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S T OPPING THE SLIDE JAZZ BANDS’ BIG FINISH Terps break rough patch with easy win over local rivals

Three different university jazz bands close out the semester with a free performance

SPORTS | PAGE 12

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 8

THE DIAMONDBACK WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

98TH YEAR | ISSUE NO. 137

Men’s basketball scores low APR Team avoids penalties but poor NCAA report grades worst in ACC BY JEFF AMOROS Senior staff writer

The Terrapin men’s basketball team eeked out an Academic Progress Rate just above the minimum permissible score, but remained vulnerable to scholarship cuts if players leave the program while academically ineligible, according to a NCAA report released yesterday. The Terps scored 906 on a 1000-

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

Newly sworn-in Student Government Association President Jonathan Sachs addresses a small crowd on McKeldin Mall as former SGA President Andrew Friedson and Vice President for Student Affairs Linda Clement look on.

Sachs sworn into office Staff writer

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

Former SGA President Andrew Friedson (right) hugs newly sworn-in SGA President Jonathan Sachs shortly after his inauguration on McKeldin Mall yesterday evening.

Wiseman named dean of education Promotion comes after a year of guiding college

A crowd of more than 70 people gathered on the McKeldin Mall yesterday afternoon to watch Jonathan Sachs be officially sworn in as SGA president. Sachs took the stage and charismatically promised to help bolster student involvement and unity. He did not explicitly outline policies to implement next year in the same way that former Student Government Association President Andrew Friedson did last year, but Sachs made sure to emphasize the importance of hearing the voices of the students as individuals rather than a collective body. “We will focus on reaching out to the individual to attempt to personalize each student’s experience by actively seeking their input and participation in the SGA and life in this community,” he said. Sachs stressed that, to increase student involvement, the SGA will need to take a more proactive approach. “We must move from an open-door policy to a doorto-door policy, from an office hours mentality to time in dorms to address the day-to-day issues that we face,” he said. “As student body president, it is my job to know what’s best for my fellow Terps. But making these judgment calls can only be achieved by seeking

Please See SGA, Page 3

Please See APR, Page 9

New dining option may come to North Campus Venue would cater to proposed dorm

SGA pres. aims to bolster student engagement BY BEN WORSLEY

point scale, just a few points above the baseline minimum permissible score of 900 and two points lower than the team’s score last season. Teams falling below 900 face escalating penalties with each consecutive year below that score, including sanctions ranging from warning letters to practice and scholarship reductions to postseason bans.

BY CARRIE WELLS Staff writer

Details on the reopening of the long shuttered dining hall on North Campus emerged last night when a Dining Services official presented new plans for the space to RHA members, who will individually mull over the options before making recommendations to the department.

Northwoods, which previously served as Denton Dining Hall before closing down in 2003 due to cuts in Dining Services’ budget, will likely open in the fall of 2010 to accommodate students living in a proposed 650-bed dorm in the Denton community. Plans for the dining venue could still “go back to the drawing board,”

Please See NORTHWOODS, Page 7

FILE PHOTO–THE DIAMONDBACK

Northwoods could reopen in fall 2010 if a new dorm is built within the Denton Community on North Campus.

2018

Univ. Senate shows broad support for strategic plan BY KEVIN ROBILLARD Senior staff writer

The university’s strategic plan overwhelmingly passed in the University Senate yesterday after months of debate. The plan contains ambitious new initiatives to improve graduate studies, international programs and the community sur-

Vote rejects amendments, maintains provost’s power and CORE redesign rounding the university, as well as a new proposal to overhaul the university’s CORE curriculum. The overwhelming margin of the vote — 68 senators were in

favor of the plan and only five voted against it — gives Provost Nariman Farvardin and university President Dan Mote the green light to move forward with

the plan, which aims to make the university “world-class” and a top-10 public research university. “I’m ecstatic,” Farvardin said after the vote. “The most important thing is the university came together in the end.” Farvardin also chaired the strategic planning committee.

Please See PLAN, Page 7

BY JESSIE LANE For The Diamondback

Donna Wiseman, who served as interim dean of the College of Education this school year, was appointed dean of the school Tuesday. Wiseman was the college’s second interim dean in two years and worked to overcome her temporary status while Donna Wiseman guiding the college through the long-term strategic planning process. Wiseman held a number of administrative positions at Northern Illinois University and

City Council bemoans lack of involvement with plan BY BRADY HOLT Staff writer

Though the University Senate cast its final vote on the strategic plan yesterday afternoon, the College Park City Council didn’t begin discussing its stance on the plan until several hours later, poking holes in parts of the document weeks after it was initially

set to discuss the plan. The council expressed concerns about some language and content in the “Surrounding Community” section of the 10year plan, and intends to send a letter to university President Dan Mote that lists its thoughts. The council and City Planning Director Terry Schum took issue with many strategies they said

were vague in the plan, such as suggestions about police services and environmentally friendly building projects. The city also opposed a segment of the strategic plan calling for a private road to connect the campus to the Capital Beltway that would let visitors bypass Route 1. City officials said they opposed the connector road because it

wastes funds that could be used for Route 1 renovations. The council had been scheduled to critique the strategic plan earlier — the first draft of the plan was released in early March — but it delayed discussion in favor of other city business, Schum said.

Please See CITY, Page 7

Please See DEAN, Page 3

Tomorrow’s Weather:

T-Storms/70s Index:

News . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Classified . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Diversions . . . . . . . . .8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . .12

www.diamondbackonline.com


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THE DIAMONDBACK | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

Page 2

TODAY

Outdoor Big Band Finale

@M

ARYLAND

MONDAY | NEWSMAKERS

Open-air spring celebration, 5:30 p.m., The Main Courtyard, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

TUESDAY | OVERHEARD

Presentation: Benefits of Integration Discussion on adult literacy, 11 a.m., Health and Human Performance 1312

WEDNESDAY | Q + A

THURSDAY | BEST of the BLOGS

Discussion on Leadership Director of the Center for Leadership and Organizational Change speaks, 12 p.m., Taliaferro Hall 1126 FRIDAY | SCENE + HEARD

Q+A

BRIEFS

New invasive algae found in Baltimore County KINGSVILLE — State wildlife officials say a new invasive algae species has been identified in the state. The algae is called didymo, and it can choke out native bottom-dwellers. It was found by anglers at Gunpowder Falls in Baltimore County. The algae grows in mats and has a white, yellow or brown appearance. For an idea of what it looks like, consider the common name for it — “rock snot.” Didymo is widely thought to be human borne and spread when people don’t clean boats or other supplies such as fishing boots before entering new waterways. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is asking boaters to help stop didymo’s spread by cleaning any boats or supplies that were near Gunpowder Falls before putting them in other waterways.

55 students released from hospital after school buses crash NEWARK, Del. — A Christina School District spokeswoman says the 55 students who were aboard two school buses that collided Tuesday morning in Newark are doing fine. School district spokeswoman Wendy Lapham says the Gauger-Cobbs Middle School students were evaluated at Christiana Hospital and released to their parents. None were seriously injured, and only three or four students complained of minor injuries. State police say the driver of one of the buses, 59-year-old Larry Gould of Bear, has been cited for inattentive driving.

— Compiled from wire reports

CORRECTIONS Due to an editing error, yesterday’s Diversions story, “All that and a cup of noodles,” incorrectly stated the release year of Elvis Costello’s album King of America. The album was released in 1986. Yesterday’s article entitled “Strategic plan to raise stipends” incorrectly stated when pro-graduate education changes were put into the strategic plan. The measures were included in the initial draft.

The man on the street The Diamondback discusses on-campus housing with a student denied a spot BY JOEL COHEN Staff writer

Thursday marked the end of the university’s housing assignment meetings, and for many, it also marked the beginning of a late-semester search for offcampus housing. With hundreds of sophomores and juniors denied on-campus housing for the coming year, more students than ever are being forced off the campus and into a housing market with limited supply. The Diamondback spoke with sophomore geology major Steve Fisher, who attended several housing meetings only to be denied a spot on the campus, to learn about his attempts to secure on-campus housing. JAMES B. HALE–THE DIAMONDBACK

The Diamondback: What were you told about the housing situation on this campus before you decided to come here? Steve Fisher: I didn’t think about it that much, because I never thought it would be a major problem. I know now that Maryland has a major housing shortage. I wasn’t aware of that before I came here. I knew as a freshman that I would have housing. My plan was to be on campus for my first three years, and then move off campus with my friends senior year. This plan has been moved up a year. DBK:What has been your housing experience so far at this university? Fisher: It’s been good. I’ve lived with the same roommate that I got randomly assigned freshman year. My friends have lived close to me, so I have not had a problem seeing them when I want to. DBK: Can you talk a little bit about the housing process in your first couple of years here? Fisher: Freshman year was easy; I wanted Anne Arundel (Hall), which I knew was really nice. Reapplying for the same dorm was easy — just check one box to say you want to stay in the same building

Sophomore geology major Steve Fisher sits in his dorm room in Anne Arundel Hall. He and his friends had planned to live in a quad next year, but their plans were derailed after the people in front of them in line received the last quad. [and] same room. Going into next year, junior year, got much more complicated. DBK:What has been your experience in trying to secure housing for next year? Fisher: [My friends and I] get into the [housing assignment] meeting, and they have this big projection board. We are watching the board. We are seeing all the numbers scroll through, and we saw Buildings 5 and 6 had doubles and quads left. The people in front of us jokingly said that they would get the last quad. Turns out, they did. My friend with the better number gets called and he gets inside the rope. He told the guy which room he wanted. [The guy] looks at his sheet, and says, “Sorry, that one’s already been taken. The computer’s been down for 30 to 45 minutes, and it’s not updating anymore.” How could you mess up that badly? You’ve had months to prepare for this. ... [Students] are making plans based on the information available, and you’re not telling them it’s not accurate? We were amazed that this was the best

THE 2008 TERRAPIN YEARBOOK IS HERE AND ON SALE NOW!!! Where: Diamondback Business Office 3136 South Campus Dining Hall Phone: 301-314-8000 When: 10am-4pm, Monday-Friday Cost: $62 FIRST-COME, FIRST-SERVED! ONLY 60 AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC SALE! THE 2008 TERRAPIN IS A 320-PAGE ALL-COLOR YEARBOOK! IF YOU HAVE ALREADY PURCHASED A BOOK PLEASE BRING YOUR RECEIPT AND PHOTO ID.

