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DYLAN THROUGH LIFE

Terps using strong second-half efforts to maintain undefeated record

The music legend makes magic again on his 33rd album

SPORTS | PAGE 8

DIVERSIONS | PAGE 6

THE DIAMONDBACK TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009

99TH YEAR | ISSUE NO. 135

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

SGA Pres. Four sought in strong-arm robbery accused of Group attacks alumnus outside Annapolis Hall early Sunday morning improper job hiring BY NICK RHODES Staff writer

University Police are looking for four individuals in connection to the strong-arm robbery of an alumnus near Annapolis Hall early Sunday morning. The incident is the first such

crime this month and comes only days after an assault outside the bars early Friday morning, making it the second crime alert sent out by University Police this week. Until the first crime alert, none had been sent out since March 30. At about 2:30 a.m. Sunday, the victim, a university alumnus, was

parking his car alone in the metered parking lot of Lehigh Road. The first suspect tapped on the driver’s side window of the car and asked to use the 22-year-old victim’s cell phone to make a call. The victim agreed, got out of his vehicle and handed over his phone, according to the crime alert.

Sachs says hiring was proper; Petition forces investigation’s launch

Please See ROBBERY, Page 3

Fighting a fatal fungus

BY DERBY COX Staff writer

A petition signed by 54 people has forced the SGA’s judicial body to investigate possible misconduct by President Jonathan Sachs, centering around an SGA position he filled last summer. The petition accuses Sachs of unspecified misconduct during the appointment of the Student Government Association’s assistant vice president for financial affairs last year. Sachs said he acted properly during the process and that the complaint was simply the result of an upset individual who was denied a position. “Anytime that you make an appointment, there are some disgruntled people, and that's what this case is all about,” he said. The complaint is related to Sachs’ rejection of Anjelica Dortch for the position, who was Vice President of Financial Affairs Jason Hofberg’s first choice. Sachs ultimately approved Hofberg’s second choice, Andrew Levine. The SGA Governance Board, which is made up of students otherwise unaffiliated with the organization, is required to investigate if more than 50 students sign a petition. But a search by The Diamondback revealed a significant portion of the signers aren’t listed in the student directory and appear to have no ties to the university. The petition is vaguely worded, and many of its signatories are members of the Student Power Party, which was sharply critical of Sachs during the SGA elections. The petition calls for the board to “investigate the conduct of SGA President Jonathan Sachs during the appointment process of the SGA Assistant Vice

The suspect then began walking away from the victim toward the South Hill section of the campus with the cell phone in hand. The victim began following the suspect when three other unidentified suspects surrounded him. One of the

Karen Lips looks for salamanders under a rock next to a stream near the campus. Salamanders, like other amphibians, are threatened by the fungus Lips is trying to stop the spread of. The fungus is already prevalent throughout North and South America. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

Biology professor Karen Lips is trying to save the world’s amphibians from extinction BY RICH ABDILL Staff writer

T

here is an international pandemic killing off millions of amphibians, and university biology professor Karen Lips is trying to save them. Lips and her colleagues discovered an unusual fungus called Chytridiomycosis that thrives in cold, moist environments

and infects the skin of amphibians, killing them by hampering their ability to absorb both oxygen and water. The effect on international ecosystems has been drastic, Lips said, and while she’s not optimistic about finding a cure for the fungus, she is trying to develop a better understanding of “chytrid” to better predict where it will hit next.

Please See FROGS, Page 3

Please See PETITION, Page 2

DOTS offering special parking permits for finals Students will be allowed to park near McKeldin, other study spots during night-time hours B D C WHERE YOU CAN PARK Y

ERBY

OX

Staff writer

Students cramming late at night for their final exams this semester will be able to park near popular study areas around the campus as a result of a new DOTS initiative. The Department of Transportation Services plans to offer special overnight parking permits that officials hope will help prevent students from having to make long trips to their cars late at night. The permits,

■ Near Skinner Hall — Lot W1, Lot Y ■ Near Susquehanna Hall — Lot S4 ■ Near the engineering building — Lot T ■ Near the Cambridge Community — Lot MM2 ■ Near Worcester Hall — Lot A, Lot D ■ Near the Mowatt Lane Parking Garage — Lot U6

A full deck and an empty pool Lack of water doesn’t deter sunbathing students BY TIRZA AUSTIN Senior staff writer

