Page 1

ON THE ROAD AGAIN

CROOKED LAUGHS

SPORTS | PAGE 8

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 7

Mike Epps chats about starring in Next Day Air

Terps hope experience away from home pays dividends at Notre Dame

THE DIAMONDBACK FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

99TH YEAR | ISSUE NO. 143

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

Most SGA Univ. considers dropping slogan legislators ‘Fear the Turtle’ likely safe, but will be examined during marketing effort failed to meet goals BY ALLISON STICE Senior staff writer

“Fear the Turtle” may have to fear for its life. University officials are investing more than $1 million over a threeyear period to come up with a fresh image for the university, possibly including a new slogan. They hope the new campaign, which they plan to unveil in the fall, will better

encapsulate the character of the university. While administrators don’t anticipate dropping ‘Fear the Turtle’ completely, students defended the slogan, saying it has become an integral part of the university’s fabric and they would be sad to see it go. “If this were a corporate setting, we would probably call it branding, and some of us do,” said Vice President for University Relations Brodie

Remington. “But there is a possibility for misunderstanding there: Some people may think of branding as slick words and that’s it. We hope to come up with catchy words and phrases that are true to Maryland, not just spin, and whatever we say in the most attractive, appealing way, it has to

Service initiatives go largely uncompleted

Please See SLOGAN, Page 3

BY DERBY COX Staff writer

In an attempt to hold themselves accountable, every year, SGA legislators set down expectations and attempt to meet them by the end of their term. But only about half of the 34 legislators who served this year accomplished their initial goals. The goals legislators set for themselves — called service initiatives — are intended to keep the organization on track, but the yearly loss of legislators and unexpected roadblocks scuttled many of the plans this year. The initiatives, which were reintroduced to the Student Government Association last year, were aimed at improving the SGA’s accountability, said Matt Lyons, the outgoing SGA speaker of the legislature. SGA President Steve Glickman, who served as an outlying commuter legislator this year, did not complete either of his initiatives: the creation of a commuter lounge in the Stamp Student Union and the planting of trees to recognize SGA legislators of the month. The tree-planting initiative stalled, Glickman said, after a legislator he was working with left the organization — one of five to drop out this year. But Lyons

Please See INITIATIVES, Page 3

For senate, a rush to fill committee chair posts Several key leadership positions still open for coming academic year BY TIRZA AUSTIN Senior staff writer

An exodus of University Senate committee chairmen has officials scrambling to locate replacement candidates. Of the senate’s 14 committee chairmen, 10 either left the organization or are no longer eligible to serve. Senate Chair Elise Miller-Hooks has filled three of the open positions thus far but still needs to find more senators willing to play “absolutely critical” leadership roles in the university’s most powerful advisory body. “The chairs set the tone for what the senate agenda is going to be,” said Reka Montfort, the executive secretary and director of the senate. “The quality of their output is going to be the quality of the senate.” The committee chairmen for next year will help lead the senate as it grapples with controversial issues like creating new policies for academic integrity and arbitrary and capricious grading. The

Please See CHAIRS, Page 3

TOMORROW’S WEATHER:

Chronicling the

NEARLY DEPARTED Inspired by mother’s revival, American studies professor examines near-death experiences BY ADELE HAMPTON Staff Writer

W

hen American studies professor Suzanne Gordon was 10 years old, her mother died. Gordon can still remember watching emergency room doctors pronounce her mother dead. And she can still remember her mother coming back to life. Her mother’s experience has stayed with

Gordon throughout her life, prompting her to delve further into the study of near-death experiences. Millions of people in this country have been affected by these occurrences, she said, creating a network of Americans who share a common experience of bridging this world and the afterlife. A near-death experience is “a distinct, subjective experience that people sometimes

Please See EXPERIENCES, Page 2

Suzanne Gordon, a professor who researches near-death experiences, lights a candle in a traditional Maya candle holder. PHOTOS BY MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

Connecting to African roots City officials African Students challenge Association aims to Rt. 193 game promote culture day parking BY DERBY COX AND ADELE HAMPTON Staff writers

An Africa-shaped pendant hangs from Desta Anyiwo’s neck on a gold chain, reflecting the ceiling lights above. He lives his life fastened to two cultures — one of his African parents and one of his American homeland, unapologetic for both. “If you are a person of African descent and you’re not connected to your culture, it’s kind of like you’re an empty shell,” he said. “You can’t go and hate the roots of a tree and love the tree. The roots are really important. I think every group has something significant, something unique to show, and if you’re a person of African descent that isn’t proud of their culture ... you’re just fooling yourself.” The senior African-American studies and mechanical engineering major

Please See AFRICAN, Page 2

T-Storm/80s

INDEX

Under plan, fans would park at Metro stations BY BRADY HOLT Senior staff writer

Desta Anyiwo is the president of the African Students Association, which won the best-student-group award from the SGA earlier this week. JAMES B. HALE/THE DIAMONDBACK

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CLASSIFIED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

DIVERSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . .7 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

The number of parking spaces available near the university on football game days could shrink even further. City and state officials said they will ask the university to end its decadeslong agreement with the State Highway Administration that allows football fans to park on the shoulders of University Boulevard on game days and replace those spaces with satellite ones at the Greenbelt and College

Please See PARKING, Page 3

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changed by these events’ EXPERIENCES, from Page 1 report after a near-death episode. In a near-death episode, a person is either clinically dead, near death or in a situation where death is likely or expected,” according to the International Association for Near-Death Studies Inc. As a researcher in this field, Gordon hopes to educate the general public about the study of neardeath experiences and legitimate the field. “There’s a real need to educate, not just the medical profession, but society,” Gordon said. “And the reason I want to write a book that’s really an education book is because I think it’s important for the aging population to have a source of information where there’s no agenda. In this book, my effort would certainly not be to convince you that there’s life after death.” In Gordon’s new book, An Insider’s Guide to Death and Dying and Its Challenges to Medical Science and Religion, which is in its initial stages, she presents the results of more than 10 years of work and 50 case studies from the Washington area to compare the lives and experiences of people who both knowingly and unconsciously underwent near-death experiences. This is the first study in the field of near-death experiences that uses ethnography to conduct research, Gordon said. One such case study was that of Neville Johnston, who in 1977 was walking out of a Manhattan theater when a man walked by and shot him three times. He was rushed to the hospital and declared dead on arrival. But Johnston, who is alive today, said he saw himself pronounced dead. “As soon as it happened, I remember looking down and thinking ‘There’s a body on the ground in my clothes, in a pool of my blood,’” Johnston said, adding that after meeting what he called a “counselor angel” and spending time in heaven, he awoke alive and lying on a hospital bed, with newfound abilities — Johnston said he can now experience the past and future lives of others and acts as a medium between this world and the next. “I don’t exist in the same timeline as everyone else,” Johnston said. “I chose to recognize my experience. When I was first talking about this, people thought I was crazy, but people have a right to do what they love to do.” Growing up in Southeast Washington, D.C. Gordon switched from one religion to another, exploring an array of cultural perspectives on spirituality. While her religious ambivalence never allowed her to settle on one set belief system, her fascination with spirituality remained. She explained how traditional Western views harp on the impossibility of near-death experiences and try to assign scientific explanations to the unexplained. However, the beliefs of indigenous and Eastern cultures are more open to the idea of life and death operating in a number of different but intertwining dimensions. “I’m almost an anti-religious person in terms of religions as political institutions,” Gordon said. “Most religions are begun because somebody had an experience like a near-death experience and it became a profoundly shifted worldview and then a religion gets built up around it and charges you money and makes a lot of regulations. I went to so many different churches trying to find something that made sense.” Gordon, who has been a professor at this university since 1998, started in the communication department before moving to the anthropology department. She now teaches classes about the sociology of religion. But because of the unique nature of the field of near-death experiences, Gordon said, her study has no place at the university. “Wouldn’t I love to, but, I mean, where?” she asked. But while there are no plans to bring a class on near-death experiences to the university, Gordon’s “mission of spirituality” is

