Page 1

REACHING HIGHER

STRINGS ATTACHED

Freshman high jumper Barbiasz spurned track and field powerhouses to join Terps

The Meat Puppets struggle with their new release

SPORTS | PAGE 11

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 8

THE DIAMONDBACK TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

99TH YEAR | ISSUE NO. 145

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

Professor Francis may invest in Santa Fe Former Terp basketball star in discussions to join local bar’s ownership bonus pay policy to be scrutinized BY NICK RHODES Staff writer

Former Terrapin men’s basketball player and NBA All-Star Steve Francis’ glory days on the court may be behind him, but the former Terp could be planning a comeback to College Park by investing in Santa Fe Café.

Senate chair wants to examine merit review this summer BY TIRZA AUSTIN Senior staff writer

After a more than a decade of being overlooked, merit review — a campus policy that outlines how faculty members are allocated bonuses for their performance — will be examined by the University Senate during the summer. The bonus money is distributed, in part, through salary committees made up of faculty members asked to evaluate their peers’ performance and based on department chair recommendations. The current policy, which was signed in 1992 by then-university President Brit Kirwan and amended in 2002, has not undergone a single review, although the criteria of the original policy called for a review “no later than five years after” its implementation by a task force jointly appointed by the senate and university president. But senate Chair Elise Miller-Hooks said examining merit review will become a priority this year. “It’s always been important,” Miller-Hooks

Francis is in talks with Santa Fe owner Mark Srour to become a part-owner and investor in the downtown bar. “We’re all excited,” said Srour, who flew out to meet the basketball star this past weekend. “He thoroughly enjoyed talking to me and we’re negotiating. It looks like it’s going to be a done deal.”

Francis, who is originally from Takoma Park, Md., transferred to the university in 1998 and played for one year, leading the Terps to the Sweet Sixteen in the 1999 NCAA Tournament before declaring for the NBA Draft. He was drafted No. 2 overall and played

Please See FRANCIS, Page 7

STEVE FRANCIS

y c i l o p t po rincess

p

Please See MERIT, Page 3

Stacia Cosner has been a leading advocate for the Good Samaritan policy since 2006, when she served in the University Senate. Despite Cosner being barred from re-election, a Good Samaritan protocol was finally adopted earlier this semester. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

Stacia Cosner has worked to reform the university’s drug policies since her own harrowing arrest experience BY MARISSA LANG Senior staff writer

T

he day before the start of the spring 2006 semester, Stacia Cosner was relaxing in her room, smoking a joint when three police officers knocked on her door. What followed was a traumatic experience that sent her hurtling down a path toward becoming the

Santa Fe Café was fined $5,000 by the county liquor board last week. VINCE SALAMONE/THE DIAMONDBACK

Liquor board fines Santa Fe $5,000 County board says bar served underage patron

Please See COSNER, Page 7

A sign listing the “10 Cannibamandments” hangs in the office of Students for Sensible Drug Policy. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

Taking advantage of environmental momentum Student groups host House Majority Leader

BY BRADY HOLT

BY RICH ABDILL

Senior staff writer

Staff writer

The Santa Fe Café was fined $5,000 for serving an underage patron alcohol Wednesday, according to the county liquor board. The inspectors, who attended a hearing last week that set the fine, could not be reached for comment yesterday or Friday, but a woman who answered the phone at the Board of License Commissioners yesterday afternoon confirmed the fine. She provided the few details she had by reading a one-line entry on Santa Fe: “All it says is ‘the board found you were in violation of ’ and a fine.” Mark Srour, who owns Santa Fe Café in

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) doesn’t usually get to use the filibuster — but he gave it the old college try last night. After months of planning by environmental groups at the campus, county and state level, Hoyer came to the Stamp Student Union last night to discuss environmental issues gaining momentum nationally as several pieces of legislation are being examined at the state and national levels, including the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act — a recently passed state bill that sets emissions reduction goals for the state

Please See FINE, Page 3

Please See HOYER, Page 2

TOMORROW’S WEATHER:

original advocate of a university Good Samaritan policy, toward championing less harsh university sanctions for marijuana use, toward testifying in the state senate and House of Delegates in favor of voting rights for convicted felons, legalized medical marijuana and a statewide Good Samaritan law. And she never saw it coming. “That definitely changed my life

Sunny/70s

INDEX

After student dies in crash, officer faces traffic court BY ADELE HAMPTON Staff Writer

Congressman Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) spoke last night about making the country more environmentally friendly.

Cpl. Mario Chavez, the police officer involved in the fatal car crash that killed 20-year-old sophomore Brian Gray in December 2007, will be tried in traffic court Wednesday morning for a citation he was issued months after the crash. Although Chavez admitted to consuming alcohol the night before the collision, he was not asked to complete a sobriety test at the time of the accident. Gray’s mother, Mary Gray, has filed a civil lawsuit against

Please See COURT, Page 7

VINCE SALAMONE/THE DIAMONDBACK

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Students’ concerns were left unanswered HOYER, from Page 1 through 2050. Hoyer addressed a crowd of 300 students, faculty and community members, but left some feeling the congressman skirted issues. Though the event was billed as a “town hall meeting,” Hoyer, a university alumnus and the U.S. representative for the district that includes College Park, took questions from the audience for 25 minutes. But during his speech, which lasted longer than organizers anticipated, Hoyer raised many key points and expounded his commitment to “climate change legislation.” “I accepted this invitation to come tonight because I feel the country needs to chart a new course towards a cleanenergy economy,” Hoyer said. “It’s not an alternative, it’s a necessity.” Organizer Matt Dernoga, the political liaison for university lobbying group UMD for Clean Energy, was excited before the event and said he saw it as a valuable way to have an open conversation with one of the nation’s most powerful politicians. “The goal of today’s meeting is to show the house majority leader the broad, diverse constituency he has,” said

Dernoga, who is also a columnist for The Diamondback. “People think it’s just latte-drinking, middle-class hippies that care about this, but it’s the working class, it’s labor, business, people of faith that are interested in clean energy solutions.” While Hoyer elicited hearty applause with pledges to invest in more efficient power grid technology and to preserve forests, the room’s mood sunk when he rejected a suggestion of a ban on the construction of new coal power plants. “Given that great applause, you would expect a politician to say ‘of course.’ But I won’t say ‘of course,’” Hoyer said, adding clean-coal technology may someday be a plausible and environmentally responsible course of action. Several attendees were visibly frustrated when Hoyer suggested “we have a 200plus year supply of coal,” adding clean coal technology might still be worthwhile. But Dernoga gave Hoyer credit for being honest even when the crowd was against him. When asked when Americans could expect climate regulatory legislation that could be held to scientific standards, Hoyer said “don’t hold your breath,” instead offering that science is always used as a guide in legislation, but the situation is

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complicated by conflicting interests from many constituencies. He spent much of the evening expressing his commitment to climate change legislation without committing to any of the strong stances advocated by members of the audience. “Progress is a series of imperfect compromises,” Hoyer said. But some students argued change could be made without political compromises. Junior environmental science major Jessie Yurow, who helped organize the event, emphasized the importance of citizen involvement. “It’s important that we start taking steps to address climate change,” Yurow said. Hoyer agreed with Yurow that individuals can lead movements to enact change. “It is up to each of us to demand policies that will provide a sustainable environment for future generations,” Hoyer said. “My goal, which is that of both Speaker Pelosi and President Obama, is to strengthen our economy by making America the new world leader in new clean energy and energy efficiency technologies.” But despite Hoyer’s views, which were largely consistent with those of audience members, student attendees said

SGA President Steve Glickman and State Del. Barbara Frush (D-Anne Arundel and Prince George’s County) talked before Steny Hoyer’s speech began yesterday. VINCE SALAMONE/THE DIAMONDBACK

they wished Hoyer would have left more time to respond to their concerns. “We would have liked to get more questions in,” Dernoga said. “Politicians like to talk a lot, and he talked a little more than we hoped, but I think as far as getting everything together it was a success.” Senior government and politics major Amy Dewan said she thought Hoyer

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was prepared for the questions he was asked but was avoiding being confronted with too many of them. “There were some really good questions,” she said. “I wish more questions could have been asked. It seemed like there was some filibustering.” abdilldbk@gmail.com


4

THE DIAMONDBACK | TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE DIAMONDBACK

