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BROTHERLY LOVE

CLEANING UP COLGATE

Terps dominate Raiders for 20-4 NCAA Tournament victory

Carlos Cuarón discusses working with family and friends on his film, Rudo y Cursi

SPORTS | PAGE 8

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 7

THE DIAMONDBACK MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

99TH YEAR | ISSUE NO. 144

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

Wooded SURPRISE IN SOUTH BEND Hillock site to be bulldozed Admin. will develop area despite protests BY RICH ABDILL Staff writer

About nine of the 13 total acres of forest in the Wooded Hillock area of the campus behind the Comcast Center will be bulldozed as planned, possibly by the end of the year, university officials said, despite student protests and an SGA resolution asking the university to reconsider. The area was designated to be the relocation site for university facilities displaced by the planned East Campus redevelopment on Route 1, but student activists have held speak-outs and protests against the decision, which Student Government Association Environmental Liaison Davey Rogner said was leaked to students by a faculty member in early February. Professors have also spoken out against the proposal, saying the wooded area is an invaluable teaching tool. The decision to develop the hillock was made in 2007 by a committee of faculty and staff, a process critics have said lacked both

Terps upend undefeated Notre Dame to advance to NCAA Tourney quarterfinals BY MICHAEL KATZ Staff writer

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – The impeccable Irish came on to their home field undefeated. The champion of the Great Western Lacrosse League, Notre Dame entered the NCAA Tournament without a blemish on its record. But forgive the Terrapin men’s lacrosse team — an inconsistent but tested squad with one-goal losses to the likes of Virginia and Johns Hopkins — for remaining unafraid.

The Terps’ fearless attitude showed Sunday, as they jumped on No. 7 seed Notre Dame early in a 7-3 win in the first-round matchup at the Fighting Irish’s Alumni Stadium. With the win, the No. 14 Terps (10-6) advanced to face Syracuse in the quarterfinals at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., next weekend. “I wouldn’t say it’s an upset,” said midfielder Dan Groot, who noted what he deemed a lack of swagger from Notre Dame (15-1) in pregame

Please See LACROSSE, Page 8

Please See HILLOCK, Page 3 PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN GAVLICK/THE OBSERVER

EDWARD BERLINSKI, 1961-2009

Lecturer hoped to pass down love of writing ‘He loved teaching his students’ BY ADELE HAMPTON

The University Shop will be relocating to the storefront previously occupied by Vertigo Books at the beginning of the summer. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

Greek Store moving to Vertigo Books location Expanded store to stock ‘classier’ Terp gear BY BRADY HOLT Senior staff writer

The Greek Store is moving into the former Vertigo Books storefront over the summer after 15 years in its current location, giving it more space to offer a wider variety of merchandise, including what management is calling classier Terp-wear. The store, which has spent about 15 years downtown next to Chevy

TOMORROW’S WEATHER:

Chase Bank on Route 1, already offers a variety of goods and services targeted at the university’s students involved in Greek Life, including Greek letters and a wall full of ceremonial paddles. But the move, set to occur no later than Aug. 1, will triple the store’s floor space to about 3,000 square feet and open up new markets for the business, said Derek Martino, the

Staff Writer

Edward Berlinski, a lecturer with the English department’s Professional Writing Program who colleagues said spent his life spreading his passion for literature, died of a seizure Wednesday morning at his home in Cheverly, Md. He was 48 years old. Berlinski, who suffered from epilepsy for nearly two decades, was a poet and an avid reader. He devoted his career to passing down his love of writing, Professional Writing Program Director Lea Chartock said. “He was a poet; he was a writer; he was a prolific reader; he was a scholar,” said Lucretia Berlinski, his wife of nearly eight years. “He loved to read books about God and love and spirituality and the afterlife. He was romantic, and

A historic chorus sings its final notes Mostly non-student choir gives final show BY TIRZA AUSTIN Senior staff writer

EDWARD BERLINSKI PROFESSIONAL WRITING LECTURER

he loved teaching his students at the university.” Born in Airway Heights, Wa., as an infant Berlinski moved to Connecticut with his parents and three siblings and lived there until he was 19. As a child, Berlinski was adventurous but always remained focused on his

The Maryland Chorus sang its goodbyes to the university yesterday. After more than 40 years of international appearances, Handel festivals and annual holiday concerts, the music school decided to disband the group earlier this semester as part of a restructuring process aimed to bring more undergraduates into the choral program. Founded in 1967, the 70-member group is about one-third students and two-thirds non-students, including many local residents. No new choir will be created for non-students. The group’s final concert performance was yesterday at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. It will be a “bittersweet” one, Director of Choral Activities Edward Maclary said before the show.

Please See BERLINSKI, Page 2

Please See GREEK, Page 2

Sunny/70s

INDEX

Please See CHORUS, Page 3

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CLASSIFIED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

DIVERSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . .7 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

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THE DIAMONDBACK | NEWS | MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

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PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE

PETE SEEGER: THE POWER OF SONG

Free event featuring music by Nigel Westlake, John Cage and more. Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, 8 p.m., Dekelboum Concert Hall

Screening of the documentary based on the artist’s life and work. 1102 South Campus Commons, Building One, 7 p.m.

Q+A

BEST of the BLOGS

SCENE + HEARD

Professor remembered as poet, avid reader BERLINSKI, from Page 1 goals, which included pursuing higher education, said his mother, Dorothy Berlinski. When he left for college, it was not enough to just get a bachelor’s degree, she said. “His most favorite thing was writing poetry,” Dorothy Berlinski said. “He was very reliable and very spiritual. He prayed every day for everyone in his life. He cared about everyone he came in contact with on a deep level. He would do anything for anyone. He was

“He had a strong love of poetry and writing ... and worked well mentoring new instructors.” LEA CHARTOCK PROFESSIONAL WRITING PROGRAM DIRECTOR

extremely compassionate.” Berlinski attended the Catholic University of America in Washington and graduated

ResLife joins the fight against flu Officials hand out $13,000 in Clorox wipes to guard residents from swine flu BY DANA CETRONE Staff writer

The Department of Resident Life has joined in the fight against swine flu. Its weapon of choice: Clorox disinfecting wipes. Early last week, Resident Life distributed about $13,000 worth of Clorox wipes to the dorms on North and South Campus, hoping students would use them on “hightouch” areas, such as door knobs and light switches. Resident Life plans to continue the campaign over the next several days. “When you work in an institution with people in close quarters, we want to do everything we can to protect students’ health,” said Donna Metz, the assistant director for North Campus. “It was a preventative thing more than anything else.” In a collaborative effort with the University Health Center, Resident Life officials decided to hand out the wipes after hearing about swine flu on the news, Metz said. “We’re doing the kind of things we always do, like reminding students about good personal hygiene,” Metz said. “There are always outbreaks of flu, and we post signs to cover your cough, use sanitary measures and things

like that.” Students received an e-mail from Resident Life May 5 informing them that resident assistants would be giving out the Clorox wipes to all residents. The e-mail also included ways to prevent spreading germs by avoiding “skin-to-skin” contact. Some students thought the wipes were a good idea to prevent the spread of swine flu. “It makes more people aware and emphasizes how people should take care of themselves,” sophomore hearing and speech sciences major Caroline Diederich said. “But I figure swine flu is not a big deal and the symptoms are similar to allergies. A lot of people are becoming hypochondriacs.” Freshman English major Hannah Yi said the campaign couldn’t hurt. “I guess it’s just kind of worrying because there are a few cases in Maryland,” Yi said. As of yesterday, there were 23 confirmed cases of the H1N1 virus in the state, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but university officials said late last week that they would not close the school if swine flu cases appeared on the campus. cetronedbk@gmail.com

