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REEFER MADNESS

QB QUANDARY Terps still uncertain of opening day signal-caller

Seth Rogen and James Franco keep the high times rolling in Pineapple Express

SPORTS | PAGE 12

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 7

THE DIAMONDBACK THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

98TH YEAR | ISSUE NO. 149

Meeting Library’s late-night study will stay brings end Thanks to student reaction, McKeldin’s extended hours will continue of summer specials BY ROXANA HADADI AND BRADY HOLT Senior staff writers

Thanks to an onslaught of student protest, the university will not cancel late-night study at McKeldin Library for the fall, university administrators said.

Bar owners ‘voluntarily agree’ to set $1 floor limit

The decision came after library officials told late-night study’s student employees in June that they should find other jobs in case the university cut the library’s 11 p.m. to 8 a.m. hours, and after Facebook groups mobilized students into opposing the decision. A public forum on late-night study held last

month drew more than 30 students, during which “a number of the students there rather eloquently articulated the importance and the value that [latenight study] represented for their academic success,” Interim Dean of Libraries Desider Vikor said. As a result, the final decision on

the service, which was made by Vikor and Provost Nariman Farvardin, was based largely on the negative student reaction, Vikor said. “I heard the students very loud and clear, and certainly came

Please See MCKELDIN, Page 2

#2

N/A

BY ROXANA HADADI AND BRADY HOLT Senior staff writers

Last week’s meeting among city and university officials, police officers, county liquor representatives and bar owners resulted in a $1 price floor that will affect downtown bars, city officials said. “The bar owners appeared to voluntarily agree” on the price floor, said College Park Mayor Stephen Brayman. The $1 minimum, which was suggested by a bar owner whom Brayman would not identify, will apply to beer and rail drinks or translate into a rate of $1 per beer glass quantity in a pitcher. The meeting was also attended by more people than Warren Kelley, an assistant vice president for student affairs at the university who attended the meeting, originally said, Brayman added. While Kelly said the meeting

#1

Please See MEETING, Page 2

PHOTOS BY ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

The university fell off the list for top party schools; ranked second as the least likely to study; and topped the list for the best athletic facilities, according to Princeton Review’s most recent report.

FILE PHOTO–THE DIAMONDBACK

MARYLAND MEASURING UP?

The $1 floor limit has caused Thirsty Turtle, above, to change its 25-cent drink specials.

University’s Princeton Review rankings divide administrators

City council pursues legal action against Srour Bar owner again fails to meet sprinklers deadline

BY BEN PENN Staff writer

The validity of Princeton Review’s college rankings, which featured the university prominently in several categories in its publication released last week, can change from moment to moment — it just depends on which university administrator is talking.

Senior staff writer

The city of College Park decided last night to pursue legal action against Santa Fe Café owner Mark Srour to try and force him to install a sprinkler system at his bar. Srour had signed a contract with the city more than five years ago promising to install a sprinkler system by March 2006 but later said it would be too expensive to do so. But after more than two years of delays, he told the city earlier this summer he would report to them yesterday to either say he would be installing a sprinkler system immediately or explaining his lease for the prop-

Please See SPRINKLERS, Page 3

Tomorrow’s Weather:

Please See RANKINGS, Page 2

Facebook’s new layout met with mixed reactions

Terrorism research center receives $12M

Students divided over website’s design

Funding from Dept. of Homeland Security will help center study terrorism’s origins

BY KELLY BROOKS BY BRADY HOLT

Princeton Review’s 2009 edition of The Best 368 Colleges, which rated the university’s athletic facilities No. 1 in the nation but also gave the school a No. 2 ranking in the “Students Study the Least” category, had administrators contradicting one another when commenting on the rankings’ credibility. Vice President for Student Affairs Linda Clement refused to distinguish Princeton Review, a test preparation company that compiles rankings based on student surveys from a variety of schools, as a legitimate source. For this year’s rankings, Princeton Review used a combined 120,000 student surveys from 368 schools.

For The Diamondback

It may have taken senior economics major Essien-Ita Offiong only a few seconds to switch to the new Facebook layout, but just because it was an easy transition doesn’t mean it was a good one. “I don’t like it,” Offiong said in McKeldin Library’s computer lab, immediately after changing over. “I liked Facebook the way it was, like, three years ago.” Offiong is just one of many students who have greeted Facebook’s new design, which was launched on July 20, with dislike. The social networking mega-site has been developing the new Face-

Sunny/80s Index:

book since early this year, according to a statement on the website. More than 100,000 Facebook users offered suggestions on the layout during the six months prior to the launch date, and some were included in the final version, also according to the statement. Facebook’s new design now splits profiles from being one page into several, with different tabs for a user’s wall, info, photos and applications. Although the statement says the site is now “simpler and cleaner” and users can opt back to their old Facebook design, some people aren’t too pleased. For example, pre-existing Facebook

Please See FACEBOOK, Page 3

News . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .4

BY CHRIS YU Staff writer

A university-based research center has received almost $12 million in funding for the next three years from the Department of Homeland Security to continue studying the origins and impact of terrorism. Launched in 2005, the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism brings together experts from around the world to study how terrorism develops and is carried out to help reduce future attacks. “The world has changed

Classified . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Diversions . . . . . . . . .7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . .12

quite a bit in terms of terrorism,” said Gary LaFree, a criminology and criminal justice professor and director of START. “Terrorist attacks have been getting more dangerous and more evil over time.” With the new funds from the Department of Homeland Security, researchers at the center plan to focus on how terrorist organizations develop and draw in individuals, LaFree said. Center researchers will also study what strategies are effective at stopping attacks and how

Please See TERRORISM, Page 3

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2

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

Page 2 BRIEFS

Toddler dies in hit-and-run on Route 1 A 2-year-old boy was killed in a hit-and-run Sunday outside of Laundry World. The boy, Alexander Nucumendi of Greenbelt, was with his mother and siblings when he ran out of Laundry World to follow a sibling into the street. Though his mother, Rosa Grajales, attempted to grab the boy before he left the store, he ran onto Route 1 and was hit by a black Ford F-150 pick-up truck, witnesses and family members told Prince George’s County Police. The driver honked his horn and then kept going, witnesses also told police. Alexander was pronounced dead at an area hospital later that night. — Compiled from wire reports

Congress passes sweeping higher education bill WASHINGTON — Congress passed a bill Aug. 1 that included a variety of initiatives to keep costs down for college students, including requiring colleges to adopt a code of conduct regarding student loans, requiring textbook publishers to disclose pricing to faculty and allowing low-income students to get Pell Grants year-round. The legislation, which is the first time in a decade Congress has reauthorized the main federal law overseeing higher education, follows two other moves by Congress to make college more affordable: In October, the legislative body provided the single largest increase in federal student aid in decades and, in June, boosted college benefits for veterans by expanding the GI Bill. Specifically, this act will focus on protecting college students from loan abuse by banning lenders from offering gifts to college officials as a condition of making student loans, will require the Department of Education to compile and publish a list of which schools have most rapidly increased their tuition and will ask colleges to give students advance information on textbook prices and costs. The act will also increase funding for graduate study at institutions that primarily serve minorities and will provide financing for new scholarship programs and support centers for military veterans. — Compiled from wire reports

TODAY

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Get Involved

School of Public Health’s First Annual Poster Presentation for UMSTAR, 11:30 a.m., School of Public Health: Main Hall

Register your group, program or department for the First Look Fair 2008 online at www.thestamp.umd.edu/firstlookfair