Opinion

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Staff Editorial

Guest Column

A year in review

Give props for liberty

L

ast year’s SGA candidates squared off in a series of three debates. Jonathan ship. The legislature never took a position on the issue of post-tenure review. A month Sachs laid out a platform of tangible goals and a vision of personal outreach ago, state legislators, the administration and the student body were fighting about to the student body, “from an open-door policy to a door-to-door policy.” He pornography and the limits of free speech. While a student group gathered hundreds admitted it would be hard. But when former President John F. Kennedy of students to watch a porno in celebration of their First Amendment rights, the SGA was in its office, passing a resolution on an issue that had already been settled. And promised to take the nation to the moon, that was hard too, Sachs continued. This year’s Student Government Association hasn’t taken the student body to while the SGA debated two separate bills arguing against prayer at commencement, the moon. They never reached their full potential in terms of leading the student that’s where their efforts stopped. The lack of involvement on these issues is a real body. But this year, the SGA has delivered on most of their promises. They’ve shortcoming, because they represented the best chances to unite and mobilize the stushown that they can identify problems and develop practical solutions on their dent body. It isn’t too often that average students are really engaged in a discussion; those moments are a valuable chance to mobilize students. They are own. In some cases, they even demonstrated that they could rally a chance to not only work for students, which the outgoing adminisstudents and lead them. tration did quite well, but also work with students, which wasn’t Installing a new crosswalk improved safety. Revamping the SGA website has increased transparency. Pushing the Department of The SGA completed its done enough. Uniting the entire student body isn’t a fair measure for judging Transportation Services to invest in a bike plan will help the envigoals and fought hard for whether an SGA administration failed or succeeded. This past year, ronment. The list goes on — dining, housing, parking. The SGA took student’s interests. the SGA succeeded. We tip our hat in thanks to the dozens of stusmall but concrete steps to improve the campus on all these fronts. dents who spent hours working to improve our school. And even if Individually, none of these accomplishments are stunning. But over they didn’t make it to the moon, we think Sachs was right in setting his sights so high. the course of a year, these small initiatives have added up to real progress. And the SGA has shown that they can rally students to support their efforts; their When a student government succeeds in uniting a student body, they can achieve radgreatest successes have come from leading. This week, the SGA capped off a year of ical change. In 2006, the student government at Gallaudet University led a protest of environmental initiatives by participating in a protest of the university’s planned de- their incoming president — and the university gave in. Our SGA got together more velopment in the Wooded Hillock. In April, members organized the behavioral and so- than a thousand letters to bring to legislators in Annapolis. In Phoenix, student govcial sciences college walkout, during which hundreds of students took to the McK- ernments brought thousands of students to rally at the state capital. On Oct. 14, 1968, eldin Mall, protesting the college’s under-funding. And during Annapolis’ legislative 12 students at the University of California Santa Barbara barricaded themselves in a session, the SGA recruited thousands of students to write letters to their state legisla- dorm. The protest quickly drew a crowd of about a thousand, and within 12 hours, tors in support of textbook legislation. Their effort was rewarded with the passage of a school administrators were pressured into implementing a Black Studies department. We hope future SGA administrations have equally high ambitions. And if they bill that repeatedly failed in recent years. But the SGA failed when there was the greatest opportunity and need for leader- do as well as the outgoing administration, we’ll consider ourselves fortunate.

Our View

Editorial Cartoon: Mike O’Brien

Studying abroad: Goin’ it alone

W

hen you wake up tomorrow and start preparing for your finals, I hope you’ll think of me... waking up in the afternoon and preparing to lounge on the beach. I’ve been safely on the other side of exams and school for more than a month, and I’m enjoying the perks of choosing a cheap and short study abroad option, something that you can do, too. Because I don’t have a real major, I decided to only take classes in Thailand on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. This obviously afforded me a huge amount of traveling time, which also translated to a huge amount of alone time, what with all the academically driven students taking classes on the weekend (My weekend is from Thursday to Monday). Instead of wasting time waiting around for the squares to finish their school week, I took to traveling around by myself a lot. Not being the most plan-oriented of folk, I had some lapses in judgment, acumen and just plain smartness. However, now safely back in the Western world, I can

ESTI

FRISCHLING look back on my mistakes and say, thankfully, they only led to missing some flights and getting lost in some jungles. I can’t read maps, do simple mental math or remember my foreign cell phone number, so if I can travel alone, anyone can. One advantage to traveling solo is the approachability. When you’re sitting at a café or on the beach, it won’t be long before some guy will use “borrowing your lighter” as an excuse to sit down next to you and tell you his entire life story, which could end up being absolutely fascinating. When you’re on a bus, you never know who your seat partner will be or where they’ve been. You’re a lot likelier to get invited to share a cab with a

trio of strangers who may or may not be a band of hot blonde surfers. Also, when traveling alone, you can say things like, “I hooked up with Jake Gyllenhaal on the beach while Reese Witherspoon was stuck in their hotel room with swine flu,” and no one will be able to deny it. Of course, there are risks, and I don’t mean getting kidnapped or mugged. Sometimes the guy asking to use your lighter is a creeper who says, “Have you checked out my nipples?” (Seriously, that happened to me.) Your bus partner could end up being a fat, sweaty man who snores, and the surfers could end up being hitchhikers (Thankfully, that didn’t happen to me). Sitting alone, some people will guess you’re just a brave little soldier waiting for your boyfriend to get out of the bathroom. Others assume you’ve just been dumped or convinced out of committing suicide. And if you do somehow end up hooking up with Jake Gyllenhaal on the beach while Reese Witherspoon is in their hotel room with swine flu, no one will be able to confirm it.

Despite some mishaps, traveling by myself has been challenging in a good way, and quite exciting. You get to see the things you want, trek as slowly (or as seldom) as you want and eat as many lunches at as many different restaurants as you so please. If you keep some used bookstores on your itinerary and strategically misplace your time-keeping device when standing in line behind a cute boy at immigration, you can also avoid quite a bit of boredom. If you choose the right study abroad program, you could end up spending less than half as much as you would at the university while attending fewer than half as many classes. But I guess this isn’t so much a column encouraging people to go abroad as it is a column encouraging people to go to Thailand and not make any friends. In summation, good luck on exams, suckers. Esti Frischling is a sophomore studio art major who wrote columns this semester from Thailand. She can be reached at estidbk@gmail.com.

Fear the Turtle: More like ‘Fear the Gindes’

O

h, you silly university, you. Just when I think I’m out, you go and announce you’re going to spend a million bucks on re-branding, and you pull me back into the game. Picture me having turned in my last column of the semester, sitting on a beach somewhere and sipping a mai-tai, when my bullshit pager goes off Friday. Back to the grind. It was an excellent piece of reporting by Allison Stice, “Univ. considers dropping slogan,” that ripped me out of my beach chair and away from my romance novel. It appears that in an economic shit storm, the faceless, soulless conglomerate known as “university officials” has decided that it’s high time to dedicate $1 million toward coming up with a “fresh image” for the university. The Diamondback policy states we

ROB

GINDES can’t use the f-word in the paper. This felt like the time to mention that. Seriously, you guys? Seriously? What the... friend? And don’t give me this crap about the budget dictating that money has to go to certain places; I’m sure someone can come out and say something to the effect of, “This money would be better served going absolutely anywhere else in the entire friendly world.” The joke is that we don’t even need a re-branding. Administrators seem to want to come up with a new slogan to

replace “Fear the Turtle,” which has worked just fine as far as I’m concerned. It’s quirky, and it’s unique. And it’s not just about athletics: All the commercials I’ve seen have championed us as an academic leader, with the slogan as sort of a way to say, “We might be turtles, but don’t sleep on us.” Naturally, since it ain’t broke, the university has to fix it. And if that didn’t make you sick enough, just scroll through the comments online for Stice’s story. It’s full of alumni who give money and are starting to second-guess their donations if this is where the money’s going. My own mother looked absolutely hurt while talking about this with me. And you do NOT mess with the ineffable Karen Gindes. You guys are going to pay for this. What a wonderful way to kick us in the ass on our way out the door for the summer. You know what $1 million

could buy? Enough portable air conditioners to fill three high-rise dorms. The university could establish scholarships to pay tuition for 43 students — from out of state! Tell me this money is going to the right place. Please, try to justify this. I’m not buying the “drop in the bucket” argument either, because every penny counts. Tell my mother that $1 million is a drop in the bucket, and she’ll drop you into a bucket. I don’t even know what that means. But she’ll be pissed. Besides, I’m beginning to think about these “drops in the bucket,” and I’m starting to wonder, what are they drops of, exactly? Because I have a sneaking suspicion that these “university officials” are pissing in our buckets and telling us it’s raining. Rob Gindes is a junior journalism major. He can be reached at gindesdbk@gmail.com.

POLICY: The signed letters, columns and cartoon represent only the opinions of the authors. The staff editorial represents the opinion of The Diamondback’s editorial board and is the responsibility of the editor in chief.

