happy Dancing Lovely Lady, Happy Dancing Mystery Magic, Happy

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Dancing Pit Pussy, Happy Dancing Red Rose, Happy Dancing Techno Trance, Happy Dancing Vivaldi Victory, Happy Dancing Vulcano Vampire, Happy Dancing Walhalla Wonder And of course we own more Cresteds who are Champion and not own-bred. I think it is wonderfull to breed a Crested who is beautifull, but the most important thing is a healthy and happy Crested! I love to see a happy Crested in the showring. Beside the Chinese Crested Dog I am also allowed to judge: Poodle, Bichon Havanais, Coton de Tuléar, Tibetan Spaniel and the Welsh Corgi Pembroke


I am judge for allready 30 years.

I judged in countries

My company at home are two Chinese Crested bitches - Powder Puff “Minnie” 13 years old and Hairless “Pia” 3 years old. My daughter is a veterinarian and breeding under the name “Laureola’s” for 25 years and for 10 years Bull Terrier.

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Breeds I judge are • Group 9, • British Sheepdogs, • Nordic breeds, • St. Bernard dogs, • Dalmatians • Rhodesian Ridgeback, • Dho Kyi, • Shar Pei • Schipperke.

Germany, Italy Slovakia Croatia Finnland Russia Luxemburg Belgium Switzerland Slovenia The Czech Republic Lithuania

Brigitte Bregenzer Judge

Sincerely yours

AUSTRIA

aon.913169889@aon.at

I started in the sport of dogs in 1975 in Kalamazoo, Michigan with an Old English Sheepdog and a great mentor. I have also loved, owned & shown Cocker Spaniels, Komondorok, Afghans, Chinese Cresteds & Miniature Pinschers. I started in Chinese Cresteds in 1993 with Carol Kerns (Carron) as my mentor and breeding partner. I fell in love with the breed at Carols house delivering a litter of puppies and the rest was history. Although my kennel name is Tumbleweed, most of our puppies carried the Carron prefix. Although I no longer have any Cresteds in my home, they will always be one of my true loves. I started judging in 2007 with Chinese Cresteds and Cocker Spaniels. I have had the great honor to judge the American Spaniel Club’s Cocker Spaniel National Specialty. I believe in giving each dog my full attention and consideration, after all the exhibitors have paid for my time and whether or

not I choose their dog, they are entitled to my honest and unbiased opinion. I currently judge 8 AKC breeds and Junior Showmanship competition. I am a member of the American Chinese Crested Club and an approved mentor and presenter of the Cresteds, also I am on the Board of Directors and Show Chairman with the DFW Toy Dog Club, member of the Dallas Miniature Pinscher Club, Life member & Parent Club Presenter as well as on the Board of Directors with the American Spaniel Club, member of Nolan River Kennel Club where I have held a position on the Board of Directors and as Show Chairman, President of the Cocker Spaniel Specialty Club of Dallas, I also am a member of several judges association including the DFW Judges Association where our main focus is breed education.

Mary B. Napper Breeder, Owner & AKC Judge #62737

USA

Tumbleweed.dogs@juno.com

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The DOG Magazine-ISSUE 05/2015 Chinese Crested  
The DOG Magazine-ISSUE 05/2015 Chinese Crested  
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