Sunbathers everywhere — and not a drop of water to cool them. The deck of the Eppley Recreation Center’s outdoor pool was covered with sunbathing students yesterday, but the pool itself was devoid of water. Even though the pool opened on Maryland Day, swimmers will be denied an outdoor pool on the campus for at least the immediate future. The university has yet to meet a federal mandate to upgrade its drain covers, and until it does, the pool must remain empty. Despite having known about the mandate since before the start of the academic year, Associate Director

Please See PERMITS, Page 3

Please See POOL, Page 2

Despite an empty pool, students have flocked to the deck to bask in the sun. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

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THE DIAMONDBACK | NEWS | TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009

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WE WANT YOU Story ideas? News tips? E-mail them to The Diamondback at newsdesk.dbk@gmail.com

NEWSMAKERS

Sachs to face hearing by end of semester PETITION, from Page 1 President of Financial Affairs.” Dortch declined to comment on the pending investigation other than to say the petition was designed “to look at the SGA constitution in terms of an appointment process that could possibly treat people unfairly.” “I was treated unfairly during this entire appointment process,” Dortch added. “And it needs to be looked at so it doesn’t happen to someone else.” Dortch said the Governance Board told her the signers of the petition would remain confidential, but the document was mailed to The Diamondback by a person who was unlisted in the university directory. Sachs declined to say why he didn’t approve Dortch, but said he acted appropriately during the appointment process. “It was a judgment call, and I know I did the right thing,” Sachs said. “That discretion is prescribed in the by-laws to protect the organization.” Hofberg said he thought Sachs had denied the appointment in response to Dortch’s sometimes confrontational style, which he said she exhibited as a member of the finance committee before he made the appointment. “My understand is that [Sachs] felt she wouldn’t work well within the organization,” Hofberg said. Matt Verghese, who served as Sachs’s chief of staff last semester, said a desire to bring a fresh perspective to the position was a primary factor in Sachs’s decision, but that temperament was also a consideration. The Governance Board needs to select a new member before a hearing on the issue can occur, but the hearing is scheduled to take place before the end of the semester, Governance Board Chief Justice Rudi Sarna said. Josef Parker, who was elected from the Student Power Party to serve as a neighboring commuter legislator in the SGA next year, said he signed the petition to ensure that appointments are made carefully in the future. “I want to make sure that people who are getting jobs are qualified, because we are talking about a huge budget,” he said. Many signers of the petition were affiliated with the Student Power Party, including Malcolm Harris, the party’s presidential candidate, and Julia Burke, the party’s candidate for vice president of academic affairs. But several signers of the petition also appear to not be enrolled at the university. For example, there are no students named James Byrnes, Taylor Hibert or DeLante Curtis in the university directory, but all three signed the petition. Dortch said she believes all the signatures are from university students. coxdbk@gmail.com

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‘Dedicated to protecting America’ University aims to raise profile, aid security with new building BY KEVIN ROBILLARD Senior staff writer

While they won’t likely be developing exploding pens, dagger shoes or rocket-firing cigarettes, researchers at a new universityaffiliated center will be creating cutting-edge technology for federal intelligence agencies. The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency, located at the M Square Research Park — a joint venture between the university and private developers located down the street from the College Park Metro Station — was officially dedicated yesterday. While high-ranking Congressional members said the agency would be particularly crucial to national security, university officials were confident the agency will add to the school’s prestige. “This is about dedicating a

building that’s dedicated to protecting America,” said Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), a member of the Senate committee that oversees federal intelligence agencies. “Make no mistake, in the 21st century, the four horsemen of the apocalypse are stampeding across the globe.” IARPA, an outgrowth of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, was created in the 1950s to engage in high-risk, high-reward research for the military. The agency is supposed to engage in what university President Dan Mote called “farout thinking.” DARPA has since developed the satellite-based global positioning system and the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network, one of the early precursors to the Internet. IARPA aims to engage in similar projects to help the nation’s intelligence organization devel-

University President Dan Mote unveils the design for the new headquarters of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency headquarters Monday at MSquare off River Road in College Park. JAMES B. HALE/THE DIAMONDBACK

op both high- and low-tech ways of information gathering. “Intelligence is the best defense against terrorism and Russia and China and all those we’re competing against,” U.S. Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (DMd.) said. Ruppersberger, Mikulski and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), who represents College Park, took credit for bringing IARPA

to M Square after what they said was a rough battle with Virginia’s congressional delegation. “It is another step in expansion of the technology and research base at the university,” Hoyer said. While most of the government officials in attendance stressed technological development, Mote said researchers at IARPA would also work in the social

and life sciences fields, adding that they could also serve as adjunct faculty members and possibly take on students as research assistants. “We were caught with our pants down on Sept. 11, not because of technology, but because there were a lot of cultural differences we didn’t understand,” Mote said. Mote and Hoyer both emphasized having the agency nearby would naturally help to better the university’s reputation. “It increases the prestige of the university from which students will be receiving a degree,” Hoyer said. The university already has a base of students and researchers focusing on national security with two federallyfunded research groups: the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism and the Center for the Advanced Study of Language. robillarddbk@gmail.com