ALEX SCHOTZ For those of you who follow politics, you may think that an editorial on California’s Proposition 8 is more than a few months too late. I, however, wanted to analyze the bill from a historical and moral standpoint, both of which I feel have not been examined effectively in the past. Proposition 8 was the amendment to California’s state constitution that reads, “Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California.” Proponents argue marriage is an essential institution and this legislation will prevent public schools from teaching children that gay marriage is acceptable. Passed 52.3 percent to 47.7 percent, the majority of Californians appear to feel the same way. But can a simple majority dictate the life of each individual of the state? The website ProtectMarriage.com, the official collective of anti-gay marriage advocates in California, thinks so. These advocates of the proposition believe that democracy was put into action because the majority of the population voted against gay marriage. Unfortunately, this organization is significantly flawed in its reasoning. The Founding Fathers envisioned a nation that protected individual rights at all costs against religion, the majority and, most importantly, the state. Thomas Jefferson foresaw the tyranny of the majority when he explained how “a democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where 51 percent of the people may take away the rights of the other 49.” Jefferson stressed that “the rightful must be reasonable; that the minority [must] possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression.” With such reasoning, it is immoral for a group of people to force its values onto and infringe the personal decisions of others. Government legislation stating that gays cannot marry is not protecting individual rights but rather oppressing consenting, rational adults from exercising their liberty. ProtectMarriage.com claims gay marriage will hurt society by conflicting with our religious freedoms and the very notion of legalizing gay marriage was forced on California residents by San Francisco judges. If up until this point you were skeptical of any logic behind the website’s arguments, the previous statements should reflect ignorance and fear. How does legalizing gay marriage force anything onto anyone? I understand people’s personal beliefs and discomforts, but this is not and never will be a justification for taking away the rights of the minority. How does denying a group of consenting, rational adults the ability to marry in any way relate to religious freedoms? The First Amendment was created to protect the individual from the state, not to grant a religious institution the ability to dictate the rights of others. If gay marriage “conflicts” with certain religions, then don’t allow gay couples to marry in a church. Marriage is not a religious union but rather a legal institution backed by the state. For these reasons, there is no justification in denying gays the right to marry. So why does this all matter, especially if, like the majority of the population, you are not gay? Anytime we permit the will of the majority or the government to take rights away from some group, we all lose liberty. We open the door for more and more government control of how we should lead our lives. I believe I am the best person to determine what’s best for me, and I’m willing to bet that you feel the same for yourself. So, do yourself a favor, pick up a copy of Ayn Rand’s The Nature of Government or read your Thomas Jefferson to truly understand what individual rights mean and why the state has no right to prevent gay marriage. Alex Schotz is a senior logistics major. He can be reached at aschotz@umd.edu.

AIR YOUR VIEWS Address your letters or guest columns to the Opinion Desk at opinion.dbk@gmail.com. All letters and guest columns must be signed. Include your full name, year, major and day- and nighttime phone numbers. Please limit letters to 300 words. Please limit guest columns to 600 words. Submission of a letter or guest column constitutes an exclusive, worldwide, transferable license to The Diamondback of the copyright in the material in any media. The Diamondback retains the right to edit submissions for content and length.


TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

3

In light of the economy, students clamor for federal jobs Experts say financial climate, Obama’s election are responsible for rising interest in government positions BY NELLY DESMARATTES Staff writer

When senior Vanessa Morales began searching for a job a few months ago, the everworsening economy made her uneasy about going into the private sector. Instead, she started looking for a job with the federal government. “A federal job is a lot more stable,” said Morales, a criminal justice and Spanish language major. “Whereas a job in the private sector right now, with the way the economy has been going and the amount of jobs being lost, it’s

really unreliable.” As the federal government continue to hire despite the rising unemployment rate and hiring freezes across the country, many graduating seniors, like Morales, are turning to the federal government for employment at a larger rate than ever, according to a recent study by the Partnership for Public Service. The study results postulate that the recession, unemployment rates and the election of President Barack Obama have all contributed to a drastic increase in student interest in federal jobs. More

than 250 counseling officials at nearly 200 colleges and universities were surveyed to gauge student tendencies. The study found that over 90 percent of students working with university career counseling offices are interested in federal jobs or internships, with over 89 percent of respondents citing fewer employment opportunities in the private and nonprofit sectors as the primary reason for their interest. “When students look at career opportunities within the federal government there are some things that are tradi-

“Government careers are very stable and also students realize that they are not likely to be downsized.” MARK KENYON CAREER CENTER ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR

tionally connected with those opportunities,” said Mark Kenyon, associate director of the university Career Center, which has also seen an

increase in student interest in both internship and full-time positions with the federal government this year. “In most cases government careers are very stable and also students realize that they are not likely to be downsized.” Like Morales, Nearly 84 percent of students surveyed listed federal job security — noticeably more stable than job security in the public sector — as a main reason for wanting to work for the federal government. “Even though the pay is usually a lot less than in the private industry, you’re guar-

anteed to keep your job,” said Morales, who will graduate later this month and go on to work for the Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. Some say Obama’s election may also be a contributing factor to the recent pique in student interest in federal jobs, as nearly 75 percent of the polled career counseling centers reported an increase in student interest in federal jobs since the presidential November election. desmarattesdbk@gmail.com

Students unsurprised Senate chair says broader review policy needed by Santa Fe Café’s liquor board citation MERIT, from Page 1

FINE, from Page 1

“The establishments are doing a very good job of checking people’s IDs and verifying that they’re old enough to drink.”

nomics major Jason Cohn said. Other students added the bars could be motivated to let in underage patrons for financial reasons. “The bars, they need their money, so of course they’re going to let people in,” said Zina Makar, a sophomore business and government and politics major . Despite these allegations, College Park bars are rarely fined for underage liquor violations, which a liquor board representative cited as a positive sign last year. “It means the establishments are doing a good job in the board’s opinion that the establishments are doing a very good job of checking people’s IDs and verifying that they’re old enough to drink,” the representative had said.

COUNTY LIQUOR BOARD REPRESENTATIVE

Staff writer Nick Rhodes contributed to this report. holtdbk@gmail.com

addition to Cornerstone Grill and Loft and The Mark, declined to comment on the violation. But students said they weren’t surprised to hear that someone had been drinking underage at Santa Fe, only that someone had been caught. “Every bar lets people in underage,” sophomore eco-

said. “It’s people’s salary. It’s their livelihood.” Some faculty members have been asking the senate — the university’s highest legislative body that advises administrators on university policy — to evaluate the policy for several years, Miller-Hooks said. But, she added, it has been since overshadowed by other important university issues, such as reorganizing various colleges, the issue of open access journals, posttenure review and bereavement leave for librarians. “It’s been too difficult to get to this as well,” Miller-Hooks said. “[But] it has not happened. It needs to be done.” After a task force of faculty members instructed by the provost to come up with a workable post-tenure review policy, many appointees noticed merit review has never been reexamined or standardized. Senate officials said the fact that merit review was suggested as a mechanism to evaluate tenured faculty members in a proposed posttenure review policy, some senators might be uncomfortable with it, as it could be used to apply to a new posttenure review policy in the future. “It’s important we make sure we are comfortable with merit review,” MillerHooks said. The senate’s most powerful committee will discuss the issue of merit review when they reconvene in August

to decide what elements of the university’s policy they would review, MillerHooks added, noting they will have to consider departmental differences, as individual departments are responsible for conducting the annual review and are responsible for creating their own standards and guidelines. “Implementation is not consistent across campus,” Miller-Hooks said. “Some faculty are working on papers, others on painting or books. We need a policy broad enough to meet the needs of these diverse units.” The university-wide policy requires departments to use specific guidelines as they conduct Merit Review of their faculty members. But administrators and senate officials said a general policy is needed to guide merit review’s implementation. “I look forward to an interesting discussion on this topic,” said geography professor Eric Kasischke, who will serve as the senate’s faculty affairs committee chair next year. English department chair and professor Kent Cartwright said individual departments are using similar standards of evaluation, noting for example, the English department evaluates a faculty member based on his or her faculty activity, curriculum and service to the university. The biology department, similarly, judges faculty on teaching, research and service, added biology chair and professor Richard Payne.

“Some faculty are working on papers, others on painting or books. We need a policy broad enough to meet the needs of these diverse units.” ELISE MILLER-HOOKS UNIVERSITY SENATE CHAIR

But administrators have yet to evaluate how each department is implementing the policy and whether or not it is being used effectively. Payne added the current system distributes based on merit “asymmetrically” and allows some of his faculty members’ salaries to fall behind but maintained the review should remain peer-based. Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs Ellin Scholnick said transparency on how merit decisions are made is key to review, suggesting colleges may be the best body to review the departments’ methods, comparing the criteria each department uses for Merit Review to knowing how a teacher is grading a student’s performance in class. “You like to know how it’s being done,” Scholnick said. taustindbk@gmail.com

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Also born on this date are Kim Fields, actress; Katharine Hepburn, actress; Florence Nightingale, health pioneer; Emilio Estevez, actor; Ving Rhames, actor; Steve Winwood, musician and songwriter; George Carlin, comedian and actor.

