Page 1


THE DOG MAGAZINE

CONTENT 12

COLLAR ENTRAPMENT, STRANGULATION AND CPCR TECHNIQUES HEALTH

22

DERMOID SINUS IN THE RIDGEBACK HEALTH

38

YES, I AM A WORKING RIDGEBACK WORK/SPORT

56 70

NSOAH SERVICE DOG ANASTASIA KHARITONOVA HANDLING

82

22

WORK/SPORT

DERMOID SINUS IN THE RIDGEBACK HEALTH

FROM DOWN UNDER BREEDERS

88 96

VILLAGEDOGS BREEDERS

CLUB E.L.S.A 25 YEARS CLUBS

105

THE RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK PEDIGREE SEARCH INFO

109

JUDGES AROUND THE GLOBE PART 1 INFO

118

FOLLOWING THE PAWPRINTS OF THE PAST! SHOWS

2 | THEDOGM AGAZI NE

38 YES, I AM A WORKING RIDGEBACK WORK/SPORT

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


EDITORIAL

HI, Our goal with this magazine is to promote responsible breeding and dog ownership and to encourage ethical conduct and responsible breeding of purebred dogs. Our vision is to help promote responsible pet ownership and improve the quality of life of every dog show dog or pet. We make it our goal to provide the most up to date and honest information every dog

owner should know.

THE DOG MAGAZINE NO. 1 Januar 2015 路 EDITOR | GRAPHIC DESIGN Ewa Larson, Natasja Rutters, Sne啪ka Kuralt

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

|3


4 | THEDOGM AGAZI NE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


THE TEAM EWALARSON My name is Ewa Larsson, Britisher Show Bulldogs we are situated in Canterbury, England. My kennel was established in 1992. My bulldogs live with me inside my house and are raised in a loving environment as one of the family. I believe this approach is reflected in the behaviour of my dogs. Health, a correct temperament and dogs of the highest quality are my goal. Since Spring 2006, I am on the Bulldog Club Inc committee. The Bulldog Club Inc is the oldest Bulldog club in the world, and holds the prestigious Bulldog of the Year Show. I am a Bulldog Breed Specialist Judge currently on “ B” list. I am member of : The Bulldog Club Incorporated, The London Bulldog Society, The South of England Bulldog Society, The Junior Bulldog Club. My affix “ Britisher” is derived from a noun Brit·ish·er which stands for: “An Englishman- a subject or inhabitant of Great Britain”. Please feel free to visit our website. www.britisher.co.uk

NATASJARUTTERS “A little story about who I am and what I do” We live in a small town in southern Netherlands near the Belgium border. I always loved dogs and in particular the Bulldog. And when I got my own place … there was my first English bulldog. For many years I was surrounded by the love of these beautiful dogs. At the moment I share my house with 2 French Bulldogs, who also have a wonderful character only in a smaller body With my male Ch. Carte Truffé Kangaroo Kiss ‘Sydney’ (import Finland) I regularly take part of dog shows in the Netherlands and abroad. I am a member of the Hollandse Bulldog Club and the English Bulldog Club Netherlands. Beside designing and spending time with my dogs I love to be creative, like painting and photography. For more information about my dogs www.mybulldogs.nl and work www.mdgraphics.nl

I first started to be seriously involved in Cynology, when I bought my first Rhodesian ridgeback (Cubo) from breeder Mr. Andrej Fister – Kyala kennel. Since I had had a ridgeback, I wanted to spent some time and communicate with people who own the same breed. So I became involved and was one of the founding members of Club of Rhodesian ridgeback Slovenia. I was chief of organization of our first special show for Rhodesian ridgebacks in Slovenia. The show entered more than 50 dogs, which was a very nice number for such a small country. We even got Mr. Hans Mueller as a judge, for our first club show, even though the show was not CAC awarded. Soon after, I began my apprenticeship for a Cynology judge, and in January 2011 I acquired a license to judge Rhodesian ridgebacks.

I was born and raised in Southern Slovenia, in a small town called Senovo. By education I am a graphic designer and landscape architect. Currently I am employed in Landscape and GIS Company, where I am a head of marketing and education department.

I currently own two Rhodesian ridgebacks Cubo and Cana. Cubo, his pedigree name is Myollnir Kyala, is one of the most successful show ridgebacks in Slovenia and has always makes me proud. He is 8 years old now and he is calm and mostly a gentleman. Cana (Dikeledi Ayaba) is our female ridgeback, five years old; she brings joy to my life with her silly stunts and happy nature. Cana was imported from Croatia, from Ayaba kennel.

I always felt a great love toward animals, especially dogs. Dogs and cats were always around when I was little and I guess it was meant that that part of my love in life stays with me even in my adulthood.

In my free time I make small products for dog owners, mostly for Rhodesian ridgeback lovers and do different graphic designs for all breeds.

SNEŽKAKURALT

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

|5


6 | THEDOGM AGAZI NE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

|7


8 | THEDOGM AGAZI NE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

|9


10 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 11


AUTHOR Teresa West-Holmes

PHOTOS Teresa West-Holmes

HEALTH

COLLAR ENTRAPMENT, STRANGULATION AND CPCR TECHNIQUES Collar entrapment and subsequent strangulation is life-threatening for the dog involved and presents a dangerous situation for humans and other nearby animals. Good equipment and sensible prevention practices can minimize the chances of a strangulation occurring in the first place, but even best practices cannot guarantee that accidental strangulation will never occur. In the event of a strangulation accident, CPCR (Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation) may help to revive a dog and restore it to full mental and physical function. The purpose of this article is twofold: to examine collar-entrapment from an equipment perspective and to give instruction on how to deal with it in the unfortunate case that it arises. 12 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


i

This article was the winner of the 2013 Dog Writer’s Association of America’s Maxwell Medallion, as well as the 2013 AKC’s Club Publication Excellence Award. A digital copy of the article can be accessed on their website: http://www.luvakis.com.

FOUNDATION OF THE PROBLEM – THE COLLAR UNDER TENSION Collars are valuable pieces of equipment for dog-owners, allowing both control of the dog and a conventional location for identification. However, collars present the potential for entrapment and strangulation. Some collars are “non-break-away”; they are not designed to break under pressure. Examples of this class include metal buckle styles, martingales, and chain training collars. Entrapment with this style of collar will not resolve until the collar breaks (unlikely) or tension is removed. This class of collars is especially dangerous to use without supervision. One of the most common collar entrapment and strangulation accidents is caused by metal training collars left on unattended puppies/ dogs in kennels.

Aware of this potential, many fanciers use “breakaway” collars when their dogs will be unattended. The most common of these are cotton or nylon web collars with a plastic buckle or “safety” clasp, similar to child seatbelts in grocery carts. A dog hanging from a fence, for example, or a similar non-twisting entrapment of the collar may apply enough tension to the buckle to either cause it to either pull apart or fracture; however, with large clasps and/or heavy plastic, this may not occur. In such a situation, a human will usually be able to release the buckle, perhaps by first relieving the tension on the collar. However, this is not the case with a twisting entrapment. A common scenario for this is a collar entrapment between two dogs, wherein one dog’s collar gets trapped on the lower jaw of the other. The ensuing struggle to break free may result in the collar being tightened like a noose.

GIVE THIS TEST A TRY… Think your dog’s break-away collar will give way under a twisting tension? Fasten the collar around a post, and twist until it is tight, then try releasing the buckle. (Fig A) Alternatively, have a strong person hold the collar and attempt to pull it straight apart while you try to release it. (Fig B) Many “break-away” collars are difficult to release even in this test without any twisting.

A

B

These images were taken of a Lupine large-dog adjustable collar (1” width) with side release buckle. The collar on the left is brand new; the collar on the right was part of a collar entrapment and strangulation accident. Note how there is very little damage to the collar webbing and no damage to the buckle despite the extreme tension and abuse the collar on the right went through while attempts were made to release the buckle, as well as cut though the collar with kitchen shears.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 13


A r t i c l e | Collar entrapment, strangulation and cpcr techniques

L- New Collar, R- Collar from Entrapment Accident

Break-Away Collar made by Premier Pet Products

My favorite example of a true “break-away” collar is the KeepSafe® Break-Away Collar made by Premier Pet Products. Designed to prevent dogs from getting entangled by their collars, the KeepSafe® Break-Away Collar has a patented break-away safety buckle that releases when pressure is applied. (This now adorns the neck of every dog in our home as their “everyday” collar.)

RELIEVING TENSION DURING A TWO-DOG ENTRAPMENT Suppose a dog has become entrapped in the manner described above. What should you do? We’ll call the dog being strangled the “wearer” and the dog with its jaw trapped in the collar the “entrapper.” 1. Lessen the chance of spinal trauma – Often the entrapper is roughly the same size as the wearer. Do your best to stop the entrapper from dragging the wearer around. This can cause severe or even fatal trauma to the cervical spine (neck) of the wearer. 2. Attempt to cut the collar – This must be approached with extreme caution. Attempting to cut the collar can severely injure the wearer, the entrapper or even yourself (especially when struggling against panicked, thrashing dogs). Often the collar is tightened around the neck of the wearer to the extent that the blade of a knife or pair of scissors/shears cannot be inserted between the skin and the collar. When faced with such a situation, an extremely sharp knife (e.g.

14 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

a buck knife) can be used in an attempt to cut through the collar from the top down. Sometimes this is not an option because of risk of injury to the human involved or because a sufficiently sharp instrument is not available. 3. One last chance – When all else fails, struggling against one dog instead of two can make the situation more easily surmountable. By the time all other options have been exhausted, the wearer is most likely nearing the end, collapsing from lack of oxygen and blood flow to the brain. Once this is the case, the wearer will no longer struggle against rescue efforts or oppose tension from the other dog. With the wearer limp, it is now possible to roll the dog laterally, using the entire body to untwist the collar. It may take several turns before tension is released enough to free the entrapper. Rolling a flaccid large breed dog is most easily done by grabbing the front legs (paired together in one hand) and the rear legs (paired together in your other hand) and pulling the legs either up and over the body or under the body (as dictated by the direction of the twist in the collar).


i

Teresa West-Holmes has been an emergency veterinary technician since 1997. She is also a member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society. She and her husband, Paul, have been proud Ridgeback owners since 2002 and members of RRCUS since 2003.They share their home with their two non-fur kids, Emily and Erin; two cats, Cheddar and Cajun; and five Ridgebacks, Seti, Ekundu, Nyea, Shirley and Kin-dah.

Flip body by coupling the legs in each of your hands.