Students won’t mind the location change GREEK, from Page 1 store’s general manager. Martino’s plan calls for the Greek Store to sell universitythemed clothes and other items that are more “hip and fashionable” than what students might typically find at the University Book Center or at the Maryland Book Exchange, making it “the Hollister of Maryland stores,” Martino said. The move would also let the store consolidate its operations into one facility, Martino said, noting the store maintains an off-site location responsible for preparing custom T-shirts. Moving that production into downtown College Park will likely result in faster turnaround time for custom orders. Management of the Greek Store first began actively looking for a new storefront about a year ago. It was “fate” that led his business to the old Vertigo storefront, Martino said, as the timing of the bookstore’s departure coincided with the expiration of the lease on The Greek Store’s current location. Although the store location will be a block farther away from Fraternity Row, many

customers in the store last week said they won’t mind the change. “In terms of convenience, with Chipotle and Starbucks, we’re already over there anyway,” said junior Spanish major Scott Malecki, who had come to the store for a Phi Sigma Pi-lettered T-shirt. Many customers come to the store only occasionally, and a convenient location would encourage them to go in to browse more frequently, they said. But some students said the Greek Store would have to provide a price advantage over the Maryland Book Exchange to persuade them to shop there. “It probably wouldn’t be my first instinct, just because [the Book Exchange] was so close,” senior communications major Julia Suszyzynski said. Martino said he hopes the additional merchandise will attract Greek students, but it would not be competing with existing stores in providing “rah-rah fan gear.” “When we don’t have something, we’ll send people to [the] Book Exchange,” Martino said. holtdbk@gmail.com

Sharpen your pencils and check out the crossword puzzle on page 5.

with a degree in medieval history. He went on to get his master’s degree from American University and then returned to Catholic to obtain his doctorate degree in rhetoric and composition. As Berlinski moved into the professional world, he began as a writer and editor, specializing in technology, public affairs and marketing, Chartock said. After spending 10 years in the public and private sectors, Berlinski moved on to teaching. Since 1990, Berlinski taught writing to students at Catholic University, Strayer University,

Johns Hopkins University and this university. Chartock described him as a scholarly, reserved man who strived to help others improve their own writing, whether it be professional or personal. “He had a strong love of poetry and writing ... and worked well mentoring new instructors,” she said. Throughout his shifting career, writing and teaching remained Berlinski’s passions. In 2007, he founded Improve Writing Now LLC — a writing consulting and coaching service acting as a

guide to those who want to learn more about professional writing. On the organization’s website, he frequently posted

“He prayed every day for everyone in his life. He cared about everyone he came in contact with on a deep level.”

blog entries on a wide variety of topics, from how to write reader-friendly Internet stories to how to craft a resumé. Berlinski is survived by his wife; his mother; father Edward Berlinski; sisters Diane Berlinski and Kristin Dederer; and brother Michael Berlinski. A wake and full viewing was held yesterday afternoon at Stewart’s Funeral Home in D.C. The burial will take place in Connecticut Tuesday before his family and friends.

DOROTHY BERLINSKI MOTHER OF EDWARD BERLINSKI

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MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

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‘We aren’t leaving people in the lurch’ CHORUS, from Page 1 “Though the loss of the chorus is a sad one, it is not a devastating one,” Maclary said. “We’re not losing opportunities; we are losing the name of the ensemble and part of the tradition that has lasted for 40 years.” Members of the chorus are expected to pursue careers in other chorus groups in the Washington, D.C. area, Maclary said. There are plenty of options open to people who want to participate in a chorus, Maclary added. “As badly as I feel about the demise of the chorus, I would feel worse if this was one of the only places to sing in the area,” Maclary said. “I feel OK, because we aren’t leaving people in the lurch.” The choral program in the music school will continue to serve undergraduate students through the other programs it offers: University Chorale, Chamber Singers, Men’s Chorus, Women’s Chorus, Gospel Choir and Opera Chorus. The choral program has changed significantly since Maclary joined and since the Maryland Chorus began. When the chorus was formed, it was the first at the university and one of few in the area, Maclary said. “This helped to spur other choral enterprises in the

“As badly as I feel about the demise of the chorus, I would feel worse if this was one of the only places to sing in the area.” EDWARD MACLARY DIRECTOR OF CHORAL ACTIVITIES

area,” Maclary said. “It has left a strong legacy of artistic achievement of its own.” Maclary, whose most vivid memory of the Maryland Chorus was performing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony during the dedication of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks, said he will greatly miss the community members who participated in the program, but said he looked forward to seeing their artistic endeavors in the future. “When I arrived here, the Maryland Chorus was the only chorus being offered at the School of Music,” Maclary said. “Now the choral program has grown and matured. We are offering much wider opportunities for students.” taustindbk@gmail.com

Here’s a formula I know you’ll love: Your old stuff +DBK Classified

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Activists not giving up on hillock HILLOCK, from Page 1 transparency and student input. But Carlo Colella, the Facilities Management director of architecture, engineering and construction, contradicted a previous statement that asserted there was “no deliberate student involvement” and recalled that former SGA President Andrew Rose, who Colella said was was in office during the process, was on the committee that reviewed possible sites some time before the decision to develop was made. Colella said the development is contingent on the East Campus plans being finalized, but he added the decision process is over and development will probably start later this year, regardless of student discontent.

Still, the activists aren’t deterred by the administration’s decision. Rogner said he e-mailed faculty members Saturday asking them to help defend the hillock by writing short descriptions of how they could use the woods in their classes. He also said there are plans being made to lobby county officials that are overseeing the allocation of funds for the East Campus development. “It’s not over till it’s over,” Rogner said. Geography professor Stephen D. Prince was in the Hillock on Saturday with about 20 students, graduates and other faculty members on a tour put together by student activists. Prince said he takes classes out to the hillock at least twice a semester to examine the area, which has both undisturbed

woods and an area that was destroyed by the 2001 tornado but has started to regrow. Prince pointed out there are few other places to observe these natural conditions within close reach. “You can’t get very far down the road in an hour and a quarter. We can just walk here,” Prince said. “I would take my students to this place if it were 50 miles away. It’s not just that it’s very convenient, it’s very unusual.” Activists also say the hillock is more than just a teaching tool: Faculty and students on Saturday’s tour emphasized the unique conditions created by the hillock’s tornado-affected area. Many students, though, don’t see the hillock as an effective use of the university’s space. “I went there for a bio class to

study where the tornado went through,” sophomore letters and sciences major Lauren Higgins said. “I don’t think that land is helping the university, really — from a business standpoint, how much revenue will it bring in?” Sophomore letters and sciences major Tod Tanis said the situation is being blown out of proportion. “To be honest, I didn’t even know the woods were back there,” Tanis said. Sophomore Destiny Coleman agreed with the sentiment. “It’s not like ‘Oh, let me take this class so I can study something significant in the woods,’” Coleman said. “It’s just woods. People just smoke weed back there.” abdilldbk@gmail.com

Seven students sitting in a tree Planned East Campus development may endanger student-built treehouse BY SARA NEWMAN For the Diamondback

On Friday, seven seniors unveiled their hidden hideout: a three-level treehouse buried deep in the woods behind the Comcast Center parking garage. The “treehouse seven,” as they like to call themselves — seniors Cooper Linde, Andrew Zhao, Taylor Jones, Matt Ritterpusch, Chris Ahn, Fred De Grano and one who declined to be named — opened their canopy campout to about 40 students who came out to celebrate the treehouse’s completion. The group said they wanted to make the structure public so others could enjoy an alcohol-free escape, as they have for the past academic year. But with the impending threat of developing the Wooded Hillock area, the seniors say they hope the treehouse will remain undisturbed. “It’s all about a bunch of friends who like to get together and have a good time,” Linde said. “There’s nothing like this anywhere on campus.”