Suzanne Gordon studies connections between the living and the spirit world. MATTHEW CREGER/THE DIAMONDBACK

continuing in other ways. As a founding member of the newly formed American Center for the Integration of Spiritual Transformative Experiences, an organization dedicated to creating a safety net for those who have had near-death experiences by offering them guidance and a sense of security, Gordon hopes to help others grapple with this phenomenon and their need for a spiritual mission. “So many people have trouble because they don’t know what these experiences are,” Gordon said. “The doctors don’t know what they are. It turns people’s lives around, and they don’t have anybody to talk to about it. People are changed by these events.” hamptondbk@gmail.com

Q+A

AFRICAN, from Page 1 lives his life fully involved in both cultures. His dedication to learning about his African roots is a commitment black students at the university are increasingly making, with the help of the African Students Association, which won the Student Government Association’s award for student group of the year last week over nearly 30 other entrants. Eleven members of the SGA Student Group Affairs Committee, which was composed of legislators and students from outside the organization, selected the group for its outreach to the student body and its many Africa-centric events, said former SGA Director of Student Groups Sumia Ahmad, who did not vote on the awards. “[Anyiwo] came in, and he made ASA more visible on campus,” Ahmad said of the outgoing ASA president, noting that the events cosponsored by the group, including an African career fair, a program on sexual violence against women and an African potluck dinner, were all great successes. The group also helped the Nyumburu Cultural Center raise $13,000 to provide 35,000 textbooks for Uganda. “Growing up, I always felt that culture was very important,” Anyiwo said. “It was kind of interesting because I was of Nigerian decent, but I never lived there, and I didn’t speak any Nigerian languages, and I was here in America but wasn’t really directly tied to the land. So it was kind of like I was in between. I wasn’t quite African-American, and I wasn’t quite Nigerian.” Recruiters at the African career fair — held in the Stamp Student Union last month — said it’s important for young African-Americans to learn about their his-

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tory and their African culture in order to cement their own personal identity and noted that events like the African career fair help encourage aid to Africa through community development projects, health and medical outreach and education training. “When you go [to Africa] and you see the pride of people who don’t know from one moment to the next where their next meal is coming from, who don’t know when they will have a drop of water again, and they can still stand up straight and strong, you cannot help but feel proud to be a piece of this race,” said Jacqueline Kakembo, the chairperson for Opera-

tion Crossroads Africa. Anyiwo said because students often have numerous identities and cultural backgrounds, it is easy for African-American students to overlook parts of their identities. He added there needs to be more interaction between cultural student organizations, an action Ahmad said helped the ASA clinch first place in last week’s awards. But Anyiwo said their work is far from over. “We have the [Black Student Union], we have the ASA, and we have the [Caribbean Student Association], and all of which are necessary,” Anyiwo said. “But ... our populations are not as connected as I would like.”

SCENE + HEARD

Jacqueline Kakembo talks to students at the Back 2 Africa career, volunteer and study abroad fair. JAMES B. HALE/THE DIAMONDBACK

coxdbk@gmail.com, hamptondbk@gmail.com


FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

3

Students: Slogan isn’t outdated Senate officials SLOGAN, from Page 1 be true.” The $1 million budget for the marketing effort, which began in the fall, will largely go towards airing the new slogan on television, radio and in print, officials said. University marketing officials has been polling students, alumni and faculty since September in order to determine the essence of the university’s character. “We’re re-evaluating or revisiting our campaign, it’s what you do in marketing every few years and in light of our new strategic plan, it’s important to keep evolving,” Executive Director of Marketing Strategy Deborah Wiltrout said. “We are hoping that over the summer we can do more work and hopefully

have something new by the fall.” Six weeks ago, the university hired a Philadelphia-based marketing firm, Red Tettemer, to work in conjunction with the university’s team. Remington described the company as “creative, outsidethe-box types.” Their contract, which is expected to last six months to a year, can be terminated or extended at any time, and the university will likely pay tens of thousands of dollars for their services, Remington said. The “Fear the Turtle” campaign has been successful since its inception in 2003, featured television and advertising spots across the East Coast. But the university should reconsider their advertising campaigns every two to three years and at the most, every five years, Rem-

ington said. But, as of yet, university officials haven’t given up on the old campaign completely. “As [university] President [Dan] Mote has described Fear the Turtle, it’s memorable, it sticks with you, it’s creative, it’s serious but it also allows for humor,” Remington said. “If you look at the video and print pieces from other universities, 99 times out of a 100 they’re all the same shot of students on the mall, having a class, beautiful buildings. ... How do you find what is special and distinctive about Maryland?” But students, most of whom have known the “Fear the Turtle” slogan for their entire university careers, said the quirky slogan is part of what makes this university unique. “I love the slogan,” sophomore journalism major Samantha Link

confident about filling open seats

said. “It’s endearing. What else is it going to be?” Many students said the slogan is timeless and worried a replacement wouldn’t find such a broad base of appeal. “I like it. It’s got a lot of bravado. It’s manly,” junior accounting and information systems major Eric Faber said. “Change it after I leave. It’s my mascot.” The marketing team emphasized that they’re not ruling out “Fear the Turtle” altogether. “I don’t think ‘Fear the Turtle’ is ever going anywhere — it’s such an integral part of the university,” Wiltrout said. “But how we evolve or integrate that as we move forward, that is a challenge.”