DEALING WITH THE POSTTRAUMA – THE WEARER IS RESPONSIVE AND ABLE TO BREATHE UNASSISTED Once the wearer has been separated from the entrapper, both dogs must be assessed; however, the wearer, being the more critical of the pair, obviously should be addressed first, but don’t forget about the entrapper. If breathing unassisted, the wearer should be immediately transported to the nearest veterinary facility for examination and diagnostics. Even if the dog seems

Symptoms of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema include, but are not limited to: • Difficulty breathing • Increased respiratory rate • Standing in unusual positions to breathe easier • Pale or bluish gums • Spitting up pink, frothy saliva, or bubbles of saliva • Increased heart rate

fine severe and possibly life-threatening health concerns can arise shortly after the incident. Because of this, even seemingly normal dogs may need to be hospitalized for observation. If the wearer is released back into the owner’s care after examination, the dog should be closely monitored for at least 24 hours after the event. If at any point, concerning symptoms develop, the dog should be returned immediately to the veterinary office for reassessment. The most serious injuries to the wearer include noncardiogenic pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), cerebral edema (brain swelling), spinal trauma, tracheal (airway) trauma, retinal detachment and/or proptosed (luxated) eye(s).

Symptoms of cerebral edema include, but are not limited to: • Irregular breathing • Nausea or vomiting • Vision loss • Ataxia/loss of coordination • Inability to walk • Stupor • Seizures • Loss of consciousness

Like the wearer, the entrapper also runs the risk of sustaining injury during the event. Spinal trauma, jaw dislocation and/or fracture, and trauma to the dentition are all common injuries sustained by the entrapper.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 15


A r t i c l e | Collar entrapment, strangulation and cpcr techniques

DEALING WITH THE POST-TRAUMA – THE WEARER IS UNRESPONSIVE AND REQUIRES CPCR What is CPCR? This refers to Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation. The emphasis is on ensuring not just respiratory support but also circulatory support and blood flow to the brain. If one is faced with performing CPCR on a dog, it should be performed quickly but calmly and methodically. Getting in a hurry or panicking does no good for the rescuer or the dog; staying calm, thinking as clearly as possible, and being as methodical as possible will render the best possible results.

CPCR Techniques For The Large Breed Dog

1

Assess Cardiac Effort – Watch for signs of a heartbeat; look, listen and/or feel the chest for cardiac effort, or feel for a pulse on the inner thigh. (Fig 1a, 1b)

1A

1A

Look, feel, and listen to the side of the chest where the elbow meets the ribs; this is a common place to find the heartbeat on thinly-built breeds such as sighthounds.

1B

1B

Locate a structure that feels like a “cord” that runs down the middle of the inside of the thigh; use your finger tips to feel for a pulse.

16 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | Collar entrapment, strangulation and cpcr techniques

2

Initiate Compressions – If no pulse or heartbeat is detectable, lay the dog out flat on its side with legs/feet pointed towards you. Begin by compressing the middle of the chest forcefully downward. Compressions should not be performed on the apex of the chest/towards the spine, as this will push the dog away from the rescuer and render compressions nearly worthless. (Fig 2)

Good Compression Form

Bad Compression Form

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E ¡ I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 17


a. Two People – Person A compresses the chest with straightened arms, palms overlapping and flat to the side of the chest, while Person B compresses the abdomen with straightened arms, palms overlapping and flat to the side of the abdomen. Chest and abdomen compressions are performed in an alternating, cyclical cycle. Compressions to the chest should be around 100 per minute. Because of the relentless rhythm, around 100 beats per minute, Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust” and “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees are tunes everyone knows and can help you maintain a good compression rate and rhythm. (Of course, “Stayin’ Alive” has a more apt song title!) (Fig 2a)

2A

2A

b. One Person, Chest Compressions Only – One-person compressions can be done either while kneeling beside the dog or straddling the dog. Compress the chest with straightened arms with palms overlapping and flat to the side of the chest. Because one-person CPCR is exhausting and there is no back-up available, keeping the compression rate near 60 beats per minute can help you sustain your efforts for a longer period of time. An easy song choice here is The Tokens’ “The Lion Sleeps Tonight.” (Fig 2b)

2B

18 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

2B


c. One Person, Chest and Abdominal Compressions – This technique is for a small-statured person who might lack the upper body strength to administer effective compressions when administering CPCR to a large breed dog. While kneeling next to the dog (with dog’s legs/feet pointed towards you), lean over the top of the dog, place your hands on the ground, shoulder-width apart and wrists snug against the dog’s back. Your chest should be over the last 2 or 3 ribs and the cranial (upper) part of the dog’s abdomen. With your weight resting on your palms, place one knee over the middle of the dog’s chest and one knee over the middle of the dog’s abdomen. Use your legs and knees to compress the chest and abdomen in an alternating, cyclical cycle, simulating peddling a bicycle. Keep the upper leg straight (do not sit back on your feet), envision pressing the knee and shin directly into the ground below with each compression. Compressions to the chest should be around 60 beats per minute; again, using “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” helps to keep the rate and rhythm. (Fig 2c)

2C

2C

2C

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 19


3

Assess Breathing – Watch for the chest to rise and fall. Looking down the horizon of the dog (from head to tail with you ear next to the dog’s face) is an easy way to visually detect even minor respiratory effort and while listening for air passage through the mouth or nose. (Fig 3)

3

4

Assist Respiration – If no respiratory effort is noted, artificial respirations or rescue breaths can be administered. This is done by enclosing the tongue in the mouth, pulling the flews/lips firmly down, cupping the sides of the muzzle to hold the lips in place (this keeps air from escaping though the sides of the mouth), then firmly and steadily blowing air into the dog’s nose. (Fig 4) Watch for the chest to rise with each rescue breath administered. If enough people are available to assist, rescue breaths can be performed by a third person while chest and abdominal compressions are being administered, otherwise, compressions can be halted temporarily while a series of 3 breaths are given. Approximately 12-20 rescue breaths should be administered per minute, but priority should always be placed on compressions.

4L

20 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

4R


5

Continue to Monitor – Stop periodically to assess the dog. Repeat steps 1 and 3 every 60 to 90 seconds and continue CPCR if no respiratory and cardiac effort is detected. Discontinue CPCR if the dog is showing signs of respiratory and cardiac effort but monitor closely to ensure continued improvement; resume CPCR if dog ceases to have a detectable heartbeat.

6

No Response – When exhaustion overcomes the rescuer(s), CPCR should be ceased. Yes, this is an excruciatingly difficult choice to make. However, if you are feeling light-headed or otherwise unwell, your health must take priority and resuscitative efforts must stop. This is especially true if you are the only rescuer because there are no additional people to help you if your physical condition deteriorates to the point of requiring assistance. Likewise, if the dog has shown no response to your efforts after 10-15 minutes, successful revival and recovery is very unlikely. Sometimes the kindest thing for you and them is to say “enough is enough.”

MY RECENT ENCOUNTER WITH COLLAR ENTRAPMENT The inspiration for writing this came from a collar entrapment that occurred in our household on May 15, 2013. As they are every day, our dogs were outfitted with what I assumed were play-appropriate collars and were let out to sun themselves in the yard before breakfast. After hearing what was obviously distressed vocalizations coming from the yard, I bolted out the door and rounded the corner of the house to the backyard. I could see our alpha bitch, Nyea, was also confused and distressed about the interaction between two of the other dogs and was attempting to break up what, I can only assume she perceived to be a fight between our 6-month-old puppy, 52lb “Kin-dah” and our nearly 10-year-old bitch, 77lb “Ekundu.” As I approached the writhing mass of entangled dogs, instead of a fight, I could see Kin-dah’s jaw had become entrapped in Ekundu’s collar (most likely during play). Kin-dah had then managed to twist the collar multiple times in an effort to free herself, but this only further tightened the collar’s hold on her jaw and was strangulating Ekundu. The plastic safety buckle on Ekundu’s collar was perfectly oriented on the back of her neck; I grabbed hold of it, depressed the sides of the buckle to release the collar and…nothing! The buckle released but only opened an eighth of an inch or so. I pulled and swore and pulled some more, but the buckle would not give any more. At this point, I figured cutting the collar was my next best option, so I ran back into the house and retrieved a pair of kitchen shears. Unfortunately, the collar was too tight for the shears to be inserted under the collar and the collar too thick and difficult to cut, so I used them as a lever and attempted to pry the buckle apart…again nothing! Now what? At this point, I’d followed the mass of entangled dogs approximately 20 feet across the yard. This had to stop! I commanded Kin-dah to “WAIT!” Thankfully, despite her extreme distress, she did. By this point, it was obvious I was losing Ekundu. Her

eyes bulged from her head; she had thick saliva with strands of blood running though it hanging from her lips; her mucous membranes had lost all colour and were a sickly pale; her rear had given up, and her front limbs were fading quickly in their ability to push against the ground in resistance to the tension on her neck. I was losing my Bubba Kundu right in front of my own eyes, but I wasn’t giving up! Moments later, she fully collapsed, and I knew this was my last chance to change the outcome. I grabbed her legs, flipped her body over and over again, finally relieving twist in the collar enough to release from Kin-dah’s jaw. Kin-dah, no surprise, immediately bolted for the house, and I was left alone in the yard with a dead dog laying at my feet– no respiratory effort, no detectable cardiac effort. Being exhausted already from my initial efforts to resolve the situation and the only adult home at the time, I knew my ability to do effective traditional chest compressions was no longer there, so I threw myself over Ekundu’s body and began compressions with my knees and shins. After a minute and a half of compressions and rescue breaths, her mucous membrane colour began to improve; she started to breathe on her own, and her heartbeat became strong and steady once more. Amazingly, after resting in the yard for about five minutes, she was able to get to her feet and wearily walk to the house. We then quickly left for further care and diagnostics at the clinic, where astonishingly, both dogs were discovered to have no significant injuries. After several days of close monitoring, anti-inflammatory medications, pain relievers and antibiotics, both girls were once again happy and healthy. I truly hope every dog fancier reading this article is never faced with this situation. Through informed collar choices, a collar entrapment should be avoidable altogether. If however, such an event does present itself, I hope the information provided can make the difference to save a dog in need. My sincerest gratitude to Dr. Ari Jutkowitz for his recent lecture on CPCR : Current Guidelines and Applications presented at CVC East, which little did I know at the time would help save my beloved Bubba Kundu’s life less than 48 hours later.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 21


AUTHOR Esther Kappert

PHOTOS Esther Kappert Archive

HEALTH

DERMOID SINUS IN THE RIDGEBACK

This article is about the Dermoid Sinus (DS) and the surgery of removing one from the neck and one from the pelvis.