@M Student opinion split about rankings ARYLAND

RANKINGS, from Page 1 “The reason these rankings are developed is a commercial enterprise,” Clement said. “I think we aren’t very certain about the scientific nature of the surveys. Until you understand the total nature, I might be skeptical about the results.” In contrast, Senior Associate Athletics Director Kathy Worthington, who was pleased with the athletic facilities honor, as well as the university receiving a No. 2 ranking in the “Students Pack the Stadiums” category, believed the survey results should be taken seriously. “Princeton Review is a well-respected publication,” Worthington said. “We take great pride that they appreciate what we have to offer.” In fact, the Athletics Depart-

ment puts such stock in the Princeton Review rankings that it posted a press release on its website in an effort to attract future students. “We want our recruits to know how well liked our facilities are by our students,” Worthington said. But Kate Gannon, an associate director in the office of undergraduate admissions, said students shouldn’t take the Princeton Review rankings too seriously. “I think prospective students regard the Princeton Review rankings as fun facts or points of interest, but I don’t think they make their final decisions on where to apply or where to attend based on them,” she said. Clement, who did not mention the university’s placement in any specific ranking, agreed with Gannon, adding that her skepticism stems from her years as an

Bars increase prices MEETING, from Page 1 was organized by College Park Public Services Director Bob Ryan and included 10 various university and city officials, Brayman said the meeting was not closed-door and also included some city staff, county councilman Eric Olson, city manager Joe Nagro and five students. Specifically discussed at the meeting were Thirsty Turtle’s 25-cent Thursday night summer rail specials, which have been criticized by university and city officials. But while Brayman said “we’re not in the business of threatening people,” the city also told bar owners at the meeting they could attempt to persuade the state to adopt legislation against such low prices, as they encourage “binge drinking and overdrinking,” Brayman added. This week, Thirsty Turtle has changed its prices, bumping the 25-cent rails the bar has advertised all summer to $2. However, in contrast to Bray-

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man’s statement that all the bar owners agreed on the price floor, a Facebook message sent to the members of group “THIRSTY TUESDAYS ONE DOLLAR PITCHERS and DRINKS” Tuesday stated, “THANKS TO THE LOVELY CITY OF COLLEGE PARK WE HAD TO CHANGE OUR PRICES...SORRY GUYS...” Thirsty Turtle co-owner Alan Wanuck could not be reached for comment. But some students, such as senior economics and linguistics major Lori Hoglund, said the change in prices will affect their downtown habits. “I would still go Monday nights because they have $2 Long Island iced teas, but if it were not for that, probably not,” she said. “[The price increase] is a huge switch because a lot of other people only go because of the 25-cent drinks.” roxanadbk@gmail.com, holtdbk@gmail.com

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Warrant discrepancy in raid at mayor’s home UPPER MARLBORO — Despite what Prince George’s County police said initially after a drug raid at the home of Berwyn Heights Mayor Cheye Calvo, narcotics officers and SWAT team deputies did not have the type of search warrant that would allow them to enter the home without knocking. A review shows the warrant was a standard search warrant. Officers and deputies broke down Calvo’s door July 29, after he brought a package addressed to his wife inside from his front porch. The officers shot and killed Calvo’s two Labrador Retrievers. Police spokesman Henry Tippett says the initial information about the warrant came from the head of the narcotics control division. Tippett says he could not explain the discrepancy. Calvo’s attorney, Timothy Maloney, calls the raid “a lawless act by law enforcement.” — Compiled from wire reports

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admissions director. “I was an admissions director here for a long time, and I would always tell people about these rankings, and I didn’t have concrete confidence in them and to not trust rankings — we don’t know the force of the research,” Clement said. But despite Clement’s warnings, some students were already reading into the rankings this week. “It sounds like some priorities are a little bit backwards,” said Michael Sweeney, a senior computer science major, upon learning of the university’s equally high marks for sporting event attendance and lack of studying. Yet Sweeney did not hold the university responsible, saying, “You’ve got to blame the students on that — it’s your decision to study or not.”

Junior theatre major Thony Mena also sensed a set of misguided priorities, except on the part of the university, not the students, in regards to the highly rated athletic facilities. “The athletic fields are apparent,” Mena said. “God knows how much money they spend on athletics when you’ve got kids without housing.” But junior criminology and criminal justice major Ian Nabb was able to see the positives from the rankings and said he is proud the university trails only the University of Florida in “Students Pack the Stadiums.” In recent years, both Florida’s football and men’s basketball programs have won national championships. “Coming second place to [Florida] is not too bad,” Nabb said. “I think it shows a lot of campus involvement and school pride.”

Incoming sophomore transfer students Kristen Harris and Oona Urbanski, both letters and sciences majors, did not expect to be entering a student body rated amongst the least-active studiers in the nation. “It doesn’t really discourage me, because it’s not going to make me study less,” Harris said. “I’ll just study harder, and that will make us look better.” But when told the university actually failed to make Princeton Review’s list of top-20 party schools, after receiving such an honor repeatedly in recent years, Urbanski noticed an obvious contradiction — and reflected a different type of student disappointment. “If we study the least, we better be a good party school,” Urbanski said. penndbk@gmail.com

Services of two desks to be eliminated MCKELDIN, from Page 1 away after that evening with an enhanced appreciation of where they were with respect to late night,” Vikor added. “For me, that was the prime and the determining factor.” However, Vikor would not comment on where the university will now look to trim costs in order to pay for more expensive journal subscriptions, the reason the university was considering getting rid of late-night study. “I will work that out with the provost, and I think as far as students and other users of the library goes, we’ll deal with that in due time,” Vikor said. For his part, Farvardin acknowledged the rising cost of journal subscriptions and agreed the library’s budget will continue to be analyzed. “The cost of subscriptions and acquisitions and books goes up

much faster than the budget of the library can ever go up; they can’t buy as many books or subscribe to as many journals as they would like,” he said. “That’s something that has prompted this effort, to look at how much money the library is spending.” To keep students involved with the decision-making process regarding the library, a student advisory committee to libraries will be created, Vikor said. Student Government Association President Jonathan Sachs, who will be involved with the committee, added “This is going to be an important step in moving forward with library policy.” Senior English and history major Anne Price said she was pleased with the decision to keep late-night study. Price, who has worked at late-night study in previous semesters, is also a member of the group Students for a Democratic So-

ciety, which helped organize the forum last month. “I only hope that the administration has learned a lesson from this incident, and in the future, they will do more to understand undergraduate needs at the university when making large and important decisions about things that effect undergraduate students,” Price said. Yet while late-night study will continue, the government documents and periodical desks will no longer exist, Vikor said. Both services will be merged with other desks on the front floor, and though there are no final dates yet, government documents will probably phase out in the fall and periodicals in January, Vikor said. The decision to cut those desks had nothing to do with late-night study, he added. roxanadbk@gmail.com, holtdbk@gmail.com


THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

3

Facebook to switch all Small fire occurs in Cornerstone over weekend users to new design SPRINKLERS, from Page 1

FACEBOOK, from Page 1

mathematics major Lisa Hoffmaister, said the changes groups such as, “I Want the will just need some getting Old Facebook Back,” “We used to, while junior comLike the Old Facebook Bet- puter science major Mark ter!,” “WE WANT THE OLD Heneks said the new site is “pretty cool” overall. FACEBOOK BACK” Both had seen similar and “BRING BACK formats on their OLD FACEBOOK” iPhone Facebook already had thouapplication, and said sands of members. they were becoming But since July 20, the familiar with the forgroups have seen mat. dozens of new mem“It looks more like bers, many of whom Web 2.0,” Heneks added. have complaints Senior communicaabout the website’s tion and philosophy new design, which major Roshini Chatthey argue isn’t as lani, who said she was exciting as Facebook –Essien-Ita split “50-50” about the claims. Offiong changes, also hinted at “It’s not simple,” SENIOR Facebook’s evolution: Offiong said. “I don’t ECONOMICS She joked the comlike the layout. It’s pany should create its almost like own version of widescreen.” Microsoft Word. But reactions to the “Eventually, they’ll be their new Facebook aren’t all negative. Some users, such as own software.” The new Facebook design is Robert M. Jackson, said the to users at site is “less cramped” and available “aesthetically pleasing,” but www.new.facebook.com, and complained about the fre- in the “coming weeks,” all quency of Facebook design Facebook users will automatically default to the new site modifications. “I kind of wish they would design when logging in, stop doing changes — maybe according to the statement. once a year,” he said. Other users, such as junior newsdesk@umd.edu