R.J. BENTLEY’S RESTAURANT • DOWNTOWN COLLEGE PARK

TUESDAY $2.50 3 Olives, $2.50 Cuervo, $2.50 Jim Beam

WEDNESDAY All specials are 8pm to close unless otherwise noted. All specials subject to change.

orn today, you are one of those imaginative, fiery, energetic and mercurial individuals who are hard to pin down and commit long term to anything that is not the product of their own imaginations. While you are more than willing to work tirelessly in the pursuit of your own goals, you do not respond well to having your behavior dictated in any way by others. For this reason, you may develop the reputation of someone who starts a great deal but finishes little — but the truth is that you will always finish that which truly captures your interest. Your desire to be noticed is one of the traits that keeps you going, even when the going gets tough. This, of course, conflicts directly with that part of your nature that craves privacy and solitude; the truth is that you want both — to be left alone, and to be noticed and admired.

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$2.50 Captain Morgan, $2.50 Bud/Bud Light, $3 SoCo, $3.50 Long Island, $2 Sex on the Beach, $2 Rails

I N F R A M I SR I N T E L ARD ANA NE P T U B L US NA P K AN T E I GOR

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Smooch “Exodus” hero High note Six-pointers

F I C A

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50 Sleek swimmer 51 Fine violin, briefly 52 Picket — 54 Handle, slangily

42 Portfolio item 46 Does a stock clerk’s job 47 Odds-taker 48 Serious theater 49 Overhaul

56 Not for ACROSS 1 Shopping centers 57 Circle part 58 Undamaged 7 Whirlpool locale 62 Comply with 10 Fasten 63 Sultry — West 14 Wolf relative 64 Hit a homer 15 Upper limit 65 Crooked 16 Mystique 66 McBain and 17 Mole run Asner 18 HMO staffers 67 Progression 19 Road map info 20 Optical toy 23 Computer device DOWN 1 Int. rate 26 ESPN feature 2 Gehrig or Rawls 27 Ants at a picnic 3 Novelist — Rand 28 Drew on 4 Tired out 29 Shame! 5 First-stringers 30 Grain holder (hyph.) 31 Tattered cloth 6 Find a buyer 32 — out (relax) 7 Book copier 33 Triangle of old or square 37 Rap-sheet letters 8 Bearlike animal 9 Lhasa — 38 Zero in on 10 Theft 39 Athena’s symbol 11 Jalopies 40 Ms. Grafton 12 Inched along 41 Pasta choice 13 Loosens, 43 Urban trains as a grip 44 All-purpose truck 21 Conundrum 45 Kook 22 Tanker mishaps 46 Gal. parts 23 Painting on a wall 47 Parrot 24 Honshu port 48 Talk on and on 25 Monet contem 51 Delhi honorific porary 52 Big celebrations 29 Deke or juke 53 Half a fare 30 Cereal holders (2 wds.)

need — and they are not at all the same. A friend gives you good advice. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Questions of what is right and what is wrong are sure to spring up at several points during the day. Economic needs may be confusing you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Are you sure you’re sending the right signals to the right people? Take the time to reconsider what you are saying, and how. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — A promise is made that seems to change everything — but underneath the surface you’ll see that some things never change. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — A quiet and uncomplicated approach is the best for you. Pay no mind to those who say that things aren’t the way you see them. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Take advantage of the opportunity granted you to get away from what you consider a stifling routine. Explore something new.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — You must be prepared to make a few difficult decisions very soon. Consider how financial realities are affecting you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Questions asked are likely to require more than a simple yes or no answer. Weigh your thoughts carefully at all times. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — What you say and how you say it will leave a lasting impression on others, so you mustn’t be careless. You attract attention during the evening hours. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — You may not be doing things the way others have done them in the past, but you’re doing them in a way that comes naturally to you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You must try to put things back in the proper order as you attempt to prioritize and restructure the way you do even the simplest things. Copyright 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

TODAY’S HOROSCOPE SPONSORED BY:

To see what is in store for you tomorrow, find your birthday and read the corresponding paragraph. Let your birthday star be your daily guide. WEDNESDAY, MAY 13 TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You must be ready to take your knocks, especially if you stay on course and continue to do what others say cannot be done. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You are likely to be torn between what you want and what you

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6

THE DIAMONDBACK | TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

Classified CALL

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADS

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• Larger Type • Sold In 1” Increments • One Column Wide • $33.00 Per Column Inch

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OFFICE HOURS

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9:30AM – 4:30PM Monday – Friday 3136 South Campus Dining Hall

The deadline for all ads is 2PM, two business days in advance of publication.

SPECIAL Run the same classified or classified display ad 4 consecutive days and get 5th day FREE!

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301-314-8000 TO PLACE YOUR AD, OR BY EMAIL: ADVERTISING@DBK.UMD.EDU BY FAX: 301-314-8358

EMPLOYMENT

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CAMP COUNSELORS, male and female, needed for great overnight camps in the mountains of PA. Have a fun summer while working with children in the outdoors. Teach/assist with ropes course, media, archery, gymnastics, environmental ed, and much more. Office, Nanny, Bus Driver (CDL requires) positions also available. Apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com

LARGE MASTER BEDROOM WITH FULL BATH IN 6 BEDROOM HOUSE. SUBLET FOR SUMMER, AVAILABLE FALL ALSO. OFF ADELPHI WITH SHUTTLE. $750 + UTILITIES. JENNIFER 301-367-9948

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Non-profits are struggling to provide services. Socially responsible individuals are needed to raise funds. Current project is a local children’s hospital. Call David Miller at 301-641-4446 for more information. Compensation is available. STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM. Paid survey takers needed in College Park. 100%. Free to join. Click on surveys. Bartending! $250/day potential. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800-965-6520 x 116

William’s American Bistro Is Hiring All Positions Managers, Bartenders, Wait Staff & Cooks Experience preferred. Please apply in person Monday & Thursday 11 am-3 pm for an immediate interview or email resume to hrhe01@gmail.com. Earn extra money. Students needed asap. Earn up to $150/day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791

LOOKING FOR A SUMMER JOB MAKING $20-$30/HR.? Inc. 500 company is looking to add 5-6 UM students to its marketing team working part time 3-4 days/week. Part-time hours...full-time pay... $20-$30/hour! Flexible schedule; internships available. Call Jon at 301-595-4050 today!

SUMMER WORK College Pro Painters Now Hiring Full Time Work Outdoors with Students Earn 3-5K 1-800-32 PAINT www.collegepro.com

Office Assistant Takoma Park company seeking self-motivated individual to support small sales office. Business experience preferred. Must be multi-task oriented & dependable. Proficiency with Microsoft Office. Excellent telephone skills. Flexible F/T or P/T weekday hours. Resume to: creativefiling@aol.com. Please include hours available.

Positions Available Lifeguard/Gate Guard

Sitters Wanted. $10+ per hour. Register free for jobs near campus or home. www.student-sitters.com College seniors, recent college grads, grad students needed to work with high school students as Resident Assistants/Tutor Counselors (RA/TCs) during a six-week summer residential program at the University of Maryland. RA/TCs support instructors in classroom, assist with program activities, and supervise students in dorms. Excellent pay plus room & board! Application and program information available at www.precollge.umd.edu.

Physical Therapy Aide FT/PT position avail. in physical therapy office in Chevy Chase near Metro. Opportunity to continue working during school year. New grads welcome. Paid parking/Metro. Fax or email resume to 301-654-7897 or kibbeyandterlept@verizon.net.

ACTIVISM

CAMPAIGN JOBS Change Begins Locally Fight for Healthcare, Clean Elections and Lower Tuition! Full-Time, Part-Time Available. Rapid Advancement. $400-$600 Per Week. Metro Accessible. Call Dana at Progressive Maryland, 301-495-7004 ext. 13.

CUSTOMER RELATIONS REP. Great Pay, Flexible Hours! Small financial firm near Bethesda Metro. Excellent communication & analytical skills. $13/hour (negotiable higher based on performance). PT or FT. Email resume: bethesdafinancialfirm@gmail.com. Parttime store clerk/stock person needed at beer and wine store near campus. Flexible hours. Call Jim or Ted: 301-277-9271 Looking for drivers for Gullivers Moving Company. Please contact Kenneth or Eugene at 301-209-0514

$8-9 per hour. College Park/ Laurel area. Apply online at www.lighthouse-pools.com.