22 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


0

Operation was made by Drs. H. ten Kate, Veterinaryclinic Hellendoorn Nijverdal

HINTZA A DS can be found by palpation of the skin, between thumb and forefinger and can mostly be found in the neck or the pelvis, but also at the earset. We found our DS puppies right after birth by palpation, although both DS were very small, we could feel the little cord and see a collect of hair where the hole was found.

2. The doctor opened the skin around the hole to start the surgery by following the cord. PICTURE 2 3. The doctor is working his way down through the skin and tissue. PICTURE 3

DS can be found from head to toe, following the line of the ridge, but also at the earset. I personally do not know of any other cases than ears, neck and pelvis/ tailset. Our first DS puppy had a DS in her neck, easily found by palpation and visible to the eye. She was operated at the age of 6 weeks. 1. After her neck was shaved, you could see the hole of Dermoid Sinus. PICTURE 1

3 4. When the doctor finds the start of the DS, it is important to be sure it is the start of the DS so it can be fully removed. This one was fully removed and about 4 cm long. PICTURE 4

1

4 T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

2

| 23


A r t i c l e | Dermoid Sinus in the Ridgeback

Since the neck has a lot of skin, in most cases there will be quite a swelling after the surgery (size of tennis ball or even bigger), this swelling mostly starts 2 till 3 days after the surgery and will stay for a week or two, in my experience. The doctor wrapped the neck with a bandage and after waking up the puppy, was feeling very well. I kept her separated from her brothers and sisters for 24 hours because they would eat the bandage. After that time I removed it and the puppy could be with her siblings. Hintza did have a huge swelling, but it fully healed and she is now three years old.

ZENA Our second puppy with a DS was a very special one, she was born with a low weight, had a crown on her head and had DS at her pelvis. We operated her when she was 4 months old because she needed to have enough strength. Her owner was with us until she slept and I could be there when she was operated. 1. After shaving her pelvis the hole of the DS is cleary visible. PICTURE 1

1 24 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | Dermoid Sinus in the Ridgeback

2. As you can see, the puppy was in good care, not noticing what is happening to her. You can see the cord is pulling from underneath the skin, also a indication when you palpate the skin, it feels like there is something stuck beneath. PICTURE 2,3

2

3

3. Like with the surgery of the neck, the doctor is first locating the opening of the DS and makes a incision around it to follow the way down the start of the DS. The cord can be seen on the second picture. PICTURE 4,5

4

5 T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 25


A r t i c l e | Dermoid Sinus in the Ridgeback

4. The DS is now fully removed and was around 3 cm long, not going into the spine. PICTURE 6 5. This is the DS cut in half, as you can see there is lots of hair in it and you can also see a bit of extra tissue has been removed to be sure the DS is fully removed. PICTURE 7

6

7 6. This was the wound after surgery, and the wound 3 days after surgery. This dog did not get any swelling, there is less skinn on the pelvis than in the neck, so there is not so much room for swelling. PICTURE 8,9

8 26 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015

9


A r t i c l e | Dermoid Sinus in the Ridgeback

Both dogs are doing very well and the owners are very happy with their DS operated puppies. Of course we instructed them very well before the surgery and we even kept them up to date during the surgery. Both surgeries took around 90 minutes, with them waking up again. They were treated with antibiotics and painkillers but were feeling ok as soon as they woke up from surgery. Nothing visible anymore on the pelvis of the operated puppy, she is 2 years now.

Hintza and Zena walk together almost every week

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 27


28 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 29


30 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 31


32 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 33


34 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 35


36 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 37


AUTHOR Melanie Nowak, Germany

PHOTOS Melanie Nowak, Oliver Dittrich

YES,

I AM A WORKING RIDGEBACK

Hallo, my name is Tusani Day for Magic, called Magic. I was born on march 22nd 2007 and I am a working Ridgeback! You never thought a Ridgeback is able to work? So you never met me and my kids. Foto by Magdalena Stockschläder / HUNDErt Blicke

SPORT 38 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

I will tell you all about my two favourite sports – Dogsportstournament & Coursing.


0

Melanie Nowak is breeding Rhodesian Ridgebacks under kennel name Magicalline.

THE DOGSPORTSTOURNAMENT When I was a little girl I was already interested in working with my owner Melanie. We started with short sessions on our daily walks in the woods and fields. 5 minutes here and there with walking by feet, learning sit & down, waiting & coming. We trained with lots of fun and lots of goodies that I thought it is a wonderful game together with Melanie. When I was about 1 year old we went to a dog sports club to improve our work together and to start with the sports equipment for dogsportstournament. Of course I was still too young for jumping and running, but I already learned more about the tunnel, the runway and the hurdles in very low hight. It was so exciting, I couldn´t wait to learn and see more of these. With 18 month I finally could start with all equipment and run & jump. Yes, sometimes, ok most times, I was so overactive that I forgot about Melanie and about all I learned, I just wanted to jump, jump, jump. It was so much fun. At the age of 2 years I entered my first tournament. For this first time only the obstacle course, two times with Melanie, as fast as we both could. You need not to

think about it, of course I am faster than Melanie, also over all these obstacles. But at this very first time on a tournament I was so overexcited that I nearly missed half of them. To train my concentration Melanie called me back after every missed obstacle and led me over it. You think this has not been very fast? No, it was not fast, for our first run we needed more than 30 sec for 80 meters. But it was very important for me to learn that also on a tournament I have to go over every obstacle. When I was 2,5 years old I passed the german BegleithundprĂźfung with mentality- and obedience test. This is the condition to start at a tournament in the supreme discipline, the quadrathlon. Only 2 weeks later I competed at my first quadrathlon with Melanie with very nice results. The judge has been impressed by my will to work, and I was impressed by the change of his expression from the first time he saw me to the award ceremony. When we started with the obedience he just had a short look on me, grimaced and told Melanie & me good luck. Looks like he has never seen a ridgeback working before. But after the day he clearly changed his mind and welcomed us to the world of dogsportstournament. The base was done. From then on we have been one or two times a week

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E ¡ I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 39


A r t i c l e | YES, I am a working Ridgeback

on our trainings place. As I am a Ridgeback I hate to do all time the same, especially the obedience. So we train obedience only now and then on the trainings place, but also on our walks. Melanie tries to keep it interesting and fun for me. Short and concentrated sequences with the main focus on correct work with lots of fun. Still the hardest thing for me to learn und understand is, that I also have to sit or lay down on wet and cold weather. Hey, I am a Ridgeback, I don´t have much coat on my belly! But I try my best. On the training place we always change the order of the equipment and the route. That’s how I learn to concentrate on Melanie and not only on my running and jumping. Of course sometimes I think I know which way to go, especially after a long break. That’s the moment I just want to jump & run and have fun. But we are getting better and better through the years and are now a perfect team. Our biggest achievments so far are the District-Champion titels in 2011 & 2013 and the Vice-County-Champion titels in the years 2011 & 2013. As I had puppies in 2012 & 2014 we have not been able to compete. But our still biggest aim is to comepete at the German-Championchips. We already have started with the qualification this year and hope to stay healthy to compete at the District-Championchips, County-Championchips and finally the German-Championchips in 2015. Keep your fingers crossed. My daughter Leia (Magicalline Alias Priness Leia), born April, 14th 2012, also started with dogsportstournament. She is very enthusiastic and looks like a natural. When she has been on her second training on the obstacles she seemed already to know what to do. Proud I have to say that she is more concentrated than me and it looks very promising that she will be even more successful than me. She passed her german Begleithundprüfung with 17 month and competed her first 2 quadrathlons this autumn with amazing results. She really loves to work like me, looks like I gave the good working genes to her. Can´t wait to see her on more tournaments. My youngest daughter Fay (Magicalline born to dance in fairy dust), born March, 8th 2014 still is very young and not allowed to jump. But she starts working with amazing energy and endurance. For sure she also got my working genes and will be a perfect team partner to Melanie in future.

40 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | YES, I am a working Ridgeback

ABOUT DOGSPORTSTOURNAMENT Dogsportstournament is a kind of dogsports, which owner & dog do together as a team. The most popular versions are Quadrathlon 1-3 (VK 1-3) & cross-country-run 1km, 2km or 5km. Further versions are the Triathlon, the Steeplechase, the Qualifications- Speed- Cup and the team competitions Shorty (2 teams) & Combination-Speed-Cup (3 teams).

The Quadrathlon:

Obedience • VK1: Walking with leash, without leash, sit & down while walking • VK2: Walking without leash, sit,down & stand while walking • VK3: Walking without leash, sit while walking, down & stand while running Hurdle race • VK1 & VK2: Owner & dog jump in 60 meter over 4 x 30cm high hurdles. After 30 meters comes a turner bar. Owner & dog has to be syncron over the hurdles, otherwise they will get failing points. • VK3: Owner & dog jump in 80 meter over 6 x 35cm high hurdles. After 40 meters comes a turner bar. Owner & dog has to be syncron over the hurdles, otherwise they will get failing points. Slalom ( 2 times ) • VK1: 65 meters – Owner & dog have to run through 7 gates of bars in zig-zag-pattern. Missing one gate means getting failing points. • VK2: 70 meters - Owner & dog have to run through 7 gates of

bars in zig-zag-pattern. Missing one gate means getting failing points. • VK3: 75 meters - Owner & dog have to run through 7 gates of bars in zig-zag-pattern. Missing one gate means getting failing points. Steeplechase ( 2 times ) • The centerpiece of the dogsportstournament • VK1 – VK3: 75 meters in a linear slope with 8 different obstacles. Owner runs as fast as possible on the right side next to the obstacles, the dog has to run over all obstacles. Missing one means again failing points. The Cross-Country-Run • 1km, 2km or 5km are possible • The dog has to be on the leash with a harness, the owner has an abdominal belt with panic snaps • The dog is allowed to pull the owner The Triathlon • Consists of the same competitions than the Quadrathlon, just without Obedience • All competitions are like VK1

The Steeplechase • Single Competition as written under Quadrathlon/Steeplechase The Qualifications- Speed- Cup • 2 identical show-jumping-courses next to each other • 2 teams run at the same time • Every obstacle has to be done by the dog • The competition will be held in sudden death The Shorty • Team-competition (1 team consists of 2 owner & dog teams) 2 parallel Steeplechase The Combination-Speed-Cup • Team-competition (1 team consists of 3 owner & dog teams) • The Parcour is subdivided in 3 sections with obstacles, gates of bars & turner bars • Every owner & dog team gets a section • Like in a realy the second owner & dog team starts when the first finishes his section

All versions always have to be completed by owner & dog as a team!