Pool upgrades strands students in the heat POOL, from Page 1 for Aquatics Carrie Tupper said the pool might not be filled before the end of the semester, but she was hopeful it could open during the next week. Meanwhile, some students bemoaned the loss of the pool even as they relaxed near the empty concrete basin in yesterday’s 90-degree heat. “It’s a pretty big bummer,” said junior public health major Naomi Kruger, who was tanning on the pool deck yesterday afternoon. “It’s much better to go to the pool if there is water. It lets you stay out longer. It’s a really sucky situation, because it’s really hot right now.” Taylor Betancourt, a freshman in letters and sciences, was mad when she found out the pool would not be open two weeks ago. “I was looking forward to the pool being open for so long,” Betancourt said. “It reminds me of summer.” The delay, Tupper said, has

two causes. Campus Recreation Services first encountered problems working out the details of the contract to upgrade the pool. Contractors originally said the upgrades would cost $100,000, but university officials have managed to lower the cost of the project to $20,000, she said. Causing the current delay, Tupper said, is a massive backlog from suppliers and contractors. Since the law — which aims to improve pool safety by preventing swimmers from becoming stuck in drains — was signed by former President George W. Bush in December 2007, every public pool in the country has been required to upgrade its drain covers, causing demand for the essential parts to dramatically outstrip supply. The university tried to make do by opening the pool deck and turning on a misting fountain for sunbathers to cool off. But without water in the pool, which was left

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uncovered, roped off and still being watched by four lifeguards, the experience wasn’t the same. “[The pool staying closed] would ruin the end of our year,” said Alex Selarnick, a freshman government and politics major who said he had planned on coming to the pool on every day with nice weather for the rest of the semester. “It provides a nice social scene, but it defeats the purpose [to not have water in the pool].” taustindbk@gmail.com

The outdoor pool on North Campus remains empty as sunbathers lounge around it. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK


TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009 | NEWS | THE DIAMONDBACK

Construction worker in critical condition after fall BY NICK RHODES Staff writer

A male construction worker fell from the fourth floor scaffolding of the South Campus Commons Building 7 construction site yesterday afternoon and is in critical condition, police said. University Police and the Prince George’s County Fire Department responded to the injured person call around 2:20 p.m. University Police spokesman Paul Dillon said the unidentified 26-year-old male was transported to a Baltimore hospital and is now in critical condition. Dillon said he was unsure of the specific injuries, but said the man suffered broken bones and

a leg injury. University Police do not anticipate a criminal investigation but said the university’s Department of Environmental Safety and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration — a federal organization that works to prevent work-related injuries— will investigate the incident. No one else was injured. Attempts to reach officials from either Whiting-Turner, the company building Commons 7, or Capstone Management, which manages Commons properties, were unsuccessful. Staff writer Darren Botelho contributed to this report. rhodesdbk@gmail.com

No weapon was used in strong-arm robbery ROBBERY, from Page 1 suspects punched the victim in the head, stunning him for a brief period of time. University Police spokesman Paul Dillon said there is no evidence a weapon was used. When the victim regained consciousness, he saw the four suspects heading toward South Campus Dining Hall and realized he was missing his watch, Blackberry and wallet. The victim was transported to a local area hospital where he was treated for a minor injury and released, police said. The suspect who took the phone is described by the crime alert as a black male, 5-foot-10, who wore a

multi-colored shirt with white stripes at the time of the robbery. The victim could not provide a description of the other three suspects, according to the crime alert. University Police are reviewing video surveillance footage in the area and encourage anyone with information about the incident to contact them. Dillon advised against lending cell phones to strangers. He said cell phones are more common than ever and most people already have one. He suggested thinking twice before giving someone your personal property. rhodesdbk@gmail.com

3

RHA leads talks on legal drinking age Administrators say talks have helped open their eyes to drinking issues BY DANA CETRONE Staff writer