P/T Administrative Assistant Graphics co. seeking energetic, organized person to handle accounting and secretarial duties. Experience with QuickBooks a plus. Located in Laurel. Email resumes to rsharma@sharmaassoc.com or call 301-776-0015. Lifeguards, pool operators, supervisors. Full time/part time. Competitive pay. Free training. Summer and indoor positions. 301-210-4200 extension 114 Pre-Med student needed for scanning Medical records. $12 Flexible hours. Greenbelt. Call 301-345-5857

CHILD CARE

Babysitter Seeking dependable, active, mature nonsmoker to care for my 8 mo. old daughter Tu-Th from 10-3 in Takoma Park. Candidates must have reliable vehicle and excellent references.

Robin, 301-704-6683. After-school care for 12-year-old boy, SIlver Spring, 4 days/week. Fall semester. Must drive, non-smoker, references. 202-289-2394

FOR RENT COLLEGE PARK. Houses 4/6 bedrooms, Apartments, 2 bedrooms. 410-544-4438 HOUSES/Apartments- Walking distance. 1-7 bedrooms. 301-335-7345. ecb1985@gmail.com

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Room in house. $450/month. Walking distance. Only quiet students apply. Available May 27-August 22. 301-422-2146, 301-728-1338

10 Steps to Campus 1-4 BR. Large apartments. Beside South Commons/Business School. Starting at $900. 301-770-5623. Email: gosia@pinstripeproperty.com. WALK TO CAMPUS Nice 5 bedroom houses. Summer and Fall availability, 301-918-0203 1 bedroom for rent for $675/month + utilities in 4 bedroom house. Located in Silver Spring near New Hampshire Ave. Approximately 10 miles away. Please call 443-812-4643 for more information.

Knox Box Apts. One Block from Campus 2-3 BR from $1200-1900 301-770-5623/24 Email: gosia@pinstripeproperty.com Houses: 3-4 bedroom, off Route 1. From $1200. 240-210-1503. landwardmd@gmail.com 4 br/2 bath home with 2 living rooms; modern kitchen; dining room; cac; garage and large lot several blocks from Campus Drive on Adelphi Rd. Easy walk or shuttle. $2500 + utilities for up to 5 people. 443-745-5446. E-mail: cvbleab@aol.com HOUSE FOR RENT. Newer home. Great location. Walk to campus. 6 bedroom, 2 full bathrooms, huge kitchen. New appliances. Washer, dryer, central AC, big yard, lots of parking. 240-876-8907. John. Commons 3 Summer Housing. Up to 3 rooms. First floor. 240-291-0396 DOWNTOWN COLLEGE PARK. Single family, 6 bed house for rent. Half rent in June. Asking for $3,995/month and $2,000 security deposit required. 13 month lease beginning July 4h. Call 240-678-8700 3 ROOMS Available for ‘09-’10 school year and summer ‘09 at TEP Fraternity House (4603 College Ave.), 2 blocks off campus, right by off-campus restaurants, $610 a month including utilities, Internet, cable, and maid service. Groups welcome... Call Eugene at 443-255-8104 or e-mail tepmanagement@gmail.com

Spacious Furnished Studio Apartments. Only a few remaining! Enjoy all our wonderful amenities! Rates starting at $299! 301-345-3388 www.universityclubatcollegepark.com

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Available for August 2009. Comfy, spacious, and fully furnished with all the amenities you could ask for! Rates as low as $500! Call today! 301-345-3388. Hartwick Towers 2 br/1 bath. $2025/3 people. Available June 1st/12 month lease. 443-745-5446. E-mail: cvbleab@aol.com HOUSE FOR RENT 4 BR, 1 BA Prime location. Near fraternaties and sororities. $2800 a month plus utilities. Call 240-393-8252 or flynn2@comcast.net

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8817 Patricia Court 5 bedroom/3 bath, behind Comcast Center 8514 Edmonston Road 4 bedroom/2 bath, completely renovated Contact Lisa for more details: 301-704-1342, terprealestate@comcast.net KNOX BOXES. For rent. Fall semester. 301-918-0203. House for rent. Cherokee St. 4 bed/2 bath. Steps to Shuttle UM. Available in July. 240-888-2758 NEW HOUSE FOR RENT ON METZEROTT ROAD. IMMACULATE 6 BEDROOM 4.5 BATH. HARDWOOD THROUGHOUT. WASHER/ DRYER. GARAGE. $4,050/MONTH. EMAIL: AC331@HOTMAIL.COM

ROOMMATES One roommate for Knox Box basement apartment beginning in June. $575 plus utilities. 202-257-6624

443-336-1742 KMGinfo@gmail.com TIME’S RUNNING OUT. ACT NOW. AVAILABLE JUNE 1st . Adelphi Road, very close to campus, easy walking distance. On shuttle & Metro bus route. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths. $2,850/month. $600/room. New ac, large private yard, washer/dryer, lawn-care provided, lots of off-street parking. Early signing bonus. Contact Dr. Kruger 301-408-4801.

Quiet Neighborhood 5+ bedroom, 3 bath house with large fenced backyard. On bus line. $3200/ month + utils. 4429 Underwood St., University Park. Available late August. Email manager@waterstreetmanagement.com for info and appointments. Rooms for rent in student housing, 1 mile to University for SUMMER only or FALL/SPRING. From $475. Call 240-281-3145. babakh84@gmail.com 6 Br, 2 Ba house. Very close to campus. Available 6/1. $2450. 202-361-0266

WALKING DISTANCE 4 rooms starting at $550-$650 + utilities. Washer and dryer. 2 bathrooms. Backyard. Rent whole house with friends or rent one room. Call 240-355-8337. HOUSE FOR RENT 5 BR, 1.5 BA. Prime location steps to campus. Near fraternaties and sororities. $3200 a month plus utilities. Call 240-393-8252 or flynn2@comcast.net UNIVERSITY VIEW- REDUCED FOR SUMMER. CALL PETE 410-279-1499

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TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

7

‘You try to model yourself after her’ Santa Fe to see major upgrades

COSNER, from Page 1

forever,” Cosner said. “When I walked out of [jail] the next morning I was like, ‘This is never going to happen to anyone else out there. Not if I can help it.’” As the unaware freshman from Glen Burnie, Md., opened the door to the police, she was told they could smell the pot from all the way down the hallway. “My very first instinct was to say ‘I’m sorry, here’s the pot, just take it,’” said Cosner, who had less than half a gram of marijuana at the time. “I was completely freaked out. I gave them all I had.” Police handcuffed her and searched through the rest of her room, looking for more marijuana. They found nothing. Still, they led her out of her room and through the hall as her fellow dorm residents looked on. She was taken to a Prince George’s County jail in Hyattsville, Md. “There are serious, for-real crimes in there and I’m this little college girl with less than five dollars of pot,” she said. Cosner said she spent the night alongside a woman who sat, clutching herself in the corner of the room and “must have been going through some serious withdrawal or something.” Cosner was too scared to sleep, kept awake by the smell of her cellmate’s urine on the floor. She was released the next morning and walked the nearly three miles back to College Park without her cell phone or wallet. Once back at the university, Cosner was greeted with a notice of suspension, which she traded for two years of mandatory drug testing twice a week, and a notification she had to move out of the dorms within 48 hours. Although she successfully appealed

the eviction and stayed in the dorm for the duration of the spring semester, she said the experience was eye-opening. “It was so hard dealing with all of that,” said Cosner, who is graduating with a degree in communication. “That’s not even the worse story I’ve heard. But with [university officials], it’s always the same: ‘Drugs are drugs are drugs.’” Cosner decided to take action to try to change the administration’s attitude. The next semester, she was elected to the University Senate — the university’s most powerful legislative body — and became president of Students for Sensible Drug Policy. From both positions, she began a conscious push to reform the university’s drug policies. Inspired by success stories at other institutions, she decided to introduce a Good Samaritan policy in the senate, hoping it would reduce the number of students being sanctioned for illegal substance use, including underage drinking. Though her original proposal was turned down last spring, she continued working on the issue from outside the senate, as university officials banned Cosner from running for her seat again because of her criminal record. But others picked up where Cosner left off. Undergraduate Senator Brad Docherty chaired a committee that created a Good Samaritan policy that appeared ready for passage earlier this semester. But before the measure could see a vote, it was replaced by a Good Samaritan protocol written by Director of Student Conduct John Zacker, who repeatedly clashed with Cosner. “I would say we’re pleased but not content with the outcome,” Docherty said. “[Stacia and I] had to figure out if

we wanted to swallow the pill — swallow the compromise we were offered — but ultimately we decided it would be best to support this first step.” The approved protocol deviates from Cosner’s original proposal — it doesn’t cover drug use and requires students to complete an alcohol education program to totally avoid punishment under either Residence Life rules or the code of student conduct — but Cosner echoed Docherty’s sentiments and said it was a small victory and a big first step in the right direction. “We wanted it more comprehensive but this is an excellent step forward,” Cosner said. “If this helps one person call for help one minute sooner then it’s absolutely worth it.” While support in the senate for the protocol was nearly unanimous, the vote was merely symbolic, as it is entirely up to administrators to implement, monitor and continue the procedure. During her time on the senate’s Student Conduct Committee, Cosner and Zacker clashed repeatedly over Good Samaritan — part of the reason she hopes the senate “checks up” and “follows through” in evaluating the effectiveness of the protocol after a year. “I have no doubt students will keep [Zacker] on top of it,” Cosner said. When asked to comment on Cosner’s time on the senate, Zacker said “she is the one who introduced the [Good Samaritan] proposal” but declined to comment further. Docherty, who is listed on a dry-erase board in Cosner’s SSDP office as a “key student ally,” said Cosner is the kind of activist that inspired him to do more. “You just know she’s the kind of per-

