Page 1

ON TOP OF HIS GAME

A SEARCH BEGINS

Big Boi’s solo debut spotlights the rapper as one of the genre’s finest

Possible replacements for Athletics Director Debbie Yow emerge SPORTS | PAGE 8

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 6

Thursday, July 8, 2010

THE DIAMONDBACK THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

Students mugged in Lot 1

Univ. disregards area restrictions on water Students largely uninformed about local order to decrease consumption BY SOHAYL VAFAI Staff writer

The university is facing criticism from students and public works officials for violating mandatory water restrictions and not notifying on-campus residents of the need to conserve. The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission ordered all its customers throughout Prince George’s and Montgomery counties — including the university — to minimize water consumption between last Thursday and early Tuesday as it made emergency repairs to its largest water main. To maintain enough water pressure for firefighters and to prevent a

contamination risk, WSSC told customers to halt all outdoor water usage and minimize consumption while washing clothes and dishes, bathing and even flushing toilets. Anyone caught watering plants or washing cars risked a $500 fine. But the university didn’t even hear about restrictions until noon Friday, according to William Monan, assistant director of landscape services. Even then it only reduced its watering instead of halting it altogether as WSSC required, Monan said, and the university said nothing to most students until more than nine hours after the five-day restriction period had ended.

see WATER, page 7

Our 100TH Year, No. 146

Police arrest two teens after ‘brazen’ robbery BY LEAH VILLANUEVA Staff writer

A university employee waters plants near Lot 1 on July 2 despite an order banning all outdoor water use. BRADY HOLT/THE DIAMONDBACK

BEATING THE HEAT

Two students were assaulted and robbed in Lot 1B on Friday afternoon, police said, and two 16-year-olds were arrested nearby shortly afterward in connection with the crime. In what police believe to be the first broad-daylight mugging on the campus in more than a year, the two students — both men — were attacked by a teen who approached them on a bicycle as they were getting into their car parked near Knight Hall, University Police spokesman Capt. Marc Limansky said. The students were walking back from the University Health Center at about 3 p.m. when a teenager came up behind them and accused them of talking about his mother. The students ignored him and got into the front seats of their black four-door Toyota, but the teen — who police do not believe knew the students — climbed into the passenger side of the back seat and continued to badger them. When the driver came around to the rear passenger door and told the teen to get out of the car, the teen punched the student in the face, knocking him to the ground, then got into the driver’s seat and began punching the other student, who remained in the passenger’s seat, Limansky said. He then grabbed the second student’s iPhone and rode off with another teenager on bicycles, Limansky said, adding the students suffered minor injuries. The students and a passerby who witnessed the robbery immediately called police with a description of the robbers and their bicycles, and University Police broadcast an alert, Limansky said. Police stopped one of the two suspects at the

see ROBBERY, page 2

Next president might not be permanent Interim could replace Mote as search drags on BY RICHARD ABDILL Staff writer

to conserve energy from 2 p.m. until 10 p.m. due to the possibility of brownouts and blackouts caused by a large increase in electricity demand in the area. An hour after the university’s email, Commons management followed suit, asking residents to

An interim president may take over the university after President Dan Mote’s retirement takes effect Aug. 31, according to Donald Kettl, the public policy dean and chairman of the search committee tasked with finding Mote’s replacement. After Mote announced his retirement in February, Chancellor Brit Kirwan and the Board of Regents apDAN MOTE pointed a presidential UNIVERSITY search committee to inPRESIDENT terview candidates and compile a short list for Kirwan and the regents to consider. Kettl said that while his group was working “as quickly as we can,” there is no guarantee there will be a permanent replacement by the time Mote leaves at the beginning of the fall semester. Kirwan said he would appoint an interim president in the meantime, a situation that wouldn’t be unprecedented at this university — an interim was briefly in charge after Kirwan himself stepped down as president here in 1998 before Mote’s appointment.

see COMMONS, page 3

see MOTE, page 3

As temperatures reached the triple digits for the third straight day Wednesday, pedestrians on the campus found relief at a water station the University Health Center set up outside of the Stamp Student Union. Prince George’s County officials reported that 28 people across the county have been taken to local hospitals for heat-related illnesses. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

Air conditioning outages exasperate residents of Commons 1 and 2 Area increase in energy demand due to the heat threatens to overload electrical grid Commons 1 and 2 were without air conditioning Tuesday night, and Commons 2 residents were still facing air conditioning issues Wednesday evening, residents and a community assistant said after temperatures soared to 101

degrees during the day. Abby Widom, a university alum who was staying with a friend in Commons 2 Tuesday night, called the outage “miserable.” “I woke up drenched,” she said. South Campus Commons management could not be reached for comment on the incident Wednesday night.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER:

Partly Cloudy/90s

BY ALICIA MCCARTY For The Diamondback

At the same time some students were left without air conditioning, university officials requested students across the campus conserve energy as air conditioner use throughout the region threatened to overload the electrical grid. Officials sent out a campus-wide e-mail early Wednesday afternoon asking the university community

INDEX

NEWS . . . . . . . . . .2 OPINION . . . . . . . .4

FEATURES . . . . . .5 CLASSIFIED . . . . .6

DIVERSIONS . . . . .6 SPORTS . . . . . . . . .8

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2

THE DIAMONDBACK | NEWS | THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

ROBBERY

THE BLOG IS BACK

from page 1

To read these posts,

visit blogs.umdbk.com/campusdrive Elevators retrofitted with sheets of plywood. Chickens consumed by the hundreds nightly. New sidewalks adapting to pedestrian preferences. University icons that were inspired by embalmed reptiles. Many little things are happening in and around this campus. You’ll soon be reading about them on The Diamondback’s reinvented Campus Drive blog at blogs.umdbk.com/campusdrive. Also, send any hot tips for blog ideas — big or small — to The Diamondback newsroom at news@umdbk.com.

This elevator in the Biology Building may need remodeling. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

corner of Adelphi and Toledo roads about a mile and a half from the robbery scene, Limansky said, and soon got word that someone had run into the nearby Prince George’s County Community Center. Police found that suspect in the building’s bathroom with the stolen iPhone, he added. The victims and the witness all identified the two 16-year-olds as the muggers, and the teens were charged with robbery, assault and theft, Limansky said. Although police believe only one of the two suspects was a direct participant, police spokesman Paul Dillon said both conspirators are equally responsible under the law. Because they were charged as juveniles, Limansky would not identify them except to say one of them lives nearby in Riverdale. Neither is suspected of committing any other on-campus crimes, he added, crediting the arrest and the recovery of the iPhone to “good police work” and the timely and coordinated response of the officers. Limansky noted that the robbery was unusual for the College Park area; most recent muggings have occurred late at night blocks away from the campus itself.