The seven began constructing the treehouse in September and worked on it mostly at night, lighting the area with flashlights and headlamps and using material they either purchased or found while dumpster diving. “Some people were suspicious when I would come back into the dorm real late at night covered in dirt and carrying tools,” said Linde, who is a resident assistant in LaPlata Hall. “I always just told them I was building a treehouse.” The treehouse, which sits 12 feet above the ground, can be accessed by climbing a wooden ladder to the wall-less first story, where two steps lead up to the second-level “house” section. “Building a house 10 to 20 feet off the ground is a huge accomplishment, especially when you may not have all the specialized tools,” said senior engineering major Divyang Mago, a friend of the seven who constructed the treehouse. Though they tried to be as discreet as possible — besides bringing their friends up to see their handiwork — the treehouse in-

Seven seniors sit atop a treehouse they constructed in the wooded hillock. PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANDREW ZHAO

evitably attracted curiosity during its construction. Zhao listed two machete-wielding men claiming they were land surveyors working for the university last semester and a woman who claimed to be geocaching as some of those

who accidentally discovered the secret project. Mago said no one has defaced or harmed the treehouse, and they hope that respect will continue. newsdesk.dbk@gmail.com

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THE DIAMONDBACK | MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE DIAMONDBACK

Opinion

KEVIN ROBILLARD EDITOR IN CHIEF

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OPINION EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Staff Editorial

Guest Column

Keep the turtle

A concealed cause

A snappy slogan can’t change a university, but it can embody one. businesses. The slogan was meant to encourage sportsmanship, but it Since two members of the University of Michigan marching band started inspired resentment and spite instead. Students complained administrascreaming the words “Let’s Go Blue” at hockey games nearly 40 years tors were trying to impose a culture on the university. Faculty decried ago, students and alumni there have lived by the phrase. At the Univer- the campaign as wasted money in tough economic times. Eventually it sity of Texas at Austin, where a cheerleader in the 1950s started chant- gave birth to a satirical web spinoff, actlikeyougiveaf---.com. Before “Act ing “Hook ’em horns,” the phrase is today used to end letters and as a Like You Know,” the ambiguous advertising campaign “Zoom” failed to resonate with students and alumni. greeting in everyday conversations. “Fear the Turtle” is different. It can mean many things, and it’s catchy. It’s This university’s “Fear the Turtle” isn’t quite so ingrained in the student not offensive, but it’s not vapid. And most important of all, culture here. However, in the five years it has rallied sports people like it. While it isn’t chanted at basketball or football fans and graced university ads, it has also drummed up games, students and alumni proudly buy T-shirts, keychains donors and caught the attention of high school seniors. While the phrase doesn’t have a clever story behind it — it started The university’s “Fear the and other knickknacks emblazoned with the slogan. It has national attention for the university and, according with a market research team — and the words by themselves Turtle” slogan has the po- garnered to one admissions official, it has led to an increase in student mean little, to students and alumni, the phrase means a lot. tential to become a applications. Chances are “Fear the Turtle” would have sur“‘Fear the Turtle’ IS the university, at least as far as the vived the university’s marketing reassessment anyway, but athletic department goes. It’s a fun phrase creating tongueuniversity tradition. it’s important for administrators to realize they’re not just in-cheek chest puffing,” noted Matthew Stabley, a correreconsidering a phrase. They’re playing with the way students view their spondent from an NBC affiliate in Washington. Our fears were stoked last when Vice President for University Relations university, the place that will one day come calling to them for donations University President Dan Mote defended his decision to keep prayer Brodie Remington indicated the university might consider dropping the catchy slogan. And as administrators back off the statement, we’re glad it at commencement, saying it was one of the university’s last remaining traditions. But “Fear the Turtle” has the potential to become one. Adminwasn’t true. The university had finally found a catchphrase that worked. Before “Fear the Turtle” debuted in 2003, administrators plackered the istrators are now making it clear they plan to leave the phrase alone. It’s phrase “Act Like You Know” across bus stops, bulletin boards and local the right decision.

RYAN GOFF

Our View

Editorial Cartoon: Shai Goller

Environmentalism: The movement’s spreading

T

he coal industry has been running commercials since the presidential election joyfully touting that coal supplies 50 percent of America’s electricity. These commercials are outdated and untrue. According to the U.S. Energy Department, coal supplies 48.9 percent of America’s electricity. I’ll show you why the details matter. Four of my closest friends are conservatives. Traditionally, support for regulating industry’s greenhouse gas emissions falls along party lines. Over the past couple years, I’ve been surprised to find three of these friends have come around to my viewpoint on this issue. Two of them lobbied with me on environmental legislation. Another referenced a column of mine in a college essay on why America needs to transition to a clean energy economy to avoid catastrophic climate change. And if I was referenced in a paper, the world really is in jeopardy. I arrogantly assumed this shift was

MATT

DERNOGA limited to my friends because my crazy environmentalism had rubbed off on them (and because I can blackmail them). But a snapshot from a recent poll suggests otherwise. Eighty-five percent of Democrats, 80 percent of Americans under 30 and 64 percent of Republicans support government regulation of greenhouse gases. A seemingly controversial issue is not even a close one. The most incredible number is almost two out of every three Republicans want regulation. I frequently tune into Fox News ,where commentators and news desk make it appear the planet is cooling and regulating emissions will wreck the

economy. It hasn’t worked. This has been reflected in our energy policy. About 200 coal plants have been proposed since 2000. Since 2007, 95 of these proposals have been canceled or postponed, and nearly all of the remaining proposals are on hold. Most of this took place during a coal-happy Bush presidency. It’s not getting any prettier. In contrast, wind power grew by more than 8.5 gigawatts in 2008 and solar more than 1.2 GW — record growth during a contracting economy. The wind industry now has more jobs than the coal mining industry. For the first time in forever, the environmental movement is winning in the United States. Students at universities all around the country, including students at this one, have been on the forefront. I remember two years ago when an outgoing state senator and the director of an environmental nonprofit group came to the university to talk to 50 students about global warming. They said that some day, the

state would pass a global warming bill. It seemed far off. This semester, students played a role in passing one of the strongest global warming bills in the nation right here in Maryland. Today, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (DMd.) will come to the university before hundreds of people for a clean energy town hall meeting. Part of the discussion will be about when the United States will pass a strong global warming bill. I see the paradigm shift in only two years. The details matter. They tell a different story than the commercials. The coal industry is trying to outrun the facts, but they are catching up quickly. We are witnessing the death of coal. A word for the coal industry: Coal might supply ALMOST 50 percent of America’s electricity, but your years are numbered. You are approaching zero. Matt Dernoga is a junior government and politics major. He can be reached at mdernoga@umd.edu.

College: A final goood-bye, but no need to cry

B

ecause I am illiterate, I can only assume that The Diamondback’s been full of columns expressing sentimentality over the end of the spring 2009 semester lately. Many of you are worried because you’re about to enter the so-called “real world.” Well, don’t frown, Charlie Brown, because the way I see it, life after college is going to get even better. You know one thing about the real world that won’t suck? No homework, dude. Just think about that. The real world will be bereft of grades and CORE and resident assistants. What a wonderful place that must be. Whoever said that college was the best time of our lives clearly underestimated the very period we’re about to enter: wedding season. Even if you haven’t found that special someone yet, your friends are about to start tying the knot.