“It’s not simple. I don’t like the layout. It’s almost like widescreen.”

erty had not been renewed. A divided council had agreed to give Srour some additional time to come back with an answer on whether he would honor the contract, but its patience ended when he did not appear at last night’s council meeting, asking Public Services Director Bob Ryan to pass along a request for another two weeks. “Start the proceedings, Mr. Mayor,” District 2 Councilman Jack Perry said instantly. Perry has long been critical of the city’s long-term acceptance of Srour’s noncompliance on his property-use agreement. “I think we’re hearing more excuses and more delays,” said District 1 Councilman Patrick

Wojahn, who had been in the minority at the city’s last meeting with Srour in saying he had already been given enough time to decide to install the system. Several other council members quickly agreed, informally authorizing city attorney Suellen Ferguson to file a formal contract dispute. Srour could not be reached for comment last night. In other downtown bar news, a small fire occurred in Cornerstone Grill and Loft this weekend, Ryan said. Though Prince George’s County Fire Department Spokesman Mark Brady said he did not receive any calls over the weekend about a fire in Cornerstone, Ryan said “there was a lot of vandalism in addition to the fire.”

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

Despite the fact that Public Services Director Bob Ryan said Cornerstone Grill and Loft may be closed for a few weeks, a sign on the door said the bar was supposed to reopen Wednesday. Though Ryan said Cornerstone will be shut down for two to three weeks for restoration and repairs from the fire and vandalism, a sign on Cornerstone’s door Wednesday afternoon from “Manage-

ment” informed patrons “the loft will reopen at 5 p.m. on the 6th. Please visit Santa Fe during this time. Sorry for any inconvenience.” holtdbk@gmail.com

START Funding to go to education endeavors START, from Page 1 terrorism affects a society. Part of the funding will also go to providing education, LaFree said. The university is one of only two in the country with an undergraduate minor in terrorism

studies, and over the past three years, START has also worked with over 450 graduate students, LaFree said. Since the center opened three years ago, LaFree and his researchers have learned a great deal about terrorism and its effects, he said. For example, his team has found people generally do not panic too much during

times of crisis — “the public is more resilient than we give them credit for,” he said — and some terrorist groups even send out warnings before they attack, as their goal is not to amass casualties but to send a message. But while terrorist attacks have grown more and more deadly throughout the years, the number of attacks around the

world was actually declining before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, LaFree noted. To keep track of domestic attacks, START was the first organization to computerize the information and make it available to researchers. The database is widely used, LaFree said. chrisyudbk@gmail.com

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4

THE DIAMONDBACK | THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008

ROXANA HADADI

THE DIAMONDBACK

Opinion

EDITOR IN CHIEF

YOUR INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK PHONE: (301) 314-8200 | FAX: (301) 314-8358 3150 SOUTH CAMPUS DINING HALL | COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742 NEWSDESK@DBK .UMD.EDU

NICOLE VAN BERKUM MANAGING EDITOR

JEFF AMOROS

ADAM FRIED

OPINION EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Laura Moore

Staff Editorial

Joel Cohen

Routes for Route 1

“If you can’t go around it, over it or through it, you had better negotiate with it.” - Ashleigh Brilliant

Writing on empty

T

hink back to the first time you came to College Park. Think back to the first time you traveled along Route 1 in the area directly outside the campus. What were your first impressions of that stretch of road? What are your impressions now? Like many of you, I am appalled by the utter lack of charm and character of the city. Taking a left turn at many points along the road feels like a dangerous and risky act. Route 1 passes through the campus, and many students bike and walk across and along this road, but unfortunately, the area is anything but safe for bikers and pedestrians. Drivers speed through, as if to exit the locale as quickly as possible. And just try to find an upscale restaurant worthy of a special occasion or out-of-town guests. There has been no clear guiding hand overseeing development, and this has resulted in an embarrassing mishmash of architectural styles and a dreary jumble of suburban sprawl-type development. We need more than a series of piecemeal, unrelated improvements. Clearly, Route 1 and the surrounding area are in dire need of a comprehensive new vision. A cornerstone of the university’s recent strategic plan is improving the surrounding area. University administrators understand we cannot advance to the upper echelons of international research institutions unless our location improves dramatically. You have to wonder how many prospective students, faculty and staff came to the campus for a visit, only to decide instead to move to a location such as Ann Arbor, Mich., or Berkeley, Calif. Clearly, the area surrounding the campus is holding us back. East Campus’ 38 acres of upscale retail, office space, student and market rate housing will be a very important part of improving the Route 1 corridor, and hopefully, it will spur other improvements in the area. But we need to think about the area as a whole and think about what our vision is. Fortunately, Prince George’s County — along with MarylandNational Capital Park and Planning Commission, the City of College Park and the university — is embarking on a plan to rethink the Route 1 corridor surrounding the campus. In order for this plan to be successful, we need input from those most impacted: the people who live and work in the area. And this includes the entire campus community. We need your feedback. As the plan progresses this fall, there will be many opportunities for public input, including a design charrette. The charrette will consist of multiple collaborative sessions with elected officials, planners, consultants and interested members of the public working together to formulate a shared vision. The sessions will be spread across six days, and participants may come to as many or as few as they like. We have hired nationally known planners to help in creating this plan and conducting the charrette to ensure this plan is truly a shared one. We want the entire campus community — faculty, staff, undergraduate and graduate students — to be a part of this plan to re-envision the Route 1 area in College Park. Think about what you want the area to look like broadly. But think about the details too: Where should there be traffic signals or traffic circles along Route 1 and Rhode Island Avenue? Should there be bike lanes? Where should there be housing, retail outlets and offices? Where would you like to see student housing? What should it look like? What should the heights of buildings be in various locations? How far back should buildings be from the street? How does public transportation fit into this plan? What can we do to make the area safer for drivers, bikers and pedestrians? This is your opportunity to make your voice heard and get involved in your community, whether you’re living in College Park or commuting from farther away. This is your home, so we need your input to make it reflect who we truly are as a community.

Laura Moore is a former president of the Graduate Student Government and now works in the office of Prince George’s County Councilman Tom Dernoga. She can be reached at laura@lauramoore.com.

Model for success

I

n an exemplary instance of university officials from the scrap heap. Vikor described the student consulting with students before bringing down protest as “the prime and the determining factor.” Both university officials and the students they the hatchet on a popular service, administrators announced they will not cancel late-night study work with have a lesson to learn from this resolution. Unless there is a clear-cut reason at McKeldin Library in the fall. not to, university officials should When The Diamondback first reach out to students on all imporreported the possible axing of the tant decisions made about programs program last month, it appeared and services relating to students. It’s university officials were well on University officials and as simple as that. And when time their way to cutting the service. resources permit, the officials Students who worked for the students should use the and should reach out to as many students library during late-night hours had already been told to look elsewhere late-night study solution as possible. In this case, Vikor got for jobs, and the program appeared as a model for resolving feedback from more than 30 students who, in the end, swayed her to be on the chopping block in order future conflicts opinion on the matter. to pay for the rising costs of journal Likewise, the students who met subscriptions. But before the fate of late-night study was deter- with Vikor should be commended for their efforts. mined, Interim Dean of Libraries Desider Vikor did By showing up to the forum and voicing their disexactly what all university officials should do before pleasure, they forced the university to take into making a controversial decision on an issue impacting account the negative opinion of students on the issue. students: She sat down and talked with a few. In the future, officials and students alike should In today’s article about the decision to keep latenight study, Vikor credited student protesters at a look back on the late-night study debate as a model forum on the topic last month with saving the service for making decisions on important issues.