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process they could come up with. My friend called his parents, and they said that he had to be on campus. A friend joined him in a double. The rest of us ended up getting an apartment at Camden (on Route 1 near IKEA). DBK: Who do you blame for what happened to you and for the overall housing situation? Fisher: Whoever is ever making longterm plans for the university in terms of admissions and housing. I think, in some of the articles I read, the admissions part has been ignored. The reason that there’s such a housing shortage is that there are too many kids on campus. Why? Because you’re letting too many kids into the university. The quality of some on-campus students is not up to the level of a university that considers itself one of the top research universities in the country. Not including the admissions process in the housing plans is the biggest mistake. DBK: How much do you expect to pay for housing next year?

Fisher: We’re each paying about $580 in total a month. DBK: What’s the solution? Fisher: Juniors should be allowed to have on-campus housing. Kicking seniors off is acceptable. Immediate solution: When they had that meeting months ago where they decided what seniors would be allowed to do, they decided that juniors would be allowed to renew their leases [at Commons/Courtyards]. I think they went the wrong way on that decision. They should have not allowed juniors to renew their leases. That’s what they should have done. In terms of what they can do, it’s too late to do anything at this point. The one thing they could is to try to have more off-campus housing meetings and get more information out there. But it’s really too late for that. If you don’t already have off-campus housing, it’s going to be really hard to find anything available at this point. cohendbk@gmail.com


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

3

‘Maryland, you will be heard!’ Sachs says

IMAGINARY FRIENDS

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

Shortly after his inauguration speech on McKeldin Mall, Student Government Association President Jonathan Sachs signs the SGA Pledge with former SGA President Andrew Friedson. SGA, from Page 1

JACLYN BOROWSKI–THE DIAMONDBACK

Armida and Her Imaginary Band (of cardboard figures) sang and read poetry during TerPoets in the basement of Dorchester Hall last night. Armida Lowe, a junior philosophy major, accompanied her band's debut with a biography of each of its members, complete with stories that entertained the audience.

Education school one of highest ranked in nation DEAN, from Page 1 Texas A&M University before joining the university in 2001 as the associate dean for academic programs. A former public school teacher, Wiseman holds a Ph.D. in reading from the

“As a future teacher, it is important to me that my dean knows and truly understands how to educate.” –Rachael Weinstein JUNIOR EDUCATION MAJOR

University of MissouriColumbia and an M.S.E. in reading from Arkansas State University. Wiseman is also active in national teaching organizations, chairing committees for the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and the American Educational Research Association, according to a university press release. “Dean Wiseman brings to the table a history and record of a scholar and educator, and both of those are essential to the College of Education,” Associate Dean David Cooper said. “She is deeply immersed and committed to collaborative partnerships on a state and national level, which adds strength and a sense of accomplishment to the college.”

Wiseman specializes in literacy development and instruction, forging partnerships between secondary schools and universities, and professional development. Before becoming a college administrator, Wiseman taught classes in literacy development, teaching methods and children’s literature, among other subjects, the press release read. “As a future teacher, it is important to me that my dean knows and truly understands how to educate,” junior education major Rachael Weinstein said. “We need strong leadership in the College of Education to show us how to be strong leaders, because that’s what our profession is all about: taking the children of today and making them the leaders of tomorrow.”

The education school is one of the highest ranking programs in the nation, setting the standards for K-16 education. Wiseman said she plans to continue the good work of the college and expand on it. “As dean, I will work to build synergy around initiatives taking place within the college, focusing primarily on signature themes relating to diversity, globalization, policy and technology,” Wiseman said. “The work of teaching, learning and understanding human development is challenging and in constant flux, but I know the college will maintain and expand its considerable influence in the local, state, national and international arenas.” newsdesk@dbk.umd.edu

out and listening to the diverse student opinions and expertise that exist at Maryland.” Sachs stressed the importance of unity within the student body, citing events like Maryland Day and the Crab Fest as popular ways to bring students together. He also said he believes in the unique character of all students. “It’s important to embrace our individualism rather than fight it,” Sachs said. He later added, “We must strive to recognize diversity” for each and every student. Sachs admitted during his speech that the position of SGA president comes with the great responsibility of tackling many daunting tasks. But he made sure to acknowledge the duties that lay before him may be difficult, but will by no means be impossible. “Difficulty indicates the strength of reaching a major accomplishment,” Sachs said, “and is a reason to persevere through it.” Friedson echoed Sachs’ sentiments after the event, saying, “It’s a difficult position, but no task is insurmountable.” During the inauguration ceremony, 30 legislators and three executives were also sworn in by Vice President of Student Affairs Linda Clement. New SGA Vice President of Academic Affairs Sterling Grimes also gave out awards for the 2007 year’s best committee chair, executive, captain member and male and female legislator. Yesterday’s inauguration

marked the official end of Friedson’s term. After the event, SGA faculty advisor Craig Slack commended Friedson’s work over the past year, calling him “the students’ student body president.” “He was very impassioned about using his voice,” said Slack, who has served as advisor for 11 years. Slack added that Friedson’s ideas “were deeply critical. It wasn’t just surface.” Friedson, who admitted he hasn’t had much time to reflect on his work as SGA president, said he thought his group of legislators and executives was “incredibly successful” this year. “We were very visible to the community,” he added. Friedson and Slack agreed that only time will tell how Sachs will perform as SGA president, but both were optimistic. “He has a really good sense of how to reach out to people,” Slack said. “He knows how to reach out to students as individuals, not as a collective mass.” “He’s very charismatic,” Friedson added. “He has clearly shown his ability to reach people today.” Sachs addressed his outreach efforts many times throughout the speech, driving home his dedication to finding out what is on students’ minds and making sure their concerns are addressed. “I will strive to keep the promise I made to my fellow students as I ran for this office. Maryland, you will be heard!” worsleydbk@gmail.com


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THE DIAMONDBACK | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

Opinion I

n my four years at the university, I have come across countless student leaders. Some of them are praised frequently in The Diamondback and some by their peers, while a select few go about their important pursuits without the glamour of the limelight. There is one such leader who, despite impressive service, has not only gone without praise but has also not been given her due. For those of you who have worked in or with the Student Government Association, you likely already know about whom I am speaking. Daozhong Jin, with her unflappable grace and radiant intellect, is a person whom we should all strive to emulate. She works with a passion and intensity that few possess or even understand, yet she naturally shies away from praise and recognition. As Vice President of Financial Affairs for the SGA, Daozhong allocated approximately $3 million in Student Activities Fees, coordinated countless workshops to help group leaders write their budgets and devoted her time to answering questions groups had about their finances. She went beyond the call of duty and spent some of her weekend nights attending numerous student organization events to build relationships with group leaders and an understanding of what they do. For two years, Daozhong served as not only a chief financial officer for the SGA but also as the go-to member on all things that needed to get done. This go-to personality transitioned perfectly when I appointed her as my chief of staff. Daozhong has almost single-handedly kept the organization together, being more than just my closest confidant and advisor. She oversaw my entire cabinet and the projects and work they were doing, coordinating multiple large-scale events such as the SGA Welcome Back Block Party, the Crab Fest and the Zero-Waste Spring Barbecue. Over the past year, she has become the person all members of the SGA have come to rely on to help them represent their constituencies and fulfill their service initiatives. She has done all this and never once asked to be accredited for it. In fact, last Wednesday, Daozhong — despite having the flu — stayed through our entire nine-and-a-half hour budget meeting to assist me as we found a way to ensure the SGA could fulfill its obligations next year without hurting student organizations by cutting from their allocations. It is perhaps most impressive that I was not the least bit surprised. While my name and face are what you will find in the pages of The Diamondback, other area periodicals and on the local news, none of the work the SGA or I have done would have been possible if not for Daozhong. Her perspective, her grasp on issues and her tireless devotion to improving the SGA have been tremendously felt. Never have I encountered someone so capable, yet so unassuming. Her intelligence and poise are unmatched. I know I speak for all those who have worked with Daozhong when I say how blessed I am to have worked so closely with her. I could go on and on about Daozhong’s professionalism and how she makes those around her better. But beyond being the glue that has held the SGA together and a trusted advisor and steadfast motivator who has driven me to better advocate for students, I am most grateful to Daozhong for being a true friend. Daozhong is patient and loyal, and has an uncanny ability to maintain composure in the most turbulent of times. She always puts her friends first and is always there when they need her. Because she does not hear it nearly as much as she should, I wanted to take this opportunity to thank Daozhong Jin for all she has meant to me, to the SGA and to the student body. We are all better because of her.

Andrew Friedson is the former president of the SGA. He can be reached at sgapresident@umd.edu.