Students and administrators gathered yesterday to discuss the legal drinking age in the last of a three-dialogue series aimed at opening discussion on the typically taboo subject of underage drinking. About 11 students, administrators and health experts participated in the Residence Hall Association’s final Amethyst Dialogue of the year, held to further the RHA’s Responsible Action Policy, a resolution passed recently in support of a Good Samaritan policy and furthering alcohol education on the campus. The organization plans to send information and opinions gathered at the dialogues to the Alcohol Coalition, a group organized by the University Health Center that aims to educate students about safe drinking practices. They hope to inspire change in programs such as AlcoholEdu and eChug to make them more relatable and relevant for students. “If AlcoholEdu was more applicable and realistic, people wouldn’t just ignore it,” RHA President Alex Beuchler said. “We hope an overhaul of this program will be a productive way to reach students.” Beuchler said that although the dialogues consisted of only small groups of students, RHA members use their best judgment to help flesh out ideas and assess the successes and failures of the dialogues. Depending on what they determine, the RHA may continue to hold Amethyst Dialogues — named after the Amethyst Initia-

tive, which university President Dan Mote and University System of Maryland Chancellor Brit Kirwan signed to open discussion about alcohol-related issues, including the legal drinking age — in coming semesters. “The dialogues are very issuedriven,” Beuchler said. “A lot of people are invested in subjects like the Good Samaritan policy.” Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Warren Kelley said that despite Mote’s decision to sign the Amethyst Initiative, the drinking age wasn’t even a question the administration had considered taking a stand on until it was brought up at an Alcohol Summit in October, which drew students, faculty and experts from across the state to discuss alcohol practices and lowering the legal drinking age. Beuchler, too, was inspired by the summit, and soon after established the RHA’s Alcohol Dialogue initiative to engage the rest of the student body. “I don’t know that we thought about the drinking age, because we all know people under 21 abuse alcohol, and we know that people over 21 abuse alcohol,” Kelley said. RHA Finance Officer Rachel Vieder noted regardless of what the legal drinking age is, students will still engage in questionable practices. “There are still people who are 21 who pass out in the grass,” Vieder said. “Society cannot be their babysitter.” The group discussion focused on whether a lower drinking age could smooth the transition from high school to college and how

RHA President Alex Beuchler discusses the legal drinking age with students and university officials. VINCE SALAMONE/THE DIAMONDBACK

drinking is seen as a “forbidden fruit,” tempting students to drink while they are legally forbidden from doing so. “I think it’s the stigmatics of our culture that younger people shouldn’t be drinking,” RHA Public Relations Officer Alicia Hartlove said. Only one student involved in the discussion disagreed, noting that lowing the drinking age “makes it easier for the bad apples to screw it up for themselves.” The group brainstormed ways to mitigate harm from alcohol, ranging from “drinking licenses” that could be revoked based on the person’s behavior and a grace period between 18 and 21 where punishments are harsher, similar to how many states handle issuing driver’s licenses to young people. “Although we cannot pass a law, the best we can do is create an environment where drinking still exists that’s relaxed,” Kelley said. Beuchler said she hopes students and administrators who participated in the dialogues walked away better informed

about how different populations perceive the alcohol culture on this campus. “We want to review all three talks and assess their success and contributions. We will try to figure out what worked, what didn’t work and why,” Beuchler said. The dialogue was held in the wake of the University Senate’s recent near-unanimous support of a Good Samaritan protocol. But the senate is holding off the decision of amending university policy until next spring. In the meantime, Beuchler said the RHA will continue to work with the Department of Resident Life, the Office of Student Conduct and other student groups to change what they can. “It’s a student-led effort, and people have been very open so far,” Beuchler said. “Whether they are directly involved in the talks now, or simply their peers are helping us with planning ideas, it should have a great effect on all Maryland students.” cetronedbk@gmail.com

Allen: Registration for finals Fungus endangers at least 2,500 frog species parking to open next week FROGS, from Page 1

PERMITS, from Page 1 which will be valid from May 12 to May 20, will be usable from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m., DOTS Director David Allen said. Nearly 80 spots will be made available for the program, including several near McKeldin Library and the engineering building. The permits, which will be available in the DOTS office starting May 7, are free for students who already have parking permits and will cost $30 for everyone else for the week. Gabi Band, the Greek legislator for the Student Government Association who came up with the idea while trying to find places to study late at night, said the program would make studying safer for students. “In my freshman, sophomore, junior years, I’d need to drive to some place quiet to study,” Band said. “I’d have to park somewhere farther away, and then I’d leave at like 4 [a.m.] and I’d have to walk to my car.” Band said he saw the program as a low-cost strategy to help make the campus safer. “Yes, the best thing to do would be to put more police on the street,” he said. “But there are a lot of small programs like this that you can implement to deal with crime.” To gather data for the permit, the SGA set up shop earlier this month in the Stamp Student Union, armed with thumbtacks and a large map of