Our View

Editorial Cartoon: Mike O’Brien

“The world is run on ideas. There are good ones, and there are not so good ones.

Air Your Views The Diamondback welcomes your comments. Address your letters or guest columns to the Opinion Desk at opinion@dbk.umd.edu. All letters and guest columns must be signed. Include your full name, year, major and day- and night-time phone numbers. Please limit letters to 300 words. Please

limit guest columns to between 550 and 700 words. Submission of a letter or guest column constitutes an exclusive, worldwide, transferable license to The Diamondback of the copyright in the material in any media. The Diamondback retains the right to edit submissions for content and length.

POLICY: The signed letters, columns and cartoon represent only the opinions of the authors. The staff editorial represents the opinion of The Diamondback’s editorial board and is the responsibility of the editor in chief.

at issue What do you think of Facebook’s new redesign?

“ “ “ “ “ “ I think it’s real bad; I like the old Facebook.”

Denise Valdez Freshman Art

I hate it. It’s too complicated.

Anne Charles Freshman Elementary education

I kinda like it. It’s easier to find what you’re looking for.

Jonathan Booz Freshman Economics

I don’t like it. It’s not easy to use.

Nicole Brickman Freshman Communication

I like the option to switch back, because I checked it out for a minute and switched back to the old one.

Jeff Hopkins Senior American studies

I think it’s just more of a pain to use because we aren’t used to it.

Jonah Bergstein Sophomore Kinesiology

G

ood column ideas are hard to come by. Sometimes, they can be right in front of you — in plain sight on the cover of a DOTS brochure, even. Other times, they might be buried on page six. A good column idea and a well structured column will keep the readers interested, and they will most likely read the whole thing. A bad column idea will cause the reader to stop reading right about ... now. The world is run on ideas. There are good ones, and there are not so good ones. Remember the slogan McDonald’s started in 2005: “It’s what I eat and what I do”? That’s right, you don’t, because it was, well, a bad idea. But of course you know the company’s current slogan, “I’m loving it!” because that was a good idea. Good ideas and bad ideas are abundant both at this university and throughout the world. Michael Jordan’s decision to make his first comeback in the ’90s: good idea. Michael Jordan’s decision to become part owner and president of basketball operations of the Washington Wizards: bad idea. Department of Transportation Services decision to inform students about parking permit registration: good idea. DOTS’ decision to inform students about parking permit registration, with their social security numbers on the envelope: real bad idea. It doesn’t stop there. Student Entertainment Events’ decision to team up with MTV to host last year’s Art Attack: good idea. The decision to charge students $5 to attend: bad idea. Your decision to go: even worse. The fact that Simple Plan is still around: the worst idea yet. Changing the Dining Services director: good idea. No change in the food: bad idea. The introduction of Gmail: great idea. Everything about the university e-mail system: bad idea. The university’s world and the business world even sometimes come together to formulate ideas. The university’s decision to enter into a soda contract to generate much-needed funds: good idea. Choosing Pepsi: bad idea. The ways in which people perceive ideas vary greatly. Just as you may be the one person who actually likes Pepsi, some peo–Joel Cohen ple may honestly COLUMNIST think cutting latenight study hours in order to maintain funding for other endeavors is a great idea, while some other people may think it is a horrible idea. Sometimes, it just depends on your perspective. Along those lines, I thought my decision to major in government and politics was a great idea. My parents and probably the rest of the world, not so much. I think we can all agree, though, majoring in something such as art history or psychology is always a bad idea. This is the part in even the best columns where many readers will stop reading unless you offer them some compelling reason to continue. It’s kind of like the midsemester “I can’t wake up for my 11 a.m. class anymore” attack that happens to even the best of us. For those of you to whom the university so graciously offered the Off-Campus Housing Services phone number rather than an on-campus room phone number, getting to that 11 a.m. class could mean waking up at 8:30, leaving the house by 9, taking a bus and then walking halfway across the campus. On that note, plans to build more housing: good idea. Only starting to plan after there’s already a problem: bad idea. Me winning the housing lottery: the best idea yet. Congratulations! You read the entire column. But don’t blame me; it wasn’t my idea.

Joel Cohen is a junior government and politics major. He is currently accepting column ideas and can be reached at jcohendbk@gmail.com.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

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Features HOROSCOPESTELLA WILDER

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Suit color 5 Surprise greatly 10 Mortgage or car loan 14 Emmy relative 15 Fixes potatoes 16 Otherwise 17 Southwest vista 18 Mountain lions 19 Starlet’s aspiration 20 Adjective for Rome 22 Bewails 24 Flair for music 25 Poetic adverb 26 Not the same 30 Horse’s “lunchbox” 34 Gazed at 35 Delighted in 37 Kirk’s helmsman 38 Limb 39 Understand 40 Pipe fitting 41 Novelist — Bagnold 43 Flax product 45 Cold spell 46 Single (2 wds.) 48 Beeps 50 Chemist’s hangout 51 Ms. Arthur 52 In sync

56 Mother-of-pearl source 60 Hot rum drink 61 Half diameters 63 Raid 64 Emerald Isle 65 Battery terminal 66 “Rabbi Ben —” 67 Puts on 68 Tavern brew 69 Not fake DOWN 1 Iditarod terminus 2 Foster a felon 3 Gripper 4 Kind of sale 5 Raiment 6 Claw badly 7 Sofa end 8 Enthusiasm 9 Made a try 10 Stands up for 11 Joie de vivre 12 Cellar, briefly 13 Jeans partners 21 Remind too often 23 Stooge with bangs 26 Glitterati member 27 Safari sight 28 Auspices 29 Thumb, e.g. 30 Parties 31 Good, to Juan

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TODAY’S CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY:

CORNER OF ROUTE ONE & KNOX ROAD 301-779-7044 www.cornerstonegrill.biz

MONDAY NIGHT SPECIALS $1 Bud & Bud Light Bottles $2.75 Jack Daniels $2 Sex on the Beach Shooters

SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIALS $2 Miller Lite Drafts $2 Grey Goose $2 Electric Lemonade Shooters

SURFING WITH THE ALIENS

Would You Work for $3.50 a Day?

Just 35¢ per word, $3.50 minimum. Plus, if you run your ad four consecutive issues, you’ll receive a fifth issue FREE! And, your ad will be placed on www.diamondbackonline.com at no additional charge! To place your ad, come to room 3136 South Campus Dining Hall, Monday-Friday 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Or, you can place your ad over the phone with your Visa, Mastercard or American Express. Call 301-314-8000. No tipping necessary.