FRANCIS, from Page 1

tion was sound. “Brian Gray failed to yield when making a left turn,” Korionoff said. “You have to yield. [Chavez] was treated just like any other citizen. The investigation was handled thoroughly.” Earlier this year, Chavez was suspended from active duty. While police officials declined to comment on the details of his suspension, according to the Washington Post, sources close to the situation said Chavez was under investigation for alleged public intoxication and inappropriately showing his handgun. Police said the suspension is not related to Brian Gray’s death.

nine years in the NBA for three teams. Now, Francis is looking to enter the nightlife scene of College Park. Srour said Santa Fe will close May 24 for renovations. He hopes to open up the ground floor by the beginning of the fall semester but is unsure if construction will be completed. “Santa Fe needs a nice facelift,” he said. “It’s a building that’s many years old.” Srour said he wants to make Santa Fe more like the 9:30 club in Washington, D.C. “We are going to promote more of a band venue,” he said. Srour said the bar in the center of the building will be removed and he plans to finally acquiesce to city demands and install a sprinkler system. “We’re going to be changing the name and changing everything,” he said, adding the bar’s upper level will be turned into a “more trendy lounge [area].” Though Srour admitted the deal with Francis was not 100 percent complete, he noted he has other parties interested if it falls through. He anticipates an agreement to be finalized within the next couple of weeks. Regardless of who his partner is, Srour believes the bar will be a success. Francis could not be reached for comment. “It’ll be the hottest venue in town,” Srour said. Many students seem excited about the possibility of Steve Francis returning to College Park. “If Steve Francis came to Santa Fe, that’d be sick,” senior English major Geoff Thompson said. “I’d love to go to the bar and just know he’s there.” To some, there’s an element of nostalgia that excites them about Francis coming back. “If you were a Maryland fan growing up, before you went here, you definitely knew Steve Francis and were a fan of his,” junior history major Sonny Mazzullo said. “I used to watch all the Maryland games before I went here.” Students were also looking forward to a revamped bar with more focus on the music. “I mean, that’s pretty cool that Santa Fe is going to be revamped,” Mazzullo added. “I would love it if they made it more like the 9:30 club.” Junior marketing major Igor Fedorovskiy said a music venue is a perfect fit to complete a diverse lineup of late-night options. “I feel like it’s great that College Park has a place where people can appreciate live music,” Fedorovskiy said. “I’m really really grateful I have that at the university.”

hamptondbk@gmail.com

rhodesdbk@gmail.com

A sign hangs in the SSDP office in the Stamp Student Union. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

son that gets things done,” Docherty said. “When you work with her, you try to model yourself after her because she cares so much about the issues.” Good Samaritan wasn’t the only issue Cosner fought for. She has condemned unnecessary SWAT team usage, lobbied for a statewide Good Samaritan policy and 10-year “mandatory minimum” sentences for drug offenses. After she graduates, Cosner will go on to serve as outreach director for the national office of Students for Sensible Drug Policy and hopes she can continue her legacy of fighting for students’ rights, even if she’s no longer a student herself. “I’m going to miss being a student,” Cosner said. “I hope I can make people think about this issue and spread a little more awareness, or make them take students a little more seriously. I’ve tried really, really, really hard to dispel the notion that we’re just a bunch of hippies that wander around playing frisbee and smelling the flowers. We lobby and do research. We mean business.” langdbk@gmail.com

Officer in Gray case put on leave earlier this year COURT, from Page 1 against Chavez and Prince George’s County, which will come to trial Sept. 14, said Tom Ponton, a close family friend. State Circuit Court Judge C. Philip Nichols Jr., who will preside over the civil suit, has issued a gag order preventing anyone involved in the case from speaking to the media. “[Gray] felt her son should not have died ... and the only way to equalize the situation is with a lawsuit,” Ponton said. Gray may seek about $4 million in damages, Ponton said. Since the death of her son, Gray has lobbied the state legislature to approve legislation that would make it easier to

prosecute and convict those accused of reckless driving — in her son’s case, prosecutors could not meet the high standard of gross negligence necessary to charge Chavez with vehicular manslaughter. The proposed bill would create a middle ground between a traffic citation and a felony vehicular manslaughter charge, according to The Washington Post. Gray spoke in front of the state legislature in January in support of the bill, calling for legal action. Because there is no medium between a traffic citation and a criminal charge, Chavez could not be found guilty of anything more than speeding. On the day of his death, Gray was making a left turn onto Belair Drive in

his hometown of Bowie, Md., when his Chevrolet Beretta was struck by Chavez's police cruiser, hurtling Gray 85 feet from site of the collision. Chavez, who was traveling twice the speed limit at about 50 mph, admitted to drinking three or four beers and sleeping on a friend’s couch the night before the accident. But despite his admission, he was not asked to complete a sobriety test due to a state law that does not require police officers to do so, said Ramon Korionoff, a spokesman for Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey. Instead, Chavez was issued a citation for speeding in December 2008. Gray’s family and friends were infuriated by the outcome, but officials say the investiga-


8

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 | THE DIAMONDBACK

Diversions

Michael Jackson

MUSIC NOTE: Michael Jackson’s much-hyped 50-show series in London this summer may not be happening after all. According to Yahoo!, AllGood Entertainment Inc. claims it signed an agreement stipulating the singer cannot give another performance until a July 2010 Jackson family reunion concert. AllGood says Jackson could be compensated with more than $30 million for the single show, so limit your sympathy for him accordingly.

arts. music. living. movies. weekend. online exclusive INTERVIEW — WAX Once the rarest species of M.C., white rappers such as Asher Roth have recently been populating the diversified hip-hop landscape in increasing numbers. Combine that with the increasing prominence of heretofore musically ignored areas, such as this state giving rise to rappers like Wale, and you have someone who might just be an archetype of the modern M.C. — Wax, a university alumnus. His is an unlikely journey, and unlike rappers who fervently disavow their pasts for street credibility (like Wale did), Wax was quick to speak of his time as a student at the university in an interview with The Diamondback. “I was there … ’98 to 2001, I guess,” Wax said. “I majored in government and politics, minored in African American studies. I did pretty well. I got pretty good grades.” Yet the transition from student to performer was part of a natural progression. According to Wax, he was bitten with the desire to write songs when he was 5 years old. He has tried to be a musician in every manner or genre possible, even playing guitar and singing in a sixman rock band, Macgregor, which opened for Wyclef Jean at Art Attack in 2002. “I learned to play guitar when I was, like, 10. I was playing rap guitar or whatever a little bit later than that when I was in high school, middle school or something,” Wax said of his musical evolution. “It’s not something that I decided to do. Those were two things I did, so I combined them.”

— Vaman Muppala

For the full interview with Wax, just click the Diversions tab at:

WWW.DIAMONDBACKONLINE.COM

REVIEW | MEAT PUPPETS

Pulling all the wrong strings Meat Puppets return with a lazy and mild new album BY VAMAN MUPPALA Staff writer

Perhaps punk bands are meant to dive headfirst into their doom in a haze of drugs, à la the Sex Pistols and Sid Vicious. Though not an explicit member of the punk movement, the Meat Puppets did adopt a variety of the genre’s musical and behavioral staples: basic raw chords, heaps of attitude and a voracious appetite for cocaine. As a result, it’s difficult to explain the following lyrics from the band’s latest, Sewn Together: “Ooh it’s raining / but I feel so fine / Ooh it’s raining / raining bright sunshine,” on album closer “Love Mountain.” Of course, one can excuse the Kirkwood brothers (Curt on vocals and lead guitar, Cris on bass) for wishing to end on as positive and uplifting a statement as possible after the struggles the duo has been mired in recently. “The Monkey and the Snake,” however, precedes “Mountain” and nearly tops it in insouciance, as Curt narrates a dark, pseudo children’s tale about a “monkey” who is “singing in a band” and while in a conflict with a snake he “hit with a drake.” The chorus even features jubilant whistling that would seem much more appropriate in Leave It to Beaver. To further flaunt their willingness to play nice, the Puppets title a song “Nursery Rhyme,” insert vague references to “heaven-sent” babies, add a basic chord progression and leave it at that. It is no secret the Kirkwood brothers felt stifled by genre conventions. In fact, their flirtations with country and psychedelia are largely responsible for their success. Their previous effort, 2007’s Rise to Your Knees, was their defi-