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 41


A r t i c l e | YES, I am a working Ridgeback

COURSING Now I will tell you all about my second hobby, lure coursing & dirt track races.

Now I will tell you all about my second hobby, lure coursing & dirt track races. As to be sure I don´t really remember when I started with Coursing. When I was a young girl we didn´t have Coursing for Ridgebacks in Germany. I started really early with showing my hunting skills. Melanie of course didn´t want me to hunt and we have been looking for a possibility for me to use my skills legally. In the beginning we recognized some coursings organized by the sighthound clubs for every race. Oh I was so excited when I first saw this artificial lure. I wanted to go and chase it, immediately. And I did great. So I came to my new and second hobby, the lure coursing. In Germany sadly the Rhodesian Ridgebacks are not allowed to compete in official lure coursings. So we talked to our Club, Club E.L.S.A., that we like to organize lure coursings for Rhodesian Ridgebacks. No sooner said than done! We started with the organization of 2-3 lure coursings a year throughout Germany. I

42 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

remember well my every time new excitement. We did not go for training, our training was to go on long walks, doing our dogsports and running and playing with my companion Kevu (Ekevu vom Moerser Schloss). With the years more and more Ridgebacks came to our events. I was really successful and managed to get the titles: Club E.L.S.A. Coursing Master 2009 + 2010 + 2012 + 2013. I am so proud. In the year 2010 we also started to go for training at the racing arena and also organized Ridgeback events there. Every sighthound owner who is active in dirt track races with their dogs know, that you will lose time if you get older than 4 years. So I watched the younger girls being faster than me. But you can believe me, I still love it and I will do it as long as I am healthy. No matter what time I will run. Once a year I also have been to the Slovakian club weekend. As I was born in Slovakia I took this chance to meet my family and friends. On one of these meeting days every time is a lure coursing. In Slovakia the Ridgebacks also have the possibility to get a lure


A r t i c l e | YES, I am a working Ridgeback

coursing license, so they had classes for amateurs and for profis. You know I didn´t have a license as it is not possible in Germany. So I had to compete all time in the amateur class. Until this summer. Melanie talked to the head of the Slovakian Racing Hounds and what we have to do that I also can get a license. And… we managed to get a license for lure coursing in Slovakia. That´s so amazing, at the end of my career I got my license. Wow. Sadly I am too old now to compete

in profi class in Slovakia, I already had to compete in veteran class last summer with 7 years. But the best thing was, that I won everything out of veteran class and was: SKCHR Coursing Cup Winner! Now it is the time of my daughters to compete and win. Leia (Magicalline Alias Princess Leia) & Loki (Magicalline alias Storm) from my first litter in 2012 did already great. Both have amazing wins and will be success-

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 43


A r t i c l e | YES, I am a working Ridgeback

ful in future. Leia was awarded Club E.L.S.A. Coursing Master 2nd place 2014 & also got her Slovakian lure coursing licence. Also Jack (Magicalline Alias Jack Sparrow) started to be successful, after it took him a long time to recognize what fun it is. My little daughters Fay (Magicalline born to dance in fairy dust) & Hailey (Magicalline born to shine bright) and their brother Django (Magicalline born to be free Django Unchained) from my litter in 2014 also started with perfect hunting skills in junior class. Until they are 18 month old they are only allowed to run 50-70 meters in a linear slope. But for sure they also will be great in future. Looks that also here my genes are recognizable.

44 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015

To re-establish the Rhodesian Ridgeback in Germany for coursing & dirt track races I also started to learn running with a muzzle and a shirt. This is the precondition for not single runs and for being generally accepted. So I hope that more and more Ridgebacks come for training and also train with muzzles and shirts and run with minimum one dog together. They will see, it麓s even more fun. So, what is the conclusion of my story? Yes, Rhodesian Ridgebacks are working dogs. They are different and they work different, but it does not make it less fun. If the owner gets involved with the RR they can become a perfect team. Keep on working with your Ridgeback, we LOVE it.

Yours Magic


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 45


46 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 47


48 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 49


50 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 51


52 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 53


54 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 55


AUTHOR Barbara Obermoser

PHOTOS Barbara Obermoser archive

NSOAH

SERVICE DOG SPORT 56 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


0

I can not describe how much I love Nsoah. He is healthy, has a typical breed characte and work with 110%. I’m a proud owner of this special dog!

WORKING WITH A DOG It was a foregone conclusion that a Rhodesian Ridgeback was to be our future companion. For a long time we pondered about what we want to achieve with our dog and how to work to reach the goals. Close cooperation between dog and owner is a very special experience. Since my friend is confined to the wheelchair, Nsoah learnt from a very young age to cope with this. He loved to pick things up and bring them and was quite happy to run beside the wheelchair. His love of humans soon made itself felt. He is neither timid nor aggressive. These characteristics combined with his playfulness and love for working formed a good basis for our training him as a service dog. He attended puppy class, then training classes for young dogs, courses for socializing and obedience training, but the most intensive part was the bonding between Nsoah, my friend in the wheelchair and myself. We included small games and exercises in our daily life and as we had recently taken part in a clicker seminar, we put what we had learnt to good use. He was quick to learn and loved the training sessions. He accompanied my friend and myself nearly every-

where, be it to shopping centers, city centers, various events, restaurants, etc. At home he has his fixed jobs: picking up objects, closing doors, removing socks and so on. He has developed into a very good service dog and retained his friendly disposition. Furthermore his health (x- rays, health check) is excellent, which also plays an important role- only a fit, healthy dog is suitable for being a service dog. Naturally, Noah is first and foremost a member of the family, who doesn’t only have jobs to do. We try to inject lots of variety into his life. Although he is not exactly a fan of dog shows, we do attend international events from time to time. However we prefer to spend our free time in the fresh air. Nsoah also loves the race track! To ring the changes, we also train him in tracking and always practice obedience. Nsoah is an ordinary dog, who enjoys ordinary things of life, be it swimming, biking, playing with his “doggy” friends or lying in the sun (from the vantage point of the sofa!) There are various ways of keeping a Rhodesian Ridgeback active- be it on the race track, in rescue dog work, tracking or as a hunting dog, which was his original purpose, or opening up new opportunities- as a service dog.

The human sometimes feels that he is the owner, has been elevated to the ruler. This is a mistake. He is only one part of the whole. Its role is that of a keeper... to what has been entrusted to him!

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 57


A r t i c l e | Nsoah, service dog

SERVICE-DOG

NSOAHS WORKING ON WHEELCHAIR • Pick up objects, bring objects, light on- light off, open and close the doors, hold objects, help to take off clothes.... • Not everyone Rhodesian Ridgeback is suited for this work. • Noah is very intelligent, learns quickly, love work everyday, is stable in the head and body. He trusts me and I him.. It is important to know your dog. • The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a work dog, a allrounder. • In breeding should health, race typical character and work characteristics be the most important. • He was quick to learn and loved the training sessions. He accompanied my friend and myself nearly every

58 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | Nsoah, service dog

MANTRAILING

Each person has a specific individual odor. Dog noses are able to identify that particular smell and tracking. Mantrailing therefore means that a Mantrailer dog follows an individual scent trail. This scent trail leaves every man, whether he is or is whether it bears much or little clothing. With the help of an object, which is clearly fraught with the smell of the person sought, the Mantrailer from the myriad smells of the environment can take the right scent trail to filter out and make the trace of the missing person identified. The Mantrailer works on any surface: forest, prairie, or concrete. This makes the work of the Mantrailers so unique The handler has the important task of the dog “to read”, ie the signals showing a dog during search - finest changes in body posture, tail, head movements - to see, to interpret and react accordingly. Nsoah is very successful in this work. We have also trained with the dog unit (K9) of the police in Budapest. They were very surprised that a Ridgeback works so well and purposefully. I’m a proud owner...

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 59


A r t i c l e | Nsoah, service dog

OBEDIENCE

• In obedience there are various possibilities to work with the dog. Nsoah has very much fun. Obedience is very important. We need it in the city when we meet people or dogs, when we go to a restaurant and so on...

OTHER ACCTIVITIES FOR FUN AND KEEP US IN FORM Race track To be able to control the hunting behave well, we regularly go to the racetrack. In this place Nsoah must hunt as long as he wants. We have already participated in dog racing and we were always well placed.

60 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | Nsoah, service dog

Bike- Jöring Bikejöring is cycling with your dog. The special thing about it: The dog can and should draw - namely the wheel The dog helps a Harness and is hung with a special tug at the wheel.. Now make man and dog sporting a unit of a special kind. At speeds up to 30 km / h depends on perfect coordination and instantaneous communication. We are traveling a lot. Nsoah is HD ED OCD free and clear of transitional vertebrae. Again, the health is very important. Also, the dog must be very stable in the head. He must be well follow. Here are important komandos: Start, Stop, Left, Right, slow, fast - very important

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 61


62 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 63


64 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 65


66 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 67


68 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 69


AUTHOR Anastasia Kharitonova

PHOTOS Anastasia Kharitonova archive

HANDLING

ANASTASIA KHARITONOVA So, it all started about 20 years ago. My parents are not cynologists, but it was their dream to have a dog. 70 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


0

Anastasia Kharitonova lives in Moscow, Russia

At the time when it was not an easy period for our country, my parents decided to buy a working breed dog. It was an easy choice of breed, the Rottweiler. As my parents are serious people, after they received a call from a club to participate in a puppy show, they decided to go there. So all the family went along as most were puppy owners.

it was very difficult, because I was only 11 years old at

The Rottweiler is a working breed which requires lots of exercise prior to exhibiting at dog shows. My mother was not ready to run a lot and after a few rounds running she complained and asked me to replace her. But

After success in this very important show, I understood

the time and our “puppy” was not well trained and her weight was already about 40kg But since my star sign is Leo the “Lion” (I was born in August) I ran this difficult show ring with big enthusiasm and won.

that I liked this scene. After time I understood that I wanted to participate in more shows and to show our dog by myself, but my parents were against this. I dis-

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 71


A r t i c l e | Anastasia Kharitonova

covered that the school of junior handlers is opened at the Russian Cynological Federation. I passed an exam to be included to the group. It was successful. I trained there a year and finished this school with a high graduation certificate. After this we bought our second Rottweiler and opened our kennel “Rottharburg”. And I started to show other dogs as well. I continued to participate as a junior handler in show rings and in 2000 I won best junior handler of the year in Russia. One day I went shopping at one of the biggest dog shows in Russia and met the owner of little Rhodesian Ridgebacks who wanted to buy a good show lead. When I saw what he wanted to buy, I did not agree so I recommended what to buy. Then he asked about the possibility to show his puppy. I did this and we won Best puppy. We decided to continue our work and later this puppy became one of the most titled females of

I love my work.