STEVEN OVERLY

YOUR INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK PHONE: (301) 314-8200 | FAX: (301) 314-8358

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Andrew Friedson

An unsung hero in the SGA

THE DIAMONDBACK

EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR

JOHN SILBERHOLZ DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

GOUTHAM GANESAN

BENJAMIN JOHNSON

OPINION EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Staff Editorial “In all labour there is profit: but the talk of the lips tendeth only to penury.” ~ Proverbs 14:23

A life less bitter

W

hen involved in the daily routine of under- duct independent research. Their living conditions are graduate life at the university, it is often nothing to be envied either; the minimum stipend for a easy to forget the university is home to a le- nine-and-a-half-month assistantship is $14,772. This level gion of more than 10,000 graduate stu- of support makes living in College Park quite a challenge. It comes as a relief that the strategic plan placed such dents. These men and women wear many hats — as researchers, teachers, graders and, of course, as heavy emphasis on graduate education. The general goal is to make the university more competistudents. They also tend to call the unitive in recruitment of graduate stuversity home for a longer period of time dents. Among the ways in which the than the typical undergraduate. The graduate education plan aims to achieve this is to raise the Smaller institutions often tout their ability to have professors carry a large provisions in the strategic stipends offered, provide more housing options dedicated to graduate students portion of the teaching load, but at a plan are all welcome and make graduate admissions more school as large at this one, this is simply impossible. That legion of graduate stu- changes that will improve selective. The plan exhorts the graduate school to “require that Ph.D. and dents inevitably bears a large part of the the graduate school. professional graduate programs be responsibility for articulating concepts to students. They serve as indispensable intermediaries right-sized, adjusting enrollment to assure that programs between often inaccessible professors and undergradu- are of high quality, [and] supported by sufficient reates. Anyone who has taken a large-lecture course knows sources.” The impact to be most directly felt will be the proposed stipend increase to at least $18,000 for a ninethis well. Chances are many students have had an experience with and-a-half-month period. With all of the other problem areas of the strategic plan, it a graduate student teaching assistant who seemed unmotivated or bitter with his or her experience at the university. is encouraging to see an aspect of it that is well considered, While many would argue getting paid to study is a privilege, timely and beneficial to all parties involved. Better supportgraduate school can certainly be a trying time. Doctorate ed and distributed graduate students would have a direct and masters candidates are often caught in limbo between effect on the undergraduate experience at the university, as dependence on their advisers and the responsibility to con- well as the quality of research conducted here.

Our View

Editorial Cartoon: Max Greenberg

Letters to the Editor Better luck next year It is no surprise that the Commencement Speaker Selection Committee has failed seniors yet another year at the university. I am sure Carl Bernstein is a very nice man and after reading about him, I saw that he has published a few books and helped expose the Watergate scandal. But he is nowhere near the quality of the commencement speakers that the university used to be able to get and that other universities continue to receive year after year. We had Bill Cosby in 1992, Hillary Clinton in 1996 and Sergey Brin in 2003. Imagine the laughter that Cosby created throughout his speech or picture the inspirational speech Brin gave when he talked about going from a Maryland student to founding one of the largest corporations in the world. The one thing that these seniors might remember 30 or 40 years later is how great that speech was by their commencement speaker, but unfortunately I have a feeling the class of 2008 will not remember anything about Bernstein’s speech. The school’s job should be to get a commencement speaker who is of high stature and who can give the students a memorable speech as they enter the real world. One graduation ceremony I will never forget is Princeton University’s 2003 graduation. They had famed comedian Jerry Seinfeld as their commencement speaker. Seinfeld never went to Princeton, nor was he affiliated with the university in any way, but the Princeton Commencement Speaker Selection Committee knew how much the students would enjoy his speech. He spent the entire speech talking about the most random things like he does in his show, going from how great of a school Princeton is to how can we describe a cereal by giving it a name as big as “Life” and how pretty soon we are going to have a new cereal called “god.” The senior class and the parents were laughing the entire time, and I can assure all of you that the senior class at Princeton of 2003 remembers that speech very well.

No one can dispute that Bernstein made a contribution to our society, but I have a feeling many students at this university do not even know who he is. However, this day is about the university senior class of 2008 and the question is, “Is this the person you want to send you off to the real world on your final day of college and who you will remember for the rest of your life?” I think not. KUNAL MAHAJAN SENIOR FINANCE

Opening bands deserved better coverage In the May 5 edition of The Diamondback, the cover featured the story “Worth the dollar bills.” I eagerly read the article, having attended Art Attack and been very impressed by some of the bands, and I wanted to hear what The Diamondback had to say. I have to admit, I was most disappointed. Only one line in the article was dedicated to the first two bands, both of which were great. The members of The Spill Canvas are masters of their craft, and I was blown away by them at the concert. It seems sophomoric to only focus on the bands that had the most girls screaming in the crowd. It makes the reader wonder if Thomas Floyd was even present for the beginning of the concert, or if he was just filled in afterward by some of the “disinterested” crowd. A group like The Spill Canvas would have been excellent to focus on as an up and coming band that students at the show really enjoyed. I guess all that I could hope for next time would be less hype and more about what really matters — the music. SHANNON THORNTON SOPHOMORE LETTERS AND SCIENCES

Air Your Views The Diamondback welcomes your comments. Address your letters or guest columns to the Opinion Desk at opinion@dbk.umd.edu. All letters and guest columns must be signed. Include your full name, year, major and day- and night-time phone numbers. Please limit letters to 300 words. Please

limit guest columns to between 550 and 700 words. Submission of a letter or guest column constitutes an exclusive, worldwide, transferable license to The Diamondback of the copyright in the material in any media. The Diamondback retains the right to edit submissions for content and length.

POLICY: The signed letters, columns and cartoon represent only the opinions of the authors. The staff editorial represents the opinion of The Diamondback’s editorial board and is the responsibility of the editor in chief.

JENN YOUNG Scaling the walls

T

he convenience of having all our necessities within walking distance makes it easy to forget that our campus is part of the surrounding city. While we stay inside the confines of the campus, we are neglecting our neighbors and overlooking serious issues affecting both our campus and our community. Langley Park-McCormick Elementary School, within a mile of our campus, is a contrast to our university in demographics and lifestyle. Out of the 508 students this year, 82 percent are Hispanic, and only 40 percent of these students and 10 percent of their parents are English proficient. 87 percent of the families live below the poverty line and many of them are dependent on community outreach for food, clothing and other essentials. Several students from the university have recognized the growing need surrounding our campus and have developed organizations to address the problems. One such organization, Beyond These Walls, was developed in 1999 by two previous students of the university. The current art program at Langley Park-McCormick consists of one teacher who comes to the school for one month out of each year. In recognition of the need for art education, BTW developed an after-school art program to enhance creative learning. In addition to this program, BTW also provides reading programs, Little Terps Soccer and English as a Second Language evening classes. Steph Murphy, one of the leaders of BTW, reflects on the mutual benefit of BTW outreach programs: “One can see by the nature of both the soccer program and the arts and reading program that they truly extend the learning for university students beyond the campus boundaries, putting them in touch with real life experiences and needs of underprivileged children and giving the university students an opportunity to actively participate in making a difference in their lives.” Dan Espinoza worked with BTW during his freshman year. He was inspired to develop an organization that would provide an opportunity for the students on the campus to discuss serious social issues affecting the community. Espinoza and fellow student Dan Lewkowicz founded Community Roots, an organization that Espinoza explains “is really trying to build a community on campus and bridge cultural and ethnic groups. We meet once a week and have dialogue about sociopolitical issues, and once people feel strongly enough about an issue, they take action.” When students in Community Roots feel passionately about the concerns discussed in meetings, they become active with SEEDS, a branch of Community Roots that goes out into the community to begin hands-on problem solving. One of SEEDS services is a mentorship program in which students from the university work with students from Langley Park-McCormick several times a week, tutoring them in their classes and encouraging them to fulfill their potential. Steve Jackson, an active member of Community Roots, explains that teaching students from Langley Park-McCormick to think critically is his top priority. This idea is shared by Espinoza, who says, “When the students start to show eagerness to learn we know we’re making some sort of difference.” In encouraging critical thinking, Community Roots mentors are inspiring a new generation of students to examine the status quo and to recognize what changes must be made in the future. I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to shadow the activities of Community Roots and BTW on Friday as I was able to witness firsthand the strong bonds that have been created between the students of the university and the students of Langley ParkMcCormick. These organizations strive to give back in a way that will perpetuate continued giving. We all have a role to play in developing an atmosphere of social responsibility across our campus and throughout our community. Decide what matters most to you and find a way incorporate that into the way you live your life. To get involved visit www.beyondthesewalls.org and the Community Roots Facebook group.

Jenn Young is a sophomore history major. She can be reached at jyoung22@umd.edu.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

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Features HOROSCOPESTELLA WILDER

CROSSWORD ACROSS 53 Business concern 1 — wheel (2 wds.) 7 Go on stage 56 Water, in Tijuana 10 Arroyo 57 Kimono sash 14 Familiarize 58 She played 15 Bossy’s comment Jessica 16 Continuously 62 Hurry 17 Partial refund 63 Permit 18 Numskull 64 Knee jerk, e.g. 19 Like a house cat 65 Watches 20 Effect 66 Pause fillers 23 Sheet of plywood 67 Minor injury 26 Super Bowl roar 27 Nurse’s concern DOWN 28 Just scraped by 1 In honor of 29 — -de-sac 2 Previously 30 Luau fare 3 Barbecue tidbit 31 Bellboy’s bonus 4 Brought up 32 Page of an atlas 5 Pentium maker 33 Squander 6 Short distance 37 Letter after zeta 7 Ethically neutral 38 — Nouveau 8 Bus 39 Lubricate 9 Meat substitute 40 Itty-bitty 10 Scuba gear 41 Comes back (2 wds.) to win 11 Be of use 43 Some, to Pierre 12 Showroom 44 Prince Val’s models eldest 13 Singer — Cara 45 Giants hero 21 Spews ash of yore 22 Booty 46 Put 2 and 2 23 Lorre of films together 24 Curly-tailed dog 47 Stretchy fabric 25 High country 48 Mead subject 29 Insert mark 51 Lamb’s parent 30 Snooped 52 Sleek sleds

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© 2008 UNITED FEATURES SYNDICATE

TODAY’S CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY:

15% OFF

Entire Bill

9204 Baltimore Ave. (Rt. 1) College Park, MD 20740 (Between Super 8 Motel & American Legion – Behind the Barnside Diner)

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WD1

orn today, you are a strongwilled, ambitious individual, and though you may not set your sights on reaching the top of your profession, you are nevertheless determined to make something of a name for yourself — and at times it doesn’t even matter to you whether it is one that is popular or unpopular. Being liked in the common sense of the word is not something that you actively pursue, though surely it is something you enjoy. Highly principled and always on the lookout to help someone in need, you will strive at all times to increase your own level of influence so that you can, indeed, do some measure of good in the world. What appears to be threatening to most people is nothing that brings you any kind of trepidation or doubt. You embrace challenges of every kind, and you often seek them out. Your personal life may, at times, take a backseat to your professional endeavors, and even your hobbies may be paramount from time to time. Also born on this date are: Eva Peron, dancer and Argentine leader; Anne Baxter, actress; Gary Cooper, actor; Robert Browning, poet; Johannes Brahms, composer; Johnny Unitas, football player. To see what is in store for you tomorrow, find your birthday and read the corresponding paragraph. Let your birthday star be your daily guide.