The latest album from the Meat Puppets, Sewn Together, disappoints in comparison to its triumphant 2007 comeback effort, Rise to Your Knees. COURTESY MOONGLAMPERS.NET

ant comeback album and offered nuanced, mature musicianship. Sewn Together feels like the aftertaste from Knees. Its best tracks are rife with recycled ideas played not particularly inventively — just well enough to fill time and serve as pale approximations of the real thing. “Smoke” finally finds Curt digging as he sings, “There must be smoke in my eyes / feel the flames / But I can’t see the light.” The acoustic guitar in the background provides unexpected accents to the song and recalls the glory days of the alt-country scene when Uncle Tupelo reigned supreme. Though the Kirkwoods effectively prove their mastery of ballad in “Smoke,” they cannot conjure up

any fire for “I’m Not You.” The stomping drums come off as perfunctory. Though the melodic interplay is as sharp as ever between Curt’s and Cris’ respective guitar and bass lines, the tempo of the song feels unjustified, as if the brothers were simply throttling along with little to no overarching purpose. Their vocals in the chorus are layered, harmonized and droning, at complete odds with the misplaced jangle of the tune. Shortly after the numbing “I’m Not You,” Curt displays his mastery of Spanish guitar inflections and addresses an unknown lover on “Sapphire,” promising to “fly all together

/ I’ll love you forever.” Yet, in the intro, he alternately claims that “between the black and the grey / There is only the rage.” Naturally, exasperation sets in. The balance and tension between complex emotional passages can be fascinating, but it simply is not executed well enough here. Curt reassures the listener it is “all sewn together” in the title track, but his claim rings false. Nothing coheres, and nothing consistently enlightens. Instead, one is left passively following Curt’s plea in the very same song: “Watch me fall.” vmain13@umd.edu

ALBUM:Sewn Together | VERDICT:

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TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 | SPORTS | THE DIAMONDBACK

9

Terps rely on signature speedy Coach kept team playing style for more than just offense hard without further embarrassing opponent JOSEPH

COLGATE, from Page 12

JOSEPH, from Page 12 just eight shots — down from 32 in the first half — but instead focused on fixing errors and possessing the ball. “We wanted to make sure in the second half that we weren’t just trying to go in and take shots just to take shots,” Terp coach Cathy Reese said. “We wanted to make sure we were able to handle the pressure that this team was going to put on us.” Reese has been involved in plenty of blowouts. Leaving aside a few big blowouts in her three years at the Terps’ helm, Reese played on four national championship teams in four years at this university in the late ’90s. This one, though, was unique. The 16-goal win was double Reese’s previous best margin of victory in an NCAA Tournament game as either a player or coach. In a regular season game, it’s easy to pull out everyone and do everything you can to let the clock wind down. But it’s tournament time — momentum is important. Reese used the lopsided advantage to work on facing pressure defense and crisper passing. She was happy her

team notched assists on half of the goals, a slight improvement from the team’s average of 44.9 percent in the regular season. At one point in the second half, Reese even called a timeout, frustrated with turnovers in what had become a practice scrimmage for next weekend’s game. The 20-4 win was impressive enough, even if it could have been much uglier. “I don’t think we needed to win 30-4. To be completely honest, I don’t,” Reese said. “I think we need to demonstrate possession and be smart when we had the ball.” This past season, a high school girl’s basketball team in Texas throttled a local opponent. The final score made national news: 100-0. Two sides of the story have emerged: The winning coach Micah Grimes claims he pulled back his press and told his team to keep the pace down, along with keeping the clock running even for free throws in the second half. Others have denied his claims, and no video exists to back up either side. Both sides on the issue have valid points. Such a game could have been stopped at a

certain point to spare the girls from further humiliation. Grimes has argued he refuses to tell his players to lay down and play poor basketball. Sunday, Reese found a favorable middle ground. The Terps will be able to use the momentum gained from the game, even the 5-4 second half. The Raiders will return to Hamilton, N.Y., with a better sense of where their team is among the lacrosse elite — and perhaps some motivation to schedule an NCAA Tournament team or two in their nonconference schedule. There was also validation for the use of the 10-goal mercy rule. “It definitely hurts the team that is down, but we’ve been in the other position this year, where it’s been a big advantage for us to keep that clock moving at times where we’re up by that 10,” Colgate coach Heather Bliss said. “So I don’t think there needs to be a rule change with that. But as the coach on the other end, you are yelling for the clock to be stopped at every opportunity.” Sunday, the Terps made sure it didn’t. And they did it in the right way. ajosephdbk@gmail.com

The Terps thrive on transitions and breakaways, often outracing their opponents with sprints downfield to create offensive opportunities and set the pace of the game. And grabbing 14 of 16 draw controls in the first half Sunday gave them even more chances to push downfield and throw Colgate off balance. This approach works well because the Terps possess one of the quickest lineups in the country, with speed not just on the attack but at every position. For example, attacker Sarah Mollison, midfielders Merrifield and Caitlyn McFadden and defender Karissa Taylor were all neck and neck for the lead in sprints at a recent practice. “It’s one of our strengths,” Taylor said. “We trained really hard in the fall and even throughout the season. We’re always consistent with our speed. We always want to be the fastest out there... We just push it every time we have the ball, so it really works to our advantage.” Their speed helps on the defensive end as well. When the Terps do not have possession, they literally run circles around their opponents, swarming them and chasing them down to stifle the attack and cause turnovers. In Sunday’s match, the Raiders gave up the ball 20 times and picked up just seven ground balls, 10 fewer than the Terps. “I think using our speed in the midfield was a key of pulling the game,” McFad-

Caitlyn McFadden is one of numerous scoring threats flourishing in the Terps’ uptempo system. ADAM FRIED/THE DIAMONDBACK

den said. “We were really able to ride the ball and get it back when we did have those turnovers or their goalie came up with saves. So I think that was huge, being able to win the ball back.” They can’t always run up and down the field, though. Up 15 on Colgate, the Terps decided at halftime it would be to their advantage to hold the ball and stretch out their possessions. “We want to control the tempo of the game,” Johnson said. “And sometimes, we’re going to slow it down.” Though the Terps have been able to succeed with a slower pace, against Colgate they lost momentum and focus after the shift, resulting in errant passes, turnovers and the Raiders’

first goals of the game. Though they maintained a large lead, coach Cathy Reese called a timeout halfway through the final 30 minutes to refocus the team. “I thought we were throwing the ball away a lot on offense,” Reese said. “I thought that we needed to do a better job of that, which we did after that timeout.” Facing stiffer competition against No. 7 seed Syracuse (144) in the Elite Eight on Saturday, the Terps should make sure to keep their energy up if they slow the game down or just stick to their effective speedy style if they want to make their first Final Four appearance since 2003. kyanchulisdbk@gmail.com

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THE DIAMONDBACK | SPORTS | TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

Terps took advantage of Irish miscues IRISH, from Page 12 deficit to 6-2. The Irish got one more goal the rest of the way. All day, Notre Dame seemed to be making the types of careless mistakes that kept the team from clawing back out of a deep but manageable hole. “We didn’t handle the ball very cleanly,” Notre Dame coach Kevin Corrigan said. “It was a limited possession game, and you’ve got to be selective and smart about what you’re doing offensively in a game like that, and I don’t think necessarily we played with the discipline we needed to play with there.” The Terps demonstrated the necessary discipline in notching a 20-for-20 mark on clears. As a result, they controlled possession for much of the game. Each team turned the ball over a fair amount, but the Irish only cleared successfully on 10-of-15 chances. That

allowed the Terps to continually apply pressure. “I can think of five or six times where you look at it and go, ‘Yes! No!,’ where we dropped the ball or threw it a little wide,” Corrigan said. “Just one of those days.” That statement could apply even when the Irish did possess the ball on offense. Notre Dame out-shot the Terps 34-33 but only put 12 shots on goal. Meanwhile, the Terps had 21 shots on net, making Irish goalie Scott Rodgers work to keep his team competitive. “My job is to save every shot put at me,” said Phipps, who finished with nine saves. “Hopefully, I get into their heads, and maybe [they] think twice about shooting. “I know a couple times I thought they should have shot and didn’t, they pulled it out and threw a pass,” Phipps added. The Terps’ effort also played a role. Although the

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stats show they only picked up five more ground balls than the Irish, it seemed like the Terps were always winning the loose-ball battle. “The ground balls had to be us,” Cottle said. “If we were gonna win this game, the ground balls had to be us and our kids did a good job there.” At one point in the third quarter, Irish defender Mike Creighton checked the ball out of midfielder Jeff Reynolds’ stick, and it popped up into his own. Creighton charged down the field with another chance to shift the momentum. But Terp midfielder Jake Bernhardt caught up and caused a turnover with a check from behind. Terp defender Brett Schmidt scooped the ground ball and went back the other way. One minute later, midfielder Rob Morrison scored to give the Terps that 6-1 lead. “This is getting ugly,” a

The Terps were 20-for-20 on clear attempts in Sunday’s win.