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In other recent crime news, two students and their non-student companion were cited for shooting fireworks off the roof of the Mowatt Lane parking garage at 1:35 a.m. last Thursday. Officers saw fireworks and stopped the three men in the garage’s stairwell, police said, and one of them admitted to setting off one firework. Police also stopped a man on Knox Road near Cornerstone Grill and Loft who they said was cursing at and mooning nearby pedestrians around 1 a.m. Friday. Adrian Lamont Moten, a 22-year-old student from Hyattsville, was cited but not arrested for disorderly conduct, police said. And Friday afternoon, police said a man assaulted a university parking enforcement officer after the officer ticketed his truck, which was illegally parked between Marie Mount Hall and the Skinner Building. The man yelled profanities at the officer and swatted at his face, grazing the officer’s cheek, and then briefly blocked in the parking enforcement vehicle with his own truck when the officer tried to leave, police said. Because the officer wasn’t injured, he decided not to file charges, police said.

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The students therefore had no reason to believe they were about to become victims, he said. “They were walking together at a time of day when their guard would be down,” Limansky said. “It was just a brazen thing.” Sophomore computer science major Molly Li said she was “not too comfortable” about the idea of a mugging occurring on the campus in the middle of the day. “I usually avoid walking around at night because I know something like this could happen and I’ve heard about it happening,” Li said. “But broad daylight — that’s just a little disconcerting.” Junior computer science and finance major Edward Tsao said although the daytime mugging was unusual, he was “not surprised” to hear about it. “You kinda get enough police reports from Prince George’s County Police to kind of expect this stuff to happen,” Tsao said. However, Limansky said that in spite of the “smattering of occurrences” of crime in College Park, “statistically, it’s a very safe campus.” Police said the last similar crime occurred more than a year ago when a female student was robbed of her book bag as she crossed a street near South Campus Commons at 11 a.m. last May — a mugging that remains unsolved.

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THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

3

New parking meter system may spread to more of downtown College Park City says centralized pay stations are more convenient than individual meters BY ALICIA MCCARTY For The Diamondback

New parking space pay stations are on track to replace individual meters throughout much of downtown College Park later this summer, city officials said. The 13 new stations will replace nearly 200 meters and four existing pay stations, officials said. The stations would let motorists pay with paper money or a credit card at the College Park Shopping Center and on nearby streets and lets parking officers collect money in central locations rather than in dozens of individual meters, officials said at Tuesday night’s College Park City Council meeting. The city is replacing its existing pay stations at its new parking garage and its municipal parking lot after users complained they were too slow and difficult to use, College Park finance director Steve Groh said. The new machines will include signs detailing how to use them and will process credit card transactions faster, he added. “I feel very confident that the new machines will address the issues with the existing machines,”Groh said. The new stations cost approximately $10,000 each, he added. As planned, the city will install five pay stations throughout the 143-space shopping center parking lot, two others along Lehigh Road and Sterling Place and two

Four city pay stations criticized as confusing and slow will be replaced. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

The College Park Shopping Center will likely get five new pay stations to replace 143 individual meters in August, city officials said, but students are unsure of the new system’s merits. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

more in the garage, officials said, news that didn’t thrill students parking in the area Wednesday morning. “This is faster,” said Yuki Watanabe, a senior mechanical engineering major, pointing to the meter he just fed in the shopping center lot. Senior theater major Chelsie Lloyd let out a frustrated sigh at the news. She said she prefers meters to pay stations, particularly at a shopping center,

because she is often simply running into a store to pick up food and does not need long-term parking. “I think the pay station splurge on campus has caused a lot of problems,” she said. Despite its investment in new parking stations, the city has no immediate plans to change its parking rate from the existing 75 cents an hour, officials said.

District 2 Councilman Bob Catlin said he still hopes to see surface lot parking rates increase at some point to encourage more drivers to use the underutilized parking garage rather than circling crowded lots and streets hunting for a space. The original Ledo Restaurant pizza parlor — scheduled to move into the garage’s Knox Road retail space from its current location on Adelphi Road later

COMMONS

ment has had with residents about the status of the system. She said she had received no e-mails about the outage from management and no confirmation that it was actually fixed. Kaitlyn Shulman, a public policy graduate student who lives in Commons 2, echoed Chen’s concerns about management’s communication with residents. “I’m just wondering if I should invest in a fan,” Shulman said. Nicole Silva, a senior family science major and the community assistant for Commons 1 and 2 who was on duty Wednesday evening, said she had been informed by other staff members that the air conditioning in both buildings had been fixed Wednesday morn-

MOTE

in College Park: Vice President for Research Mel Bernstein left July 1 to from page 1 take a position at Northeastern University and Athletics Director DebSeveral faculty members around bie Yow announced last week that for the 1998 transition said they she is leaving for N.C. State. Bernstein’s and Yow’s positions couldn’t recall any problems with the system, and the University of Mary- both come with a chair in the presiland, Baltimore, also had an interim dent’s cabinet and are now staffed by president until July 1, after former interims while officials wait for a perpresident David A. Ramsay stepped manent president to appoint their replacements. down in March. The presidential transition comes at a time of administrative upheaval rabdill@umdbk.com

www.diamondbackonline.com

from page 1 conserve energy by keeping thermostats at 78 degrees, taking shorter showers and unplugging appliances. Neither e-mail mentioned any issue with the Commons air conditioning. Vivey Chen, a senior economics and geography major who lives in Commons 2, said she experienced issues with her air conditioner during the last week of June and was not surprised when the problem became more widespread. Chen called the outage “infuriating” and was most frustrated by the lack of communication Commons manage-

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this summer — will also help boost the garage’s use, officials said. The city must get approval from the owners of its downtown commercial space before installing meters at the shopping center and on the two streets, Catlin said. Barring objections, which he said he didn’t expect, the meters would go in sometime next month. news@umdbk.com