B

THURSDAY, MAY 8 TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — That which seems most difficult may actually be something you can accomplish with relative ease — provided your attitude is intact. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — There is all likelihood that you will get along better with a rival than you have in the past — owing to

a change in your own thinking. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You can make a show of things and win the admiration and loyalty of those who haven’t committed one way or another before now. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Discuss career issues with caution during the first part of the day. You don’t want to reveal your hand prematurely, and give up your advantage. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Focus on unity rather than those issues that may cause a rift at home or at the workplace. If you have to work, use extra care. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Selfconfidence is essential, and if it’s not the real thing, then you must be able to fake it well enough to display stability and confidence. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Teamwork is sure to pay off, but you may find that your greatest rewards lie in solitary efforts that help the group in the long run. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — While you are enjoying your-

self, a rival (probably a Cancer or Scorpio native) is getting ready to do battle with you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You can reap even more rewards from an already favorable situation simply by giving your imagination a little more free rein. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Avoid going off on a tangent of any kind; it is quite necessary to stick to the matter at hand and focus squarely on solving a problem. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — Concentrate on domestic affairs and issues. Do what you can to increase the amount of time you spend with family members — on and off the job. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Something that happens early in the day is likely to remind you of better times — but also that good times can very well return.

Copyright 2008, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

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6

THE DIAMONDBACK | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

Classified RATES

35¢ per word $3.50 minimum ALL CAPITAL LETTERS........35¢ extra per word Bold letters..............................70¢ extra per word All ads must be prepaid

CALL

301-314-8000

TO PLACE YOUR AD, OR BY EMAIL: ADVERTISING@DBK.UMD.EDU BY FAX: 301-314-8358

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADS • Larger Type • Sold In 1” Increments • One Column Wide • $32.00 Per Column Inch

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SPECIAL Run the same classified or classified display ad for four consecutive days and get the 5th day

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

Office Assistant Needed!

$22/Hour

Outdoor job near campus. Start now. Full time and/or part time during the semester. 35 acre turf grass research facility. Needs help with mowing and maintenance tasks. Great environment. Convenient to courtyards and shuttle. .Call Dave 301-403-8195

Now Hiring All Positions We offer great salaries, benefits including paid vacation, insurance plan, tuition assistance, 401K, meal plan & much more! Apply in person: Arundel Mills Mall, MD, 410-796-0200 or 14601 Baltimore Ave., Laurel, MD, 301-470-4405. Earn $800-$3200 a month to drive brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.AdCarClub.com. NY Deli, in College Park, is hiring delivery drivers, cashiers and cooks. Please call 301-345-0366

GREAT JOB! AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE PORTER For busy GM service department. Full/Part Time. Duties include shuttling and washing service vehicles Monday-Friday. Flexible schedule for students. For consideration contact Gary Citterman at Capitol Cadillac/Buick/Pontiac/GMC, Greenbelt, MD. Ph: 240-737-0361, fax: 301-441-2092, e-mail: gcitterman@ecapitol.com.

Office Assistant Takoma Park company seeking self-motivated individual to support small sales office. Business experience preferred. Must be multi-task oriented & dependable. Proficiency with Microsoft Office. Excellent telephone skills. Flexible F/T or P/T weekday hours. Resume to: creativefiling@aol.com. Please include hours available.

HTML/PERL/SQL Programmer Rockville, MD jobs@ejpress.com

Established Beltsville distributor needs dependable, self-motivated, articulate individual w/computer, internet and good organizational skills. FT employment for May graduates. FT summer employment w/PT hours during the school year. Good salary. Call 301-595-4627.

Summer Employment

4 Bedroom House

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Veterinary Technician Needed

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Evening Callers Mon.-Thurs. 5-8 pm. Earn $10-25/hr. Great summer job. Relaxed atmosphere. Mortgage company in Rockville, MD. Call 301-545-1181 x25, ask for HR.

* Strong organizational skills and attention to detail * Ability to prioritize * Very good verbal and written communication skills * Experience with Microsoft Excel and Word

Sitters Wanted. $10+ per hour. Register free for jobs near campus or home. www.student-sitters.com

This position offers excellent growth opportunities to the right candidate. Please send resume and salary requirements to: resumes@washingtonrefrigeration.com.

Animal Hospital Receptionist & Techs 2-3 weeknights 4-8 p.m. & 2 Sats/mo., 8-5 p.m. Techs also work one Sun./mo. For reception position you must be able to work Tues. & Thurs.

Call Lynn Animal Hospital, 301-779-1184.

Free Housing! Free wireless internet. Free training/ classes, scholarship opportunities and tuition reimbursement program. Become a volunteer firefighter or EMT with Branchville VFC. Contact Jen Chafin at 301-474-1550 or www.bvfco11.com.

WEB PROGRAMMER Rockville company has summer opening for entry-level PERL, SQL. HTML programmer. Send resume to jobs@ejpress.com $15/HOUR. Participate in pre-launch research of a website. Upload pictures and videos. Work from home, get paid on campus. ContactWEBMASTER@DIDITZ.COM with subjects “info”

❖ APARTMENTS

Now hiring P/T evenings and weekends, and F/T M-F 7:30am-4pm. No experience needed. Apply in person: College Park Animal Hospital, 9717 Baltimore Ave., or call Joyce, 301-441-2547.

Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Maryland is implementing a new Clinical Information System – Genesis. Working closely with our training staff, coaches will receive training on the new software and function as a front line resource to support our physicians during the activation of the Genesis Software. Candidates must be computer savvy. To apply, go to www.holycrosshealth.org and click on career opportunities.

Commercial HVAC and plumbing company in Beltsville is seeking a full-time assistant to support the Senior Project Manager. Previous experience in the construction field and knowledge of mechanical systems and equipment desired. Necessary skills include:

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You must have a neat appearance and great communication skills. The ability to drive a manual transmission is a plus. Schedule is perfect for students or anyone looking for a supplemental income.

PT Valet Parking Staff Needed

CAMP COUNSELORS needed for great overnight camps in NE Pennsylvania. Gain valuable experience while working with children in the outdoors. Teach/ assist with waterfront, outdoor recreation, ropes course, gymnastics, A&C, athletics, and much more. Office & Nanny positions also available. Apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com.

Summer Babysitter Needed Spend your summer having fun and going to the local pool with 11 y.o. son and 14 y.o. daughter. Mon.- Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., June 25-Aug. 23. Location: Silver Spring. Near New Hampshire & Beltway. Salary based on experience. Must have car, good driving record, references and must like dogs (one adorable cocker spaniel). Call 301-431-4620 after 6 p.m. or jhisnanick@yahoo.com. Bartending! $250/Day Potential. No Experience Necessary. Training Provided. 1-800-965-6520 x116

FOR SALE HOME FOR SALE 1 Bedroom 1 Bath All Appliances Furnished with Households Living Room Dining Room Sets King Bed A/C DVD Near Public and UMD Bus Route Homeowners Monthly Fee Near Elem School Off-Street Parking Call 772-234-9941/ 772-538-3536 $130K OBO

Rooms for Rent Walking distance 3/4 blocks from campus, large house, 3 bathrooms, 5/6 bedrooms, $475/$525 per room. Quiet and graduate students preferred. Available June 1st and/or August 26th. 301-422-2146, Sekip Sahin HOUSE FOR RENT - 6 BR, 2 1/2 BA, W/D, walk dis. $3,400. Call Glenn (410)551-9959. House for rent. 9008 Adelphi Rd. Adelphi, MD. Minutes from UMCP. On bus route. Great location. Two story home. 3.5 bedrooms upstairs, kitchen, living room, dining room, bathroom. Basement with 2.5 bedrooms, kitchen, closet, bathroom, and walkout. Contact Yesy 240-821-2053. House for rent. Travis Lane. Great location. Very clean. Walk to campus. 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths. 301-332-7935. HOUSES/APARTMENTS. College Park. 2-6 bedrooms. 410-544-4438

Summer Sublet. Hartwick Road. 2 bedroom, 4 people. Fully furnished. znathan@umd.edu House for rent. Big, 5 bedroom, 3 full bath, a/c, dishwasher, washer and dryer. About 1 mile from campus. $2300/month. Lawn care included. Call Scott at 301-980-8567. House for rent: 6 bedroom, 2.5 bath house within minutes from campus, in Hyattsville for Fall: $2,900 + utl. 240-426-4355. Single room for summer: $500

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Single family home. 4 bedrooms, central a/c, laundry, large yard, fireplace. $1695/month. 2700 Hughes Road. 202-744-3656 or 202-686-5993. Two Houses Left. Adelphi Rd. 1 block from North Campus Dr. 5++ bedrooms, downstairs kitchenette house, $3200; 5 bedroom house $3000/month including new a/c, utilities not included. Some off-street parking. Large private yards, washer/dryer, lawn care provided. Availble June 1 - early signing bonus. Contact Dr. Kruger - 301-408-4801 Summer sublet. 2 mi. from campus. $551 mo. utl incld. Furnished w/o bed + more. May 25-Aug 25. 410-409-4626 Very nice large house close to campus. Available summer and fall. 301-918-0203. 5 bedroom and 3 baths, cac, washer/dryer, garbage disposal, carpeted. 571-221-5105.

ROOMMATES Share nice house. Non=smokers, no pets. Walk to campus. 301-918-0203.

Needed for basic architectural drawing classes for undergrad Architecture student in July. Please contact Amelia at BIOTRANS@AOL.COM.