Notre Dame fan in the bleachers lamented. Cottle was pleased with the Terps’ performance, the team’s best result since a March 21 win against North Carolina. But discussing the offense after the game, he

PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN GAVLICK/THE OBSERVER

noted that a performance is only measured against what the other team does. Sunday, during a game in which the previously undefeated Irish struggled, that notion applied to the entire game. “If we would have lost 13-7,

we’d be talking about how bad our offense was,” Cottle said. “It has a lot to do with what the other team gets to. But saying that, I think we’re playing better.” mkatzdbk@gmail.com


TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 | SPORTS | THE DIAMONDBACK

11

Jumping to the Terps Barbiasz passed up major offers to high jump at father’s alma mater BY JAKOB ENGELKE Staff writer

It was only one year ago when track and field jumper Dwight Barbiasz found himself at a crossroads in his athletic career. Barbiasz (pronounced bar-BEE-az) had multiple prospects after his high school graduation. He could spend a year at prep school to play football, go to a collegiate track powerhouse or attend the school he grew up rooting for. Chris Barbiasz, Dwight’s father, played linebacker for the Terrapin football team in the late ’70s. As a result, Dwight grew up as a Terps fan from afar, in Milford, N.H., and knew all about the athletics program. He visited College

Barbiasz finished second in April’s Penn Relays. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

Park for sporting events and watched Terps games while at home. “I went to a few basketball games at Cole Field House,” Barbiasz said. “And I went to a few football games. At one of them, I got to stand on the sideline because it was an alumni game. Standing on the field as a kid was a great experience.” In high school, he was a football and basketball player, and originally wanted to play football at a prep school after high school. But as he realized his potential in the high jump — which he picked up in the spring of his junior year in high school — he began to lean toward a track career. He was an All-American as a member of the 2008 USA Today All-USA high school track and field team. He received offers from track powers such as Auburn, Florida and LSU. He took official visits to Texas and Tennessee. But because of Barbiasz’s Terp allegiance, this university — not known for its track program — was able to win the recruiting battle. It was a major coup for a program that finished 44th in NCAA regionals last season. “When I saw a video of him, I told [head coach Andrew] Valmon right away that I liked what I saw,” Terp jumps and hurdles coach Frank Costello said. “I saw that he had a lot of raw talent, and he was the kind of jumper I was looking for.” Roughly two years after picking up

Barbiasz, shown jumping last week, was named ACC Indoor Track Freshman of the Year in March. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

the sport, Barbiasz has soared for the Terps this season. On February 28, he posted a high jump of 7-2.25 inches. The jump was good enough to secure the ACC Championship in the event. Nearly a week later, Barbiasz was named ACC Indoor Track Freshman of the Year. “[Winning the ACC as a freshman] is great,” teammate and fellow jumper David Edwards-Brennan said. “It’s really good. I’ve never heard of anyone doing that. [The type of people that do that] have national records in the high jump. So he’s in that class of people.” Barbiasz did not stop there. On March 14, he competed at the NCAA Championships and placed third in the high

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and coaches to have a very intense competitive edge. His teammates said he treats every practice as a competition and will practice even when he is not feeling the best. Leading up to the ACC Championships, Barbiasz had a nagging foot injury, but he put it out of his mind to claim the title. “He has that one ingredient that you need to really be successful: It’s that he’s a vicious competitor,” Costello said. “That’s the thing you don’t know until you actually get a person, throw them in a track meet and see how they do. He impresses me the way he competes. He’s fearless.” engelkedbk@gmail.com

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jump with a height of 7-0.25 inches. On April 25, he was able to post another mark of 7-2.25 inches at the prestigious Penn Relays to place second in the meet. Even through his success, Barbiasz continues to refine his technique with Costello, a former two-time NCAA high jump champion. Costello also trained Barbiasz’s father as a strength and conditioning coach with the football program but didn’t make the connection until the younger Barbiasz showed up at the university. “I came here because I know Frank is going to get me to where I need to be at the next level,” Barbiasz said. “My goal is to be in the Olympics by 2012 and maybe get sponsored by Nike or Under Armour.” Barbiasz is known by his teammates

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THE DIAMONDBACK | TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

Sports

Men’s lacrosse NCAA Tournament Schedule Sunday, 12 or 2 p.m.: No. 1 Virginia (14-2) vs. No. 8 Johns Hopkins (10-4) Site: Annapolis

Saturday, 12 or 2 p.m.: No. 5 Cornell (11-3) vs. No. 4 Princeton (13-2) Site: Hempstead, N.Y.

JOSEPH

W

henever one team takes a 10-goal lead in an NCAA Division I women’s lacrosse game, the officials signal for the clock to continue moving between goals and on fouls. It’s a rule to help speed up a massive blowout, beneficial to both the fans and winning team. Even the losing team can at least get the lopsided match over with. Sunday, while hosting a

CAA champion Colgate team, the Terrapin women’s lacrosse team reached that 10-goal advantage in just 13:02 of play. The dominance continued, turning a 15-goal first-half lead into a 20-4 win, the Terps’ widest margin of victory this season. Blowouts like this have the potential to be humiliating. At one point, the Terps seemed as though they could have won the game 40-0. But Sunday’s romp showcased a softer side to winning big. The Terps played with class, not laying down but also not pouring it on. In the second half, they attempted

Please See JOSEPH, Page 9

Saturday, 12 or 2 p.m.: TERRAPINS (10-6) vs. No. 2 Syracuse (14-2) Site: Hempstead, N.Y.

Uptempo attack lets Terps exert control

In blowout, Reese used right strategy ADI

Sunday, 12 or 2 p.m.: No. 3 Duke (14-3) vs. No. 6 North Carolina (12-5) Site: Annapolis

Women’s lax uses speed at all positions BY KATE YANCHULIS Staff writer

Coach Cathy Reese celebrates on the Terp sideline during Sunday’s blowout victory. ADAM FRIED/THE DIAMONDBACK

As soon as the whistle blew, Terrapin women’s lacrosse midfielder Laura Merrifield was off. She snatched a draw control out of midair, zipped down the field and scored, all in the span of eight seconds. Merrifield’s score came in the middle of a stretch of six Terp goals in three minutes, part of the 15-goal first-half performance by the speedy Terp offense in Sunday’s 20-4 win against Colgate. At times, the No. 2-seeded Terps (20-0) seemed to be running laps

around the Raiders (14-5) in the first-round NCAA Tournament victory. “Our game is about pushing transition,” attacker Karri Ellen Johnson said. “And obviously it works.” The Terps have favored this fast-paced style of attack all year, leading to their average of nearly 16 goals per game, the third highest in the country. The Raiders, too, possessed a high-scoring attack, with a 14.17 goals-per-game average, the 13th-best in the NCAA, but the Terps overwhelmed them.

Please See COLGATE, Page 9

Men’s lax benefits from sloppy play Mistakes by Notre Dame at critical junctures allow Terps to keep control of game, move on to face No. 2 seed Syracuse on Saturday BY MICHAEL KATZ Staff writer

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — After snagging a pass from Terrapin men’s lacrosse defender Max Schmidt, Notre Dame attackman Neal Hicks discovered a clear path to the goal and not a defender in sight. He immediately closed in on Terp goalie Brian Phipps and used a stick fake before letting a shot go not far outside the crease. Phipps never had a

chance to make a save. That’s because Hicks misfired on the attempt, sending the ball sailing out of bounds and gifting it back to the Terps. It was just one example of the Fighting Irish’s sloppy play. For most of Sunday, the Terps played stingily on defense and effectively on offense in earning a 7-3 win at Notre Dame in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. But they got a little help from the Irish, who at times seemed averse to execution.

“I think that was a big play, though,” coach Dave Cottle said of Hicks’ missed opportunity. “When you talk about... having a breakaway [because] we threw it away, it was a big play.” A goal by Hicks could have cut the Terp lead to four points with more than eight minutes to play in the third quarter. Instead, it took the Irish another five minutes to tally their second goal of the game and cut the

Please See IRISH, Page 10

Attackman Joe Cummings and the Terps took advantage of Notre Dame’s uneven play to control the tempo of the game in Sunday’s 7-3 win. PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN GAVLICK/THE OBSERVER

051209  

The Diamondback,