ROB

GINDES Yeah, that sounds really terrible; a few years filled with dressing up, going to exotic locations, having bachelor parties and topping it all off with an open bar. Granted, you’re going to have to start taking it easy. In college, partying is essential. Twisted Tuesday, Wasted Wednesday, Frantic Friday, Blasted Blursday. It doesn’t matter; if there’s alliteration, then drink. In the real world, however, this is frowned upon. This is alcoholism. But even that’s not a big deal. Stay sober for a while and smell the roses. You’re not in college any-

more: There won’t be people telling you that this makes you lame. It might mean you have to cut back on the partying, but just because you’re out of college doesn’t mean you have to stop learning. In the real world, you can go seek out the things you actually want to learn (so long, rocks for jocks!). Get cultured and worldly. Become an aristocrat. Why not? It’s your life. That’s really what’s going on here, graduating seniors. You’re being handed the keys to your own life. Go out and drive that road. Obviously, I’m not an expert here, unlike everything else I’ve written about this year. I’m excited I still have a senior year to look forward to, and beyond that I don’t have much of a plan after graduation. But the thing to remember is that if you think college is the peak of your life, then I feel bad for you. Because no one

knows what the future has in store. I’m pretty sentimental myself, because this is about to be the last summer vacation of my life. Sure, it’ll be nostalgic. And all next year, you can bet that I’ll sully up these pages with my Rob Gindes Greatest Hits collection to pat myself on the back for a solid 17 years of public education. But after that, it’s not like it’s all over for me. And no one else should look at it that way either. Let college be college. I mean, where else could I have so many people read my swear words and Willy Wonka references? (By the way, a quick and heartfelt thankyou to everyone who did.) But after this, there’s so much more on the horizon. Rob Gindes is a junior journalism major. He can be reached at gindesdbk@gmail.com.

POLICY: The signed letters, columns and cartoon represent only the opinions of the authors. The staff editorial represents the opinion of The Diamondback’s editorial board and is the responsibility of the editor in chief.

The recent rash of crimes here in College Park has had me thinking about crime control. What ways are there to prevent crime? More police? That idea does have one drawback: money. Police officers are expensive, and in this economy cost, is a crucial factor in any policymaking. The answer is exceedingly simple: firearms. I’m not talking about a posse of vigilantes riding in on horseback, guns-a-blazing; I am talking about a concealed carry weapons permit program. There is a stigma in this state about guns, but if one takes a second to do some research, he or she can see quickly that a responsible CCW program can significantly cut down crime. I urge everyone to look at the website concealedcampus.org. This is a national group whose goal is to allow licensed CCW holders to be allowed to carry their guns on college campuses. We are not talking about freshmen at fraternity parties having guns. Here in this state, it is nearly impossible to get a carry permit. You must first go through a background check, which is logical since we don’t want to issue permits to people who have a criminal background. But you must also provide a reason, such as having a business that handles cash, being a former police or correctional officer or having documented threats against you. This provision excludes the vast majority of the population. This is what I take issue with. Why must you have a cash business in order to legally carry a concealed weapon? Especially with such large crime problems in cities like Baltimore, one would think legislators would be looking for ways to reduce crime without spending too much money. The answer is lowering the requirements of the carry permit. States with looser carry permit laws have about 1 percent of the population legally carrying a concealed weapon. On average, after the laws went into effect murder rates dropped by 8 percent, rapes by 5 percent and aggravated assaults by 7 percent. There is no other policy that is this cost-effective. One common argument against the CCW permit is that it would lead to more shootings. The above facts disprove this. Consider the state of Florida. Florida has issued more carry permits than any other state: 1.33 million as of 2008. During that same time period, only 0.01 percent of those permits were revoked due to gun crimes. Also consider that in cases where a person draws a gun for self-defense, it is rare that any shots are actually fired. Look at police officers as an example. Every day, many officers draw their guns while on duty but few ever have to pull the trigger. The sight of a gun is typically enough to prevent or stop a violent act or crime. With all this data, why doesn’t the state legislature ease carry permit restrictions? One common argument is that “we have to protect children.” Did you know that more children are killed every year by drowning in swimming pools and bathtubs than firearms? Perhaps the state should consider implementing a permit program for swimming pools. Guns do not kill people; the person pulling the trigger does. I, and many of my friends back home, grew up with firearms in the house. We are all still alive. Saying guns kill people is like saying spoons make people fat. I am not recommending that we allow anyone who wants to carry a gun. Each person should undergo a thorough background check, but if a lawabiding citizen wants the ability to protect himself or herself, what is the problem? Ryan Goff is a sophomore mechanical engineering major. He can be reached at rgoff1@umd.edu.

AIR YOUR VIEWS Address your letters or guest columns to the Opinion Desk at opinion.dbk@gmail.com. All letters and guest columns must be signed. Include your full name, year, major and day- and nighttime phone numbers. Please limit letters to 300 words. Please limit guest columns to 600 words. Submission of a letter or guest column constitutes an exclusive, worldwide, transferable license to The Diamondback of the copyright in the material in any media. The Diamondback retains the right to edit submissions for content and length.


MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 | THE DIAMONDBACK

5

Features HOROSCOPESTELLA WILDER

CROSSWORD 44 Fencer’s weapon 46 Wild boar, e.g. 47 Waves of applause 49 Fishing lures

39 “We — not amused” 40 Selfish 42 Raw-fish delicacy

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61 Rock star, say ACROSS 62 Poker stake 1 Central points 63 Surpass 5 Percolate 64 Verne’s skipper 10 Eight bits 65 1939 Lugosi role 14 Golf club 66 Mural undercoat 15 Seaweed 16 Racetrack shape 67 Hang open 17 Dogie 18 Opportunity and DOWN 1 Payroll deduction Spirit (2 wds.) 2 Kind of tradition 20 Beeper 3 Pepsi or RC 22 Crumpet 4 Ultraviolet companion opposite 23 Panorama 5 Flee hastily 24 Anouk — of film 6 Very pleased 26 Ginza money 27 Interpret wrongly 7 Tally 8 Pedro’s house 30 Breakfast nook 9 Any ship 34 Purpose 35 Takes a good look 10 Heifer 11 Actor 36 Web site — Montand 37 Suet cousin 12 With a bite 38 Fray 13 Movie lioness 40 Tall flower 41 Collection of tales 19 Tandoors 21 Bearing 42 Feeling miffed 43 Laugh at in scorn 25 Dowagers 26 Gave forth 45 Eighth planet 27 La Scala site 47 Spruce up 28 Pointless the walls 29 Subway hanger 48 — Nimitz 30 Apply henna 49 Portends 31 Fall planting 50 Turn pink 32 Line of work 53 Frat letter 33 Kind of 54 Huge-cast films statesman 58 Table setting 35 Ms. Arden nicety (2 wds.)

© 2009 UNITED FEATURES SYNDICATE

Previous Day’s Puzzle Solved:

TODAY’S CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY:

OM RO L U Y E B L A H S F E S T

I O N I C A X L E

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N COB R A WA E OR I ON O L A NORMS RA R N S D AWD L I B I OS NE ED CYC L E RE L I O K E E L S MYN A DRA I N S CK S S PRA Y E HOO L EREC T WO E S S R T A S T T A L K O I L C PO S I N EW V E AW EMO T E E D NS RE B AR S E

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You are a sympathetic, empathetic and always generous individual, eager and willing to give another the help he or she needs to feel better, do better, and improve his or her daily life. You must take care, however. This is just an integral part of your personality; you mustn’t confuse it with love.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — A domestic surprise gives you a boost. You’ll see things in a new light, and you’ll be able to renew an old commitment. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You’ll be able to get business done on schedule, but you may have to take a couple of shortcuts. Think ahead, anticipate obstacles.

otherwise, continue on course. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — You must be willing to follow instructions to the letter, until it is recognized that you have what it takes to make new rules. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You will have the opportunity to step in and fight for someone who is unable to fight for himself or herself.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You can expect something of a runin with someone whose aspirations clash with your own. You mustn’t let this conflict shake you up.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Someone will be expecting you to put a little more on the line than usual — and you can do it, with remarkable results.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You may have one or two questions that must be answered before you are able to shift a current project into a higher gear.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — It’s time to move on from what is holding you back. You can make an important decision that reflects your renewed confidence and resolve.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — You are likely to learn that there is such a thing as too much — but fortunately you’ll be able to minimize any hazards. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — You may find yourself at crosspurposes with someone who is in charge. Until you are told

ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You’ll be pondering some of the big issues — and in the end you’ll realize that you are equipped to handle almost anything that comes. Copyright 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

TODAY’S HOROSCOPE SPONSORED BY:

To see what is in store for you tomorrow, find your birthday and read the corresponding paragraph. Let your birthday star be your daily guide.