72 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

this time. Together we won most of the biggest shows and group 6 of most CACIB shows in Russia. It was a beginning of breeding and increased numbers of Rhodesian Ridgebacks in Russia. After time I started to acquire a lot of Rhodesian Ridgebacks for working, then started to travel more (for Russians it`s not easy, we lived so far from the main show locations). We won a lot in nearby countries and in Russia itself. It was a big breed success and Russian ridgebacks became batter and better at that time. I have vast experience showing different breeds, but I decided to settle on two breeds: Rottweiler and Rhodesian Ridgebacks. I don`t like it when handlers promise to show several dogs from different breed during one day. In my opinion it`s not serious and no guarantee of achieving good results. It`s not my way. So I mostly fix on two breeds. My first two trips to World and European Dog Shows were not really successful, but I learnt how it happened, the process, method of judgment and style of presentation of European people. We worked a lot, I did a lot of shows and in 2008 I finally won my first World Winners Competition. It was a great but difficult


A r t i c l e | Anastasia Kharitonova

I wish everybody to find their own way of winning!

time, I had fantastic wins with male and female RR together! It was an unbelievable result. It was a great start and I continue to work to better this result! After this I have several wins at European and World Dog Shows, but of course the best one is in Budapest, Hungary. It was a very difficult show with 3 rings of one breed. But I was in all the rings during my time there and won Junior WW, and both WW with male and female + BOB and BIG-I!!! I can`t forget this day and show. I will never be used to the fact that it happened with me. I`d like to say thanks to the judges for their choice! I like my work. From my high level of education I`m a psychologist. It helps me because I need to work a lot with people who are much more difficult than to work with than dogs. Dogs are dogs but people have other patterns of behavior that can be devious and con-

trolling. I used to collect all the owners of dogs in one team and after time we became closer and closer. And I`m proud of this. Each time you can see me at shows I`m with my team. That`s why I work with people only if they trust me and if we can discuss everything we do together. I`m sure, only in this case we can work achieve a result. Only in this case I feel that I have the power to win. Also I have several special training events during the year of which I`m proud. When I started to become a handler nobody wanted to teach me or to answer my questions. But you can`t show the dog if you don`t understand it. And it can come only after time and understanding of what you are doing and trying to achieve. So now that I have the possibility to share my knowledge with other people who are interested. Each time I receive any message about wins that my students have had it feels so great, I`m so proud to be helpful. Dogs are different, judges are different, and situations of presentation at shows are different. I like if I can find this individual way of handling and to win.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 73


74 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 75


76 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 77


78 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 79


80 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 81


AUTHOR Paula Aitchison (Edgar), Macumazahn Rhodesian Ridgebacks

PHOTOS Paula Aitchison (Edgar) Archive

BREEDERS

FROM DOWN UNDER My “Prefix”, as it is known here in Australia, was taken from the “Allan Quatermain” books written by Henry Rider Haggard Allan Quatermain was known to the natives in Africa as “Macumazahn” or “He who watches in the night” or “Night Watchman” … for me, it was the perfect description of what a Ridgeback does!

82 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | From Down Under

It was June 1984 – I had a number of dog breeds written on a piece of paper, which was on my work desk. My boss happened to walk into my office and proceeded to scrutinize it!! “What’s this for”, he said in his blunt tone (he was a barrister!) I replied - “we are looking for a dog and this is what we have narrowed it down to”, to which his response was, “you DON’T want any of these dogs you WANT a Rhodesian Ridgeback”! “A what??” I replied. I had no idea what he was talking about. I had never heard of the breed and of course there was no internet in 1984 so no chance to Google it and you would never catch me in a library, so how would I know about this dog! Anyway, my boss’s brother just happened to own a de-­sexed pair. He brought photos in the next day for me, to take home to show my partner, these “amazing dogs” with a ridge on their back! Well, it was LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT! and so the hunt was on to find one. It must have been fate, as the following weekend there just happened to be a litter of Rhodesian Ridgeback puppies advertised for sale in the newspaper, here in Adelaide. I rang the number, got the address and drove straight there….only 2 puppies left for sale – a ridgeless female and a ridged male. We bought the ridged male and called him Nubie -we picked him up 2 weeks later. I was SO excited, I could not stop smothering him with hugs and kisses. Naturally, we had to stop at 3 friend’s

houses on the way home to show off my new baby. He was so tiny, only 3.5kg at 6wks (back in those days it was common for pups to go at 6wks) he slept in Paul’s shoe the first night we brought him home. This is how my love affair with this wonderful breed began. Even though Nubie was undersized at 6wks, he grew to 27” and was a very handsome upstanding dog indeed, with the most gentle nature and magnificent movement. He was a talking point on our daily walks. Every day on the beach I would get people saying; “OMG, what is wrong with his back?” Or “Is he angry all the time?”; “why doesn’t your dog like me?”; “has your dog had an operation on his spine?” (to which my standard reply was “Yes and they sewed his skin back the wrong way around”); “how much hair gel does it take to do that?”; “can I touch it? will it hurt him if I pat it the wrong way?” ; “what’s your dog crossed with?” and so on….. The first Ridgeback was introduced to South Australia in 1971, so there were very few around, hence people were curious as to what he was. I never intended to show and certainly not breed, only to do obedience and have this wonderful unique dog as my companion. In early 1986 my obedience club held a show which the club secretary had informed me that there were 4 RRs entered and I should go along to the show to meet some other people who had this

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 83


Article |

unique and “rare” breed. I met the most wonderful small group of people and their gorgeous dogs. They soon introduced us to the remaining handful of RR show people. We all became great friends and still are to this day. They encouraged and helped me to show Nubie. He was a natural in the ring and did very well for himself. He was never bred from as he had a thyroid issue and low sperm count – hence why I continue to have my dogs checked for thyroid, just in case. It is in our Breed and unless it is checked for goes unnoticed, therefore bred with and the problem perpetuates like so many issues. At least nowadays, we have access to all kinds of health and genetic testing, so we can make an informed decision on what should or should not be used, or who we can mate to who. I take my responsibilities as a custodian of the Breed passionately and do as much as I can to protect the Breed to the best of my ability whether it be making a decision to choose the right quality bitch & dog to breed; do as much health testing as I can to reduce the incidence of issues; cull when necessary; place puppies in the best homes possible and to give the new owners help and support whenever needed for whatever reason; continue to listen to others and their experiences, both good and bad and to never stop learning about our wonderful Breed. From my first litter in 1990, my dogs have been successful in both the All Breeds & Specialty rings. It is re-

84 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

From Down Under


A r t i c l e | From Down Under

warding when Breeder Judges acknowledge a dog as being good examples of what a Ridgeback should be rather than what a “show dog” should be, which seems to be what a lot of All Breeds Judges are looking for in their ring. In saying that though, there are more and more Ridgebacks being rewarded in the All Breeds ring at both Group & In Show level, whether it’s because of sheer numbers being shown now, or Judges are better educated in our Breed and are seeing them as more than “just a boring brown dog”. Yes you can have both, these are very special dogs and if you get one, treasure it and don’t let it go!

What a great hobby we have, with so many like minded people who “are owned” by this magnificent breed. I have made best friends and long lasting friendships through our breed and stayed with some amazing RR folk all around the world – all because of the love we have for our dogs. I am blessed and acknowledge, how my Ridgebacks have shaped my life and made me who I am today. My family has grown from 1 to 2 then 3 and now 30 years down the track, today I have 6 “kids” who I share my home with and bed and couch… We all know they are addictive you cannot possibly stop at just one!

Cheers from the “land down under” may you and your families have a safe and prosperous 2015.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 85


86 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 87


AUTHOR Dorothy McGoldrick

PHOTOS Dorothy McGoldrick Archive

BREEDERS

VILLAGEDOGS I am a dog person. I don’t remember a time when I didn’t have a dog around. During my childhood, I always had at least one dog. Sometimes, I would borrow a dog from a friend just to get a feel for walking another breed. My mother always complained about me walking other people’s dogs. She told me that our family is genetically hard-wired to live with dogs. Like me, she also doesn’t remember a time without one. I even went on to study biology and ethology to satisfy my animal curiosity.

88 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | Villagedogs

My beginnings with the Ridgeback breed were very unremarkable. My young son was suffering from skin allergies and I started to look around for a short-haired breed of dog. A friend of mine who is running a small boarding kennel in the Flemish countryside knew that I was looking for a new dog. She called to say that she had one which would suit my needs. I jumped into the car and soon found myself face-to-face with Multi CH Vishala Kinghunter Lance, owned by Stig Carl-

son. Lance was a beautiful, strong, well-muscled boy topped off with a super mild temperament. It was love at first sight! I never liked breeds that had to be messed with just to look good; so no clipping, chopping or any other primping activity. The what-you-see-is-what-youget Ridgeback was perfect for me. This is how my journey began. The search for my first Ridgeback had its ups and downs. Those were the days before the Internet. Finally, a French-bred male joined our family. Hintza (yes, the name came from the A Far Off Place film) was a strong, dominant male with an unpredictable temperament. After a short sting in the show ring, he promptly bit my son and soon after, got sterilized, which helped his dominance issues to some degree. I owe him a world of gratitude, though. He taught me everything that I wanted, and not wanted, to know about the Ridgeback. Stig Carlson, my first mentor, was a great ambassador for the breed and for dogs, in general. We spent much time discussing dog behavior issues and I have learned much from him in these early days. Unfortunately, Stig passed away way too early. Hintza also passed away soon after suffering from bone cancer. By then, I was firmly hooked on the Ridgeback breed and was busy looking for a new puppy with showing and breeding potential. One lovely spring, Dice joined our family all the way from Sacramento, California, US.

The credentials of the author, Stig Carlson, are impeccable. He’s a Swedish national with an international reputation as a breeder, author and l ecturer on Rhodesian Ridgebacks. He’s owned Ridgebacks since 1968 and is a respected officer of many dog clubs. His kennel name was Kinghunter’s and he had a few dogs who did well in the show ring; Loustigens Douglas, an imported bitch from England; Sanjika Nandiswaya of Janak, his own bred dog; Kinghunter’s Cassiopeja Lionstar. He also imported a male from Australia; Vishala Kinghunter Lance.