T

long term. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 7) — Those around you are likely to leave you to your own devices, as you attempt the unusual. (Dec. 8Dec. 21) — Health issues are likely to sneak up on you, but prior planning can help you get past such challenges with little difficulty. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 6) — Differences of opinion are unavoidable; lasting conflicts must be avoided at all costs. (Jan. 7Jan. 19) — You may be mistaking prosperity with progress. Certain difficult lessons can be learned with greater ease and enjoyment. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 3) — Don’t take things quite so personally. Constructive criticism is good for you. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) — You may come up against an official policy that is doing more harm than good. It’s time to put up a fight. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) — Don’t insist on taking the lead. You can learn a great deal by bringing up the rear. (March 6-March 20) — Don’t let your moods affect those around you in a negative manner. It is essential that you keep you spirits up at the workplace. ARIES (March 21-April 4) — It’s time to talk openly and honestly about what is bothering you — and what you expect from others

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— now and in the weeks to come. (April 5-April 19) — You’ll be playing a waiting game, while someone close to you has to backtrack a little in order to meet you halfway. TAURUS (April 20-May 5) — Reputation and prestige are more important to you now than they have been in the past. Act accordingly. (May 6-May 20) — Be sure to stay in touch with yourself by placing emphasis on those desires that usually stay hidden beneath the surface. Pursue goals aggressively. GEMINI (May 21-June 6) — Employment issues may take up most of your time. An important choice must be made before the turn of the year. (June 7-June 20) — Your interests are likely to expand. Consider following a new path, at least for a while. Experimentation pays off. CANCER (June 21-July 7) — You may enjoy an unexpected increase in personal power. Use it to forge a new path. (July 8-July 22) — Your own imagination can solve many difficult problems. The coming year can begin on a note of high expectancy as a result of your efforts.

Copyright 2008 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

TODAY’S HOROSCOPE SPONSORED BY:

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THOMAS DOBROSIELSKI

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9. For solutions, tips and computer program, see www.sudoku.com Previous Day’s Puzzle Solved:

BAGEL PLACE

FREE Diamondback Classified Ads do! They’re the best bargain in College Park!

he coming week is likely to require more work than usual from most individuals — but this doesn’t mean doing more of the same thing again and again and again. On the contrary, new activities and new approaches are favored at this time — and those who are eager to fire up their engines and explore new territory are sure to be favored. The “what” may not be as important as the “how” — both at the workplace and at home. Style isn’t everything, but it can surely win some admiration if it’s displayed in the right ways. All should avoid mere busywork. Some individuals may feel as though they’re running out of fuel, but the truth is that there are hidden stores of energy that can be relied upon at this time — and that can push the resourceful individual ahead of the pack. Victory comes to those who really want it. LEO (July 23-Aug. 7) — Don’t assert your authority in such a way that you threaten the loyalty of those around you. (Aug. 8-Aug. 22) — Protect yourself, and try not to leave yourself open for attack — either personally or professionally. Nineteen ninety-nine can end on a high note. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) — You’ll derive more than enjoyment from social activities. Doors may be opened at last. (Sept. 8-Sept. 22) — Concentrate on minor matters that are sure to take on greater significance. Look back over the past year: Have you made the right choices? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 7) — You may be able to increase your own work-related rewards. Try to look further ahead. (Oct. 8-Oct. 22) — A lesson learned may make you more able to get precisely what you want in the coming year. Love and romance are soon to be highlighted. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) — You can enjoy a good old-fashioned victory of sorts. Prepare for a coming challenge in the weeks ahead. (Nov. 8-Nov. 21) — This is a good week to pick up the pace and try to get a head start on the coming year. Decisions may prove

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6

THE DIAMONDBACK | THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008

Classified RATES

35¢ per word $3.50 minimum ALL CAPITAL LETTERS........35¢ extra per word Bold letters..............................70¢ extra per word All ads must be prepaid

301-314-8000

CALL

TO PLACE YOUR AD, OR BY EMAIL: ADVERTISING@DBK.UMD.EDU BY FAX: 301-314-8358

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FREE! EMPLOYMENT LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME JOB MAKING $15-$25/HR.? Inc. 500 company is looking to add 4-5 UM students to its marketing team. Part-time hours...full-time pay...$15-$25/ hr. Flexible schedule; internships available. Call Jon at 301-595-4050 today!

EBAY SALES Internet-savvy eBay lister/shipper wanted for local new & used sales outlet. Part time. Ebay listing experience required. Some lifting. $10-12/hr. plus commission! Contact Dave at 301-779-4040 (MWF 10-6) or email dpuhl@kingpawn.com. Bartending! $250/Day Potential. No Experience Necessary. Training Provided. 1-800-965-6520 x116

Office Assistant needed at medical facility. Part-time entry level position for self-motivated, detail oriented individual with great computer and organizational skills. Science background helpful, not necessary. Needed Mondays and Wednesdays fall semester. Email resumes to research@mddisease.com or call 240-554-0384.

Columbia Gymnastics is looking for full/part time gymnastics class instructors who are good with children. Training is provided. To apply, please send resume to Kristin or Kara at info@columbiagymnastics.com or 410-964-2053.

Estimating Trainee/Intern Leading Beltsville construction company needs estimating trainee for residential and light commercial construction. Typing and communication skills a must. Prior construction experience and/or knowledge of the construction process a plus. Spanish language a plus. Mileage reimbursement. Ideal candidate is a junior/senior in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Successful candidate can look forward to a permanent position with a six figure career potential. Company has been a niche leader since 1947. Morning hours 2-3 days a week. Flexible schedule. This is a real job, with a real company, with a real future. Contact via email with resume to sgross@minkoff.com. Telephone contacts not accepted. IINTERNSHIP/PAID: Wanted- Aggressive, outgoing, go getter, to work with broker at SMITH- BARNEY. Call Jay Gulati, VICE- PRESIDENT at 301-657-6358.

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PUBLIC RELATIONS INTERNSHIP YOU: An ambitious, hardworking student interested in a PR internship where you will build a great portfolio, learn and have fun! Must have attention to detail and the ability to multitask. US: Boscobel Marketing Communications! A boutique PR firm in Silver Spring with exciting opportunities (www.boscobel.com). Our positions are paid via hourly wage or academic credit. E-mail resumes TODAY to Catherine Conrad at cconrad@boscobel.com to apply for the internship.

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of a home near the university. Very large living room, bedroom and kitchen. Floor to ceiling living room windows. Working wood stove. Some furniture in living room and dining room. View of beautiful woods. $990 per month. 301-441-9435.

Rooms/House College Park/Riverdale: 3/4 BR, 1.5 BA. Washer/dryer. Parking. 1/2 mile to campus. Rt. 1 & East-West Hwy. $450-$525/room.

Students & Faculty The Diamondback Grad New, furnished efficiency. Separate en-

* Work 10-15 flexible hours per week * Great resume builder * Positions in sales, layout/ design & circulation Anyone interested (including upperclassmen) can apply at advertising@dbk.umd.edu.

in College Park. Near UMD. $1650/month + utilities. Big kitchen & living room. 646-623-6869, Zheng.

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Two Houses Left. Adelphi Rd. 1 block from North Campus Dr. 5++ bedrooms, downstairs kitchenette house, $3200; 5 bedroom house $3000/month including new a/c, utilities not included. Some off-street parking. Large private yards, washer/dryer, lawn care provided. 10 month lease available- early signing bonus. Contact Dr. Kruger - 301-408-4801.

5 BR, 3 BA House for Rent Located on 4402 East West Hwy. Close to campus, shuttle route. A/C, washer/dryer, dishwasher. $500, available on August 1st.

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One Bedroom Basement Apartment 15 minutes from campus. Includes kitchenette, bathroom. Utilities, internet included. $595/month. Excellent for grad student. Female preferable. Call 240-449-0689 (cell).

*Call for details

HOUSES/APARTMENTS. College Park. 2-6 bedrooms. 410-544-4438

❖ APARTMENTS

After School Care Seeking friendly and responsible person for after school care for 12 yr. old in nearby Takoma Park. M, T, W, Th, 3-7 p.m. Good driver, nonsmoker, own car. $15/hour. Contact maryhennessey@starpower.net or 301-588-7977.

FOR SALE Great condition, reasonable prices. Bedroom, living room furniture. Household items. 301-793-1586 Four bedroom, 2.5 bath, with lovely yard in prestigious Columbia. Loads of new features. E-mail: Brenda Benton@mris.com.

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HOUSE FOR RENT 6 BR, 2-1/2 BA, W/D, walking distance. $2800. Call Glenn, 410-551-9959.