CHAIRS, from Page 1 body is also considering a university-wide standard for giving faculty members raises based on merit and a proposal that could loosen credit requirements to make it easier for seniors to study abroad. Miller-Hooks, who is responsible for appointing the new chairmen, said she was prepared to make sacrifices in her schedule to recruit because of the importance of finding qualified candidates. “I’ll find them,” Miller-Hooks said. “I’ll knock on doors if I have too.” The senate ended up with the abundance of openings because most of the current chairmen were ineligible. Either their three-year senate terms were ending or they had already served the two-year maximum as a committee chairman. “It’s a perfect storm of people who couldn’t renew and couldn’t return as senators in the fall,” said Montfort, who was confident Miller-Hooks would be able to find people to fill the voids. “We have good people in the senate and good new senators,” she added. “We just have to find them.” Of the three openings MillerHooks has filled thus far, all were her first choices, and she was confident she could find strong candidates for the remaining

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SGA approved multi-racial course for fall 2010 INITIATIVES, from Page 1 said it is important to keep focused when people inevitably leave the organization. “You roll with the punches,” he said. “It’s not an end-all [when someone leaves].” Lyons added an incomplete initiative doesn’t always indicate a lack of effort. “It’s not like half the legislature did work and half of them didn’t,” Lyons said. “It was a good year, and there’s definitely room for improvement on it next year.” CELL PHONE RECEPTION Aly Litkowski, a former public health legislator, planned to improve cell phone reception in the

Stamp Student Union but soon learned that university officials were already looking into it. Litkowski said she also realized that the project would be quite expensive — signal amplifying devices could cost thousands of dollars — more money than she could scrape together as a legislator. LANDLORD RATING SYSTEM Former Outlying Commuter Legislator Nyssa Bryant worked on an online landlord-rating system — similar to popular websites often used to rate professors and university courses — as part of her service initiative. But about a week ago, after learning of a new nationwide landlord-rating system, Bryant

said she would publicize that website instead of creating her own — which she said became functional at a basic level just before she learned of the new site. Bryant said that she may begin work with the new website — which is much farther along in the design process than hers was — during the summer, after returning from a study abroad program. MULTI-RACIAL COURSE Former Courtyards Legislator Michael Schwartz, who is now an engineering legislator, created a multi-racial studies course for his service initiative, and the SGA passed a resolution supporting the course last semester. The Multiracial and Biracial

seven positions. “I’m just taking it one committee at a time,” she said. Eric Kasischke, the newly appointed chairman of the faculty affairs committee, said he decided to accept the appointment because of the challenging issues facing his committee next semester. The committee will consider the different ways colleges and departments give merit-based raises. Miller-Hooks and Montfort said they are looking for enthusiastic, organized senators with strong leadership and people skills. “I’m most concerned that they care and want to [lead a committee],” said MillerHooks, who has been receiving recommendations from outgoing committee chairmen and senators. “We want them to put this work at the top of their priorities and commitment.” Because of the huge time commitment to the position, MillerHooks added, the biggest struggle is “finding people at the right time” when they weren’t bogged down by other work. The senate is made up of faculty members, staff and students, but committee chairmen are overwhelmingly faculty members. Students and staff have served as chairmen in the past.

Student Association is developing the course’s curriculum, which could include interracial dating and adoption, Schwartz said. The university administration has approved the course, which Schwartz hopes will be ready for the fall 2010 semester and is set to run through and receive funding from the AsianAmerican studies program. Schwartz is planning to implement an online poll to gauge student interest. If interest in the course is low, the curriculum would be reworked, which could delay the introduction of the course, he noted. coxdbk@gmail.com

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DOTS officials never considered satellite parking an option before

Fans parked on the shoulder of Rt. 193 last semester during football games. BRADY HOLT/THE DIAMONDBACK

istry major, said he agreed with Peña-Melnyk that filling a high-volume road’s shoulders with parked cars is a safety hazard. “My brother’s an ambulance driver, and he uses the shoulder a lot,” Costales said.

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way it is: People are encouraged to bring their cars,” she said. “Then they bring their cars to 193, and the neighborhoods shut down.” Allen said he wouldn’t comment further on a satellite parking idea until he hears from the city and state officials who are pitching it. College Park Mayor Stephen Brayman, who was among the local officials who supported getting parked cars off the shoulders of University Boulevard, said the university should give out warnings this fall asking people not to park there next year. “I’m not saying we need a crackdown immediately, but over a season, we could educate people,” he said.

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Peña-Melnyk and city officials said they hoped to arrange a meeting to discuss the parking issue with university officials, especially those from the Department of Transportation Services, which would be responsible for any satellite parking program. The university had never considered a satellite parking program because it was satisfied with the status quo, DOTS Director David Allen said. “We’ve had enough parking on [Maryland Route] 193 and on campus. If 193 went away, we’d have to reassess,” he said. But Peña-Melnyk argued abundant parking leads to congestion on College Park’s roads after the games finish because everyone tries to leave from the same place at the same time. “That is one of the reasons traffic is the

MON-THU

Park Metro stations. State Del. Joseline Peña-Melnyk (DAnne Arundel and Prince George’s) a former College Park City Council member, asked her former colleagues Tuesday to help her end the current arrangement, which has led to dozens of cars stretching along the sides of University Boulevard from Metzerott to Adelphi roads on Saturdays in the fall. She said parking on the shoulders of the road is dangerous because it encourages people to walk along the road and blocks the lane’s normal emergency-only use. Under her proposed plan, fans who would have used the shoulders of University Boulevard would park at the College Park and Greenbelt Metro stations and

take shuttle buses to the campus. While Peña-Melnyk did not suggest any changes to on-campus parking that would interfere with Lot 1’s traditional tailgating parties, her suggestions could significantly alter the ways hundreds of Terp football fans get to games. Most oncampus students would be unaffected, but some said their families and friends sometimes park on the shoulders of University Boulevard when they come to football games and having to use satellite parking instead would be inconvenient and unpleasant. “It would be really annoying waiting for a bus each time, especially at the end of the game, when everyone’s trying to get on at once,” freshman psychology major Andy Christiana said. But Matt Costales, a freshman chem-

SUN

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THE DIAMONDBACK | FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE DIAMONDBACK

Opinion

KEVIN ROBILLARD EDITOR IN CHIEF

YOUR INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK PHONE: (301) 314-8200 | FAX: (301) 314-8358 3150 SOUTH CAMPUS DINING HALL | COLLEGE PARK, MD., 20742 NEWSDESK .DBK@GMAIL.COM