“I’m just wondering if I should invest in a fan.” KAITLYN SHULMAN COMMONS 2 RESIDENT

ing. But, she said, she was still getting calls from residents about air conditioning issues. In at least some of the cases, students didn’t notice their air conditioning had been repaired because they left their vents closed, Silva said. However, some residents were still reporting faulty air conditioning Wednesday night. news@umdbk.com

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THE DIAMONDBACK | THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

Opinion

THE DIAMONDBACK YOUR INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK PHONE: (301) 314-8200 | FAX: (301) 314-8358 3150 SOUTH CAMPUS DINING HALL | COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742 NEWS@UMDBK .COM | OPINION@UMDBK .COM

ALLISON STICE EDITOR IN CHIEF

MIKE WARLEY

MEGAN CONLAN

MANAGING EDITOR

DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

ROB GINDES

BETHANY WYNN

OPINION EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Staff editorial

Guest column

Water worries

Fenced in MARK GLAROS

D

By a stroke of luck, no massive fires or widespread water contamination on’t waste water, the old adage goes. However, university officials chose to ignore that bit of wisdom during the first sweltering week of occurred by the time the restrictions were lifted Tuesday. But just a day later, a 24inch water main burst in a residential area of Potomac, spewing chunks of asphalt July, creating a health and safety hazard. After discovering a weakness in its largest water main, which sup- and flooding the neighborhood as water gushed for hours. The broken main is just plies about 1.8 million residents in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, four miles from where the WSSC had completed repairs of the original pipeline, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission told customers to cut their which is about four times bigger. If the rupture had occurred when customers water consumption from Thursday to Tuesday. Watering plants and lawns, wash- were supposed to have been monitoring their water usage during crucial repairs, ing cars and even excessive laundry loads or toilet-flushing were discouraged who knows what could have happened. Facilities Management officials said it would be impossible not to water the throughout the area, with warnings and $500 fines delivered to those who failed 30,000 trees and flowers on the campus for three days in to comply. extremely hot weather. But parks and recreation authorities But the university disregarded the order. Although it shut in nearby Laurel suspended watering in all parks, even where off sprinkler systems a day after the restriction period new sod and grass had just been planted. Besides, the univerbegan, it continued to water plants and flowers in key locaThe university should sity’s commitment to continually watering the grass seems to tions during the rest of the restriction period. However, the ultimate transgression was that nobody have complied with re- be newfound — take a stroll through Washington Quad, once alerted students to decrease their water usage and many strictions and encouraged one of the prettiest areas on the campus to play volleyball, barbecue or lay in the grass, and you won’t be able to tell the difwere unaware of the ban. students to do the same ference from the Sahara Desert. The mandatory restrictions were intended to maintain Everybody loves green grass and fresh flowers, but the unienough water pressure for firefighters in case of an emergency and to guard against the risk of water contamination while the WSSC versity had its priorities all wrong when it chose to violate a ban intended to keep worked extensively to reinforce the pipe. The WSSC hoped to cut down con- residents healthy and safe. Worse, students were kept in the dark when a simple sumption by 33 percent in order to achieve that goal, but only managed a 14 per- flyer posted on the door of dorms could have informed those who wanted to turn off the faucet and, unlike the university, help out. cent decrease.

Our View

Editorial cartoon: Megan Conlan

Freshmen: How to be a Terp in five easy steps

T

his is a super-condensed, ultra-CliffNotes edition of “How to Be a Terrapin: An Instruction Manual for Incoming Freshmen.” Trust me, it will only be 500 words long and at the end of it, you might feel the turtle power pulsating through your veins. 1. Pick up the all-important free University Book Center and Maryland Book Exchange T-shirts. These will be integral to your participation in the giant red wave commonly seen at school sporting events. In fact, these shirts are appropriate for almost every single occasion on campus. So take your time to break them in and run your fingers over that beautiful turtle. Oh yes, there will be plenty more free shirts in your collegiate future — but trust me, none will compare to these two. 2. Throw away anything that is Duke related. During orientation, one

ANGELINA

SHE of my high school classmates mistakenly wore a Duke tank top and we all stared at her with “wtf?” expressions and avoided her like the plague. Don’t be that person. I have still been unable to come up with a proper rationale for Duke hatred and have simply concluded that the university’s tap water is laced with chemicals that elicit intense anger at the sight of the color blue or the words “Blue Devils.” 3. Forget about looking both ways before crossing the street. I too hesitated before crossing the street when I was a freshman, but I soon learned the cars always stop. They just do. I

must also insert a friendly word of caution that this rule does not apply when you go back home. And if you happen to hail from the mean streets of Washington or Baltimore, make sure to re-learn how to cross the street before going home. I learned this the hard way. 4. Stay away from the fried chicken, French fries and buffalo wings. It’s easy to say but oh so hard to do. Your eyes will probably glaze over at the number of food choices available when you first step onto the campus. And with your seemingly unlimited meal plan, why not indulge? Don’t do it. No matter how much you plan to work out afterward, you will most likely not follow through. 5. Pick up The Diamondback on a daily basis. If you can’t handle the New York Times or The Washington Post just yet, think of The Diamondback as a

set of friendly training wheels. Not only will you be a wonderfully informed student but you will have a game of sudoku and a crossword available during a particularly boring lecture. Also, if you wish to do so, know that you can always bash, insult and make death threats to Diamondback writers online under the veil of anonymity. Actually, if you happen to be extremely bored, it’s also great fun to scroll through the comments at the end of the articles posted online. But if you’re feeling particularly nice and want to infinitesimally increase your good karma, send us feedback or maybe even a compliment that isn’t laced with anger and acridity. We will love you forever. Angelina She is a sophomore physiology and neurobiology major. She can be reached at she@umdbk.com.