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Also born on this date are Natasha Richardson, actress; Margaret Rutherford, actress; Martha Graham, dancer and choreographer; Mort Sahl, satirist; Salvador Dali, artist; Irving Berlin, composer and songwriter; Phil Silvers, comedian.

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N Y E T

orn today, you often seem to be low-key to the point of being disinterested or uninvolved, and when it comes to the routine affairs that are so abundant in anyone’s life, you seem to be unenthusiastic and eager for something else to come along to add some spice to your life. When that something does come along, however, you can quickly turn into a new person altogether — joyous, energetic, ambitious, eager to prove yourself and score one victory after another. When you are ruled by this persona, there is very little you cannot accomplish; indeed, your talents are many and you are sure to win the praise of others again and again.

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6

THE DIAMONDBACK | MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

Classified CALL

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADS

RATES

• Larger Type • Sold In 1” Increments • One Column Wide • $33.00 Per Column Inch

35¢ per word $3.50 minimum ALL CAPITAL LETTERS........35¢ extra per word Bold letters..............................70¢ extra per word vmA All ads must be prepaid

OFFICE HOURS

DEADLINES

9:30AM – 4:30PM Monday – Friday 3136 South Campus Dining Hall

The deadline for all ads is 2PM, two business days in advance of publication.

SPECIAL Run the same classified or classified display ad 4 consecutive days and get 5th day FREE!

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301-314-8000 TO PLACE YOUR AD, OR BY EMAIL: ADVERTISING@DBK.UMD.EDU BY FAX: 301-314-8358

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM. Paid survey takers needed in College Park. 100%. Free to join. Click on surveys.

SUMMER WORK

Individual Rooms or Entire Houses Available

HOUSE FOR RENT 5 BR, 1.5 BA. Prime location steps to campus. Near fraternaties and sororities. $3200 a month plus utilities. Call 240-393-8252 or flynn2@comcast.net

Make A Difference! Non-profits are struggling to provide services. Socially responsible individuals are needed to raise funds. Current project is a local children’s hospital. Call David Miller at 301-641-4446 for more information. Compensation is available. Bartending! $250/day potential. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800-965-6520 x 116

CUSTOMER RELATIONS REP. Great Pay, Flexible Hours! Small financial firm near Bethesda Metro. Excellent communication & analytical skills. $13/hour (negotiable higher based on performance). PT or FT. Email resume: bethesdafinancialfirm@gmail.com.

LOOKING FOR A SUMMER JOB MAKING $20-$30/HR.? Inc. 500 company is looking to add 5-6 UM students to its marketing team working part time 3-4 days/week. Part-time hours...full-time pay... $20-$30/hour! Flexible schedule; internships available. Call Jon at 301-595-4050 today!

UNDERGRADS! Introducing “Navy Bachelors Degree Completion Plan.” Financial relief that allows you to focus on your studies without summer training or ROTC involvement. Earn up to $3200 per month, paid directly to you each year during your last 3 years (up to 36 months) – totaling over $100,000 to help cover student loans. Call 1-800-533-1657, or richmondleads@navy.mil. Looking for drivers for Gullivers Moving Company. Please contact Kenneth or Eugene at 301-209-0514 Parttime store clerk/stock person needed at beer and wine store near campus. Flexible hours. Call Jim or Ted: 301-277-9271

William’s American Bistro Is Hiring All Positions Managers, Bartenders, Wait Staff & Cooks Experience preferred. Please apply in person Monday & Thursday 11 am-3 pm for an immediate interview or email resume to hrhe01@gmail.com.

Office Assistant Takoma Park company seeking self-motivated individual to support small sales office. Business experience preferred. Must be multi-task oriented & dependable. Proficiency with Microsoft Office. Excellent telephone skills. Flexible F/T or P/T weekday hours. Resume to: creativefiling@aol.com. Please include hours available. College seniors, recent college grads, grad students needed to work with high school students as Resident Assistants/Tutor Counselors (RA/TCs) during a six-week summer residential program at the University of Maryland. RA/TCs support instructors in classroom, assist with program activities, and supervise students in dorms. Excellent pay plus room & board! Application and program information available at www.precollge.umd.edu. Lifeguards, pool operators, supervisors. Full time/part time. Competitive pay. Free training. Summer and indoor positions. 301-210-4200 extension 114 Earn extra money. Students needed asap. Earn up to $150/day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791

Positions Available Lifeguard/Gate Guard $8-9 per hour. College Park/ Laurel area. Apply online at www.lighthouse-pools.com.

Jo

College Pro Painters Now Hiring Full Time Work Outdoors with Students Earn 3-5K 1-800-32 PAINT www.collegepro.com

8817 Patricia Court 5 bedroom/3 bath, behind Comcast Center 8514 Edmonston Road 4 bedroom/2 bath, completely renovated Contact Lisa for more details: 301-704-1342, terprealestate@comcast.net

10 Steps to Campus

MEDICAL STUDENTS! Introducing the Navy Financial Assistance Program. Financial relief that allows you to focus on becoming the best doctor you can be. A grant of $45,000 paid directly to you each year during a typical four-year residency – plus a monthly stipend of $1,907 for up to 48 months – above and beyond your normal salary, totaling potentially over $270,000 to help cover student loans. Call Mon.-Fri. 1-800-533-1657. ACTIVISM

1-4 BR. Large apartments. Beside South Commons/Business School. Starting at $900. 301-770-5623. Email: gosia@pinstripeproperty.com. 6 Br, 2 Ba house. Very close to campus. Available 6/1. $2450. 202-361-0266 3 ROOMS Available for ‘09-’10 school year and summer ‘09 at TEP Fraternity House (4603 College Ave.), 2 blocks off campus, right by off-campus restaurants, $610 a month including utilities, Internet, cable, and maid service. Groups welcome... Call Eugene at 443-255-8104 or e-mail tepmanagement@gmail.com Houses: 3-4 bedroom, off Route 1. From $1200. 240-210-1503. landwardmd@gmail.com

CAMPAIGN JOBS Change Begins Locally Fight for Healthcare, Clean Elections and Lower Tuition! Full-Time, Part-Time Available. Rapid Advancement. $400-$600 Per Week. Metro Accessible. Call Dana at Progressive Maryland, 301-495-7004 ext. 13.