SERVICES EDITING — Dissertations, theses, term papers. Style manual experts. Call anytime. 301-474-6000

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Two large houses. Walk to campus. One available in June, other in August. 301-918-0203

Houses: 3 to 4 bedrooms. 1 block to Route 1 shuttle. From $1.200. 301-753-4301. landwardmd@aol.com

One Block from Campus Call Now for Summer or Fall 2008 1, 2 or 3 Bedroom Apts. Available 301-770-9624 Email: gosia@pinstripeproperty.com

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THE VIEW. REDUCED 50% FOR SUMMER. FEMALE. 410-279-1499.

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FOR RENT

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• UMD Student Discounts • University of MD Shuttle • 2 Min. from Campus

The deadline for all ads is 2PM, two business days in advance of publication.

FOR RENT

Hiring immed. for P/T afternoon/nights + wknds. CLOSED SUNDAYS. Nice environment, family owned & operated liquor store for over 50 years. Students encouraged to apply. Must be 18 yrs. Call EASTGATE, located on Greenbelt Road, 301-390-6200.

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P/T position in relaxed office – great for a student. Responsibilities include light typing, filing, simple computer skills, pleasant phone skills. Starting rate is $6.50/hr. Weekday hours approx. 2:30-7:30 p.m. & some weekends. More hours in summer. Office in College Park. Call M-F 10-3 at 301-441-8100.

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SUMMER JOBS PRE-COLLEGE PROGRAMS IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND COLLEGE PARK Summer positions available June 16 through July 31, 2008 with Pre-College Programs. Positions: Lecturers, Resident Assistants/Tutor Counselors, and Activities/Nutrition Coordinator. Visit our website at www.precollege.umd.edu for job descriptions and application, or call 301-405-6776.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

7

Northwoods on ‘fast track’ to completion

Provost says ‘easy part’ of plan is done PLAN, from Page 1

NORTHWOODS, from Page 1 said Associate Director for Dining Services Joe Mullineaux, if the dorm is not approved by the Board of Regents. “With new beds comes a need to feed students,” said Dining Services Director Colleen Wright-Riva. “The reality is that we don’t have enough seating capacity to seat everyone on that part of campus if the new residence hall is built. When you have an opportunity like that, you want to do it right.” As recently as October, Dining Services had formed committees to plan the renovations for Northwoods, which the department had initially planned to be a 24-hour snack shop. But now, plans for the space — which currently houses Good Tidings catering — could switch gears yet again. Mullineaux presented three options to the Residence Halls Association, two of which were all-you-can-eat options for which students pay one fee for all the food they want, but are unable to carry out. Of the two, one would be marketplacestyle, in which students would get food from different stations, while the other would be buffet style, with rotating options. The third option would be a traditional-style dining hall like The Diner and South Campus Dining Hall, with four or five ala-carte options. Dining Services is also considering placing a café in the building’s lobby area, and the convenience store plan has not been completely forgotten, either, officials said. But Mullineaux cautioned there will be trade-offs, saying Dining Services would have to abandon plans for the café if they choose a buffet-style hall. Regardless of which style is chosen, Northwoods would be unique from other dining halls on the campus, officials said. “We wanted to complement, rather than duplicate, what we’re doing in the other locations,” Mullineaux said. The RHA held its last meeting of the year yesterday, so members will individually give Dining Services feedback on

the proposed dining options in the next couple of weeks. Mullineaux said the department needs feedback soon, as the project is “on the fast track” to be completed by fall 2010. One RHA member, Elkton Senator Spiro Dimakas, said he was particularly impressed with a marketplace-style restaurant he went to in Canada and that he would prefer that option. “Market-style food is actually better, because nothing is wasted,” he said. “Not everyone goes for the three-course meal, but for someone who is hungry, it’s a benefit.”

FRESHMEN CONNECTION The RHA also unanimously voted to recommend Freshmen Connection students, who are fully admitted in the spring instead of the fall, to be given the same priority points as regularly admitted freshmen. Mitch Amoros, who drafted the bill, is a Freshmen Connection student himself. “The spring-semester students get treated like secondclass citizens,” he said. “We were told that we would be treated just the same, and it’s not the same.”

CAMPAIGN PROCEDURE A bill to allow students running for university leadership positions to campaign inside dorms failed by a thin margin. Those running for the Student Government Association, the RHA or the University Senate are barred from going door-todoor, but some RHA members said it is common practice. “Technically it’s not legal for me to go door to door and solicit votes, but everybody seems to do it,” said Dan Leydorf, who unsuccessfully campaigned for SGA president. “This illegal practice seems beneficial for the university. The more we get our name out there the more our voice matters.” However, other senators said the bill needed clarification and should be sent to a committee for review.

Multiple amendments were rejected, keeping intact key segments of the plan dealing with a proposed overhaul of general education, a new resource allocation process that gives more power to the provost and a salary review plan for tenured professors. Some faculty members of the senate repeatedly criticized those measures all the way up until the vote, but though the CORE overhaul was one of the most contentious parts of the strategic plan, an amendment to negate the proposed changes was more than 50 votes short of passing. In the general education section of the strategic plan, few details are outlined other than three categories into which classes will fit: “2020 Perspectives,” “Ways of Thinking” and “Pathways to Knowledge and Creativity.” The strategic plan states that a committee will be set up at a later time to outline specific details of the new general education plan. Though faculty senators had

previously opposed the CORE overhaul because of the way it would impact students’ educational experience, they yesterday abandoned contentrelated opposition and focused on the unfairness of being forced to vote on such expansive changes without seeing a final version of the new general education program. “We do not disapprove or approve of this section identifying the three dimensions. We ask merely that we have the opportunity to discuss this element of the new general education plan when it is presented to us,” said Claire Moses, a women’s studies professor who sponsored the amendment. Ira Chinoy, an associate professor in the journalism school, was one of numerous members of the strategic planning committee who defended the overhaul of CORE. “It’s one of the things that can make an undergraduate education at Maryland unique,” he said. Another amendment that failed would have created a committee to examine

whether a proposal to standardize the university’s posttenure review process was necessary. The strategic plan, as written, allows the salaries of some faculty members to be decreased if they fail to meet goals established after an unfavorable performance review. Some faculty members have decried it as effectively eliminating tenure. “I believe tenure is essential to academic freedom, but it comes at a price,” said Ann Wylie, Mote’s chief of staff and a member of the strategic planning committee. “To protect tenure, we must be responsible defenders. We must have the ability to sanction those who flagrantly disregard their obligations to the university.” Former Student Government Association President Andrew Friedson, in his one of his last acts in the position, also spoke in favor of posttenure review, and said that while only a small number of faculty disregard their responsibilities, the number of students they affect is huge. The most dangerous amend-

ments, in the eyes of the provost, were a set of four that would have either eliminated or weakened a proposal in the plan that would allow him to more quickly reallocate funding. If the university can’t reallocate funds to increasingly important and popular departments, implementing the strategic plan will be exceptionally difficult, he said. “If these amendments are approved, then the entire strategic plan will become meaningless,” Farvardin said. All the related amendments failed. The strategic planning committee didn’t object to several other amendments, including one asking for health insurance and tuition remission to be extended to domestic partners. Though top administrators congratulated one another when the plan passed, the provost acknowledged their work was far from done. “Quite frankly, what we’ve done in the past seven months is the easy part,” Farvardin said. robillarddbk@gmail.com

Councilmembers say plan lacks ‘specificity’ CITY, from Page 1 Doug Duncan, the university’s vice president for administrative affairs who oversaw the “Surrounding Community” section of the strategic plan, said

“This is a university strategic plan, not a City of College Park strategic plan.”

Staff writer Nandini Jammi contributed to this report. cwellsdbk@gmail.com

–Doug Duncan VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS

he met with City Manager Joe Nagro, Mayor Stephen Brayman and some councilmembers before the university released its first draft. But the council had never discussed the plan as an entire body, and city officials complained about the lack of a city representative on the plan’s steering committee. Schum and District 3 Councilwoman Stephanie Stullich both pointed out a stark contrast between one of the plan’s goals, to “encourage all opportunities to engage more effectively with the community and its leaders,” and the city’s exclusion from the steering committee. But Duncan was quick to defend himself. “I mean, this is a university

strategic plan, not a City of College Park strategic plan,” he said. Schum said while the city is largely supportive of the goals in the strategic plan — a sentiment Nagro also expressed soon after the plan’s first draft was released — she personally is unsatisfied with some of the proposals. “A lot of their strategies read more like goals; they lack specificity,” she said. She cited the goal of establishing a “crime-free zone,” which the council attacked for not being specific in terms of size or scope. “I think that sort of language isn’t meaningful,” Stullich said. “You could mandate a zero-percent mortality rate for hospi-

tals. I mean, what does it mean, ‘crime-free?’” Duncan said the university incorporated some suggestions from the city in its latest version of the strategic plan but stressed the university’s wants and needs come first. “[The city] made it clear they don’t support the connector road, but it’s something the university wants,” he said. Even though the city was not involved in the senate’s consideration of the strategic plan, Brayman said a letter would still be important for getting the city’s views on the record. “If we don’t, they can come back and say, ‘Well, you didn’t say it,’” Brayman added. holtdbk@gmail.com

The University of Maryland recently honored outstanding students and faculty and staff at the 27th Annual University Awards Banquet. We congratulate them on their outstanding contributions. OMICRON DELTA KAPPA TOP TEN FRESHMEN Alexandra Adler Nina Anziska Christopher DeCaro Rebecca Hammer Margaret Lilly David Nelson Kerri Pinchuk Dimitry Portnyagin Amanda Schrier Kate Yanchulis OMICRON DELTA KAPPA Fall 2007 Initiates Faculty/Staff Sue Kopen Katcef – Lecturer, Philip Merrill College of Journalism Julie Choe Kim – Coordinator for Graduate Student Life Laura Nichols – Assistant Director, Women's Studies Karen Thornton – Director, Hillman Entrepreneurs Program Students Barrie Adelberg Jenna Aidikoff Megan Baker Jennifer Bandzwolek Annika Betancourt Jennifer Bonnet Heather Bradshaw Clare Cavaliero Christopher Chan Gary Cheng Laura Chiriaco Jazalyn Dukes Rachel Finkelstein Morgan Goodspeed Megan Harvey Constance Iloh Hadass Kogan Shelley McDuff Melissa Raimondi Raakhee Sharma Shannon Sterritt Maeling Tapp Theodore Tien Bobby Truong Dawn White Spring 2008 Initiates Faculty/Staff Richard D. Brecht – Executive Director, Center for Advanced Study of Language Anne Turkos, University Archivist