PACE: Undermined by Fannie and Freddie

W

hat are the first thoughts that come to mind when you hear the words “Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac”? Mine are: bailout, financial crisis, irresponsible lending, housing bubble and subprime mortgage. Ever since the government seized Fannie and Freddie in September 2008 (right as they helped crash the economy), the taxpayer has been paying for their losses to keep the housing industry afloat. Right now, the bill sits at $145.9 billion, and the Congressional Budget Office predicts it’ll be $389 billion when all is said and done. There’s another way in which Fannie and Freddie are poised to undermine the country: clean energy. Property Assessed Clean Energy is one of the best renewable energy and energy efficiency financing ideas out there. The program allows counties and cities to give out micro-loans to property owners who want to retrofit their home with solar panels or make it more energy efficient but can’t

afford the upfront cost. The homeowners can then repay these loans over 20 years through a surcharge on their property taxes while at the same time reaping energy savings from the retrofit. The importance of the surcharge being on the property tax is that if the owner sells their home after they’ve used PACE, the loan stays with the property and is passed on to the next owners since they are the beneficiary of the lower electricity bills. By overcoming two challenges to localized clean energy generation — upfront costs and the possibility of an owner moving out after they’ve done a green home improvement — PACE changes the playing field. It makes clean energy affordable for middle-class Americans. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have just brought PACE to a screeching halt. These two government-owned corporations guarantee half of the nation’s $11 trillion in mortgages, and they have warned lenders (local governments) not to participate in PACE. The issue is

MATT

DERNOGA that if a borrower defaults on their home, the PACE property tax surcharge must be paid off before the mortgage. Fannie and Freddie see this as increasing the risk on their mortgage loans, which means they could raise interest rates to compensate. In other words, if Fannie and Freddie want to scare municipalities away from PACE, they can. Because of the warnings coming from Fannie and Freddie, all PACE programs around the countr y have been paused as they await guidance from the mortgage lenders. No new programs have arisen. This is leading to lost opportunities for green businesses and homeowners all around the countr y. Boulder County, Colo., participated in PACE last year and funded $10 million

worth of improvements, creating jobs all around the state. Many municipalities in California had adopted PACE and were expected to collectively drive $1 billion in local projects. If PACE is killed, jobs, energy savings and reduced pollution go with it. Right now, with a sputtering economy, banks that aren’t lending and an unemployment rate near 10 percent, we can’t afford to let Fannie and Freddie bury PACE. Ironically, neither can the mortgage giants. Energy efficiency and solar power have guaranteed long-term energy savings that increase the financial security of homeowners and increase the value of homes. Based on their track record in years past, we should encourage our congressmen and senators to give Fannie and Freddie some sound financial advice before they sink us on this one. Matt Dernoga graduated in May with a degree in government and politics. He can be reached at dernoga@umdbk.com.

T

he university, so precariously placed inside the Capital Beltway, has always represented the whimsical ideal of a commuter campus. Historically, this concept began with the founding of the Maryland Agricultural College more than 150 years ago, wherein students had to ride their brown 1852 Mustangs 15 miles down Route One-half and fight for parking at one of the few halting spaces outside of Van Munching Hall. While that picturesque campus may be a thing of the past (aside from the traditional see-through cows), our students and faculty are still somewhat burdened by this commuter tradition, possibly due to an irrational fear that the ghosts of Harry J. Patterson and Adele H. Stamp will haunt them for their treachery. Therefore, we established departments at the university to help ease the collective burden shared by commuters and students living on-campus, ultimately culminating in the creation of the balancing-act behemoth which is the Department of Transportation Services. Whenever the issue of “car entanglement” is brought up, many choose to focus on the (laughably) disorganized parking system DOTS has heralded as part of the reign of terror during its 8 years at the university, which merged permit and ticket revenue as smoothly as my 87-year-old grandmother would merge with a D.C. party bus barreling down Interstate 95 at rush hour. However, the issue that has attracted my attention today as an active student of the summer variety pertains specifically to the invasion of the campus by steely, shafted cars, so to speak. Indeed, concern about finding a place to park my faithful 2000 Dodge Neon is low on my list of concerns at 2 a.m. No, I would probably just be satisfied finding a way past the damn gates, chained entrances and other flimsy symbols of oppression DOTS so punctually prepares at 10 p.m. on the dot. These security measures, while seemingly admirable attempts to alleviate student safety concerns during the arduous summer months, cannot possibly be seen as legitimate attempts to strengthen the safety of on-campus residents from outside intruders. Indeed, while the gates do in fact limit the points of access to our hallowed domain, funneling cars into a handful of choke points around Route 1 and Route 193 is almost pointless without anyone actually standing there guarding the damn things. Whereas during the cooler months there would be a student donning a little yellow sash waving in permit holders and Cluck-U Chicken delivery guys, the unbearable heat of the summer months must be too strenuous for DOTS or University Police Auxiliary to station anyone there. As a result, students are unnecessarily restricted in their options and are sometimes forced to circle around the hellish back alleys of the Knox Boxes looking for a route back to the main gate. Meanwhile, potential criminals who don’t give up the hunt after being denied by the gate outside of Mowatt Lane parking garage are simply inconvenienced, and if their resolve passes the test laid down before them by DOTS and they find their way around, they are awarded with all the loot they wish to plunder during the dark, humid hours of the July night. Benjamin Franklin once said, “Those who wish to sacrifice freedom for security deserve neither.” Well, he sure as hell didn’t say anything about sacrificing both. Mark Glaros is a senior government and politics major. He can be reached at markglaros@gmail.com.

AIR YOUR VIEWS: COLUMNISTS The Diamondback is currently looking for paid opinion columnists to write for the 2010-2011 school year. Columnists generally write biweekly about campus connected issues and should have relevant writing experience. For questions, or to request an application, please e-mail opinion@umdbk.com.

POLICY: Signed letters, columns and cartoons represent the opinions of the authors. The staff editorial represents the opinion of The Diamondback’s editorial board and is the responsibility of the editor in chief.


THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010 | THE DIAMONDBACK

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Features HOROSCOPESTELLA WILDER

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Auto-sticker info 4 DJs’ gear 8 Visored caps 13 Provisions 14 Ski equipment 15 Raise spirits 16 Belonging to us 17 Lagoon 18 Hold, as attention 19 PC monitor, maybe 20 Camera features 22 As a substitute 24 Swarm with 25 Egg producer 26 Touchdown 28 Loop trains 31 Lie dormant 34 Collins or Donahue 35 Annoying insect 36 Gatehouse cry 37 Pal 38 Sarge’s pooch 39 Dwarf buffalo 40 Take a flier 41 Detroit dud 42 Traveler’s guide 43 Manual 44 Devoured 45 Mild rejoinder 47 Paint or fiber 51 Sauce ingredient (2 wds.) 55 Actor Herbert —

56 Kayak owner, maybe 57 Two-toed sloth 58 Farm worker 59 Grazing land 60 Home-loan agcy. 61 Sheik colleague 62 — -dinner mint 63 Close off 64 Rain slicker

33 Gretna Green occasion 34 Monaco’s Grand — 35 —’s Lady’s Book 37 Tenet 1

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© 2010 UNITED FEATURES SYNDICATE

Previous Day’s Puzzle Solved:

TODAY’S CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY:

EADY RMED O I F S DGE EOCC TN HERON WE A R Y OW E WA F L EEC EARTH L UNT OD I E NEER

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B MA L ED E T I A FRO C LOS A THOS L EEP A END BR CT CRE S MAO VOYAG I NE CO RE THO I C VEN SK ASS

R I N S E

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DOWN 1 Lament 2 Waterfront cities 3 Mdse. 4 Rome’s — Way 5 Lowed 6 Remove snow 7 Type of interest 8 Bit of corn 9 Omit, in speech 10 Asphalt surfaces 11 Anatomical passage 12 Treats fractures 13 Points of convergence 20 Running mate 21 Milan’s locale 23 Sweater letter 26 House haunter 27 Porker’s plaint 29 Delayed 30 Mil. plane 31 Pillow cover 32 Actress Turner

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TUESDAY GREAT SPECIALS – NO COVER TUESDAYS

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 7) — You can enjoy a rousing good time early in the week, but even you must realize that things have to settle down a bit so you can get your work done. (Oct. 8-Oct. 22) — Following another’s lead may not be instinctive to you, but it can certainly be instructive. Focus on fol-

9PM – Close

S K E E T

CANCER (June 21-July 7) — A fast start promises to propel you into an area characterized by one accomplishment after another. It can prove a banner week. (July 8-July 22) — Now is the time for you to put another at ease, even if it means you must remain unsatisfied for a little while longer. Generosity is its own reward.

lowing the letter of the law. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) — Potential is high, but that doesn’t mean you can sit back and have glories rain down upon you; on the contrary, you must work even harder for them. (Nov. 8Nov. 21) — You don’t have to be present to have an influence over others; from a distance, you may have more of an impact. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 7) — You’ll want to do what is expected of you, surely, but how you do it is entirely up to you. You can explore all sorts of techniques and styles. (Dec. 8-Dec. 21) — It’s a good time to put yourself in another’s shoes in order to understand a tricky situation more fully. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 6) — All eyes are on you as the week opens, but you may not be in the mood to satisfy their expectations — just yet. Later, you’ll swing into action and please all. (Jan. 7-Jan. 19) — Take care that you don’t let confidence become overconfidence, lest you begin to boast and endanger your own reputation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 3) — You may be surprised to learn that a past effort long forgotten is only now coming to fruition. When the time comes, you’ll enjoy some well-deserved praise. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) — The way you govern your affairs will garner you a great deal of praise. Other talents serve you well, also.

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ciplined team, you may not feel as though you fully belong. (March 6March 20) — It’s a good week for experimenting with different techniques as you begin to formulate plans that may involve a dramatic change in direction, personally or professionally. ARIES (March 21-April 4) — Others may not believe in you fully, but friends and family members know that when the time comes you will be the one to turn to for answers. (April 5-April 19) — You’ve been trying hard to keep up with others; you’ll want to chart your own course and go it alone for a while. TAURUS (April 20-May 5) — Your work environment may not be conducive to your best efforts, but if you make small improvements, you’ll improve your chances for success. (May 6May 20) — You’re likely to have your fill of family as there are reasons for more than one get-together. Find time to be alone if you require it. GEMINI (May 21-June 6) — You may find yourself waiting for messages from those who seem to know what’s going on more than you do. You’re much more in the know than you know. (June 7-June 20) — You’ll have much to do for others, but you’ll surely find the time to tend to your personal issues as well.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) — Though you are working as part of a well-dis-

Copyright 2010 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

TODAY’S HOROSCOPE SPONSORED BY:

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) — There’s no reason for you to throw your weight around; a subtle, gentle approach is recommended. (Sept. 8-Sept. 22) — You may be rubbing some people the wrong way without even knowing it — until one of them opens up and shares his or her discontent. What are you to do now?

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Quality is word one; no one should settle for less than his or her best, whether on the job, at home, on the playing field or in dealings with others. It’s a good week for one to “redefine” himself or herself, too, if that’s an idea that comes up — and such a reinvention can benefit all aspects of daily life, provided it is not simply an attention getter.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 7) — You may make a minor mistake early in the week, but rather than fight to correct it, you may realize that it can actually further your efforts. (Aug. 8-Aug. 22) — A loved one comes to you with a complaint and a request. You must remain open-minded and willing to do whatever is necessary in this situation.

K E A T S

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he coming week is likely to develop according to plan for most individuals, though some variation can be expected, surely, as a result of the natural ebb and flow that governs interpersonal relations. In fact, the stability that most will enjoy can work wonders where onthe-job performance is concerned; those who are firmly ensconced in a line of work that is lucrative and that they enjoy will be able to focus fully on the tasks at hand, rather than on the difficulties of securing more work. Those who find themselves between jobs, on the other hand, will have to look for one, but this is a good week for finding a job that pays the bills and satisfies the heart.

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6

THE DIAMONDBACK | THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE:

Diversions

VIDEO GAME — CRACKDOWN 2 “Crackdown 2 is an open-world, sandbox title. This makes exploration a blast.” — Andrew Freedman RATING: 3.5 stars out of 5 For the full review, just click the Diversions tab at: WWW.DIAMONDBACKONLINE.COM

arts. music. living. movies. weekend. REVIEW | BIG BOI

best bet BREATHLESS AT AFI SILVER The 50th anniversary restoration of director Jean-Luc Godard’s humorous and sensual Breathless will screen at the AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring for a one-week engagement starting Friday. For the restoration, Rialto Pictures “has made new 35 mm prints from a restored negative supervised by” the film’s cinematographer, Raoul Coutard, according to an AFI Silver press release. The new prints also include revised English subtitles. The film follows Michel Poiccard (Jean-Paul Belmondo, A Man and His Dog), a sexist womanizer who steals cars and sells them for a living. Godard’s lens observes Poiccard in Paris and documents his brief and doomed love affair with an American, Patricia Franchini (a pitch-perfect performance by Jean Seberg, Kill! Kill! Kill! Kill!). Breathless stands strong as essential cinema. It is an accomplishment that helped to lay the foundation of not only modern filmmaking but modern culture. — Reese Higgins RATING: 5 stars out of 5 For the full review of the movie above, just click the Diversions tab at:

WWW.DIAMONDBACKONLINE.COM

The way he rhymes BY ZACHARY BERMAN Staff writer

The career of Big Boi, one half of genre-bending Atlanta rap duo OutKast, has long relied on baring his influences and his new solo release, Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty, is a return to form. After 2006’s Idlewild film soundtrack, OutKast has been on a long hiatus and both Big Boi and his partner-in-rhymes André 3000 have planned solo releases before the next group record. Almost four years later, Big Boi has finally released his solo debut, getting the world one step closer to a possible new OutKast LP. But don’t just look at Sir Lucious as a release that is half of a whole. Much the opposite: Big Boi busts out of the splintered-music-group stigma to forge a record that is decidedly powerful and forthright. At the forefront of the album is Big Boi’s iconic stop-start, nearly conversational delivery style that sets him apart from others in the rap game. This vocal style shares a direct lineage with psychedelic funk all-star George Clinton’s relaxed delivery, who unsurprisingly makes his second OutKast-related guest appearance on this album with the headbobbing fast soul track, “Fo Yo Sorrows,” also featuring Too $hort and Sam Chris.

With or without Clinton in tow, the Parliament Funkadelic influence is immense, notable on almost ever y track. Take single “Shutterbug,” led by a deep vocoder-affected bass voice that will rhythmically slap listeners’ speakers. The thick sub-phonic snarl distinctly recalls Parliament’s “Give Up The Funk (Tear the Roof Off the Sucker).” What really helps the album pull away from the ravenous wolf pack of homogenous-sounding rap albums are the beats, which for the greater part of the album will surprise listeners with their originality and catchiness without failing to show their influences. Many of the beats go well off hip-hop’s beaten path, particularly “Tan-

Big Boi’s solo debut is no small feat

gerine,” featuring T.I. and Khujo Goodie. The beat swirls with natural-sounding eastern percussion and a perpetual distorted guitar riff, as well as multiple vocal effects. Interesting sound aside, Big Boi and company don’t feel a need to take this particular track to another level — perhaps an intellectual one — and choose to rap instead about hiphop’s constant: voluptuous vixens. The rhymes aren’t bad but the obviousness of the subject in this genre might cause more

than a few groans. “Shine Blockas,” which features jailbird Gucci Mane on the chorus, has one of the best beats on the album — a bouncing funk-gospel exploration that acts as a triumphant penultimate track on the album. In other places, Big Boi makes expert decisions in his guest casting. The melancholy “Be Still” features repeated Big Boi collaborator and hot young artist Janelle Monáe in a starring role. Realizing the strength of her chorus and voice, Big Boi lends himself a single verse and allows Monáe to take the rest of the song into the stratosphere. Sir Lucious is a record that carries few disappointments and many clear references to the past. While many recent musical artists have decided to conform, perhaps simply copying other contemporaries to make a snappy number, Big Boi continues to delve into a rich back catalogue of influences in order to formulate new sounds. With OutKast out of the picture for so long, listeners who are looking for something different may have found their album. diversions@umdbk.com

ALBUM: Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty | VERDICT:

1/2

BIG BOI PHOTO COURTESY OF KOTAKU.COM

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EMPLOYMENT

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On-Campus Part-Time Job

WALK TO CAMPUS. 5 bedroom, 2 bath. $3000/month. 4803 Calvert Rd. Julie: 240-328-3668.

Group House forming. Neighborhood across Route 1 from UMD. $800/month/person. collegeparkhouse@aol.com

DISSERTATION EDITING — Theses, papers. Wordprocessing. Style manual experts. 301-474-6000 Anytime.

GROUP HOUSES

4BR, 2BA house in Hyattsville

3 ROOMS Available for ‘10-’11 school year and summer ‘10 at TEP Fraternity House (4603 College Ave.), 2 blocks off of campus, right by off-campus restaurants and Maryland nightlife, $635 a month including utilities, Internet, cable, and maid service. Groups welcome... Call Eugene at 443-255-8104 or e-mail tepmanagement@gmail.com.

ROOMS from $399-$599 HOUSES from $2400 Some within walking distance.

Looking for extra pocket money? We have the solution! If you possess a positive attitude, can work approximately 10-15 hours around your class schedule a week, and are monetarily driven this job is for you! Gain professional experience, build our resume, establish contacts within the metro area, and enhance your communication skills by applying to be an Advertising Account Executive. Contact the Diamondback at 301-314-8000, ask for Chelsea, or stop by 3136 South Campus Dining Hall. Bartending! $250/day potential. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800-965-6520 x116.

See Hundreds Of Different Job Listings On THE DIAMONDBACK

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PT ADMIN. Office furniture dealership in CP seeks candidate for a variety of duties. Knowledge of Microsoft Office and QuickBooks; experience w/Giza Design a plus. Flexible hours w/potential long-term emp. Salary neg. Please send resume to: jwenger@steelofficeinteriors.com. Partime evenings — stripping and waxing classromm floors. Please call 301-919-4100.

CHILD CARE PART-TIME BABYSITTER WANTED. Fall semester, Tuesday/thursday mornings, in College Park. mothertown3@yahoo.com.

Seeking Awesome PT Experienced Sitter Happy, healthy 2 year old needs loving, toddler-experienced adult. Candidates MUST love to play – games, play doh, art, park visits... Position begins ASAP, 2 mornings a week in summer, one morning a week during school year. Prefer someone who will be here for at least a year. Prefer someone 1st aid/CPR certified, but will pay for the right person to take the class. Some weekend times as well. Email resume/ description of childcare experience (and list fun activities you like to do with young children!) to staggerpaw@aol.com.

240-391-8552 KMGrentals@gmail.com

Rooms for Rent Rooms in student house. $500/ month. 3 blocks from Campus Drive. 6 bedrooms, 3 full baths. All amenities, excluding utilities. Available August 2010. 301-422-2146.