DOWNTOWN COLLEGE PARK. Single family, 6 bed house for rent. Half rent in June. Asking for $3,995/month and $2,000 security deposit required. 13 month lease beginning July 4h. Call 240-678-8700

FT/PT position avail. in physical therapy office in Chevy Chase near Metro. Opportunity to continue working during school year. New grads welcome. Paid parking/Metro. Fax or email resume to 301-654-7897 or kibbeyandterlept@verizon.net. CAMP COUNSELORS, male and female, needed for great overnight camps in the mountains of PA. Have a fun summer while working with children in the outdoors. Teach/assist with ropes course, media, archery, gymnastics, environmental ed, and much more. Office, Nanny, Bus Driver (CDL requires) positions also available. Apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com

TIME’S RUNNING OUT. ACT NOW. AVAILABLE JUNE 1st . Adelphi Road, very close to campus, easy walking distance. On shuttle & Metro bus route. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths. $2,850/month. $600/room. New ac, large private yard, washer/dryer, lawn-care provided, lots of off-street parking. Early signing bonus. Contact Dr. Kruger 301-408-4801. Room in house. $450/month. Walking distance. Only quiet students apply. Available May 27-August 22. 301-422-2146, 301-728-1338 HOUSE FOR RENT 4 BR, 1 BA Prime location. Near fraternaties and sororities. $2800 a month plus utilities. Call 240-393-8252 or flynn2@comcast.net Summer Sublet- South Campus Commons. Rooms available in female 4 BR apartment for June-July. Rent $550/month and will pay $100 leave transfer fee. Call 301-908-8782 KNOX BOXES. For rent. Fall semester. 301-918-0203. New House for rent on Metzerott Road. Immaculate 6 Bedroom 4.5 bath. Hardwood throughout. Washer/Dryer. Garage. $4,050/month. Email ac331@hotmail.com

ROOMMATES

HOUSES/Apartments- Walking distance. 1-7 bedrooms. 301-335-7345. ecb1985@gmail.com

One roommate for Knox Box basement apartment beginning in June. $575 plus utilities. 202-257-6624

5 BEDROOM HOUSE

SERVICES

Walk to campus. $2995.

Clothing Rummage Sale

443-336-1742 KMGinfo@gmail.com

Physical Therapy Aide

1 bedroom for rent for $675/month + utilities in 4 bedroom house. Located in Silver Spring near New Hampshire Ave. Approximately 10 miles away. Please call 443-812-4643 for more information.

UNIVERSITY VIEW- REDUCED FOR SUMMER. CALL PETE 410-279-1499 HOUSE FOR RENT. Newer home. Great location. Walk to campus. 6 bedroom, 2 full bathrooms, huge kitchen. New appliances. Washer, dryer, central AC, big yard, lots of parking. 240-876-8907. John.

Knox Box Apts. One Block from Campus 2-3 BR from $1200-1900 301-770-5623/24 Email: gosia@pinstripeproperty.com

12-8 pm 4412 Knox Road Next to Santa Fe

SERVICES

FREE FAX SERVICE CLASSIFIEDS Send / Receive Local / Long-Distance (international not available)

Diamondback Business Office 3136 South Campus Dining Hall PHONE: 301-314-8000 Mon.-Fri. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

GOT EXTRA STUFF? THE DIAMONDBACK CLASSIFIEDS

ARE THE PERFECT PLACE TO SELL YOUR EXTRA STUFF.

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THE DIAMONDBACK CLASSIFIEDS Call 301-314-8000 for info.

ADOPTION ADOPTION: Happily married couple seeking infant to share our love and life adventure. Will pay legal/medical expenses. Contact Jim & Debbie collect: 202-567-1871 or DebJim.Family@yahoo.com

Run your classified for 4 consecutive days and receive the 5th day

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CHILD CARE

Quiet Neighborhood

Babysitter Seeking dependable, active, mature nonsmoker to care for my 8 mo. old daughter Tu-Th from 10-3 in Takoma Park. Candidates must have reliable vehicle and excellent references.

Robin, 301-704-6683. After-school care for 12-year-old boy, SIlver Spring, 4 days/week. Fall semester. Must drive, non-smoker, references. 202-289-2394

FOR RENT

SUPER SPECIAL on our last remaining 1BR Apartments

Available for August 2009. Comfy, spacious, and fully furnished with all the amenities you could ask for! Rates as low as $500! Call today! 301-345-3388. WALK TO CAMPUS Nice 5 bedroom houses. Summer and Fall availability, 301-918-0203

HURRY! DON’T MISS OUT!!! Spacious Furnished Studio Apartments. Only a few remaining! Enjoy all our wonderful amenities! Rates starting at $299! 301-345-3388 www.universityclubatcollegepark.com Rooms for rent in student housing, 1 mile to University for SUMMER only or FALL/SPRING. From $475. Call 240-281-3145. babakh84@gmail.com

5+ bedroom, 3 bath house with large fenced backyard. On bus line. $3200/ month + utils. 4429 Underwood St., University Park. Available late August. Email manager@waterstreetmanagement.com for info and appointments. COLLEGE PARK. Houses 4/6 bedrooms, Apartments, 2 bedrooms. 410-544-4438 LARGE MASTER BEDROOM WITH FULL BATH IN 6 BEDROOM HOUSE. SUBLET FOR SUMMER, AVAILABLE FALL ALSO. OFF ADELPHI WITH SHUTTLE. $750 + UTILITIES. JENNIFER 301-367-9948 4 br/2 bath home with 2 living rooms; modern kitchen; dining room; cac; garage and large lot several blocks from Campus Drive on Adelphi Rd. Easy walk or shuttle. $2500 + utilities for up to 5 people. 443-745-5446. E-mail: cvbleab@aol.com

7 Bedroom House Lock In for Fall 6705 Baltimore Ave. 3.5 BA, W/D, internet. 7 people max allowed. Recently renovated. 3.5 blocks to downtown College Park. Available Aug. 1. $2800 ($400/rm. avg.).

Gene, 301-779-7768 House for rent. Cherokee St. 4 bed/2 bath. Steps to Shuttle UM. Available in July. 240-888-2758 Hartwick Towers 2 br/1 bath. $2025/3 people. Available June 1st/12 month lease. 443-745-5446. E-mail: cvbleab@aol.com Commons 3 Summer Housing. Up to 3 rooms. First floor. 240-291-0396

r o f C i n JSA

K C A P K C A N S ! K C A T AT T-SHIRTS WILL BE SOLD FOR $5!

Ritchie Coliseum 6:00-8:00 PM

Tomorrow: Tuesday, May 12th

This event is co-sponsored by: Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Omicron Pi, Delta Chi, Delta Phi Epsilon, GameWear Team Sports, HIPO, Jewish Student Union, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Phi Lambda, Kedma, Koach, Phi Gamma Delta, The Pepsi Bottling Group, Tzedek, Unite for Sight, Phi Sigma Sigma, Zeta Tau Alpha and Lambda Chi Alpha.

JOIN 500 TERPS AND A LIVE DJ AS WE MAKE 5,000 PB&J SANDWICHES AND 3,000 BAGS OF TRAIL MIX TO BENEFIT THE HOMELESS OF WASHINGTON, D.C. Funded in part by your student activities fee.


MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 | THE DIAMONDBACK

7

Diversions

ARTS IN THE AREA: Looking for a chance to unwind before the madness of finals ensues? Well, one safe bet to check out tonight is Shear Madness, a long-running Kennedy Center comedy set in Georgetown that allows the audience to help solve a controversial murder mystery. The performance starts at 8 p.m., and tickets are $42.

arts. music. living. movies. weekend. all the crap you care about RIHANNA DOESN’T LIKE CLOTHING Well, at least that’s a conclusion one could draw after gazing at the pop star’s nude photos that hit the Web this weekend. Where did they come from? Did Chris Brown leak the pictures? Is that a nipple piercing? Most fortunately, though, this development gave the always-classy New York Post an opportunity to run the wonderfully creative headline, “RIHANNA NAKED!” Well done, good sirs. Well done.

KIEFERDOESN’T LIKEDESIGNERS Kiefer Sutherland, the Emmywinning 24 actor who has had his fair share of runins with the law, turned himself in Thursday after breaking fashion designer Jack McCollough’s nose in three places. Channeling his inner Zinedine Zidane, Sutherland delivered the blow via headbutt. Apparently, this is what Jack Bauer does in his spare time when he’s not tackling Christmas trees under the impulse of piracy.