Dice (Ukukhanya Midsummers Night Dream) was not particularly beautiful in the classical sense. I had a choice of other puppies but still picked her. I suppose this is where the “eye for a dog” comes in handy. She came from old South African and American lines. Her pedigree read like the Who’s Who in the Ridgeback world: CH Karoskloof Bayezana Naka, AM/CAN Ch. Royalton’s Blue Max, Ch. Turoka Globe’s Casino Renose, BIS, SA, ZIM Ch. Globe’s Roving Red Regent to name a few. Again, much of my knowledge about these dogs came from Ginny and Nelda Vaughn of Globe Rhodesian Ridgebacks. These ladies also provided me with 100+ pages of Globe Encyclopedia containing images and pedigrees of all dogs in their lines. They’ve answered my countless questions and provided sound advice. Mentoring is the most precious gift that another breeder can give. Totally priceless! Dice grew up to be a true functional Ridgeback. She was frequently pushed back in the show ring for being “not elegant enough” but was also highly praised

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 89


Article |

Dice

Dice as puppy

by experienced Ridgeback judges for her exceptional conformation and movement. When she moved up and down, she would not wobble even a centimeter on either side; her movement was completely true. Dice produced an outstanding progeny, including four top champions. To date, her son BIS, BISS, Crufts Winner MCH Villagedogs Hot Topic produced 13 champions all over the world. The search for my second foundation bitch took me all the way to the beautiful Honolulu island in Hawaii. Being a great believer in genetic versatility, I was looking for a well-bred bitch with lesser-known pedigree in Europe. Tom and Barbara Peach from Pupukearidge were planning a litter with Ikaika (MBIS BISS CH Pupukearidge Ikaika O Sprngvly) and Kela Sr. (CH Starridge Kela O Pupukea), a very good combination of American and old Australian bloodlines. One cold November morning, Pupukearidge Kela Kai O Villagedogs arrived in Belgium and begun her show career two weeks later. Although superbly built with lovely temperament, Kela had a handicap on the European show scene; her coat colour was light wheaten. The popularity of the dark coated Ridgeback was then at all time high, and in

90 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

Villagedogs

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

the show ring lineup, Kela would stick out like a sore thumb! Thankfully, many experienced judges focused on her confirmation instead. By the age of four, Kela won seven champion titles, several BISS wins together with junior and adult European Winner titles. For her first litter, she was bred to Nelson and produced MBISS MCH Villagedogs Ka Makana “Mak”. Mak is equally successful in the show ring. At three years old, Mak notched up six champion titles, several BISS wins and Best Junior at Crufts title. I consider my females as the most important part of my breeding. It is the stud dog that must complement my bitch, not the other way around. Maybe this is an obvious thing to say but too often, the prospective litter breeders choose the top-winning stud dog regardless of the scope of the contribution it may add to the planned litter. A good stud dog can help, but it is not the complete solution. If I ask about the faults that my chosen stud dog is carrying, I don’t mean ridgeless or excessive white. It is the width of the thigh, the sloping croup, and the weak pasterns that I am interested in. These are functional faults, not cosmetic. An anatomically correct dog will look and move beautifully and the slightly larger white patch on its chest will go unnoticed.


A r t i c l e | Villagedogs

Nelson I also consider genetic testing, which is now widely available, as crucial to prevent nasty surprises in the whelping box. Way back then, it was a guessing game if the dog has DM or Early Onset of Canine Deafness. It is not necessary to remove the carriers from the gene pool, but preventing the pairing up of genes is critical. The decision to start breeding should never be taken lightly. A lot can go wrong in the breed simply through lack of knowledge, and knowledge doesn’t come overnight. I would encourage anyone considering a breeding career to find a mentor willing to offer help and advice in the early days. Even more responsibility lies with a stud dog owner. We tend to forget that a stud dog is just as responsible for the genetic code as the bitch. The genetic health of the stud dog is of paramount importance. Only about 10% of my puppies enjoy show careers; the rest live in loving pet homes. My responsibility to those dogs is far greater than producing show winners. Don’t get me wrong: I love to show my dogs. There is no greater pleasure than showing and winning with a self-bred dog. But, for me, the definition of success is getting a phone call from a previous puppy buyer asking for another puppy.

Hintza

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 91


92 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 93


94 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 95


CLUBS

CLUB E.L.S.A 25 YEARS The German Club ELSA is the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club in the German Kennel Club VDH Monika Pehr, 1st chairman

& www.club-elsa.de

96 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


The German Club ELSA is the only Rhodesian Ridgeback Club in the German Kennel Club VDH, where the breeding dogs in addition to health checks like HD/ OCD and ED have to go through an extensive breed-

HEALTH

ing exam with an audited breed-specific behavioral and

1

Our breeders visit regularly breeders meetings and we

The German Club ELSA is the only Rhodesian Ridgeback Club in the German Kennel Club VDH, where the breeding dogs in addition to health checks like HD/OCD and ED have to go through an extensive breeding exam with an audited breed-specific behavioral and gunshot test.

2 No breeder has 2 litters at the same time, so the optimal care of the bitch and her puppies is guaranteed.

gunshot test.

have very strict rules for the raising of the puppies in the Kennels. Also for our stud dog owners further education is self-evident. For us the strictest discipline controls are no advertising slogan - it is actually practiced! The breeding regulations of the Club ELSA implies that breeders may hold a maximum of 2 breeding females with which they breed only each approximately every 2 years. No breeder has 2 litters at the same time, so the optimal care of the bitch and her puppies is guaranteed. With each brood bitch up to 3 litters are allowed, so that the utilization of the bitch is prevented. The club ELSA is the only Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of the VDH who has a hunting examination and performance judges order in which the implementation of tracking exams is regulated specifically. For our active hunting members training weekends are organized, in which, of course as in all our events, also non-members can participate. Club Individual Exhibitions are also part of our activities like coursing, breeders conferences and variety seminars (for example Mantrailing) that are offered by our

3

non hunting performance department. We also organize ring training, young dogs walks and much more.

In Club ELSA health of the dogs is paramount.

For several years we make test matings (approved by the VDH breeding Committee) between ridged and ridgeless Ridgeback. We hope to get more knowledge, whether we can reduce the risk of Dermoid Sinus in our breed if we use ridgeless Ridgebacks in our breeding program. Even if there are always rumors that there are ridgeless Ridgebacks with DS, so there is not a single excised Dermoid Sinus of a ridgeless Ridgeback in the world that could be undoubtedly positively identified as such and assigned by DNA analysis to the dog. In Club ELSA health of the dogs is paramount.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 97


JUBILEE CLUBSHOW 2015 & SPECIALTY SHOW 25 YEARS CLUB E.L.S.A.

9

n

k

DATE

LOCATION

JUDGES

11. 7. 2015 Jubilee Clubshow 2015

Spa Gardens

11. 7. 2015 Dogs & BOB

12. 7. 2015 Specialty Show 2015 On Saturday evening will be a gala dinner with a big tombola and distinctions.

Bad Sooden Allendorf

Snežka Kuralt

(Slovenia)

Germany

Bitches

Vanessa Moyano

( Spain )

12. 7. 2015 Dogs & BOB

Vanessa Moyano

( Spain )

Bitches

Snežka Kuralt

(Slovenia)

More informations on www.club-elsa.de 98 | THEDOGM AGAZ INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 99


100 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 101


102 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 103


104 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


INFO www.rhodesian-ridgeback-pedigree.org

Monika Pehr

INTERESTING

THE RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK PEDIGREE SEARCH The online platform Rhodesian Ridgeback Pedigree Search was not planned from the beginning in this scale, what it is today, has simply evolved over the years and as so often coincidences have also played a role. When I started in 1999 with the database I did not realize what dimensions that would accept and how helpful it really should be for the breeders worldwide. In 1998 I got my first Ridgeback and one year later I bought a pedigree program and began to collect the data in a database. In 2001 I drove for mating with my bitch Beris Bilé Karpaty to Denmark to the stud dog Witches LeCreme’s Trick. His owner Helle Lauridsen was like me very interested in pedigrees and had also a database. I decided to buy me the same program as Helle to provide a straightforward import of her data. Breed Mate, an Australian program with many interesting features was so installed on my computer. My old data has been imported, then the database of Helle added - and so the chaos was perfect. At once there were many dogs with different spellings, but actually were always the same dog. I had to come up with a system for it all to get a grip and decided to revise all the records completely. A lot of work, because the database already comprised by that time about 15,000 entries. I decided that kennel name, where the dog was bred, always to write in capital letters. The names of the dogs in upper and lower case. It was the challenge that sometimes I was not sure which was

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 105


A r t i c l e | The Rhodesian Ridgeback Pedigree Search

correct spelling of a name now, but I had to live with it initially easy. In months of hard work, often late into the night, I have revised the database and tried to assign the dogs correctly. During this time I got over Helle contact to Yvonne Bowker in England. She has had a lot of contact to old breeders in UK and worked extensive with the breed registry data of Rhodesian Ridgebacks in the UK. She even had a database and she offered me the data import. But‌.after my experience with the database of Helle I did not want to import this data easily, because then everything would be messed up again. So I had to tap all records in. At the End of 2001, I was finished with the revision of the data and had the idea to put my database online. Two friends of mine - Peter Rost and Uwe Scheibel were immediately impressed by this idea and offered me to put their technical know-how to provide and create a program for the database. Based on the online database of Alfirin Technologies, which was already optimized for the Breed Mate database, they programmed an online search engine and I they created the first design for the website. On 20 June 2002 the database started online. With each year that the Pedigree Search online is growing and the size of the database continues. In 2009 I got the data of about 20,000 dogs from Australia from Vicki Moritz (Kennel Ujamaa), whereby the amount of data has grown quickly to nearly 70,000 dogs. 2010 the Pedigree Search got a new look and we have added some points - such as articles on breeders, genetics and health. The most important thing is still the pedigree database. She can only be expanded and corrected through the intensive collaboration with breeders worldwide. Meanwhile, almost 90,000 dogs are in the database, and it are getting more every day. Janet Murray (Kennel Ulundi) Ann Chamberlain (Kennel Mazoe) and Linda Costa (Kennel Sarula), who have been in the breed a very long time, have helped me a lot - especially when it comes to the foundation dogs of our breed. That was (and still is) probably the hardest part, because we could only rely on the old, hand-written documents (as mentioned earlier), and in terms of spelling this documents unfortunately are not always correct and often contain transmission errors. The Pedigree Search itself and all items on our site are generally in English. However, if the breeders have problems with the English language and to give them the possibility to work with the database, we have