ROOMS FOR RENT FALL/SPRING UTILITIES INCLUDED Female students wanted to rent rooms in large, renovated sorority house with sprinkler system. Clean & fully furnished rooms and common areas, W/W carpet, W/D, on-site parking. 2 blocks from campus, on shuttle bus route, Metrobus and Metro nearby. Lease required. Location: 4517 Knox Road, College Park For more info, contact: Cathy Vaughan, 301-910-9100, cjconsulting@verizon.net.

2BR, 1 BA Large (1075 sq ft) luxury Condo Garden Apartment in Greenbelt, MD. Across from NASA, Minutes to Greenbelt Metro Station, 495, Washington-Baltimore Parkway, and University of Maryland. $1390/month including all utilities. Kitchen w/brand new appliances, W/D, enclosed balcony, large closet space, plenty of parking. For information email hmehrsefat@aol.com or call (301)345-0478. Available immediately. Apartment for rent starting August 1. Walk to school — Knox Road. Two bedroom. All utilities included. $2175/month. One year lease. Good for 3 people. 4313 Knox Road. Apt 408, College Park, 20740. Jeremy: 703-395-1792.

House for Rent Beautiful, quiet 4BR, 2BA house. Close to campus. W/D, DW, cent. A/C, large kitchen, ample off-street parking. $2300/mo. + utilities. Avail. Aug. 1. Call Paul, 301-906-9190.

Female Needed University Club. Walk to campus. $490/mo.

Call 301-481-4636.

Rent entire house for special price $1650 a month. Fully furnished walkout basement recently remodeled with kitchen. Hardwood floors on main level. Minutes to major roads, 495, Baltimore-Washington Parkway and University of Maryland. For information email hmehrsefat@aol.com or call (301)345-0478. Available immediately.

Furnished Room for Rent Furnished bedroom with access to private bathroom and kitchen and living room privileges. Located half a block from bus stop. $500/month with 1/2 month deposit. Month to month basis okay. Call Mirtha at 301-385-5315 or 240-280-7546.

KNOX BOX APTS. LEASING NOW! 10 Steps to Campus 2-3 BR from $1200-1900 301-770-5623 gosia@pinstripeproperty.com

Two Bedrooms for Rent

House: 3 bedroom, off Route 1. Available August. landwardmd@gmail.com; 240-210-1503.

RENTAL 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH Furnished Condo. Walking distance to UMD. Secure Building Utilities Included. $1,750.00 Per Month. 301-855-3711 or 703-282-5661

HOUSE

FOR

RENT

Beautiful 3 bedroom house. Conveniently close to campus and UM shuttle stop. Completely remodeled, very clean. $1450 plus utilities.

A MUST SEE! Call Henry, 443-864-3416.

House for Rent 3 BR, 1.5 BA, newly renovated, W/D, sun porch, full basement, off-street parking, no pets, no smoking. Close to public transportation & UMD. Available August 1st. $1320/month + utilities. Call 301-775-8088. NEED MONEY FOR RENT? You can find a job in The Diamondback Classifieds!

CHILD CARE Providing a caring environment in my home for infant to Pre-K, excellent references, and immediate openings available. Call Blanca at 301-879-3463.

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Call (301) 314-8000 for more information.

W/D, sun porch, off-street parking, no pets, no smoking, close to public transportation & UMD. Available August 1st. $440 per room + share of utilities. Call 301-775-8088.

Available Immediately Large two bedroom corner unit in College Park Towers. Will fit up to 4 persons. Rent, including standard utilities, is $2600 per month. Contact Mel at 301-806-8674.

Student Housing $700/Mo. – Spacious Studio: private entrance, bath, W/D – Fully furnished (2 yrs. new) – Drive, bike or walk to U of MD Contact independence4u@hotmail.com

House in Berwyn Heights For rent – 2 bedrooms in basement, private entrance with separate bath and kitchen, close to UMD, $450/ month for each room, available July. Call 301-879-8288 or email hosainalam@aol.com.

Rooms for Rent $550/room, utilities included. 10 min. to campus, close to ShuttleUM. Large basement, CAC, washer/dryer.

240-447-7124 Student house in quiet and SAFEST neighborhood. Behind Frat row and Bentley’s. colleparkhouse@aol.com; 301-471-7981.

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THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

7

USM hopes to boost transfers

WATER from page 1 Facilities Management shut off the university’s 45 sprinkler systems as soon as officials learned of the WSSC requirements, Monan said, but officials chose “special sites” to keep watering by hand or with “gator bags” — water-filled sacks that slowly release their contents around trees — throughout the restriction period to keep them alive. “We have over 30,000 flowers and trees,” Monan said. “We can’t go three full days without watering them.” WSSC spokesman John White said the university’s actions were still unacceptable because all customers were asked to sacrifice. “We asked everyone not to do it,” White said. WSSC issued 356 warnings and four $500 citations for repeat offenses during the restriction period, White added, but the university was not fined for its watering because WSSC was not aware of its actions. Widespread disobedience of the restrictions caused usage to drop by just 14 percent, well short of the commission’s 33 percent goal. Some students — like Colleen MacInnes, a junior English major who lives at the University View — thought the university should have followed the restrictions, too. “They should make a point about it and be a role model for students,” MacInnes said. Although the water restrictions were mandatory, customers who did not sign up to receive news from WSSC via e-mail or text message would have needed to learn

University system wants to see more students start at two-year colleges, hopes to streamline process BY ZEMEN HABTEMARIAM For The Diamondback

Water customers across two counties were asked to minimize all usage for several days. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

about them through media reports, White said. Many students — including Evan Schneider, a Jewish studies major who lives in Commons 5 — said they didn’t cut their water use because no one informed them they were supposed to. “I’m surprised to hear there’s a water shortage,” Schneider said Monday as he finished a fourth load of laundry. “The university should have informed us.” Officials at the Resident Life Department, responsible for the few students currently staying in dorms, said their employees took steps to conserve water but that they could have also sent out a notification.