WHO DOESN’T LIKECOURT? Reality TV star (oxymoron alert!) Saaphyri from I Love Money 2 updated her Twitter page Friday with the following entry: “If you haven’t heard that I’m in jail, you know now. ... If you like you can write me.” Distinguished reporter Perez Hilton said she will serve a three-year prison sentence for stealing her uncle’s identity and subsequently failing to appear in court. Which raises the question: Is she more clueless for thieving the identity of someone of the opposite gender or for not bothering to show up before a judge?

INTERVIEW | CARLOS CUARÓN

It’s between the brothers Carlos Cuarón talks about his directorial debut, Rudo y Cursi BY ZACHARY HERRMANN Senior staff writer

Carlos Cuarón is hardly the first director to get by with a little help from his family and friends. Of course, not every writer/director has Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) for a brother and can count Guillermo del Toro (Hellboy II: The Golden Army) and Alejandro González Iñárritu (Babel) as friends. It’d be a little deceiving to count Cuarón as a full-fledged newcomer — he co-wrote the international critical hit Y Tu Mamá También with his brother and has several other scripts to his name. But Rudo y Cursi marks the Mexican screenwriter’s featurelength debut behind the camera, and it is also the first film released by Cha Cha Cha Films, a production company founded by Alfonso Cuarón, del Toro and Iñárritu. With the two leads from Y Tu Mamá También, Gael García Bernal (Blindness) and Diego Luna (Milk), filling out the titular roles and the aforementioned filmmakers all working as producers, the film reads like a who’s who of Mexican cinema. Although Cuarón maintained he would have had the same help from his brother and friends had they not been producers, he was clearly thankful to have them along. “Their creative feedback — well, it’s the best thing you can get,” Cuarón said in an interview with The Diamondback. “Because it’s not feedback from a guy who is only getting the money to finance your movie. It’s guys who know what directing is all about and what creativity is all about.” Already a hit in Mexico, Rudo y Cursi (which translates to “Rude and Corny”) tells the story of two brothers who go from banana pickers to national soccer sensations almost overnight.

Rudo y Cursi marks longtime writer Carlos Cuarón’s feature-length directorial debut.

On paper, the concept reads like a pretty straightforward rags-to-riches sports tale, but as Beto (or Rudo, played by Luna) and Tato (Cursi, Bernal) gain fame and get into trouble, Cuarón deftly peels back a sly social commentary on his native country. Tato, the high-octane scoring act and prima donna, uses soccer as a way to launch his doomed singing career (the Spanish-language version of “I Want You To Want Me” is priceless). Beto, the brooding goalie who neglects his family, falls into gambling and drug trouble. And, in the end, neither man can obtain the power and respect wielded by the local drug lord. It’s not pretty, but as Cuarón attested, it’s “what happens.” “I guess that Mexican society is giving young people a few opportunities which we can call ‘the Mexican dream,’” he said. “One of them is, yeah, you can become a soccer player. Problem is that it is really demanding to be any professional player.

“Then, you can become a singer. That’s sort of easier especially because right now there is this world trend of creating TV idols that then you throw away because they’re waste material. “But the easiest of them all is to get involved with drugs. Either dealing drugs or working for the drug lords. And that is terrible because the whole drug thing has become the most solid institution in Mexico.” Beneath the playful exterior of the film, there’s plenty of heaviness — a balance Cuarón referred to as the “pain of laughter or the laughter of pain” — but never enough to weigh the film down. A lot of the joy comes from watching Bernal and Luna, childhood friends, bounce off one another for the first time since Y Tu Mamá También. Initially, the actors wanted to switch roles, but Cuarón convinced them to go against type — a wise choice. “This complicity between the two

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of them — this is good,” the director said. “It saves you years and years of rehearsals. And that’s nothing you could do anyway — do this in rehearsal because … it’s something that comes natural to them.” Of his extended film family, his principle actors included, Cuarón is the only one to have not yet made the jump to American cinema. He wasn’t ready to talk specifically about any of his current projects, but he plans to develop two future ideas — one in Spanish, one in English — and then see which one pans out. “I’m open for everything,” Cuarón said. “I like to make films, and I would do them here or do them in Spain, Argentina, Japan, Germany, Timbuktu; I don’t care. So, if Hollywood opens the doors for me and there’s an interesting project, yeah, I would do it, definitely.” Rudo y Cursi will open in Washington on May 15. zherrm@gmail.com

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THE DIAMONDBACK | MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

Sports

More on the Terps’ first-round NCAA win Read more about the men’s lacrosse team’s upset victory against No. 7seeded Notre Dame from beat reporter Michael Katz at TerrapinTrail.com.

20 4 NO-SWEAT FIRST STEP Women’s lax breezes past Colgate in first round of NCAA Tourney BY KATE YANCHULIS Staff writer

Catcher Tyler Bennett after his home run yesterday, his fourth home run in two games this weekend. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

Freshman is focus on baseball’s Senior Day Catcher Bennett delivers four home runs in weekend sweep against Wake Forest as one of the team’s most dangerous hitters. In just 96 at-bats, Bennett is third on the team in In Sunday’s series finale against home runs (8) and RBI (31). Early in the season, Bennett said Wake Forest, the attention was supposed to be on the Terrapin base- he struggled to hit off-speed pitches ball team’s seniors, but for the sec- and consequently made sporadic ond straight day freshman catcher appearances in the lineup. He was forced into a starting role behind Tyler Bennett stole the show. Bennett went 2-for-4 with three the plate in the April 17 to 19 Duke series, as fellow catcher RBI, all of which came on Mike Moss injured his a home run as the Terps throwing arm. (27-26, 10-20 ACC) blew Since his insertion in out the visiting Demon the lineup, Bennett has Deacons (21-27, 6-21) 15BASEBALL been on a tear, hitting 4 to complete the Terps’ TERPS . . . . . . . . . . 15 first sweep of an ACC op- Wake Forest . . . . . . . . 4 seven of his eight home runs and driving in 24 ponent on Senior Day runs in just 15 games. since 2002. “The key with Tyler has been With the Terps trailing 4-3 in the sixth inning, Bennett broke the getting him at-bats,” coach Terry game open with a towering home Rupp said. “We always knew he run that hit the light pole in left- could hit the ball. We just needed to center field. But Sunday was just find him a spot. It’s kinda like driving a car around the block after it’s Bennett’s encore performance. In Saturday’s 10-9 win, Bennett cold. You gotta drive it a few times provided the majority of the Terps’ to warm it up.” The Federalsburg, Md., native offense. He tied the program’s single-game records for home runs remains humble despite his and RBI with three and eight, re- recent offensive outburst. He spectively. Even more impressive said he knows he has much to was the fact that all three of Ben- work on, especially putting the nett’s home runs came when the ball in play more and working on his defensive skills. But his Terps were trailing. “This is probably the best I have coach begs to differ. “After this weekend someone played at this level,” Bennett said after Saturday’s win. “I was getting would say there is not much too sliders early on and they were eat- improve on. Don’t touch him, ing me alive, so I came in early, got and that’s what we will do,” some extra swings, and I guess it Rupp said. “With so many players leaving we need guys to step worked out.” Bennett’s weekend was a up, and right now Tyler looks microcosm of the way he has like he can be that guy.” played over the last three weeks — during which he has emerged lemairedbk@gmail.com BY MICHAEL LEMAIRE Staff writer