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Staff Editorial

Guest Column

E-ternatives

Out of the woods

hen people harp on an issue, it’s easy to lose perspective. versity system’s lobbyist vocally opposed it. Thanks to the bill, state law now requires universities to post textbook You start to lose interest in the important things in life: prayer, booze and even porn. And people certainly don’t tire ISBNs and previous edition information online three weeks after faculty of shouting about how expensive textbooks are. But before have submitted their final order. But that measure only saves students you lose perspective on just how high textbook prices have soared, con- money if they take the time to shop around. So instead of trundling over sider this: Last summer, police busted a group of five thieves stealing to the UBC next semester, check out websites like Textbook Revolt, textbooks from the University Book Center. The police estimated the which lets students tap into a nationwide free book exchange. Or go to men had stolen about $100,000 worth of books. Read that number again. Chegg.com, which lets students rent books for a semester, saving them Unfortunately, the university’s not going to find cheap textbooks for up to 80 percent off the list price. But if you’re looking to help the whole student body pay you. The book center just renewed its contract with less for books, take a fresh look at Amazon.com. Next Barnes & Noble, ensuring that it will remain the univeryear, at least six colleges around the country are partsity’s official textbook vendor for at least the next five Student activism is nering up with Amazon.com to bring students the latest years. Administrators have said they expect the deal to e-book reader, the Kindle DX. Arizona State University is lead to cheaper textbooks for students. That’s a pretty needed to get cheaper going to be handing out about 1,000 of the new Kindles to fanciful argument when we’re holding on to the status textbooks. students in its honors program. For the pilot programs, quo. But here’s the good news: If you’re willing to take Amazon.com has agreed to split the costs of supplying the readers 50-50 action, you can get cheaper textbooks for yourself. That’s what happened when students Michael McKay and Sasha with universities. This university has already shown a willingness to Slutsker took it upon themselves to create OurUMD and include a free invest in technology — they gave Banneker-Key scholarship students book exchange. And that’s what happened when students in the Student iPhones, for Pete’s sake. So students should be banging administrators’ Government Association launched a campaign pushing state legislation doors down to jump on the e-textbook bandwagon while the newest, to ensure cheaper textbooks. A modified version of the bill passed, hottest readers are still half-off. If you want a job done right, you gotta do it your own damn self. though some state legislators, the Board of Regents and even the uni-

PHIL HANNAM

W

Our View

Editorial Cartoon: Mike O’Brien

Accessibility: Foray into the federal

C

ollege students comprised a critical part of President Barack Obama’s winning coalition during both the primary and general elections, and the White House has not forgotten. Despite an already ambitious agenda that includes reforming health care and guiding the economy out of recession, Obama has proposed changing the very nature of financial aid. The importance of a college education can hardly be overstated. College graduates earn more than double the salary of high school graduates. Within five years, 90 percent of the fastest growing jobs will require an advanced degree. Those without post-secondary education find themselves much more likely to be unemployed during economic hardship. While Maryland students and families are fortunate to have another year where tuition will not increase, we are still aware of the rising cost of higher education. Some still remember the

MATTHEW

VERGHESE drastic increases in tuition during Gov. Robert Ehrlich's (R) term in office. Most students will pay more for books, room and board and student fees next year. Across the country, the rising cost of college has far outpaced inflation and the growth of family incomes. With an eye toward making the United States the leading nation in terms of college graduation rate by 2020, Obama made college affordability and accessibility a major part of his recovery and reinvestment strategy. The act included $50 billion in higher education funding, increased the availability and size of Pell grants and created a $2,500 tax credit. But for Obama, spending more

on higher education wasn’t enough. The president has drawn a line in the sand with banks and lenders and aims to end the Federal Family Education Loans program. The government provides large subsidies to institutions that offer loans to students. Rather than use banks and lenders as middlemen, President Obama proposes that the government offer loans directly to students. The $94 billion that will be saved, according to the Congressional Budget Office, will go toward expanding Pell grants on a yearly basis, increasing tax credits for families and offering better loans to students. A solution that seems so simple rarely is. Opposition has already been voiced among both Republicans and Democrats who are wary of the government monopolizing the college lending market. Critics see annual increases in Pell grants as an entitlement crisis waiting to happen. Banks and lenders, who came cap-in-hand to ask for assistance when

the credit markets froze, are mobilizing their armies of lobbyists to save their subsidies and preserve their profits. Students cannot be apathetic bystanders in this coming battle over financial aid. We must show our support for the president’s plan and fight to make higher education a right, not a privilege. During the campaign, newlyelected SGA President Steve Glickman spoke about his experience working for the university’s Office of Federal Relations and called for the SGA to look beyond Annapolis when advocating on behalf of students. This is his opportunity to fulfill his campaign promise. The SGA must demonstrate its ability to successfully mobilize students to stand up for fellow students. Will we see action, or will this be another broken promise by another SGA administration? Matthew Verghese is a graduate student in public policy. He can be reached at mmverg@gmail.com.

Education: It’s what you make of it

T

his is my last column. Please hold your applause till the end. Over the course of the year, some of my friends asked me why I bothered to write a column for The Diamondback. I didn’t really have a good answer for them then and I’m not sure I have one now, but here’s an attempt at an explanation. I assume most of The Diamondback’s readers are undergraduates. I know some graduate students, faculty and staff occasionally pick up the paper on their way to lunch or the bathroom, but it seems to me more than 28,000 undergrads are the target audience. So what makes me think that I’ve got something interesting to say to a reading public comprised of people whose lives, priorities and attitudes are likely very different from my own? Some of it comes down to ego. I

JEREMY

SULLIVAN like to talk and argue with people, and I’m usually pretty sure I’m right. It’s hard to say that without sounding like a total jerk, I know. But my certainty that I’ve got a point to make is part of who I am, and a venue like a column in a student newspaper was a tempting challenge. Ultimately, I considered writing the column to be a kind of teaching. There’s an important difference between teaching in a classroom and writing a column. In the classroom, the interaction between me and the stu-

dents is a crucial part of what I consider the teaching and learning process to be. I work from a prepared lecture, but always incorporate student questions and reactions into what I’m doing. In my opinion, classroom teaching is a process of exchange between the teacher and the students. On the other hand, this column was more of a one-way street. Occasionally people would e-mail me or post a comment online about a column I’d written, but my column was read (if at all) by people without their responses or reactions affecting my efforts to make a point. For the most part I’ve written about educational issues because that’s what I’m interested in. My goal was to use a column on The Diamondback’s opinion page to introduce the reading audience of undergraduates to some of the current topics of concern in education

in America today. It seems plausible, if not necessarily likely, that at some point this year my column may have caused you to stop and consider the politics of education, if only for a moment. Education is not static. The nature and functioning of educational institutions in the United States has changed before and will change again. The schools we have are the product of the choices we make. As students, teachers, administrators and voting citizens, our action or inaction contributes to the educational culture in this country. You have the power to help determine what schools and schooling will be. Jeremy Sullivan is a doctoral candidate studying American history. He can be reached at sullivandbk@gmail.com.