“There are under 200 people in the residence hall program,” said Chris Moore, the department’s administrative services director. “But it’s a lesson learned in that every bit helps even without a campus-wide announcement, even if it’s just in Resident Life.” Officials in Commons — where many students live for the summer — said they could not explain why no one had sent an e-mail to their residents. The first campus-wide e-mail came Tuesday evening from Facilities Management energy manager Joan Kowal, who declined to comment on the delay. vafai@umdbk.com

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The University System of Maryland hopes to encourage more students to complete two-year community college programs before transferring to its own schools, following the advice of a report the Board of Regents received during its meeting last month. By streamlining the process of transferring to this university — or another university system institution — the system can make it easier to persuade students to take the more cost-effective route of knocking out entry-level requirements at a less expensive college, according to Nancy Shapiro, an associate vice chancellor for academic affairs for the university system. “In my opinion, I think what matters most is not whether the student starts at a two-year college but how they end up at the four-year college — whether they graduate successfully with good grades, maybe honors, whether they’ve had undergraduate research or internships,” Shapiro said. “I think it’s the outcomes that matter.” By making it easier to transfer credits and by advertising the advantages, officials said the university system can attract more students from community colleges. Colleen Hoffman, a government and politics major who graduated last year, thinks the “2 + 2” transfer model — two years at community college followed by two at a university — is a good idea, especially if it means saving money. “There’s some really well-off areas in Maryland, some of the

highest in the country, so there’s good community colleges because of the money funneling into them,” Hoffman said. Hoffman also said if she could start over again, she definitely would have taken the “2 + 2” route, although she would have taken the first two years at a community college in Pennsylvania. “It’s a good way to save money and to put yourself through college as a result, especially a university with a well-regarded name and good reputation,” Hoffman said. However, D. Britt Reynolds, this university’s director of undergraduate admissions, said the primary goal of these initiatives is not to affect the number of incoming freshmen and transfer students but to increase the quality of transfer students coming in and keep them from wasting time retaking classes whose credits didn’t transfer. “I think we need to be planful and make good plans with our colleagues at the community college and the students at the community college,” Reynolds said, “so that we are not just planning from the point they are making the transition but that we are making the plan ahead of time so that when they make that transition, they have taken the right courses.” Teri Hollander, another associate vice chancellor for academic affairs for the university system, said the board is currently planning to work with the Maryland Association of Community Colleges this summer in a joint committee tasked with developing incentives that would spur more community college students to commit to getting their associate’s

degrees and transfer. “We have begun the environmental scan of best or most promising practices across the country as well as those in Maryland,” Hollander said. “Our state is already considered one of the leaders in transfer, but we need to now focus on degree completion.” Hollander noted studies showing that students transferring to a university after completing their associate’s degree have a higher graduation rate than those who enroll as freshmen in four-year colleges. The report also noted that a higher number of community college transfers to system institutions have been minorities. According to the report, the number of black and Latino community college students who transferred to a university system institution over the past five years have increased 17 percent and 27 percent, respectively. Some students say it’s already fairly easy to transfer to this university from a community college. Besides a science credit that was briefly lost to a computer error, senior criminology major Billy Arrington’s transfer from Carroll Community College suffered no holdups. Arrington said he initially decided to only pursue his associate’s degree but later decided to transfer to a university as a ticket to a more secure job in the future. “In this day and time, I need a bachelor’s degree, and I can make more money if I have a bachelor’s degree,” Arrington said. news@umdbk.com


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THE DIAMONDBACK | THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

Sports

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NEXT IN LINE? Gary Williams will face former assistant Fran Dunphy in the Terps’ Dec. 5 game against Temple. FILE PHOTO/THE DIAMONDBACK

Terps will play Temple in BB&T Classic

With Athletics Director Debbie Yow taking the same post at North Carolina State, here are four candidates that could be in the running to take over Terrapin athletics.

SCHEDULE PREVIEW The Terps have already set part of their 2009-10 schedule. Here’s how it looks at the moment: ■ Nov. 8: Seattle ■ Nov. 10: College of Charleston ■ Nov. 18/19: Coaches vs. Cancer

Classic (Championship Rounds) ■ Dec. 5: Temple

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The 1979 university graduate has served the Sooners for a long time, so this is likely a long shot. As appetizing as a homecoming might be for Castiglione, a cushy new Big 12 TV contract could be all the convincing he needs to stay put in Norman. With his success with the Sooners — Oklahoma’s football and basketball programs are perennial league powers — and the money he should be seeing soon, it’s highly doubtful he would ever leave.

Kentucky Executive Associate Athletics Director Mullens, right, served seven years in College Park, moving on to Lexington after serving the Athletics Department in positions including chief of staff. The West Virginia graduate nearly landed the Mountaineers’ athletics director gig just weeks ago, but will he get a second shot at leading his own program this summer?

Senior staff writer

sports@umdbk.com

Oklahoma Athletics Director

Rob Mullens

JONAS SHAFFER The Terrapin men’s basketball team will play Temple in the BB&T Classic, tournament officials announced last week. The Dec. 5 matchup will headline the region’s annual winter basketball showcase, which also includes games at the Verizon Center between Florida and American and George Washington and Navy. The Terps have lost seven of their past nine games in the tournament, including a 95-86 loss to then-No. 3 Villanova last season. Temple won’t be a tough out, either. An NCAA Tournament team a year ago, the Owls return starters Lavoy Allen, Juan Fernandez and Micheal Eric. Coach Fran Dunphy is also a former Gary Williams assistant and leads a toughnosed team many expect to rank in the top 25 next season. Tip-off time for the game has yet to be set.

Joe Castiglione

Jeff Hathaway Connecticut Athletics Director A graduate of this university and Yow’s personally recommended successor, Hathaway, left, spent nearly a decade in the Terps’ Athletics Department and has more recently helped build basketball powerhouses in Storrs with Jim Calhoun and Geno Auriemma. He’s also overseen the rapid transformation of Huskies football from Division I neophyte to Big East contender.

Randy Eaton

DECISION TIME

Terrapin Interim Athletics Director/ Chief Financial Officer

Here’s a tentative timetable of what the Athletics Department’s search for a new athletics director looks like: July 9: Athletics Director’s Debbie Yow’s last day at the university July 15: First meeting for athletics director search committee September/October: New athletics director expected to be named

Eaton, like Castiglione, is probably a reach for the athletics director position he now holds for the Terps on an interim basis — but it’s not because Eaton’s reluctant to take the position. Eaton came into the post June 28 after several years of solid work in the Terps’ Athletics Department, but he has no illusions about keeping his title beyond the fall. Still, if things go right with Terps’ football this season, and he does and says the right things, don’t rule him out.

Photographs, clockwise from top, courtesy of Oklahoma Athletics, Kentucky Athletics, Terrapin Athletics and Connecticut Athletics. Information compiled by Jonas Shaffer.

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