the campus. More than 200 students stuck thumbtacks into the map indicating where they prefer to study, SGA Senior Vice President Joanna Calabrese said. As expected, many chose McKeldin Library, but other popular spots included the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library and Van Munching Hall, Calabrese said. One student even chose the Shuttle-UM building. The SGA then took that data to Allen, who said they chose what areas to include in the program based on the map and their own data which indicated which parking lots generally had overnight vacancies. Under the plan, spaces from eight parking lots on the campus will be made available: three in Lot W1 and 25 in Lot Y, which is near Skinner Hall; two in Lot S4, which is beside Susquehanna Hall; 14 in Lot T, which is beside the engineering building; five in Lot MM2, which is next to the Cambridge Community; 19 in Lot A and four in Lot D, which are near Worcester Hall; and six in Lot U6, which is beside Mowatt Lane Parking Garage. Allen said he considered the permit program a pilot and that it could be tweaked in the future. “My ultimate goal in the future is that this could be applied to weeknight studying or midterm studying,” Band said. coxdbk@gmail.com

Lips began to notice things going wrong while doing graduate research with the University of Miami in the Costa Rican mountains in the early 1990s. Lips went to the Central American cloud forests — wooded areas high enough to be continuously shrouded in mist — during the summer to catalog amphibians, especially frogs, which are easier to find than salamanders and other creatures that live underground. She and two of her colleagues discovered four or five new species; several years later, though, she began to notice changes. “Before, we’d find 20 species and 100 animals in a night,” she said. “We came back and we’d find four in a week. ... How does everything look the same, except you lose 40 species essentially overnight?” She returned to the United States to find that other places, including the National Zoo in Washington, were having similar problems. “They said, ‘We’ve got frogs with something weird in their skin,’ and I came back and said, ‘I’ve got frogs with something weird in their skin,’” Lips said. After further research, Lips realized the chytrid fungus that she first encountered in Central America was responsible for the damage to the amphibians’ natural environment. At least 2,500

Biologist Karen Lips is researching trends among frogs to anticipate where the fungus will affect next. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

species of the 6,300 currently known frog species are “endangered or declining” because of the fungus, Lips said, and the pace of extinction is rapidly increasing. “That’s 100 species in 20 years,” she said. “Before that it was like, two.” But while Lips, who came to the university in January and will start teaching in the fall, is working with researchers to try and understand the fungus and how it spreads, she says a cure for the malady is still far off. While affected creatures can be cured in captivity with a chemical wash, returning them to their indigenous environments means the animals will just contract the fungus again. “Everywhere we look, we find it,” Lips said. “Asia is pretty clean, but North America, Central America, South America — they’re wiped out.”

And though scientists are considering genetic engineering as an answer, all they can do now is treat the amphibians in captivity or hope they develop an immunity to the fungus. Though Lips has been working with frogs for two decades, she wasn’t always so specific in her field of study — while pursuing her undergraduate degree at the University of South Florida, she knew she wanted to work with animals, but that was all. “I was going to be a vet,” she said. “But then I got a job making double the minimum wage catching turtles and I said, ‘This is the life for me.’” Lips said her research is moving out of Central America and becoming more focused on the U.S., specifically the already-affected Appalachian Mountains. The Great Smoky Mountains National

Park that straddles the border between Tennessee and North Carolina will be the first site she tackles. Though there is evidence the fungus has already passed through the Appalachian Mountains, its harsh seasonal climates keep the fungus from growing year-round and give amphibians a chance to bounce back in the winter and summer, she said. Yet while Lips isn’t giving up on the fight for the frogs, students say the problem may not draw the attention of too many people. “I mean, if I had to pick a cause to fight for, this probably wouldn’t be too high on the list,” sophomore sociology major Sophie Kieffer said. “I mean, not that it’s not important, but if I had to choose between saving the frogs and feeding the children, I would choose the children over the frogs. People would probably care if it started affecting people, though.” But even without an onslaught of public support, Lips isn’t giving up. “People might say, ‘Oh, it’s frogs; they’re nice, but what does it have to do with me?,’” Lips said. “But they eat a lot of insects, insects that carry a lot of diseases. And amphibians aren’t that far away from mammals. If all the dogs and horses and monkeys and cattle were dropping dead, people would be screaming.” abdilldbk@gmail.com

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THE DIAMONDBACK | TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009