106 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

¡ IS S UE 1/ 2015


A r t i c l e | The Rhodesian Ridgeback Pedigree Search

translated it in to some different languages. Besides English the users have the possibility to search in German, Spanish, Czech, Italian, French, Hungarian and Polish for the pedigrees of dogs and to make trial pedigees for their planned litters. With the translation I have had help from Annemarie Marenco (Kennel Amazulu - France), Vanessa Moyano (Kennel Mulema Mua Roo - Spain), Sara Venturelli (Kennel Harmakhis - Italy), Mirek Krejci (Kennel Nyathi - Czech Republic), Jolanta Schwien (Kennel Mancala - Poland) and Melinda Kert茅sz (Kennel Bulawayo Baobab - Hungary). It is not possible to list all people who have helped me (and still help) while researching for the pedigrees of our

Ridgebacks. So at this point I want to thank everyone for their tireless help! Without you all this project would not be as international and extensive as it is. Since I have to type in all records by hand and the data cannot be simply imported (because the different spellings would otherwise lead back to the same mess as in the beginning) it sometimes may take a little longer until the new entries appear in the database. The database is free for all and the work it is my hobby, although this hobby has already reached such enormous proportions, which is hard to deal with. Therefore I beg for your indulgence, if the next update should take again a little longer.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 107


108 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


JUDGES

AROUND THE GLOBE

PART 1

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 109


Lisa M. Hoffman Breeder Owner Handler Judge

UNITED STATES

COUNTY LINE RIDGEBACKS

countylineridge@comcast.net www.countylineridgebacks.com

Monika Pehr Speciality Breed Judge

• 1993 National Specialty • Award of Merit: Ch. Mine Creek’s Buster By Kwetu, ROM1994 National Specialty • 1994 National Specialty • Award of Merit: Ch. Mine Creek’s Buster by Kwetu, ROM • Reserve Winner’s Bitch & Award of Merit: Ch. County Line’s Heartbreaker • 2000 National Specialty • Reserve Winners Dog: Ch. County Line’s I Like it Like That • 2003 National Specialty • Winners Dog, Best of Winners & Award of Merit • Ch. County Line’s Ringmaster

I saw the first Ridgebacks during an Arabian Horse Show and was fascinated and impressed about this dogs. From this day on I was sure – this is my breed. I got my first Ridgeback in 1998 and in the year 2000 my Kennel name was FCI-registered. Since the year 2001 I am breeding Rhodesian Ridgebacks under the Kennel Prefix Thuraia. Since 2003 I am member of the German RR Club ELSA. I am active member of the Breeding Licensing Committee and for a one year I was stud book leader. After that I was breeding adviser and since the year 2007 I am first chairman of the Club ELSA. I am very interested in Pedigrees and since 2002 I have the Rhodesian Ridgeback Pedigree Search with almost 90.000 entries online.

GERMANY

THURAIA RHODESIAN RIDGEBACKS

kimba@thuraia.de www.thuraia.de

110 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

In 1985, I got my first Ridgeback, Ch. Ivy League’s Sgt. Pepper. I did not know it then that this would become my passion for life. My 2nd dog was Ch. County Line’s Jessie James, “Jessie”, a girl who would be my foundation bitch. I then bought Ch. Mine Creek’s Buster By Kwetu, ROM and had him shown to #5 Ridgeback in 1993. Some of my accomplishments as a Breeder are as follows:

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

In January 2012 I started with the training for the Speciality Breed Judge for Rhodesian Ridgebacks and I have passed the exam in German Kennel Club VDH in June 2013.

• 2004 National Specialty • Best of Oppoite Sex: Ch. County Line’s Pandora of Tajamani • 2005 National Specialty • Award of Merit: Ch. County Line’s Pandora of Tajamani • 2014 National Specialty • Puppy Sweepstakes • 2nd Place: County Line’s Winning Colors • 2nd Place: County Line’s Lemon Drop Kid • 1st Place 6-9 Months: County Line’s Winning Colors • Judging since 2007 • It has been an honor to Judge many shows in the USA, especially, Palm Springs Kennel Club. • International Judging • 2014: Swedish Rhodesian Ridgeback National Specialty • 2014: Canadian National Specialty I am also licensed in Beagles and look forward to getting my license in several other hound breeds, Afghans, Borzois, Whippets, etc.

The Rhodesian Ridgebacks are my great love and my passion. They have a unique character and are impressive in their appearance. They are loyal and clearly show her deep affection for their owners, like my own dogs show it every day. The Ridgeback has to be all in all a balanced dog, in motion powerful and yet elegant. My priorities, when judging our breed, is an elegant and effortless movement and a self-confident occurrence. It is of secondary importance whether a dog has a white spot on the chest, some white on the paws or some black hair on the neck or tail.


I met my first Rhodesian Ridgeback in 1972 (owned by my cousin), owned my first Ridgeback in 1976, and in 1979 founded Jomeja Kennels. Over the following years of breed involvement many milestones, records and awards were garnered by Jomeja bred dogs including Best in Show at all breeds and Specialty shows. I am an All Breeds Judge and I have been judging Rhodesian Ridgebacks since 1992, over the years I have been invited to judge all breeds and specialty breed shows in Australia and in the USA, South Africa, Europe, Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, (at breed, group and show level – FCI/AKC/ANKC). I have judged Rhodesian Ridgeback Specialty shows in many of these countries and I have also judged the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of South Africa (Parent Club) specialty show, the prestigious Top Twenty event at the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of the

I have been involved with Rhodesian Ridgebacks since my early childhood. When I was born my parents owned 6 Rhodesian Ridgebacks. They are all present on my birth announcement card and from then on I have never been without them. At the age of 8 did I start showing/ handling dogs successfully. The kennel Vir die Simba Safari was founded by my mother in 1970 and I became co-owner in 1994. I still breed from time to time with the emphasis on soundness in character and structure.

United States National and the Canadian Rhodesian Ridgeback National. I have also owned/bred/shown Whippets, Greyhounds, Giant Schnauzers, Bull Terriers and Blue Tick Coonhounds. I currently hold the position of Secretary for the Ipswich Kennel Club, committee member of the Strategic Planning Committee Dogs QLD, and have held previous executive positions as Secretary for the Dog of the Year committee, President of the Rhodesian Ridgeback Council Australia, President of the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of QLD and Secretary of the Hound Club of QLD. I am also involved in judges training for the hound group in Queensland, and have written articles on the Rhodesian Ridgeback for local and international publications. I look forward to continuing my journey with this wonderful breed, and enjoying the privilege of my judging assignments.

1978 and I am a general committee member of the RRCN as of 2009. Predominantly responsible for organizing our annual Championship Club Show and the progeny day.

Patrice Johansen Breeder Owner Judge

AUSTRALIA

COUNTY LINE RIDGEBACKS

pjjomeja@gmail.com +61406538003

Mariëlle Trésoor Breeder Owner Judge

Since November 2014 I’m qualified as a Rhodesian Ridgeback judge and I am looking forward to judging this wonderful breed.

Professionally I work as a medical doctor and am specialized in both geriatrics and public health.

We have bred several national and international Ridgeback champions through the years. I have worked regularly on national and international dog shows as a ring steward or ring secretary since my teenage years. My parents are co-founders of the Dutch Rhodesian Ridgeback club (RRCN) in

NETHERLANDS

VIR DIE SIMBA SAFARI

tresoor@thalen.org www.virdiesimbasafari.nl

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 111


Rosemary Green Breeder Owner Judge

I commenced my involvement with the world of purebred dogs in 1974 with the purchase of a young Rhodesian Ridgeback female. My first ‘Chilolo’ litter was bred in 1976. From this litter, I kept a female and was thrilled when she was awarded Best Puppy, Challenge Bitch and Runner Up Best in Show at the first RR Specialty Show I attended in Sydney in 1977.

International Experience Judging Rhodesian Ridgebacks in the following countries since 2001: • France • Holland • United Kingdom • Czech Republic • Switzerland • Norway • New Zealand • USA • South Africa • Australia – states of Victoria, ACT, Western Australia, Queensland, Tasmania

Achievements within the Breed: Breeder of:

AUSTRALIA

CHILOLO RHODESIAN RIDGEBACKS

ridgebacks@chilolo.net.au

• multiple Best In Show All Breeds • multiple Best In Show Specialty in Australia and internationally • multiple awards for Best Head, Best Gait, Best Ridge • multiple RR of the Year Awards in Australia and New Zealand • Australia’s youngest Supreme Champion RR • Australia’s youngest Specialty Show winner • 70 champions

International Experience Other Breeds UK • Basenjis and Rhodesian Ridgebacks France • Best In Group 4 plus a variety of hound breeds

www.chilolo.com.au

Executive Positions Held Past/ Present: • Secretary Darling Downs Kennel Club Inc (All Breeds) • Secretary of the National Rhodesian Ridgeback Council of Australia • instrumental in forming the Queensland RR Club which was founded officially in 1977 and held various executive positions within that Club for a number of years before moving to New South Wales in 1993 • Secretary for the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club Inc in New South Wales • Breed presentations/mentor to trainee judges ANKC Judging Qualifications: • All Hound Breeds • All Toy Breeds • All Gundog Breeds • All Working Dog Breeds • All Terrier Breeds • All Utility Breeds at Open Show level • All Non-Sporting Breeds at Open Show level

112 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

USA • Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of San Diego • Inland Empire Hound Club – whippet specialty - Whippet Club of Greater San Diego plus Basenjis, Black and Tan Coonhounds, Redbone Coonhounds • Kennel Club of Palm Springs: Best In Hound Group from a panel of almost 60 judges plus a variety of hound breeds, gundog breeds and toy breeds • Washington State Cluster Weekend – variety of hound, gundog and toy breeds over three days • Judged Best In Show at Washington State Cluster weekend South Africa • judged Best In Toy Group plus a variety of gundog, hound and toy breeds


My name is John S Berg, and I own the Rhodesian Ridgeback affix kennel “Maendeleo”, earlier co/owning kennel Kamba Anatulinda which now is terminated due to a divorce. I’ve been in the Norwegian Royal Navy for 25 years when I retired with the rank of Commander. My last assignment was Captain of the Royal Acadamy Training Ship for new officers. I bought my first Rhodesian Ridgeback in 1985 and from then a journey full of dogs and nice people started. I had my first litter in 1992 and until now I have bred 13 RR litters and 2 Thai Ridgeback Dog (TRD) litters. I’ve bred and owned several international and multiple national champions with one of the best being Ukukhanya Scout The RedBaron (liver) imported from US. With a job as an officer in the Norwegian Royal Navy it was hard to combine job and private life/hobbies. I’m educated as a dogtrainer, showsecretary and in 2001 I passed the judge-exams and was approved to be FCI Judge for Rhodesian Ridgebacks. I have had several positions within the club as chairman & editor of our club magazine and member of showcommittee and breedingcommittee. I’ve had and seen a lot of different ridgebacks throughout the years and this

has given me a wider perspective when judging ridgebacks. It’s the breed standard that describes the breed type and in the show ring I first and foremost consider the dogs type and secondly evaluate faults and preference against each other.