POLICY: The signed letters, columns and cartoon represent only the opinions of the authors. The staff editorial represents the opinion of The Diamondback’s editorial board and is the responsibility of the editor in chief.

As the East Campus redevelopment draws near, student environmental advocates and leaders are concerned that the university has neglected its commitment to sustainability in pursuit of quick, cheap growth. In order to begin the development of the East Campus Redevelopment Initiative, the university must relocate current East Campus facilities, including the Shuttle-UM compound, University Police headquarters, the building and landscape services building and the Campus Mail Facility, to another site. In December 2007, Facilities Management’s Facilities Council approved about 10 acres of more than 22 acres of woodlands located behind the greenhouses near ComcastCenter — an area commonly known as the Wooded Hillock — as the relocation site for these facilities. The campus community places significant value on the ecological, educational and symbolic meaning of the Wooded Hillock’s preservation. These sentiments were recognized in the 1991 Facilities Master Plan, which established the goal to “protect and preserve designated natural features, special open spaces, views and vistas” on the campus. The document clearly specifies the Wooded Hillock as land that is to be preserved. The process by which the Wooded Hillock site was chosen is unacceptable. After thoroughly reviewing the documentation provided by Facilities Management as justification for site selection on the East Campus website, it appears the university failed to conduct a transparent, well-informed and thorough analysis of the Wooded Hillock and the 11 other proposed sites. First, the site selection process was not transparent to the university community, and I am concerned about the questionable objectivity of the analysis in association with the private developer, Folger-Pratt. Secondly, I am concerned that the university’s cost-benefit analysis — which dismissed alternative sites — lacks critical details and clarity and does not adequately value the ecological, educational and historical importance of the Wooded Hillock. Thirdly, there are additional circumstances regarding the East Campus redevelopment which have not yet been publicly considered, particularly the cost and regulatory impact of new storm water management laws that will be put into immediate effect in this month by the state, as well as the additional availability of $5 million of state money for use on the project. The university has been progressive in integrating sustainability into the curriculum and lives of our students. The 40-year Climate Action Plan, expected to be completed this fall, also signals our community’s desire to be leaders in ushering a new paradigm of environmental stewardship. Despite the benefits and need for the East Campus redevelopment, I feel strongly that the use of the Wooded Hillock as a relocation site is counter to the campus’ environmental goals, to the desires of our students and staff, and to the global need for the university’s environmental leadership. This today, the administration will be celebrating its inaugural year as an arboretum and botanical garden with a tree planting in honor of three outstanding conservationist alumni. The celebration, occurring from 2 to 4 p.m. on the Anne Arundel Hall garden patio, coincides with National Public Gardens Day. I urge any and all students who support the preservation of green space and smart growth development to join us in celebrating. Students will be demonstrating support for the preservation of the Wooded Hillock and informing all attendees from the campus community about efforts to hold the administration accountable to their environmental sustainability commitments. Phil Hannam is a senior mechanical engineering major. He can be reached at phannam@umd.edu.

AIR YOUR VIEWS Address your letters or guest columns to the Opinion Desk at opinion.dbk@gmail.com. All letters and guest columns must be signed. Include your full name, year, major and day- and nighttime phone numbers. Please limit letters to 300 words. Please limit guest columns to 600 words. Submission of a letter or guest column constitutes an exclusive, worldwide, transferable license to The Diamondback of the copyright in the material in any media. The Diamondback retains the right to edit submissions for content and length.


FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 | THE DIAMONDBACK

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Features HOROSCOPESTELLA WILDER

CROSSWORD 28 Column type 29 Economy class 31 Picture in a picture 32 — blanche 33 Jerked away 36 Drink like Rover

Male parents Not as broad Defers to Chimney dust Sherpa’s sighting 50 Rental agent

© 2009 UNITED FEATURES SYNDICATE

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orn today, you seem to know what is going on and why it is happening, and even though you aren’t always able to have a lasting impact on the world’s affairs, you nevertheless study what makes people do what they do and say what they say so that you can remain up-to-date and current. You are a firm believer in the value of knowledge and know-how, but you also understand that anything outdated is of little or no use to you. You want to be on the cutting edge, leading the pack and exploring what is possible — not today but tomorrow and in the days to follow.

B

You know how to buy and sell almost anything, and the value of money isn’t lost on you. Indeed, your knowledge of what things are worth is one of your greatest strengths, and when things financial get tough, you are often one of the people others turn to for guidance and advice. Also born on this date are Melissa Gilbert, actress; Beth Henley, playwright; Toni Tennille, singer and songwriter; Enrique Iglesias, singer; Peter Benchley, author; Ricky Nelson, singer and actor; Harry S. Truman, U.S. president. To see what is in store for you tomorrow, find your birthday and read the corresponding paragraph. Let your birthday star be your daily guide.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Trust is the major issue. You must have those around you believing not only in your mission but in your leadership as well.

your day correctly, you can put some duties off until tomorrow. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — What seems to be the end of something is likely to be only the beginning. It’s all in how you look at it — and how others see it, too.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You can gain the confidence of someone who, when the time comes, can do you a big favor. Your admiration is sure to grow.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Others are likely to make greater demands on your time and energy than usual, and you must be willing to do what you can to oblige them.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — It’s the little things that matter, and you will discover just how important even the smallest detail can be. Keep your eyes open.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Even the best-laid plans can go awry, so you must be ready with a plan B — especially after dark, when unexpected influences may gain ground.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — There’s no reason to think that the day will not evolve as you expect — and, in the end, in a manner that favors your own agenda.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Your ambition will serve you well, and it will give you a competitive edge. Early on, friends will sense your potential.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) — The difference between what is possible and what is impossible will make all the difference for you, though the lines may be obscured.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Someone will be following you throughout the day — but will it be for good or ill? When the time is right, you will know all you need to know.

Copyright 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

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SATURDAY, MAY 9 TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — One thing leads to another, but you can steer clear of anything that is in any way unsavory or undesirable. Preserve your reputation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You will have more to do as the day winds to a close, but if you plan

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Thousands read The Diamondback Classifieds Call 314-8000 for advertising information


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THE DIAMONDBACK | FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

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EMPLOYMENT

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College Pro Painters Now Hiring Full Time Work Outdoors with Students Earn 3-5K 1-800-32 PAINT www.collegepro.com

Looking for a Summer Job? Now hiring lifeguards, swim instructors, pool managers, customer service reps and more at pools throughout Prince George’s County. Lifeguards start at $9.30/hr. Email PG-Aquatics@pgparks.com or call 301-249-8880.