Opinion

THE DIAMONDBACK

STEVEN OVERLY

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Staff Editorial

Guest Column

Immigration education

Prayers of the past

W

Some argue immigrants don’t stand to benefit significantly from a college e must protect our country from the “revolutionary and incendiary horde of foreigners now seeking our shores.” After all, these education anyway, because without documentation they can’t get choice jobs, “long-haired, wild-eyed, bad-smelling, atheistic, reckless foreign college degree or not. But that points to the need for more legislation, not less. wretches” are undermining not only our labor system, but also The federal Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act would our very American identity. That’s the rhetoric spouted by the (aptly named) provide undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as minors and Know-Nothing party of the 1880s, but it’s a tone of nativism that could just as had at least two years of college or military service a path to permanent resieasily be found on an episode of Hannity & Colmes. It’s the language that’s dency. Only through such a multi-pronged and comprehensive legislative been leveled against Jews, Europeans, the Irish, Catholics and against His- approach will we be able to transform a systemic problem into an asset. In the 1982 Supreme Court case Plyler v. Doe, the court panic immigrants. It’s part of a dogma that rails against immiruled that states must provide the undocumented children of gration, against naturalization and certainly against providing immigrants with primary and secondary educations; to do the children of immigrants in-state tuition rates. But the fact of the matter is it’s a reactionary position that doesn’t just limit Granting undocumented otherwise would be in violation of the 14th Amendment, which ensures equal protection under the law for everyone the opportunities available to immigrants; it harms our nation immigrants in-state within a state’s borders. The ruling quotes the District Court’s as a whole. Stella M. Flores, an assistant professor of public policy and tuition rates makes sense. opinion, which notes that those “[a]lready disadvantaged as a result of poverty, lack of English-speaking ability and undenihigher education at Vanderbilt University, recently completed a study evaluating the impact of offering lower, in-state tuition rates to undoc- able prejudices ... will become permanently locked into the lowest socioecoumented immigrants. The result, unsurprisingly, is that offering lower tuition nomic class.” We can’t afford to continue allowing reactionary arguments blind rates makes these immigrants far more likely to enroll in college. At this point, us to the opportunity we have to empower our nation’s disadvantaged and to it’s tiresome to review the personal and societal benefits that accompany a col- benefit society as a whole in the process. Time and again, comprehensive lege degree. Even disregarding the opportunity to pursue graduate degrees, immigration reform has failed at the national level. We hope to see President people with bachelor’s degrees earn an average of $20,000 a year more than Barack Obama’s administration buck that trend, but this state needs to join the those with just a high school education, and they have the types of jobs that are 10 states who have already granted the children of illegal immigrants in-state far less susceptible to being outsourced and shipped overseas. Unfortunately, tuition. The real threat to the “American identity” in this debate doesn’t come this month, a bill in the state legislature that would have provided immigrants from illegal immigrants; it comes from pundits and politicians who fight to limit the scope of liberty and justice for all. with in-state tuition failed.

Our View

Editorial Cartoon: Mike O’Brien

Native Americans: Give power to the persecuted

A

Facebook message asked me to sign a petition demanding that officials re-instate two Native American studies classes the university won’t teach next semester. And I started thinking, is there a more neglected and forgotten minority in the United States today than Native Americans? Counting American Indians and Alaska natives, the 2007 U.S. Census puts the population at about 0.8 percent of the United States, which is still millions of people. And according to the 2000 U.S. Census, about half a million reside on reservations. The economic opportunities on these reservations are scarce, and there is tremendous hardship. Unemployment rates are more than 50 percent, along with the highest rate of poverty in the nation. The result is, for practically every measurable social statistic, the Native American population ranks at the bottom. Anyone who reads my columns knows

MATT

DERNOGA I tie everything and anything into energy and environmental issues. No need to hesitate here. Native American reservations contain large quantities of natural resources, including energy. There is little to no access or control over as to how they are used — 65 percent of North America’s uranium lies on these reservations, as is 80 percent of all the uranium mining and 100 percent of all the uranium processing in the country. The result has been high rates of cancer, respiratory ailments, miscarriages and birth defects. The water and soil are loaded with lead, radium, thorium and other toxins. People who work in the