Students Oluwatoni Aluko Meagan Baccinelli Alyson Blair Andrew Bowen Alison Daniels Bradley Docherty Adam Fisch Arin Foreman Elana Gelbart Arkady Gelman Rijak Grover Jacqueline Iloh Alka Jhaveri Danielle Kogut Anita Kohli Samantha Lazarus Joel Liebman Leslie Lin Katherine Minkoff Shawna Murray Danielle Parnass Cory Perlowitz Lisa Pfeifer Kerry Rigley Shai Romirowsky Brett Saffer Nicholas Singer Jessica Thompson Candace Tomkiel Jennifer Wright OMICRON DELTA KAPPA SOPHOMORE LEADER OF THE YEAR Jenna Brager COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ OMICRON DELTA KAPPA LEADER OF THE YEAR AWARD Shannon Auxier COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ LEGACY SCHOLARSHIP Wambui Kiruthi KIRWAN AWARD Phillip Hannam UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER LEADERSHIP AWARD Pritma Arora MICHELLE Y. ANGYELOF AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING SERVICE TO OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS Annika Betancourt

OFFICE OF MULTI-ETHNIC STUDENT EDUCATION AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING MULTI-ETHNIC CAMPUS ORGANIZATION Latino Student Union OFFICE OF MULTI-ETHNIC STUDENT EDUCATION MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD Sidrah Khan LORDE-O'LEARY AWARD Andrew Bowen MARYLAND IMAGES VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR AWARD Sarah Hubbard ORDER OF OMEGA GREEK LEADER OF THE YEAR Adesuwa Izevbgie ORDER OF OMEGA GREEK CHAPTER PRESIDENT OF THE YEAR Rachel McGaughey MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE AWARD Kyle Carson THE WILLIAM L. THOMAS STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION AWARD Daozhong Jin ADELE H. STAMP MEMORIAL AWARD George Greenleaf

POLICE SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR Clayton Brown COMMANDER'S AWARD FOR POLICE AIDE SERVICE Alexander Eberhart DEPARTMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS STUDENT ATHLETE OF THE YEAR AWARDS Andrew Crummey Crystal Langhorne

PAVELA PRIZE FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTIONS TO ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND STUDENT ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMING Laurie Bornt

LETTERS AND SCIENCES OUTSTANDING STUDENT AWARD Alyssa Sibert

OUTSTANDING ADVISOR FOR A STUDENT ORGANIZATION James McKinney

VERA CRUZ-KOCHIYAMA AWARD King Siu Bobby Truong

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND GRADUATE STUDENT DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD Devin Ellis

NYUMBURU CULTURAL CENTER JOHN B. SLAUGHTER OUTSTANDING SENIOR AWARD Darla Bunting NYUMBURU CULTURAL CENTER JAMES OTIS WILLIAMS CULTURAL LEADERSHIP AWARD Ugonna Madueke RESIDENT ASSISTANT OF THE YEAR AWARDS Cambridge Community Jessica Jacques Denton Community James David Ellicott Community Matt Johnson

REBECCA WILLIAMS AWARD FOR COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL CHANGE Christian Melendez

North Hill/Leonardtown Community Brad Docherty

LA RAZA UNIDA AWARD Iris Ferrufino

South Campus Commons Community Greg Baesa

EMMA POWERS AWARD STUDENT EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR AWARD Benjamin Franich DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AUXILIARY SERVICES AWARD POLICE AIDE OF THE YEAR Robert Mitchell

CAMILLE K. RAJPAT MEMORIAL AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING MEMBER OF THE UNIVERSITY STUDENT JUDICIARY Zain Shariff

South Hill Community Katherine Polak UNIVERSITY CAREER CENTER OUTSTANDING SERVICE AWARD Stephanie Baker JAMES H. KEHOE AND ETHEL KESLER AWARDS Gregory Feehan Tracy Miller

WILSON H. ELKINS AWARD Kyle Carson H. C. BYRD AWARD Andrew Friedson SALLY STERLING BYRD AWARD Darla Bunting MEMBERS OF THE MARYLAND MEDALLION SOCIETY AND BYRD/ELKINS FINALISTS Barrie Adleberg Shannon Auxier Nidhi Bouri Darla Bunting Kyle Carson Clare Cavaliero Nicholas Chamberlain Jesse Chen Adam Cohn Jazalyn Dukes Lauren Effron Andrew Friedson George Greenleaf Andrew Heck Stephanie Kitchell Roberto Munster Benjamin Pittman Kerry Rigley Maeling Tapp Theodore Tien


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THE DIAMONDBACK | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

MOVIES AT THE HOFF:

Diversions ARTS

Today: Persepolis, 11:59 a.m., 2 p.m., 6 p.m., 8 p.m., 10 p.m. Tomorrow: Persepolis, 12:55 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m. Friday: No movies listed Saturday: No movies listed Sunday: Across the Universe, 9:00 p.m.

LIVING

MUSIC

MOVIES

WEEKEND

REVIEW | ANIMA

Anima’s violent struggle New play looks at the gritty and destructive side of relationships through three characters BY KELLIE WOODHOUSE Staff writer

“I don’t want to push anymore; I just want to look in the mirror and see myself,” Ella, a disturbed and torn heroin addict, pleads to both the audience and James, a conflicted war veteran who idolizes her. Her cry distills the message of the Doorway Arts Ensemble play, Anima, to a plea for freedom from the unfulfilling, manipulative and barren confines of her life. The low-budget and virtually unknown Anima, which runs at Flashpoint in Washington through May 11, is leaving the few who see it slumped over in their chairs for minutes after curtain call in a state of utter confusion and complete mortification from what they just saw. Ella and Vlad, played by Marissa Molnar and Parker Dixon, are an explosive pair dominated by whacked notions of life topped with addictions to almost every drug imaginable. They are on-and-off lovers with a hot-blooded relationship way past any limits of stability. In the first 10 minutes of the play, Ella is thrown across the stage, both actors cut themselves in an eerie act of romanticism and the pitch of their voices reaches a level only dogs can hear. After the play has slapped you in PHOTO COURTESY OF COLIN HOVDE the face a couple of times, in walks Parker Dixon (Vlad) and Andres Talero (James), a university alumnus, star in the disturbing play Anima at Flashpoint in Washington. Ella’s old high school friend and Greer, in his note to the audience, haunted Iraq War veteran James, stories of rape — along with the act state of piercing anxiety and manic played by university alumnus itself — and disturbing memories of behavior, is forced to choose writes that Anima is an extreme Andres Talero — completing the war. The actors interweave their between the poetical but broken version of many people’s reality and play’s small but efficient cast. Con- memories of these motifs with love Vlad offers her or a new, less that it can “help us to reexamine sumed with thoughts of jealousy quick, theoretical dialogue that broken life with the player who our connections with others” and “ask the sometimes unaskable.” and paranoia about James’s obvious playwright Christiaan Greer hopes adores her, James. But after a whirlwind of fistfights, Although Greer is correct in saying desire for Ella, Vlad goes haywire will raise questions about fate, more cutting, multiple overdoses his play leaves the viewer questionas James crashes at the Brooklyn abuse and reality of the viewer. With both Vlad and James living and a quick, heated sex scene, only ing fundamental societal notions, apartment in hopes of finding a job extremely self-destructive, in the apartment, Ella, who list- one performer is left standing, and the in New York City. obsessive characters are, oddly, The performance is haunted by lessly flurries around the stage in a even that is questionable.

HOT AND COLD: MUSIC EDITION most definitely HOT

almost approachable, if not relatable. Because the dialogue is often quick and quippy, some of his message zooms over the audience’s head. It’s too quick and momentous to be realistic. Instead, it becomes tiresome and superfluous at times. The utter craziness of the writing, also, makes it a difficult play to act in. Monlar is at times over-exaggerated in her movements and speech, playing the confusing Ella in a way that seems excessively calculated and inconsistent with how Greer wrote the character. But Monlar is able to capture the audience with her fiery wit and animation, especially during the more frenzied scenes. Talero, in his portrayal of the awkward and somewhat dry James, is more convincing as the play matures and he gains confidence. He is at his best when he is throwing Vlad around the stage or yelling in a fit of rage. The capricious, volatile and erratic Vlad is probably the most disgusting character on stage and the hardest to portray. Even so, Dixon is the most believable of all the actors and is able to deliver even the wordiest treatises with a precision and conviction that hinges the viewer on Vlad’s actions and decisions, making the absurdity of his character all the more shocking with each new development. Despite its imperfections, Anima is an enthralling entanglement of human souls that is going shamefully unnoticed. For an upstart company’s first performance, Anima is remarkably good, a real tour de force, the kind of play that you never forget. Anima runs at the Mead Theatre Lab Program at Flashpoint in Washington until May 11. Tickets cost $15. woodhousedbk@gmail.com

PREVIEW | OUTDOOR BIG BAND FINALIE

Going out with a big bang Jazz bands end the year with the Outdoor Big Band Finale BY THOMAS FLOYD Staff writer

“I’m Glad” by The Black Keys

“Discipline” by Nine Inch Nails

The Black Keys must have some free time as the duo preps for its upcoming tour — the band’s version of Captain Beefheart’s “I’m Glad” was recorded last Thursday at guitarist/singer Dan Auerbach’s studio. It went up on MySpace for free Friday and is available until May 9. The slow-burning, dirty blues song returns the duo to its gritty pre-Attack & Release sound, but is an extension of the pair’s already stellar 2008.