William’s American Bistro Is Hiring All Positions Managers, Bartenders, Wait Staff & Cooks Experience preferred. Please apply in person Monday & Thursday 11 am-3 pm for an immediate interview or email resume to hrhe01@gmail.com.

LOOKING FOR A SUMMER JOB MAKING $20-$30/HR.? Inc. 500 company is looking to add 5-6 UM students to its marketing team working part time 3-4 days/week. Part-time hours...full-time pay... $20-$30/hour! Flexible schedule; internships available. Call Jon at 301-595-4050 today! Lifeguards, pool operators, supervisors. Full time/part time. Competitive pay. Free training. Summer and indoor positions. 301-210-4200 extension 114

5+ bedroom, 3 bath house with large fenced backyard. On bus line. $3200/ month + utils. 4429 Underwood St., University Park. Available late August. Email manager@waterstreetmanagement.com for info and appointments. HOUSE FOR RENT 4 BR, 1 BA Prime location. Near fraternaties and sororities. $2800 a month plus utilities. Call 240-393-8252 or flynn2@comcast.net

HURRY! DON’T MISS OUT!!! Spacious Furnished Studio Apartments. Only a few remaining! Enjoy all our wonderful amenities! Rates starting at $299! 301-345-3388 www.universityclubatcollegepark.com Room in house. $450/month. Walking distance. Only quiet students apply. Available May 27-August 22. 301-422-2146, 301-728-1338

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Available for August 2009. Comfy, spacious, and fully furnished with all the amenities you could ask for! Rates as low as $500! Call today! 301-345-3388. Houses: 3-4 bedroom, off Route 1. From $1200. 240-210-1503. landwardmd@gmail.com Rooms for rent in student housing, 1 mile to University for SUMMER only or FALL/SPRING. From $475. Call 240-281-3145. babakh84@gmail.com

Earn extra money. Students needed asap. Earn up to $150/day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791

DOWNTOWN COLLEGE PARK. Single family, 6 bed house for rent. Half rent in June. Asking for $3,995/month and $2,000 security deposit required. 13 month lease beginning July 4h. Call 240-678-8700

College seniors, recent college grads, grad students needed to work with high school students as Resident Assistants/Tutor Counselors (RA/TCs) during a six-week summer residential program at the University of Maryland. RA/TCs support instructors in classroom, assist with program activities, and supervise students in dorms. Excellent pay plus room & board! Application and program information available at www.precollge.umd.edu.

TIME’S RUNNING OUT. ACT NOW. AVAILABLE JUNE 1st . Adelphi Road, very close to campus, easy walking distance. On shuttle & Metro bus route. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths. $2,850/month. $600/room. New ac, large private yard, washer/dryer, lawn-care provided, lots of off-street parking. Early signing bonus. Contact Dr. Kruger 301-408-4801.

Physical Therapy Aide FT/PT position avail. in physical therapy office in Chevy Chase near Metro. Opportunity to continue working during school year. New grads welcome. Paid parking/Metro. Fax or email resume to 301-654-7897 or kibbeyandterlept@verizon.net. STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM. Paid survey takers needed in College Park. 100%. Free to join. Click on surveys. Bartending! $250/day potential. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800-965-6520 x 116

Positions Available Lifeguard/Gate Guard $8-9 per hour. College Park/ Laurel area. Apply online at www.lighthouse-pools.com.

Office Assistant Takoma Park company seeking self-motivated individual to support small sales office. Business experience preferred. Must be multi-task oriented & dependable. Proficiency with Microsoft Office. Excellent telephone skills. Flexible F/T or P/T weekday hours. Resume to: creativefiling@aol.com. Please include hours available. CAMP COUNSELORS, male and female, needed for great overnight camps in the mountains of PA. Have a fun summer while working with children in the outdoors. Teach/assist with ropes course, media, archery, gymnastics, environmental ed, and much more. Office, Nanny, Bus Driver (CDL requires) positions also available. Apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com

Fantasy Sports Company is looking for talented and aggressive people to promote product this summer. Earn huge commissions while having fun! Interested parties please contact: bruce@paythefan.com 423-667-5718 www.paythefan.com Looking for drivers for Gullivers Moving Company. Please contact Kenneth or Eugene at 301-209-0514

CUSTOMER RELATIONS REP. Great Pay, Flexible Hours! Small financial firm near Bethesda Metro. Excellent communication & analytical skills. $13/hour (negotiable higher based on performance). PT or FT. Email resume: bethesdafinancialfirm@gmail.com. Parttime store clerk/stock person needed at beer and wine store near campus. Flexible hours. Call Jim or Ted: 301-277-9271

Make A Difference! Non-profits are struggling to provide services. Socially responsible individuals are needed to raise funds. Current project is a local children’s hospital. Call David Miller at 301-641-4446 for more information. Compensation is available.

Individual Rooms or Entire Houses Available 8817 Patricia Court 5 bedroom/3 bath, behind Comcast Center 8514 Edmonston Road 4 bedroom/2 bath, completely renovated Contact Lisa for more details: 301-704-1342, terprealestate@comcast.net

7 Bedroom House Lock In for Fall 6705 Baltimore Ave. 3.5 BA, W/D, internet. 7 people max allowed. Recently renovated. 3.5 blocks to downtown College Park. Available Aug. 1. $2800 ($400/rm. avg.).

Gene, 301-779-7768 1 bedroom for rent for $675/month + utilities in 4 bedroom house. Located in Silver Spring near New Hampshire Ave. Approximately 10 miles away. Please call 443-812-4643 for more information. Summer Sublet- South Campus Commons. Rooms available in female 4 BR apartment for June-July. Rent $550/month and will pay $100 leave transfer fee. Call 301-908-8782 LARGE MASTER BEDROOM WITH FULL BATH IN 6 BEDROOM HOUSE. SUBLET FOR SUMMER, AVAILABLE FALL ALSO. OFF ADELPHI WITH SHUTTLE. $750 + UTILITIES. JENNIFER 301-367-9948

4 br/2 bath home with 2 living rooms; modern kitchen; dining room; cac; garage and large lot several blocks from Campus Drive on Adelphi Rd. Easy walk or shuttle. $2500 + utilities for up to 5 people. 443-745-5446. E-mail: cvbleab@aol.com HOUSE FOR RENT 5 BR, 1.5 BA. Prime location steps to campus. Near fraternaties and sororities. $3200 a month plus utilities. Call 240-393-8252 or flynn2@comcast.net Hartwick Towers 2 br/1 bath. $2025/3 people. Available June 1st/12 month lease. 443-745-5446. E-mail: cvbleab@aol.com

5 BEDROOM HOUSE Walk to campus. $2995.

443-336-1742 KMGinfo@gmail.com WALK TO CAMPUS Nice 5 bedroom houses. Summer and Fall availability, 301-918-0203 HOUSES/Apartments- Walking distance. 1-7 bedrooms. 301-335-7345. ecb1985@gmail.com HOUSE FOR RENT. Newer home. Great location. Walk to campus. 6 bedroom, 2 full bathrooms, huge kitchen. New appliances. Washer, dryer, central AC, big yard, lots of parking. 240-876-8907. John. KNOX BOXES. For rent. Fall semester. 301-918-0203.