(international not available)

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College Park, 4 bedroom house. Near Md. U. $1200. 301-927-2521. ROOMS. College Park. One bedroom available. Share house. 410-544-4438.

The University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language is looking for UMD students to participate in a Pre-DLAB Study. Study sessions will last for only three hours. Participants are required to partake in one three hour session and after the session is complete they will be paid $75. No cell phones or other electronic devices are permitted in the testing sessions. For more information and to sign up for the study, please visit: http://register.casl.umd.edu.

❖ FAX

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for three off-to-school elementary children and one toddler driven to her caregiver in Silver Spring (20 minutes away), 3-5 times a week, $12 per hour; other care opportunities possible. 301-233-1304 or susan_relland@yahoo.com.

Send / Receive Local / Long-Distance

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“Make A Difference”

CHILD CARE Local Greenbelt Attorney Needs Morning Care

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WANTED

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FAX EARN SERVICE

Share nice house. Non=smokers, no pets. Walk to campus. 301-918-0203.

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202-329-1882

Sales/Estimator

Minimum Requirements: - 60 College Credits - US Citizenship - Not less than 21 years of age at time of graduation from the Training Academy - Valid Drivers License - Successful completion of a comprehensive background investigation conducted by the department

3 BR, 2 BA House for Rent

MOVE IN NOW!

Dog Care

Now hiring Police Officers! Starting salary $46,972-$55,791 depending on prior law enforcement experience or military experience and up to $4000 in bilingual skills to include American Sign Language.

703-538-5525

trance and bath, yard, fireplace & bar. High-speed internet and cable. $750 – all utilities included. Family residence. Call Nancy, 301-937-3295.

Busy daycamp needs more dog lovers to work in daycamp/boarding. 20-25 hrs./ wk. – not a temp position. Will train reliable person. Excellent position for dog lovers interested in animal behavior and training. Columbia. 410-381-1800.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD POLICE DEPARTMENT

EHO

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is looking for talented freshmen for multiple positions within the advertising/ business offices

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SERVICES

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THE DIAMONDBACK | THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008

7

ALSO OPENING TOMORROW:

Diversions ARTS

≠ The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 Starring: America Ferrera, Alexis Bledel and Amber Tamlyn

≠ Hell Ride Starring: Larry Bishop, Dennis Hopper and Michael Masden

MUSIC

LIVING

WEEKEND

MOVIES

REVIEW | PINEAPPLE EXPRESS

Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg and Judd Apatow score again with Pineapple Express BY RUDI GREENBERG Senior staff writer

Seth Rogen is Joe Stoner. Ok, maybe it’s a bit much to stick that label on Rogen. Dale Denton, Rogen’s process-serving, pot-smoking character in Pineapple Express, is Joe Stoner. With his average looks, just above-average weight and wacky day job, Denton really is the perfect picture of the mid-’20s stoner with a 9-to-5 job. After tackling the coming-of-age raunchiness of Superbad, Rogen (Kung Fu Panda) and screenwriting partner Evan Goldberg dial their ambition up a notch. The next logical step: the stoner action comedy, naturally. As the saying goes, write what you know.

The latest offering from the minds of Judd Apatow & co. (he serves as producer here), Pineapple Express hits everything you expect and then some. As in Apatow-directed The 40-Year-Old Virgin and Knocked Up, vulgarity and sincerity manage side-by-side. With Pineapple Express, the focus is on the action, the oneliners and, of course, the pot. Pineapple Express is the buddy comedy rethought by two stoners with an affinity for 1970s action flicks. Everything from the aged-looking film stock to the opening credits to the wardrobe screams ’70s. It may be 2008, but aside from cell phones and “funny videos on the Internet,” Pineapple Express

Please See PINEAPPLE, Page 8

Sizzlin’ Stamp Summer Series BEAT THE HEAT! VISIT THE STAMP FROM JUNE 5 TO AUGUST 22 FOR...

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THE DIAMONDBACK | DIVERSIONS | THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008

Ride the Express PINEAPPLE, from Page 7

Pages 8, 9 and 12

APARTMENT LOCATOR PAGES

comes directly from the tradition of Bmovie double bills, tongue in cheek of course. The concept isn’t particularly fresh, as the stoner-buddy comedy has been done before from Cheech and Chong to Jay and Silent Bob, but it hasn’t been this sharp since Harold and Kumar first went to White Castle. The film also serves as a reconnection of sorts for James Franco (In the Valley of Elah) to the Apatow world. Other than a brief cameo in Knocked Up, Franco has been absent from the Apatow universe since he starred in the 1999 cult-TV favorite Freaks and Geeks. Here, Franco shares leading duties with Rogen as Dale’s drug dealer Saul. Against type, Franco feels surprisingly free from his James Dean aspirations, finally willing to take himself a little less seriously. As Saul, his reserved, smoke-now-think-later attitude is the perfect complement to Rogen’s (relatively) more clear-thinking side. The plot is pretty basic: Dale buys a new and rare breed of marijuana from Saul called Pineapple Express. On his way to serve assumed drug kingpin Ted Jones (Gary Cole, Desperate Housewives) court

papers, he stops for a toke outside Jones’ mansion. While blazing, Dale witnesses Jones and a police officer (Rosie Perez, The Take) murder a man who is presumed to be part of an Asian drug cartel. Witnessing a murder, apparently, can be a major buzzkill. In shock — and in paranoia — Dale throws the joint out the window and tries booking it in his car. Jones and the cop see someone scurry off in a car, but they don’t know who. Dale would have been fine, except he left a trace of evidence behind. And it just so happens, Jones produces the Pineapple Express, and he only sold it to one guy, who only sold it to Saul, who only sold it to Dale. Returning to Saul, Dale convinces his dealer to go on the lam and hide from Jones until things cool off — but not before grabbing the necessary snacks ... and fruit. From then on, it’s a tactful melting pot of chases, brawls, gun fights and laughs — all of which work together. If anything, Pineapple Express is less in the Apatow brand we’ve come to expect and more akin to England’s purveyors of intelligent, R-rated comedy: Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost of Shaun of the Dead

and Hot Fuzz fame. As those filmmakers do so well, Rogen and Goldberg also know how to poke fun and pay homage without taking cheap shots. Rogen and Goldberg are a bit less inyour-face than Wright and Pegg, but the outcome is just as effective and satisfying. And like the two Wright/Pegg films, the success of Pineapple Express boils down to sophisticated writing and phenomenal chemistry. Here, Rogen proves he may be the easiest man to work with in Hollywood, once again melding perfectly with his former cast mate. We’ve seen Rogen tackle supporting roles and leading roles with a variety of cast mates in the past few years, and he never misses a step. With Franco, he’s found yet another perfect match — a more subtle, silly humor to counter his sharp wit. Originally, Rogen’s and Franco’s roles were reversed, with Rogen as the harebrained drug dealer and Franco as the suit. Somewhere along the line, the roles were flipped, and it was the smartest thing they could have done. Having Franco play out of character is brilliant. Give him a wig and skeeze him up a bit, and Franco’s the atypical dealer. Frankly, when cleaned up, Franco’s too good looking to be the average stoner. That’s a role better suited to Rogen, who seems to be in touch with 20-something

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Gary Cole, left, plays a drug dealer chasing Dale Denton (Seth Rogen) after Denton witnesses Cole’s character and Rosie Perez’s kill a man. America — it’s what he’s best at, and he proves it in Pineapple. You relate to Rogen because he doesn’t have anything special going for him. He’s just an average overweight dude who smokes way too much pot for his own good. It’s also refreshing to see Rogen and Goldberg deviate from formula a bit. Sure, Pineapple, like Superbad, takes place over the course of one or two

crazy days, but there’s no cookie-cutter sentimental ending here — just action and humor. Pineapple Express doesn’t reinvent the stoner comedy, the buddy comedy or the action movie, but it melds all three together better than any other film has in recent memory. rudi.greenberg@gmail.com