John Sigve Berg Breeder Owner Judge

For me the ridgeback ability to move is very important. He is supposed to run effective and effortless for miles and miles. The general impression the dog gives you at first glance is very important. The dog must be harmonious built, strong, muscular and symmetrical in outline. The ridge, which is the escutcheon of the breed, must be clearly defined and symmetrical. There is a lot to be said about how a ridgeback should be but I would emphasis that we remember when looking at a ridgeback that he should be able to perform the functions he was originally bred to do and keep in mind all the things the pioneer breeders has done to develop and preserve the breed.

SWEDEN

MAENDELEO

j-sberg@hotmail.com www.maendeleo.se

PS At the moment I’m approved to give CAC/CACIB for Doberman, Danish Swedish Farmdog, Newfoundland, Rottweiler, Bullmastiff, Dalmatians & Rhodesian Ridgebacks.

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 113


114 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 115


116 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 117


AUTHOR Lisa M. Hoffman

PHOTOS Lisa M. Hoffman Archive

118 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


SHOWS

FOLLOWING THE PAWPRINTS OF THE PAST!

FROM THE PAST 1987 TO THE PRESENT I started in Rhodesian Ridgebacks in 1985. As many people start out in the breed, I wanted a pet. At the time, I had little knowledge of breeding, showing or handling. I did not realize the impact that certain dogs would have on the breed, these many years later. I started in Rhodesian Ridgebacks in 1985. As many people start out in the breed, I wanted a pet. At the time, I had little knowledge of breeding, showing or handling. I did not realize the impact that certain dogs would have on the breed, these many years later. The Top 10 Dogs of 1987 were…

Dresden “BISS Silver GCH Ch Sunstone’s Magic Man” (Ch Rokishoals Luscious Lucius x Ch Sunstone’s Witchy Woman) Rhoda Springer, Breeder/Owner/Handler

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Ch. Gitano of Raintree Ch.Mshindaji’s Special K Ch. Kwetu’s Luke Blackburn Ch. Kwetu’s Oakhurst’s Bronco Raintree’s Tonto of Sno-Vue Raintree’s Oteo Nyota Rob Norm s Diamond Jim Brady Royalton Uhuru’s Promise Kali’s Ginger Bred Man Ch. Mine Creek’s Pay Dirt

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 119


A r t i c l e | Following the Pawprints of the past!

One of the all time Sire’s in Ridgeback’s was Ch. Rutan Mpenzi Rafiki of Gera, ROM. Rafiki had sired over 100 Champions and influenced a lot of the breeding programs in many kennels. BIS Ch. Kwetu’s Oakhurst’s Bronco was a Rafiki son and #1 Ridgeback in 1986. BIS Ch. Kwetu’s Pocket Full of Promise, ROM, also a Rafiki son went on to be a Top Winning Dog and Sired over 60 Champions. Some of the Top Kennels at the time were Kwetu, Barbara Sawyer Brown & Art Brown, Oakhurst, Barbara & Dick Rupert, Raintree Kathy Main, Calico Ridge, Diane Jacobsen, Rob Norm, Myrna & Joe Berger, Kimani, Alicia Mohr Hanna. A lot of these kennels are still around today. As a new person in the breed, I didn’t start out to want to be a breeder. Our breeder encouraged us to show our first Ridgeback which started me on the road to become a breeder, owner, handler and Judge. Back then, to be able to mentor under a great breeder was an honor. There is so much to learn, it takes a lifetime and you still don’t know everything. But the breeder’s that are successful time after time are always the one’s who are willing to learn and grow as a breeder and not become kennel blind or think that they know it all. You can also say similar things about Top Winning dogs. They possess certain traits that make them a Top

Winning Dog, Personality, Handsome, Structure and Effortless Movement and they pass that onto their children. One of the things that makes a long term breeder valuable is because they knew a lot of the dogs in the pedigree and know what they are pulling from the ancestors. However, one of the most important things whether you are breeding to a Top Winning dog or not is that you find the best dog for your bitch that will compliment her. Learn about structure and learn to develop an eye for great structure. Learn about movement faults and learn why the dog has the fault and what you have to do in your breeding program to correct it. If you don’t know, go to someone who you see as a great breeder for mentorship. Your goal should be to breed a great, sound, representative of the breed and to always have an eye to improvement. The biggest mistake that new breeders make is to think they know it all because they have had a little success. That success will be short lived if you don’t do the work to learn. And to keep learning and take risks but not at the expense of the dogs. The health and welfare of the dogs should be your number one concern, not your ego. In the USA, we test for Hips, Elbows, heart, eyes, Degenerative Myopathy, & Deafness. We as breeders, should all work together for the betterment of the breed.

Rafiki

120 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015


Article |

Following the Pawprints of the past!

2014 National Specialty Salt Lake City, Utah Rhoda Springer and I decided to caravan together to the National Specialty. A big endeavor of 2100 miles and 3 days of driving to get there. Driving 14 hours per day, stopping briefly to let dogs and eat. Rhoda and I worked very well together taking turns and talking dogs and adventures from the past. We arrived Friday, September 5th so we had Saturday to rest and get the lay of the land. This year’s theme was “Bees” because Utah is known for being the Beehive state. This was so true when being in the showring and having the bees buzzing around you and your dog!! Sunday, September 7th was Puppy Sweepstakes with Breeder Judge, Sandy Gordon. Sandy Gordon is from New Jersey and I have known her for many years. A good dog person who works hard on her breeding program and a good sportsman. Elliott, County Line’s Lemon Drop Kid was up first in 6-9 month puppy class. I had been working very hard since 4 months old on these puppies to make sure they would represent my kennel well. Both puppies were ready to compete. Elliott was in a class of 13. As you know, to win a ribbon at a National Specialty is a great honor. Sandy worked us very hard and took her time making her decision. Elliott took 2nd Place in 6-9 month Puppy dog!!! I received a lot of compliments on his structure and movement.

Next was Cian, County Line’s Winning Colors, entered in 6-9 month Puppy bitch. This class seemed to take even longer as Ms. Gordon moved them many times, comtemplated and finally put them in the order that she wanted. Cian was 2nd Place in 6-9 month Puppies out of 11!!! I was thrilled with these placements and so happy that all my hard work had paid off. Veteran Sweepstakes was very exciting as always. You can tell that the Veteran’s are so happy to be there. Rhoda had Rowan, Ch. Sunstone’s Witchy Woman entered in 9-11 year class. Rowan bounded around the ring like a puppy & won 2nd Place. Monday, September 8th started regular judging with Bill Sahloff. Bill is another great dog person, exhandler, beagle breeder & bred Ridgebacks with Mike Szabo. 6-9 months Puppy dogs was first with Elliott. Elliott did not get a placement. After watching Mr. Sahloff’s judging, it seemed that the sidegait was the most important thing to Mr. Sahloff. If you watch a Judge, usually you can tell what it is that they are looking for, some focus on movement, some focus on breed type, some focus on structure. Elliott was not moving out for me like I know he can. All dogs go through growing mentally and physically. It is up to you as the breeder to know when the right time is for that dog to show. Sometimes you put them away and bring them out again when they are ready. Tuesday, September 9th, 6-9 month Puppy bitches. A nasty thunder storm came up early in the morning so luckily we could move to an inside ring. Cian was in first. I knew that she was a great mover and as long as she showed well, we had a good chance. Once again, the judge worked us very hard. He wanted that effortless sidegait without wearing out. Cian was pulled out in front, after showing for many years, I know it is not over until the Judge points to you. Last time around the ring, Mr. Sahloff pointed to Cian for 1st Place 6-9 month Puppy!!!!! How exciting! So 3 placements for my puppies at the 2014 National Specialty. Very happy that we took the long drive and did the hard work to have such great results.

County Line’s Winning Colors, “Cian” (GCH. Umtali’s Bruno of Mutare x Ch. County Line’s Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut) Lisa M. Hoffman, Breeder/Owner/Handler

T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E · I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 121


Rowan, Ch. Sunstone’s Witchy Woman also took 1st in 9-11 year class. With all these placements Rhoda and I were thrilled and had a lot of beautiful trophies to bring home. Who knew what was to come!!

Best of Breed Competition 100 Champions entered

Dresden in movement

Mr. Sahloff strategically judged dogs in groups of 10 and made his cuts as he went along, saving the dogs that he wanted for his final decision. Each time, Dresden, GCH. Sunstone’s Magic Man bred by Rhoda Springer kept making the cut. As time went on, Rhoda felt that she would be in there at the end for something but never thought it would be BISS GCH. SUNSTONE’S MAGIC MAN!!!!! What a phenominal win as Breeder, Owner and Handler! Dresden is not new to the Winners circle, he was a Top 10 winning dog, owner handled and garnered several Group 1’s. Dresden is a Silver Grand Champion. Needless to say the 2100 miles home was long but so much more exciting with all the accomplishments of these two Breeder, Owner, Handlers who work hard, are passionate about our breed and our breeding program! Dresden stacking

122 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

· IS S UE 1/ 2015

County Line’s Lemon Drop Kid, “Elliott” (GCH. Umtali’s Bruno of Mutare x Ch. County Line’s Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut) Lisa M. Hoffman, Breeder/Owner/Handler


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 123


124 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 125


126 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 127


128 | THEDOGM AGA Z INE

路 IS S UE 1/ 2015


T H ED O G M A G AZ I N E 路 I SSU E 1 / 2 0 1 5

| 129


Don’t miss next issues FEBRUARY

ENGLISH BULLDOG MARCH

CHIHUAHUA RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK WWW.THEDOG-MAGAZINE.COM

The DOG Magazine - ISSUE 01/2015 Rhodesian Ridgeback  
The DOG Magazine - ISSUE 01/2015 Rhodesian Ridgeback  
Advertisement