Nine Inch Nails has a pretty solid formula down by now, so it makes sense that Trent Reznor’s latest single, “Discipline,” would fit the mold. The song features all the typical Reznor touches — an industrial beat, guttural vocals and frustrated, pained lyrics with a subtle middle finger to authority. Hopefully, “Discipline” is indicative of the rest of The Slip, the second free album NIN has offered up in two months. Download this one; we’re sure Trent would appreciate it.

most definitely COLD

“No Matter What” by T.I.

“Violet Hill” by Coldplay

Apparently, house arrest has also Coldplay offered up its first single for managed to confine T.I.’s creativi- free this past week from the forthcoming album, Viva la Vida or Death ty. The Atlanta rapper released “No Matter What” as a prelude to and All His Friends. “Violet Hill” starts, as all Coldplay songs do, with a slow, his newest album, Paper Trail. Even without judging “No Matter building piano. But curiously enough, What” as a single, which it is not, the guitars kick in, and my, oh my, it seems the boys have developed it’s tough to find much redempsomething of an edge. Sitting Brian tion here. Nothing but retreads Eno behind the boards has clearly and uninspired lyricism from a upped Coldplay’s game — just how rapper with the potential for so much, we will have to wait and see. much more.

Those stopping by the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center tonight will be treated to a different kind of spring picnic when the music school presents its Outdoor Big Band Finale in the building’s main courtyard. The annual open-air event will feature the University Jazz Band, the Jazz Lab Band and the Jazz Ensemble. Director of Jazz Studies Chris Vadala started the concert shortly after joining the university 14 years ago and sees it as a yearly opportunity for both the musicians and the audience to lay loose. “It’s a little more of a relaxed event — we don’t try to dress up formally or anything like that,” he said. “We try to put our best musical foot forward, but by the same token, we’re going to have people just hanging out by the grass and eating while we’re playing. So I think it gives a different kind of an atmosphere that both the performers and the listeners are very comfortable with.” Each of the three bands will perform a 30-minute set with no intermissions. The students are scheduled to play a wide variety of tunes ranging from the well-known works of Miles Davis and Duke Ellington to pieces composed by some lesser-known artists. “It’s a lot of cool composers that a lot of kids don’t hear,” said freshman jazz studies major Michael Kramer, a member of the Jazz Lab Band. “But if they were to be exposed to that, they might open their ears to something new.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF CSPAC

The University Jazz Band, the Jazz Lab Band and the Jazz Ensemble will all perform in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center’s main courtyard at 5:30 p.m. The true nature of the event’s spirit, however, lies within its unique setup. The musicians play toward the trees and grassy knolls behind CSPAC, allowing for their audience to create a somewhat festive ambiance. Vadala describes the experience as a smaller version of Art Attack, but with a “beach atmosphere” in which the crowd can enjoy an early dinner set to some quality jazz music. “Bring a picnic, bring some friends, bring some food, enjoy the weather and enjoy some great jazz bands,” said senior music major Vishal Panchal, who is also a member of the Jazz Lab Band. “If there is room out there, you can swing dance; you can talk — it’s just a really cool outing.

And this music is going to be smoking hot.” One element of the performance will be improvised solos by featured musicians. Vadala cites this aspect of the show as particularly important because of its place as “a big part of the jazz tradition.” “They stand up, and they play solos that are very cerebral, and they’re made up,” he said. “It’s not written out stuff, so, this gives them an opportunity to compose on their own essentially.” The concert will serve as the last performance of the year for the jazz band students, something Vadala describes as “bittersweet.” Vadala will give alumni shirts to the seniors, and though he will encourage them to return

for the annual alumni show in March, he realizes this will be the final time he works with some of the musicians. “The sad thing is we’ll be graduating some folks, and we’ll be losing people,” Vadala said. “Having this kind of relaxed environment at the end is a great way to culminate our season, but at the same time, I look forward to next time. As soon as we get done with this particular performance, I’ll already start pulling music for next season. I think it’s a good way to close things out, but we’re still looking forward.” The Outdoor Big Band Finale is tonight at 5:30 in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center’s main courtyard and is free. tfloyd1@umd.edu


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008 | SPORTS | THE DIAMONDBACK

Terps hurt by pro allure APR, from Page 1 But the Terps can still suffer possible restrictions, as teams scoring below 925 could lose up to 10 percent of their scholarships if a player leaves the program while academically ineligible. The last Terp to leave the basketball team while academically ineligible was Chris McCray in 2006. The APR is a NCAA tool that measures both an athlete’s academic eligibility as well as progression and graduation. Athletes receive one point per semester for staying eligible and one for remaining a student on track for graduation, gaining a maximum of two points per semester. To calculate the score, the NCAA divides the points earned by the team by the total possible points. That number is then multiplied by 1000. In a teleconference yesterday, NCAA President Myles Brand and NCAA Committee on Academic Performance Chairman Walter Harrison discussed both the APR and the punishments for low scores. Overall, 218 teams from 123 different schools face penalties as a result of their APR scores this year. “The real standard here is academic success of student athletes and not necessarily the penalties,” Harrison said. “The penalties themselves indicate that we take this very seriously.” The Terps’ low score represents the third time in the first four years of the APR that they have scored below a 925. Coach Gary Williams said the program often deals with players debating finishing their degrees or

ACC APR Scores The Terps’ score of 906 ranked last among ACC schools. School North Carolina Duke Wake Forest N.C. State Florida State Miami Virginia Tech Boston College Virginia Georgia Tech Clemson TERRAPINS

Score 995 984 974 960 958 948 946 944 941 931 920 906

going overseas to play professionally as their college careers wind down. “You try to do what’s right,” Williams said. “If a guy gets through four years where he’s done OK academically, but he still has some work to do to get his degree, or he’s offered $150,000 to play in Europe, what’s he supposed to do?” The Terps ranked last among all ACC men’s basketball teams and joined Clemson (920) as the only teams below 925. The score also ranks below the university’s peer institutions: North Carolina (995), Illinois (989), UCLA (968), UC Berkeley (942) and Michigan (927). Williams ascribed the Terps’ bottom rank among conference rivals and peer schools to more players having the opportunity to play professionally, though the NBA and European leagues count numerous players from other ACC schools on their rosters as well. “That’s what you run into as a coach,” Williams said. “You’d love to see your guys get their degrees, but at the same time if they ask you is there value in making that kind of money, getting to travel in Europe, that kind of thing, if they come back and get their degrees, you have to look at that.” Williams said the NCAA needs to look at the differing difficulty in achieving the degrees at various universities and factor that into the APR report. Men’s basketball programs nationally struggled to make the grade this year, as the average APR for those programs, 928, ranked last among all sports, men’s or women’s. In the teleconference yesterday, Brand said the NCAA is examining men’s basketball programs across the country and will issue a report in the fall with recommendations on how to fix the problem. “With respect to men’s basketball, we are in the middle of a discussion with our basketball academic enhancement group to address the specific issues for basketball,” Brand said. The changes are necessary because, according to Williams, basketball presents different challenges than other sports, as athletes have greater opportunities to make large amounts of money at a young age. “If a kid has the opportunity after one year in college to go make millions of dollars, it’s hard to say that he did something wrong or that the school did something wrong,” Williams said. jamorosdbk@gmail.com

9

Tompkins gets his chance After long wait, junior attackman starts for first time BY ERIC DETWEILER Senior staff writer

Scott Tompkins has spent his junior season with the Terrapin men’s lacrosse team overshadowed by an all-freshman starting attack, but he does not seem to mind. “It’s definitely made me a lot better of a player, because I see how hard they play and how much they care, and it helps me out a lot,” Tompkins said. “Sometimes, I feel like they’re the veterans, and I’m the underclassman.” But with freshman attackman Travis Reed hampered by several nagging injuries last week, Tompkins was called on to make his first career start at attack in Saturday’s game against Yale. And Tompkins made the most of his opportunity. Just more than two minutes into the game, Tompkins took a pass from freshman attackman Grant Catalino and scored the Terps’ first goal of the game, starting an impressive offensive performance by the Terps that resulted in a 16-10 win. Tompkins had some unlucky timing in joining the Terp attack. He had to fight for backup time behind attackmen like Joe Walters, Xander Ritz, Michael Phipps and Max Ritz early in his career, and this season he transitioned into a reserve role behind the talented freshman group. But his teammates know what kind of player he can be. “It’s a perfect example of why you work hard,” senior midfielder Drew Evans said. “When we needed somebody to step up, he did.” Freshman Brett Weiss and senior Max Ritz got starts at attack in the two games Reed missed due to suspension earlier this season. But coach Dave Cottle said Tompkins has been underutilized this season and was happy to give him a chance. “He’s kept practicing,” Cottle said. “He’s kept

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

In recent games, reserve junior attackman Scott Tompkins has received some extra playing time for the Terps. working hard in practice, and he’s kept doing a good job in practice.” Tompkins found out Friday he would make the start after practicing with the first-team attack unit for most of the week, which Tompkins said was a thrill in itself. “It was definitely cool,” Tompkins said. “It’s a lot faster pace playing with the first offense than it is with the scout team and everything. It’s just something to get used to, but it was a lot of fun.” Reed entered the game at the start of the second quarter and notched his first two

goals since March 29, but Tompkins was in the starting lineup. Tompkins said the goal was just what he needed to get him over some firststart jitters. “Once I got the goal, the nerves were gone, and it was just a lot of fun,” Tompkins said. It would be a good time for a fourth attackman to step up for the Terps as they head into postseason play. Reed, Catalino and Ryan Young have carried most of the attack’s scoring load thus far as they each climb the Terps’ all-time

freshman scoring list. Cottle said as the weather warms up it is important to have back-up options for those players, especially a big player like Catalino, who is 6foot-5 and 240 pounds. It’s a role Tompkins is happy to fill. “Basically, I’m here whenever the coaches need to call on me,” Tompkins said. “I just have to work hard in practice everyday and hope that they call my name eventually. If they do, I have to step up and perform.” edetweilerdbk@gmail.com


10

THE DIAMONDBACK | SPORTS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

Towson on deck today UMES, from Page 12

ALLISON AKERS–THE DIAMONDBACK

Junior third baseman Mike Murphy runs home in the Terps’ easy 6-0 win against UMES last night.