MOVIE: Pineapple Express | VERDICT:


THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008 | DIVERSIONS | THE DIAMONDBACK

9

Want to keep the buzz going? Check out these stoner flicks

UP IN SMOKE

DAZED AND CONFUSED

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

HALF BAKED

YEAR: 1978 HIGH-POINT: Chong rolls a joint made from the stash his dog eats ... after the dog fully digests WORTH THE TOKE: The first and best of the Cheech & Chong movies set the standard for the stoner-buddy flick

YEAR: 1993 HIGH-POINT: The hero Randy Floyd (Jason London) removes his belt buckle in public and smokes out of it WORTH THE TOKE: Richard Linklater’s film balances nostalgia and hijinks better than the average high-school party flick

YEAR:1998 HIGH-POINT: Lebowski’s (Jeff Bridges) Busby Berkley-influenced dream, complete with pins, girls and Saddam WORTHTHETOKE: Endlessly quotable and trippy as hell, Lebowski is the peerless stoner classic

YEAR: 1998 HIGH-POINT: Jon Stewart’s stoned ramblings about the crazy happenings on the back of 20 dollar bill WORTH THE TOKE: Not the sharpest stoner flick in the bunch, but Dave Chappelle alone warrants a quick hit

1/2

HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE YEAR: 2004 HIGH-POINT: Kumar’s (Kal Penn) sexual fantasy with a giant bag of pot - ’nuff said WORTH THE TOKE: The premise alone makes the original Harold & Kumar the stuff of stonercinema legend

1/2

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10

THE DIAMONDBACK | DIVERSIONS | THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008

REVIEW | CONOR OBERST

HOT AND COLD: MUSIC EDITION most definitely HOT:

PHOTO COURTESY AUTUMN DE WILDE

“Strange Overtones” by David Byrne and Brian Eno

“Id Engager” by of Montreal

It’s been nearly 30 years since David Byrne and Brian Eno last collaborated with My Life in the Bush of Ghosts. While the album was a landmark for experimental electronic music, it didn’t quite capture Eno’s work with Byrne’s Talking Heads. “Strange Overtunes,” the first single from the pair’s new album, Everything That Happens will Happen Today (due Aug. 19), sounds more like what post-Talking Heads Byrne should sound like: a careful mix of electronic beats, afro-centric synocpation and otherworld, whiteboy funk.

Leave it to of Montreal to release the last track from its forthcoming album as the first single. It’s pretty difficult to judge a closer without the preceding tracks for context, but if “Id Engager” is any indication, Skeletal Lamping (due Oct. 7) looks to the sunnier side of “phallocentric tyranny,” as Kevin Barnes puts it. Perhaps he exercised enough of his demons on Hissing Fauna, Are You the Destroyer? Brooding or not, the album should be one of the fall highlights — an act fit to follow David Byrne’s funk.

most definitely COLD:

Try as he may Conor Oberst just can’t shake his sappy lyrical content on his first solo album in 12 years, Conor Oberst.

Not Bright, just sappy Conor Oberst sheds the Bright Eyes tag for a less-than enthralling solo album BY ZACHARY HERRMANN Senior staff writer

It’s the critical-hype kiss of death no singer-songwriter deserves: the dreaded “next Bob Dylan” stamp. Inevitably, any talented young gun who dares to strum an acoustic guitar and turn a phrase will have to endure the awful title. The strongest survive and move on — Leonard Cohen, Loudon Wainwright, Bruce Springsteen and Jeff Tweedy all seem no worse for the wear. And for a while, it looked as if Conor Oberst — better known to us as the leader of Bright Eyes — would be able to outlast the lazy hyperbole of his staunchest supporters. With I’m Wide Awake, It’s Morning, he solidified Bright Eyes as a force to be reckoned with in the rise of the new Americana. Though plagued with cheesy production and equally hokey lyrical moments, 2007’s Cassadega pushed Oberst forth as one of the scene’s most bankable players. Ever the prolific artist, Oberst is back a year later as a solo act on the unassumingly titled Conor Oberst. Less stylistically strained than his previous Bright Eyes release, the album offers plenty of breezy, ’60s folk-rock vibes. By toning down his idiosyncrasies, Oberst sacrifices a large part of what sets him apart from the artists in his record collection. Musically speaking, Oberst’s fourth solo release is fairly enjoyable without making too much of an impression. (Note: The occasional flutter of a Hammond organ hardly qualifies as compositional nuance.) To his credit, Oberst could not have timed the release much better. Placed on an iPod, the album is ideal for an August day at the beach; perfectly complemented by a trashy romance novel, a Corona Light and other mildly satisfying, instantly forgettable staples of summer. There are flashes of American Beauty-era Grateful Dead (“Sausalito”) sans the classic interplay of Robert

Hunter’s words against Jerry Garcia’s studio-compacted electric leads. “Danny Callahan” treads into the mellower territory of fellow Obama-supporter Wilco, a much more natural fit for Oberst. His post-No Depression country-andfolk grooming threads through from beginning to end, giving the Mexicorecorded songs an appropriately dusty sound. But endless highways and shitkicking twang have been done a thousand times before, a thousand times better. Aside from the rambling standout “I Don’t Want to Die (In the Hospital),” Oberst’s penchant for insipid, selfconsciously “witty” lyrics drag the songs down one after the other. The trouble starts early and doesn’t let up on opener “Cape Canaveral.” “Please, please, please Sister Socrates/ You always answer with a question/ Show some kindness to a petty thief,” Oberst sings on the first, but not worst, of his clunky ballads. On the sun-stroked “Get-Well-Cards,” pretension alone separates Oberst from the likes of Jack Johnson. Of course, it’s unreasonable to expect Oberst to charge every song with the furious indictment of “When the President Talks to God” or the chilling fatalism expressed on “At the Bottom of Everything.” But as a writer heralded as one of the best of his generation, Oberst simply cannot get away with being empty and mindless.

The “circus tigers,” “starving children” and “pink flamingoes” never add up to the personal loss Oberst tries to communicate on “Lenders in the Temple,” the singer’s poor emulation of an Elliott Smith tune. Sorrow just comes easier to some than others. And it becomes painfully obvious when Oberst writes outside of his comfort zone. “If I go to heaven, I’ll be bored as hell/ Like a crying baby at the bottom of a well,” he laments on the plodding finale, “Milk Thistle.” Oberst has never been afraid to wear his emotions on his sleeve; for many, it’s a large part of the Bright Eyes appeal. The guy ranges from pissed off to borderline nihilistic, and he does everything in between pretty damn well. So maybe it’s his already angst-saturated tone of voice or just something he hasn’t been able to fully embrace, but Oberst cannot write sentimental without coming across sappy. The personal plights of Conor Oberst wind up feeling incredibly false in the face of the more universal woes he has expressed as part of Bright Eyes. Oberst is far too young and talented to already be considered a casualty of the next-Dylan legacy. But since 2005, his studio output has slipped considerably. Dylan had his weaker moments too — before Blood on the Tracks and Desire, there were Self Portrait and Dylan. If Oberst’s underwhelming self-titled album is what the artist needs to get back on track, so be it. But one way or another, it’s a wakeup call.

“Crawl” by Kings of Leon

“Corona and Lime” by Shwayze

It wasn’t bad enough Kings of Leon had to abandon its gritty sound for U2-esque arena dribble. No, on its new single “Crawl,” the Followill gang decides to take a foray into industrial cock-rock. C’mon guys — just because Trent Reznor’s price is right, doesn’t mean you have to listen ... and emulate. Because of the Times went one step too far, which begs the question: Where the hell will Only By The Night (due Sept. 23) go? If “Crawl” is any indication, maybe even the Brits will finally shun Kings of Leon.