Seeking dependable, active, mature nonsmoker to care for my 8 mo. old daughter Tu-Th from 10-3 in Takoma Park. Candidates must have reliable vehicle and excellent references.

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FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 | THE DIAMONDBACK

7

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Diversions

Frank Caliendo

If you’re tired of Frank Caliendo’s shtick, it’s completely understandable — the 35-year-old comedian has been everywhere lately. But the man is still a master impressionist of everyone from John Madden to Jack Nicholson, and his show tomorrow with Bill Engvall at the Patriot Center should be a riot. The event starts at 8 p.m., and tickets are $49.50.

arts. music. living. movies. weekend.

REVIEW | NEXT DAY AIR

Special delivery BY DAN BENAMOR Senior staff writer

The first big surprise of the dawning summer season is Next Day Air, a double-crossing crooks comedy owing much to films like Snatch, Go and Lucky Number Slevin. Unlike all three of those films, Next Day Air almost never plays it completely

straight, opting for a nearly full-on comedy. The results are surprisingly hilarious. A cocaine package is delivered to the wrong address, leading numerous rival factions to war over it. Two bumbling thieves, Brody (Mike Epps, Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins) and Guch (Wood Harris, playing a comic variant on his Avon

Comical crime story surpasses expectations

Barksdale role from The Wire), make up one such faction. In an interview with The Diamondback, Epps talked about his role in the film. “My interest in the movie was that it was a different role from all the comedy roles that I had played in the past,” Epps said. When asked if he killed someone

in the film, Epps added, “I’ma try.” “ This time the movie’s kind of dark, you know what I mean — cocaine, shoot ’em up, bang-bang movie,” Epps said. Even though the film relies on dark humor (sometimes very dark — a reminder to a victim that the torture wasn’t over yet drew

Next Day Air delivers crowd-pleasing fun.

huge laughs at the press screening), Next Day Air plays light. The film exists in an amoral universe, one more concerned with editing tricks and funny dialogue than any sort of morality. In that setting, the film works. While the dialogue isn’t up to the caliber of something like Snatch, Next Day Air does score laughs in every scene. It would be tough to make the same claim for many, if not most, mainstream studio comedies. For example, not knowing who sent the package of cocaine to their address, Brody and Guch celebrate, with Brody reasoning, “God sent that.” But it’s not just the dialogue drawing laughs in newcomer Blair Cobbs’ very funny script. At one point, Brody and Shavoo(Omari Hardwick, Miracle at St. Anna) speak in code about cocaine over the phone under the guise of talking about sexy women, and the film conveniently provides subtitles. Not only are the subtitles funny, but Shavoo’s girl is gradually waking up next to him during the entire conversation. There are other little touches that score chuckles, like the ridiculous name of bad guy Bodega Diablo (Emilio Rivera, Sons of Anarchy). There’s also a man sleeping on Brody and Guch’s couch with a machine gun throughout the film (Malik Barnhardt, Belly 2: Millionaire Boyz Club), despite neither of them knowing who he is. At one point, drug-dealer Shavoo is shocked when the guy on the couch gets up. Bewildered, Shavoo says, “I thought this motherf---er was dead.” Another plus is the pacing, kept at a fever-pitch for the most part, making the slim 90-minute runtime fly by. Also helping the velocity of the film is David Checel’s (Stomp the Yard) stylized editing, a must on a fluffy

COURTESY MOVIEWEB.COM

romp like Next Day Air. Adding a gun-cocking sound effect to a pointed finger, cutting on song beats, putting in freeze frames and slow-motion, Checel’s hand in the editing room keeps the film skipping along. And while the direction of the film’s ending is not a surprise, Cobbs does manage to wring a few unexpected touches out of it. Those moments toward the end of the film are unanticipated but inevitable, a hallmark of good writing. In general, Air tells a familiar story, but with such funny and fastpaced execution it elevates above its common plot. Filling up the numerous plotlines of the story required a large ensemble cast, and Next Day Air acquits itself well, though no one character is revelatory. This may have more to do with the fairly generic character types than the performers. Cisco Reyes (Leverage) as gang henchman Jesus is notable in the cast for the sympathy he manages to engender in an unlikeable role. Alternating between self-doubt and obvious braggadocio, Reyes is funny at both speeds. Mos Def (Cadillac Records) also makes the most of a smaller role as Donald Faison’s (Scrubs) larcenous coworker; his oddball delivery always good to juice up a line until it’s funnier than it was on the page. In films like 16 Blocks and Be Kind, Rewind, Mos Def has proven himself a reliable comedy force. Summit Entertainment is only distributing Next Day Air to 1,000 screens, showing a lack of confidence in a film that, at least at the packed press screening, caused laughs loud enough to obscure the dialogue in most scenes. Don’t be fooled, Next Day Air delivers the goods. dan.benamor@gmail.com

MOVIE: Next Day Air | VERDICT:

1/2

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REVIEW | LIMITS OF CONTROL BY ZACHARY HERRMANN Senior staff writer

In reviewing Jean-Luc Godard’s Band of Outsiders, legendary film critic Pauline Kael described the film’s characters as belonging to a new cinematic tradition. Godard and his protagonists were a part of the first generation to be raised in a world where movies had always existed. With this in mind, Band of Outsiders becomes a reflection of cinema, not life. It’s not anti-realism, but Godard never allows his audience to forget that Band of Outsiders is a film, and more than that, a film informed by a whole tradition of films before it. Jim Jarmusch’s (Broken Flowers) latest effort, The Limits of Control, shows that the pulse of innovative, fiercely independent cinema is still beating in this country. Like Godard before him, Jarmusch writes and shoots in the language of cinema’s subjective reality — the so-called real world doesn’t concern him much these days. From the get-go, the film — something of a trippier companion to Jarmusch’s anti-western, Dead Man — breathes in open

spaces and exhales in ambiguity. There are a lot of ways to read the film and its nameless cast of characters. The underlining principle, though, seems to be testing the limits of narrative film: How far can you bend a genre before it breaks? Pulling (as he did in Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai) from such existential hitman classics as Le Samourai, Jarmusch deconstructs the subgenre down to its barest elements. The Lone Man (a solid Isaach De Bankolé, 24), a Tai chi-practicing professional in sleek suits, sets out on a mission across Spain. He follows a string of eccentric associates — they come off more like muses or philosophers — as they impart knowledge and coded messages delivered in colorful matchboxes. The Limits of Control takes what it likes from the films before it, tosses in the psychedelic drone of musicians like SunnO)))&Boris and comes out as the most ambitious film Jarmusch has mounted in his career. Logic be damned, it’s a trip worth taking. zherrm@gmail.com