Terrapin women’s lacrosse attacker Karri Ellen Johnson buried a goal on the first possession of the game, had an assist on the second and then scored twice more, all in the first five minutes of Sunday’s win against Colgate. The Terps never looked back. Behind an overwhelming first-half performance, the No. 2-seeded Terps (20-0) thrashed the Raiders 20-4 in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. “Our team stepped on the field, and from the opening draw, we were really able to control the tempo of the game,” said coach Cathy Reese. “And that was what we set out to do.” Colgate (14-5) came into the game averaging 14.17 goals per game, but the Terps shut them down in the first half. The Terp attack hardly allowed the Raiders a chance to touch the ball in the first 30 minutes of the game. When Colgate did take possession, the Terps often stole it back before the Raiders even had an opportunity to clear the ball or set up their offense. The Terps controlled the first five draws of the game and 14of-16 in the half, dominating despite struggling with draws in the regular season. They outshot their opponents 32-3 and the near-continuous deluge of shots was too much for the Colgate defense to handle in the first half. “We knew they had a lot of offensive threats,” Raider coach Heather Bliss said. “Just defensively in the first half, we weren’t able to stay to our game plan and play our defense to be able to stop them.” Johnson lit up the field to start the game, giving the Terps a 4-0 lead. Then, with 20:19 on the clock, midfielder Caitlyn McFadden cut in front of the goal and flung a shot over the goalie’s right shoulder, starting a stretch of nine Terp goals in just less than eight minutes. After the explosive run, the Terps slowed down and rested some of their starters. But sub-

Caitlyn McFadden (left) and Laura Merrifield celebrate during yesterday’s comfortable NCAA Tournament first-round win against unseeded Colgate. ADAM FRIED/THE DIAMONDBACK

stitutes scored two more goals to go up 15-0, their biggest firsthalf performance of the year. Already holding a huge advantage, the Terps decided to switch from their transitionstyle offense to a more methodical pace in the second half. “We wanted to make sure that in the second half we weren’t just trying to go in and take shots to take shots,” Reese said. “We wanted to make sure that we were able to handle the pressure that this team was going to step out and put on us.” The Terps also played many substitutes after the halftime break, with 27 players earning minutes in the game. By the end, no starters were left on the field.

The slow pace and substitutions resulted in a more evenly played half as the Terps’ focus faltered early, and they turned the ball over 11 times, finally allowing Colgate on the scoreboard. The Terps soon reestablished control. Although they outscored the Raiders just 5-4 in the second half, they only took eight shots to score their five goals. “I don’t think we need to win 30-4, to be completely honest,” said Reese, who Friday was named ACC Coach of the Year. “I think we need to demonstrate possession and be smart when we have the ball. And that’s the bottom line.” The win was still the Terps’ biggest of the season. Ten

players scored, including Johnson, the ACC Rookie of the Year, who led the team with five points and scored three goals. Attackers Sarah Mollison and substitute Jenny Collins had three goals each as well. McFadden, the ACC Player of the Year, had two goals and two assists. The victory sets up a secondround matchup at home against No. 7 seed Syracuse on Saturday. “This is where the season gets fun,” Reese said. “It’s tournament time. Everyone wants a chance to play and everyone’s going out to win. For us, we really stepped on the field today and we played hard from top to bottom.” kyanchulisdbk@gmail.com

Softball knocked out of Terps end Notre Dame’s unbeaten season ACC Tournament early LACROSSE, from Page 1

BY JONAS SHAFFER Staff writer

Friday’s matchup against Virginia Tech was supposed to be the Terrapin softball team’s warm-up session for an anticipated Saturday date with No. 21 Georgia Tech. Beat the Hokies, upset the Yellow Jackets and maybe, just maybe, they would see their name called on softball’s Selection Sunday. But the Terps did not punch their tournament ticket. Nor did they face off against eventual ACC Tournament champion Georgia Tech. Instead, in the game they hoped would mark the beginning of a long postseason, the Terps saw their season come to an early end with a befuddling 3-0 loss to the Hokies. The Terps had taken two of three at Virginia Tech in late April, their lone failing coming after a seventh-inning Hokies rally. More impressively, the Terps had done it without their best hitter, third baseman Breanna Shaw. Friday, Shaw was back. The offense that had racked Hokies pitcher Kenzie Roark in Blacksburg, Va., however, did not show up. Just two weekends ago, the Terps torched Roark for nine hits and five runs in her first loss of the series and seven hits and four runs in her second. In her third time around Friday, she allowed just three hits

in seven innings. “We just didn’t make things happen,” coach Laura Watten said. “We just didn’t take charge of what we needed to take charge of. That’s just the way it went.” The Terps were just one out away from leaving without any trouble in the game’s decisive innings. In the fourth, pitcher Kerry Hickey did away with the Hokies’ No. 2 and No. 3 hitters. Then, left fielder Jessica Everhart smacked a triple into right field. She touched home only a few pitches later when first baseman Beth Walker roped a double into left field. One inning later, Virginia Tech center fielder Jenna Rhodes salvaged a two-out hole with a single. With two runners on and two outs, second baseman Erin Ota punched in a bases-clearing double to push the Hokies’ lead to 3-0. “They made something happen with two outs,” second baseman Devon Williams said. “We were in the same situation, and we struggled to do the same thing.” It probably cost the Terps a shot at the NCAA Tournament. “I know after the game it was a lot of tears,” said Williams, who is a senior. “I would love to play another game. I would love to not have to be done. But I am, and the reality’s going to set in.” shafferdbk@gmail.com

warmups. “I’d say we were ready to play. We thought we were the better team. We thought we’d come in here and win, and we did.” The win came due in large part to what coach Dave Cottle called “the best defensive effort” of the year. The shutdown performance came a little more than two weeks after the unit allowed a season-high 16 goals in an ACC Tournament loss to North Carolina. The Terps slid defensively early on and often, and they held Notre Dame’s No. 10ranked offense 8.53 goals under its season average. At one point, the Irish went 36:31 without a goal, a lapse that lasted from early in the first quarter until late in the third. Goalie Brian Phipps stepped up with nine saves. His effort helped the Terps hold the Irish without a goal in four extraman opportunities. “And I’ll just say, there were two dang good goalies out there,” Cottle said. “I think all the shooters were off balance on both teams.” Irish goalie Scott Rodgers kept Notre Dame within striking distance with 11 saves in the first half. At an imposing 6-foot-4, 254 pounds, Rodgers made many tough saves. He also took his fair share of shots off the chest and thighs — or, as a grinning Rodgers called it after the game, “the life and times of Scott Rodgers.” But the Terps were able to sneak some past the behemoth goalie, while the Irish shot high and wide of Phipps. Just 12 of Notre Dame’s 34 shots were on goal. Finding the net four times in the first half, the Terps grew more assured with every score. “It really helped our confidence for our team,” Groot said. “Any time you score early, the sidelines are excited. We kind of get down

Midfielder Jeremy Sieverts scored the first goal of the game in yesterday’s 7-3 victory, giving the Terps critical early momentum. PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN GAVLICK/ THE OBSERVER

on ourselves if we don’t get a lead early.” Helping to preserve the momentum, the Terps notched the first goal in all four quarters, keeping Notre Dame reeling. “More than even us gaining confidence, they were startled a little bit by us going up so much on them in the beginning,” attackman Will Yeatman said. “They haven’t been in that position too many times this season. I think it was apparent for everyone once we got that momentum going and they were on their heels a little bit, and we took advantage.” With less than one minute remaining, midfielder Eric Boyle — who is sitting out 2009 due to NCAA transfer rules — began the inevitable chant.

“15 and one!” Boyle screamed from the bleachers. “15 and one!” Though by the end, the “one” that mattered most was in the Terps’ new record: 10 in the tournament. After the inconsistencies they endured all spring, the Terps are figuring things out. Now they stand one win away from the Final Four. “We’re a team that — we feel we’ve stubbed our toe a little bit,” Cottle said. “They’re a team who has done nothing wrong. We had to make a lot of changes, and because we had to make a lot of changes, I thought we’re getting better.” mkatzdbk@gmail.com


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