If you’ve watched MTV in the last few weeks, you’ve undoubtedly seen skits and heard songs featuring Malibu, Calif.-based Shwayze. His “Corona and Lime,” with the famous-for-banging-famouspeople Cisco Adler guesting is everything a summer pop song tries to be. Step One: Name check a corporate entity. Step two: Put glossly looking white girls in your video. Step three: Mask misogynism with a fauxlove song. Step four: Suck. Thanks Adler, now that you’ve made the Billboard Hot 100, you can bang yourself.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008 | SPORTS | THE DIAMONDBACK

11

Friedgen could employ rotation for quarterbacks ‘by situation’ QB, from Page 12

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

last season’s opener, and Portis, who was academically ineligible last season because of a violation of the school’s academic honesty code. “We may play multiple quarterbacks,” Friedgen said. “I don’t know. It’s an area that, if we can get the production we expect, we have a chance to have a good offense.” Steffy started the first five games last season before he was injured against Rutgers, when Turner took over before halftime and led the Terps to an upset road victory. The Terps finished 6-7 after a 21-14 loss to Oregon State in the Emerald Bowl. This season, they return nine offensive starters to take on a schedule that includes eight teams that reached

postseason play last year. Friedgen hopes to have all his starters decided a week earlier than last season, when he named Steffy his starter August 24 — one day before camp ended. But Friedgen said if no one clearly wins the job, he’s prepared to go into the season “doing it by situation.” “I think it puts the pressure on the players to make it clearly obvious that they’re ‘The Guy,’” offensive coordinator James Franklin said. “They need to separate themselves from the crowd because it shouldn’t just be obvious to me and coach Friedgen who the starter is. It should be obvious to everyone on the team.” Turner, who threw seven touchdowns in 11 games after entering last season third on the depth chart, feels he can

handle the position. “I’m at the top of the depth chart right now,” Turner said. “I have a lot of confidence. I know what it takes to be the starting quarterback.” Steffy’s ready to prove he can put his injury-riddled past behind him and relax. “I definitely think everyone can contribute in a different area, but we’re all competing to be the quarterback, not one of the quarterbacks,” Steffy said. And Portis said the time he’s spent with the playbook learning Franklin’s offense has paid off. “I feel real astute with it,” Portis said. “I’ve been studying real hard.” It’s clear entering camp Steffy and Turner are very close in the minds of the coaches, while Portis is a step behind. But Franklin

said his offense is versatile enough for any of the quarterbacks to be successful. For now, the Terp offense and its talented, young wide receivers led by preseason honorable mention AllAmerican junior Darrius Heyward-Bey must be ready to be led by any or all of the three. As the Terps prepare for the season-opener against Delaware August 30, senior tight end Dan Gronkowski would be happy if one of the quarterback troika stepped up to earn the job soon. “You always want to know who’s going to be your starting guy,” Gronkowski said. “Hopefully, we get somebody out of that we can say is our starting quarterback, someone we can rally around.” edetweilerdbk@gmail.com

Da’Rel Scott (above) and Morgan Green will need to stay healthy if the Terps want to have success on the ground this season.

Tailbacks will split carries for Terps RUNNING, from Page 12 hamstring injury last season, which limited his season rushing stats to zero yards on three carries. Bowie State transfer Rashad Henry and freshman Davin Meggett could also see carries this season. “We bring different things to the game,” Scott said. “It’s going to hurt the defense because they really don’t know exactly what kind of running game we’re going to bring.” The major unknown is durability. Scott said he needs to show in camp that he can make all the necessary blocks in pass protection and handle more carries. Green’s daily routine now includes extra stretching to avoid unnecessary injuries.

But Franklin isn’t concerned about finding someone to take the bulk of the load. “I think the term ‘everydown-back’ is really non-existent anymore,” Franklin said. “You better have two or three backs who can take the pounding and handle the workload of the position.” But Scott and Green, who room together during camp, know just one person will be in the backfield for the first snap against Delaware on August 30. They will be battling for carries throughout the preseason. “We’re competitors, and we want that starting spot,” Scott said. “If I do get that starting spot, I’m going to take it and try to run away with it.” edetweilerdbk@gmail.com

USA lacrosse selects three former, one current Terp for women’s team McFadden, Carney, Clipp, Walker all chosen Terrapin women’s lacrosse junior Caitlyn McFadden will be a representative on the U.S. national lacrosse team, according to a report from the Athletics Department. Former Terps Quinn Carney, Becky Clipp and Acacia Walker are also among the 49 players chosen. The pool of players will be divided into an Elite team and a Developmental team before the final roster is announced leading up to the 2009 IFWLA World Cup in Prague, Czech Republic. In her sophomore season, McFadden scored 27 goals and dished out 27 assists en route to an All-ACC selection. Carney earned a silver medal with the U.S. national team in 2005. –Compiled from staff reports

FILE PHOTO–THE DIAMONDBACK

Junior Caitlyn McFadden shined in the Terps midfield last season, and she will now have the chance to demonstrate her talents on the national level.


12

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

Sports Scott, Green form new backfield duo Inexperienced players must step up with Lattimore, Ball gone BY ERIC DETWEILER Senior staff writer

With the departures of Keon Lattimore and Lance Ball, the Terrapin football team lost two of its top 14 leading rushers in program history. Terp fans may not forget the duo which combined for 1,573 yards and 25 touchdowns last season, but sophomore running backs Da’Rel Scott and Morgan Green will try to start their own memorable running back combo this season. “It’s sad to see [Lattimore and Ball] go, but now it’s my time to step up,” Green said. “I’ve been waiting for an opportunity to go out there and play.” Scott and Green entered preseason camp listed together at the top of the Terps’ depth chart at halfback. The third-year backs are prepared to share the load for the Terps this season.

For up-to-date Terps football news, log on to the official blog of The Diamondback: TerrapinTrail.com.

QB or not QB? That’s the question once again in preseason camp Turner, Steffy, Portis all vying to be opening-day starter

Offensive coordinator James Franklin is excited to have Scott’s speed and Green’s power at his disposal coming out of the backfield. “I think we’ve got two guys we can definitely win with,” Franklin said. “We’ve just got to take advantage of their strengths.” Scott, a 5-foot-11 former high school track star, left his mark last season as a kick-off return specialist, averaging a team-high 84.2 all-purpose yards per game. He showed his explosiveness averaging 9.6 yards per carry and taking a screen pass 57 yards for a touchdown in the Terps’ upset win against Boston College. Green, who has earned “Iron Terp” status in each of his three seasons for his work in the weight room, needs to prove he can stay healthy. He broke his clavicle during the 2007 RedWhite game and battled a

Please See RUNNING, Page 11

BY ERIC DETWEILER Senior staff writer

Terrapin football coach Ralph Friedgen is clear about his quarterback situation. Junior Chris Turner needs to be more consistent. Senior Jordan Steffy has to relax. And junior Josh Portis must show he can learn the playbook. But those assessments lead Friedgen right back where he was last season: entering preseason camp without a set starting quarterback. The Terps kicked off their preseason camp Monday afternoon ready to sort out their quarterback situation for a second-straight season. Friedgen declined to put Turner, who started the final eight games last season, at the top of the depth chart before camp began. Turner will have ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK to beat out Steffy, who started

For the second straight year, the preseason buzz revolves around a quarterback controversy for the Terps. Josh Portis — a darkhorse candidate to earn the job — addresses reporters at media day Monday.

Please See QB, Page 11

APARTMENT LOCATOR PAGES Pages 8, 9 and 12


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