MOVIE:Limits of Control | VERDICT: For the full review of Limits of Control, just click the Diversions tab at: WWW.DIAMONDBACKONLINE.COM


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THE DIAMONDBACK | FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

Baseball, softball and more lax on the web

Sports

Softball third baseman Devon Williams and the Terps need an impressive effort at this weekend’s ACC Tournament in Raleigh, N.C., to keep their NCAA Tournament hopes alive. Also check out columnist Adi Joseph’s thoughts on men’s lacrosse’s NCAA first-round game against Notre Dame and a preview of baseball’s final ACC series of the year against Wake Forest at Diamondbackonline.com.

No. 2 Terps proving predictions wrong Team is ahead of schedule in development BY KATE YANCHULIS Staff writer

The Terrapin women’s lacrosse team was not supposed to be this good. The Terps had lost eight starters, including five of their six top scorers and the goalie from last year’s 18-3 squad. They still had talent but lacked experience and began the season ranked No. 7 in the country, the team’s lowest ranking in two and a half years. Now, as the 19-0 Terps prepare to kick off the NCAA Tournament against Colgate (14-4) on Sunday as the No. 2 seed, one spot higher than they were a year ago, midfielder Caitlyn McFadden had one thing to say: “I told you so.” Even as others questioned how far a team with no senior starters could go, those inside the Terp locker room never doubted they would be top competitors in the fight for the national championship. “It doesn’t matter what other people say,” McFadden said. “It’s all about us, all about this team, and I think we had that chemistry and that spark this year.” Underclassmen integrated into the lineup alongside the four returning junior starters. Rather than disrupt the team dynamic, the shift has energized the Terps and provided surprise sources of production. Freshman attacker Karri Ellen Johnson leads the team with 65 goals, while sophomore Sarah Mollison has a team-high 37 assists. “I still feel like a freshman, but I’m not treated like one at all,” Johnson said. And with McFadden and the other returning starters stepping into leadership roles, the Terps have been able to realize their potential ahead of schedule and become favorites to make it to the NCAA finals. “Our team is so young,” coach Cathy Reese said. “People probably didn’t think we would be undefeated this season, but they just play their hearts, out and they come ready to compete.” The Terps have already exceeded expectations. They began the season ranked below ACC rivals Duke and Virginia, the two teams that cost last year’s senior-packed roster all three of its losses. But this year, the Terps bested both of them in the regular season to take the top spot in the

Terps vs. Colgate Where: Field Hockey & Lacrosse Complex When: Sunday, noon Radio: WMUCsports.com

The Terps face unbeaten Notre Dame on Sunday in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

NOW OR NEVER Team looking to use road experience, leave behind up-and-down season BY MICHAEL KATZ Staff writer

Freshman goalie Brittany Dipper is one of many young Terps playing well. ADAM FRIED/THE DIAMONDBACK

ACC. Then, in the conference tournament, they beat the Cavaliers and the Blue Devils again to win the program’s first ACC title since 2003. And the Terps achieved a perfect regular season after they fell a game short last year. “I think everyone on our team has stepped it up to a new level,” McFadden said. “I think our teamwork has just allowed everyone to succeed.” The Terps will try to continue their unexpected dominance through the postseason, starting with Sunday’s game against the unranked Raiders, who have yet to beat a top20 team. Last year, the Terps lost in the second round, but this year, the team believes it can continue to surpass last season’s results. kyanchulisdbk@gmail.com

With just five games in College Park this season, the road has become home for the Terrapin men’s lacrosse team. That may have been a nuisance during the year, but it could be a plus in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, when the Terps travel to South Bend, Ind., to face Notre Dame on Sunday. The Terps failed to earn a first-round home game for the first time since 2002, when they missed the tournament altogether. “This year we really haven’t had a home,” midfielder Jeff Reynolds said. “It is what it is. These guys are used to traveling, so I think traveling to South Bend is really no big deal. We’ve done it before.” Players agreed this year’s team is more road-tested than in previous seasons. But the road results have been mixed so far. The Terps played some tough games against good teams while away from home this year, losing in seven overtimes at Virginia and by one goal in a virtual road game against Johns Hopkins at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. But they’ve also had their fair share of clunkers on opponents’ turf. A 10-4 loss to Navy was a lowlight this season, and in the ACC Tournament, the Terps dropped a 16-10 decision to North Car-

Terps vs. Notre Dame Where: South Bend, Ind. When: Sunday, noon TV: ESPNU olina in Chapel Hill, N.C. “It’s been a struggle to get us to start to play as well as we can, and I’m starting to see it now a little bit,” said coach Dave Cottle, who was pleased with the Terps’ performance in a win against Yale last weekend. After every loss, the Terps have talked about flushing the memory of the previous game and moving forward. In the hallway at the varsity team house yesterday, midfielder Bryn Holmes talked about the tournament as “a new season.” If the Terps are going to take advantage of this fresh chance, they can’t risk showing up Sunday unfocused or lackadaisical. For this reason, Cottle is optimistic about the benefits of being on the road. “I think you can control the environ-

ment more on the road,” Cottle said. “You control what they eat, control what they do, control the meetings. You probably get more preparation on the road ’cause you have time at night for films.” With the distractions of everyday life on the campus and final exams approaching, it can be good to get away. “I like being in the hotel because the whole team is there,” attackman Ryan Young said. “Everybody’s around each other. It helps keep your mind off things a little bit, and then, when the time comes, everybody’s focused at the same time.” The bottom line is that the Terps seem to care little where this game is played. As Cottle said, the second round is away from home regardless. After the Terps’ underwhelming regular season, the players seemed upbeat about their inclusion in the tournament, and they are eager to play. All that matters is how they play from here on out, in what amounts to just another road game for this welltraveled bunch. “We come here to win lacrosse games if it’s home or away, “ Reynolds said. “Those external problems cannot be a factor and should not be a factor, or else we can’t be successful.” mkatzdbk@gmail.com

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