Sophomore right fielder A.J. Casario hit his seventh home run of the season on the first pitch of the sixth inning. Senior catcher Chad Durakis had a two-RBI double in the first inning to provide the offensive highlights. Another encouraging sign for the Terps was the performance of freshman pitcher Blair Delean. Delean only had three innings under his belt all season coming into the game, but he entered in the seventh inning and pitched two scoreless innings out of the bullpen. But Potter was the night’s star. His efforts helped put the game out of reach for UMES early. The freshman hopes this performance can serve as a springboard for him into next season. “Hopefully this will let me figure out my role for next year,” Potter said. “It should give me a starting point.” After losing five games in a row and six out of seven games coming into last night, the win might give the Terps a new starting point, too. TERP NOTES: Senior second baseman Steve Braun did not start for the fourth straight game last night because of a rotator cuff injury. Rupp said Braun will undergo an MRI this afternoon that will reveal how long he will be out ... The Terps will play Towson at Shipley Field tonight and try to avoid a season sweep to the Tigers. Rupp made a surprising move by announcing he will start sophomore staff ace Scott Swinson — who usually starts Friday night ACC games — in tonight’s game. akrautdbk@gmail.com

Belak rebounds as senior BELAK, from Page 12 Belak surged during her sophomore year. She led the Terps in batting average at .359, sixth best in the ACC and at the time the school’s single-season record, and hits with 70, which is still a school record. She became a master of consistently outrunning infield ground balls to get on base and gave coach Laura Watten a real weapon at the top of the lineup. Opposing teams took notice and focused on Belak her junior year. Her batting average dipped to .260, but Watten never felt Belak was struggling, and kept her second in the lineup, right behind star slugger Amber Jackson. In her senior year, Belak has rebounded. She is second on the team in batting (.328) and first in runs (37), hits (65), triples (4) and steals (24), 15 more than her next-closest teammate. And if that isn’t indicative enough of her speed, she has twice as many triples as she does doubles (2). Belak is not known for her power — she has never hit a home run — but when she does find the gaps, it usually means trouble for opposing defenses. Her speed has also made her an excellent asset in the outfield. She did not commit an error her sophomore season, and only recorded three in her two seasons since. “She’s a threat on the bases, and also a playmaker,” Watten said. “With her speed she’s able to track things down in the outfield that a lot of other players aren’t able to. It’s also why she’s in the leadoff spot.”

ALLISON AKERS–THE DIAMONDBACK

Senior outfielder Jenny Belak gets her record-tying hit with a bunt. Belak has also assumed a new role this season. Soft-spoken in past seasons, she has become more vocal as a leader, but still prefers to lead by example. Belak has been especially helpful to redshirt freshman Niki Lau, who plays beside Belak in center field. “She’s really mentally tough,” Lau said of Belak. “She’s able to calm me down when I get flustered. She’s a great person to have because she has such a great knowledge of the game and so much experience. It’s relaxing to have someone like that playing next to me in the outfield.”

Belak has also been able to reverse roles with her coach at times, using her calm demeanor to teach the fiery Watten that sometimes it’s OK to be relaxed. “I’m a very intense person and coach,” Watten said. “She is somebody that’s really taught me a lot about being light hearted. She’s got such a good nature about her … she’s absolutely earned everything she’s got. All of her accomplishments, I think they’re a result of her dedication and being such a good team player.” That, and a little speed. jnewmandbk@gmail.com

YUCHEN NIE–THE DIAMONDBACK

Sophomore defender Karissa Taylor and her classmates have helped the Terps increase tempo this season.

Sophs lead Terp D SOPHS, from Page 12 In transition, the Terps give them the ball immediately after clearing midfield. And the two do the rest. Spinnenweber and McFadden’s blazing speed allows the Terps’ fast-paced offense to race down the field on transitions to set up easy goals. “Dana and I always joke and say, ‘OK Cait, it’s your turn,’” senior midfielder Kelly Kasper said. “We always just give her the ball and let her go ... Caitlyn and ‘Spin,’ they just turn their wheels on, and they just crush everyone. They get it down on our end; then we settle.” But once the ball is downfield, McFadden and Spinnenweber can also finish.

They have 40 goals combined this season, often using their lateral quickness in the set offense to find a hole to score. “They have been a huge impact,” Kasper said. “They don’t play like underclassmen at all. They are stepping up into huge roles, which is awesome.” Meanwhile, Taylor and Gallagher use their speed to prevent opponents from scoring. The former midfielders have slowed down opposing transition and allowed the Terps to play a more attacking style of defense, which has resulted in 174 caused turnovers. “They are really athletic and able to get after the ground balls, chase the shot

from behind and help us run out the ball on clears,” McFadden said. “They have come up with big turnovers, and they are a big presence for just being sophomores,” Kasper said. “They are stepping up for being so young and doing a great job with it.” Even as the underclassmen are often removed from the spotlight because of the Terps’ senior stars, the team will need more big performances from its speedy sophomores entering this weekend’s NCAA tournament. On the biggest stage in women’s lacrosse, the Terps will find out just how fast their fast is. bkapurdbk@gmail.com


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008 | THE DIAMONDBACK

11


12

THE DIAMONDBACK | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008

NCAA Women’s Lacrosse Assist Leaders

Sports

Player Assists 1. Kristen Slahor, Ohio State 61 2. Katie Rowan, Syracuse 57 T-3.Steph Coyne, Denver 53 T-3.Hannah Nielsen, Northwestern 53 5. Kathleen McNish, Duquesne 43

Player Assists 6. Lauren Walsh, Canisius 42 T-7. Madalyn Booth, Lafayette 40 T-7. Kelly Kasper, TERRAPINS 40 9. Breana Waraksa, Mt. St. Mary’s 39 10. Mary Montesarchio, Sacred Heart 38

Potter, Terps handle UMES Freshman pitcher throws career game in 6-0 win BY AARON KRAUT Senior staff writer

ADAM FRIED–THE DIAMONDBACK

Sophomore midfielder Caitlyn McFadden and her classmates provide great speed to complement better-known stars such as seniors Dana Dobbie and Kelly Kasper.

Sophomore speedsters Pair of midfielders, defenders allow Terps to dominate in transition BY BRIAN KAPUR Staff writer

Their fast is faster than your fast — and the Terrapin women’s lacrosse sophomores know it. Sophomore midfielder Caitlyn McFadden “is probably the fastest player in the country, and you just can’t match that. I haven’t seen any other team that has girls as fast as our team,” sophomore midfielder Amanda Spinnenweber said. “There’s just no stopping us if we have the ball in our stick.” The Terps began the season relying heavily on their veteran players. But as the season went on, a speedy sophomore class led by midfielders McFadden

and Spinnenweber and defenders Karissa Taylor and Katie Gallagher has allowed the Terps to fly past opponents on both sides of the field. On the offensive end, McFadden and Spinnenweber, or “Spin” as her teammates refer to her, have come on strong after combining for just 28 goals as freshmen. The duo has given the Terps one of the fastest midfields in the nation. “Caitlyn has great speed, field sense and stick work,” coach Cathy Reese said. “And ‘Spin’ has a great work ethic and is really super fast. They are both great players, and they really fit into our system and style of play.”

Please See SOPHS, Page 10

Hitting a record Senior Jenny Belak set Terp softball all-time mark for hits with her speed as much as her bat BY JEFF NEWMAN Staff writer

Jenny Belak had gone three games without a hit. It wasn’t a terrible slump by any stretch, but sitting on 212 career hits — tied with Kelly Shipman’s school record — it was the longest hitless streak Belak had endured all season. Then, in the third inning in the first game of a doubleheader against Towson last Wednesday, the senior right fielder broke her “slump” and the nine-year-old record the same way she collects most of her hits — with her speed. Belak laid down a bunt and outran the ball to first, cementing herself as one of the best players in Terrapin softball history. The senior outfielder had already broken the career records for at-bats (748), triples (12) and stolen bases (60) earlier in the season. That’s not bad for a player

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who, after high school, didn’t want to end up anywhere near College Park. “At first, I didn’t want to go to an East Coast school,” the Sierra Madre, Calif., native said. “I wanted to stay west. But most of the schools that were recruiting me were from the East Coast, so then I became more open to the idea.” Belak fell in love with the campus on her visit and also, having grown up just outside of Los Angeles, liked that it was situated between Washington and Baltimore. “The girls on the team were awesome. That really helped too,” Belak said. Once she signed with the Terps, it was her speed that transformed Belak into one of the ACC’s best hitters. After a lukewarm freshman season in which she hit .195 in 47 games,

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It’s been a rough two-week stretch for the Terrapin baseball team, so a visit yesterday from University of Maryland-Eastern Shore was just what the doctored ordered. Behind a career performance from freshman pitcher Eric Potter, the Terps cruised to a 6-0 victory against UMES, ending a five-game losing streak. Potter struck out 12 batters in six innings of scoreless work. The Terps (27-24, 8-19 ACC) scored three runs in the first inning and never looked back, sending the Hawks (5-45, 4-12 MEAC) to their 22nd straight loss. “Lately we’ve been having trouble with walking people, so I just concentrated on throwing BASEBALL strikes,” Pot- UMES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 ter said. “It Terrapins . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 was a warm day out, so I felt good. Last weekend was really cold up at Boston College, but my stuff felt good today, and I just used it.” Potter’s 12 strikeouts were the most by a Terp pitcher since Chris Clem struck out 15 batters against Buffalo in 2004. “He had an excellent breaking ball and he was throwing it for strikes,” coach Terry Rupp said. “The first inning was a little shaky, but then he settled in and he was around the zone. He threw a great game tonight.” The Terps offense wasn’t as effective as it was in the two teams’ first meeting, when the Terps routed UMES 14-1 on April 16. But they were never challenged by a Hawks lineup that came into the game hitting only .226 as a team.

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ALLISON AKERS–THE DIAMONDBACK

Freshman pitcher Eric Potter had his strongest start as a Terp last night against UMES in the Terps’ 6-0 win. He struck out 12 in six innings without allowing a run before being relieved.

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