mines rarely receive clothing, protection, medical evaluation or compensation. There is almost no wealth to show for this exploitation, and our tax dollars subsidize it daily through our funding of uneconomical nuclear power. There is an ironic twist, though. Throughout history, as Native Americans were thrown off their land and sectioned off in reservations, we thought we were giving them land no one really wanted — land in the Midwest, where the sun was brightest and the wind strongest. We’re now in a time where we desperately need to increase renewable energy production to help address environmental, national security and economic problems, and the solar energy potential on tribal lands is 4.5 times the annual U.S. electric generation. The reservations on the Great Plains have a windpower potential that tops 300 gigawatts, half our annual electric generation. Everyone wins with a clean energy economy, but I can’t think of a group in this country who would benefit

more than Native Americans. This would explain why I’ve been seeing and hearing a lot more of groups like the Indigenous Environmental Network. A good climate bill, a green energy bill and a new electric grid only benefit indigenous people if they are involved in the legislative process. We can’t abuse their renewable resources like we’ve abused their traditional resources. They need to be a partner, not a tool. The less we understand about their culture and history, the harder this will be. We’re headed in the right direction on energy. I have a hunch. In a few decades, it will be as impossible for the university to abolish Native American courses as African American or women’s studies — lack of funding be damned. For now, they can get away with it. Or can they? Consider this my petition signature. Matt Dernoga is a junior government and politics major. He can be reached at mdernoga@umd.edu.

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MATTHEW J. BARRY Déjà vu at the alma mater! More than 20 years ago, the American Civil Liberties Union sued to stop prayers at university commencement ceremonies. I was the plaintiff, graduating in December 1987. The lawsuit was filed after Chancellor John Slaughter refused to discontinue the constitutional violation. The day before the commencement ceremony, the judge denied our request for a temporary injunction, declaring, “If he’s really so upset, he can come late and leave early... or stand out in the hall.” (What a sweetheart!) So I skipped the ceremony, even though I graduated summa cum laude. I wasn’t going to participate in a ceremony that treated me like a second-class citizen. As an atheist, I wasn’t part of the “us” or “we” mentioned during the prayers. Fast forward to 2009. The commencement still contains offensive prayer, the guy in charge of the university still ignores the Constitution and the arguments in defense of the prayers haven’t changed. One common argument states most students are religious, so they should be allowed to pray. Too bad if nonbelievers are offended. Well, most students at the university are white. Would it be OK to devote two minutes of the ceremony to white students? No? Then why have two minutes devoted only to religious students? Would black students feel excluded during a whiteonly part of the commencement? Of course. That is also how atheists feel during the theist-only section. The ceremony should unite us, not divide us. Besides, religious students can pray whenever they like — before, during or after the ceremony. Another argument is the commencement ceremony is voluntary and, therefore, including religious aspects is OK. Public high school graduations are also voluntary, but the Supreme Court ruled prayers at those graduations unconstitutional in 1992. The government can’t endorse religion regardless of whether we’re forced to witness that endorsement. Many claim the prayers are nondenominational, and therefore, they can’t offend anyone. Kyle Ingels, the university’s Catholic chaplain, said “the prayer is a very, very inclusive prayer” that is “not directed at any particular deity that would be offensive to people.” This Orwellian claim of inclusiveness can quickly be dismissed by reminding the good chaplain that atheists do not pray and thus cannot be “included” in said religious ritual. It makes no difference to an atheist if the god being invoked is specific or generic. In a 1988 column, Lisa Voss, The Diamondback’s opinion editor, asked, “Why insult [a] deity with a general, wishy-washy prayer uttered by an intermediary of the wrong religion? Why not thank whatever god for academic success by going to a church, synagogue, mosque or whatever before or after the graduation ceremony? That way, everyone could spend what they believe is an appropriate amount of time thanking whatever deity they wish in appropriate words, and no one would be offended.” Her suggestion made sense 20 years ago and still does today. I’m encouraged that the University Senate voted overwhelmingly (unanimously among the student senators) to end the invocation. It appears that removing the divisive prayer is inevitable, just as soon as the university gets a president who respects the separation of church and state. Also, I noticed the current ceremony has only an opening invocation. In 1987, the ceremony had two prayers. The closing benediction must have been jettisoned sometime in the intervening two decades. One down, one to go! Matthew J. Barry is a university alumnus from the class of 1987. He can be reached at mattb20012002@yahoo.com.

AIR YOUR VIEWS Address your letters or guest columns to the Opinion Desk at opinion.dbk@gmail.com. All letters and guest columns must be signed. Include your full name, year, major and day- and nighttime phone numbers. Please limit letters to 300 words. Please limit guest columns to 600 words. Submission of a letter or guest column constitutes an exclusive, worldwide, transferable license to The Diamondback of the copyright in the material in any media. The Diamondback retains the right to edit submissions for content and length.


TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009 | THE DIAMONDBACK

5

Features HOROSCOPESTELLA WILDER

CROSSWORD

© 2009 UNITED FEATURES SYNDICATE

Previous Day’s Puzzle Solved:

TODAY’S CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY:

S RE T S A S R O C K

A N T S

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Self-knowledge is perhaps your greatest single asset; you know yourself inside and out, and you’re not likely to be surprised by any inconsistent or unexpected behavior. You can be flexible, but you will always hold on to your ideals through thick and thin.

41 45

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Also born on this date are AnnMargret, actress, singer, entertainer; Penelope Cruz, actress; Jay Leno, comedian, late-night TV host; Lionel Barrymore, actor; Harper Lee, author; James Monroe, U.S. president.

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B

MOS F O A P T I D S T ENED S WU R S L ADY S PHERE L E L AND D I AU L D CAM M E L L OWE I ANS RE F L E X H I RE S RE I DE A PUM NERD OB I ORE S P E T

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orn today, you are almost always certain in your likes and dislikes, and in what you want from those around you and the world at large. You are one of the most solid, grounded and unequivocal individuals born under your sign, and once you have started down a path of your own choosing, you will follow where it goes, come what will. You are adept at dodging obstacles and at dealing with them directly when you are unable to dodge them, and you know how to learn from your mistakes and put those lessons to use almost immediately.

R.J. BENTLEY’S

E D I E

2

— accompli Space lead-in Pesters Boxing wins Countdown number

D A L Y

1

56 57 58 59 62

50 Snazzy 52 Flared garment (hyph.) 53 Viking name 54 Alley Oop’s girl 55 Climb sharply

38 Trespass 40 Young trees 43 Ape studier — Fossey 45 Source of light 48 Incites (2 wds.)

29 Fix the lawn 30 Organic com pound 31 River in Europe 32 Loses steam 35 Scruggs and Hines

61 Discolor ACROSS 63 Pike’s discovery 1 Superman’s girl 64 Easy as falling 5 Legendary off — — pioneer 65 Due for payment 10 Zip or area — 66 Therefore 14 Graceful 67 Starlet’s entryway aspiration 15 Ell 68 Quick letters 16 Not resist 69 Antarctic sea 17 Social equal 18 Rain forest DOWN 19 Delight in 1 Reindeer herder 20 Foot care 2 Black-and-white 22 Store sign snack 24 Yalies 3 Finished a cake 25 66 and I-80 4 Piercing scream 26 Pack scavenger 5 Paris fortress 29 Say again 6 Distinctive 33 Mouths, in individuals zoology 7 Nothing but 34 Glossy 8 Ariz. neighbor 36 Raw fish dish 9 Combo bet at 37 Edible seaweed Belmont 39 Moves gingerly 10 Gigantic statue 41 Commotion 11 Kimono sashes 42 Revise 12 Hockey feint 44 Palace dweller 13 Got a load of 46 Compass dir. 21 Woeful cry 47 Rural sight 23 Not so many 49 San Diego team 25 Type in again 51 Dust collectors 52 Soprano — Gluck 26 One who brings bad luck 53 Exuding moisture 27 Bakery lure 56 Brash 28 Singer 60 Weird-sounding Mariah — bird

To see what is in store for you tomorrow, find your birthday and read the corresponding paragraph. Let your birthday star be your daily guide.

surely cut loose and have a good time. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You may be unusually wary and suspicious, but the reason is likely to elude you. Take things a step at a time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Be willing to do more than what is assigned if you expect to gain the confidence of those in charge. Use your initiative. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You may find that a few recent decisions have brought about one or two dangerous situations. The time has come to rethink your strategy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Interaction is based on more than facts and figures — even when financial issues are at the forefront. Psychology plays a key role. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — You’re going to want to do something for another, but you must consider your own rewards as well. Don’t forget to charge for your services.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Certain hard-and-fast realities are likely to dictate your decision-making throughout the day. You may regret having few choices. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — There’s no need for you to overcomplicate issues that are, in the main, relatively simple. Take things as they come. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — That which is beyond your control during the first part of the day may be entirely manageable later on. You’re learning quickly. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — You may find that you are both teacher and student, alternatively, throughout the day. Lessons learned can be put to immediate use. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Don’t be unreasonable in the demands you make of others. Take the time to consider the consequences of both thought and action. Copyright 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

TODAY’S HOROSCOPE SPONSORED BY:

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29 TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Personal pursuits may have to wait while you tend to one or two professional responsibilities that are not necessarily of your choosing. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You’re in no mood for fun and games when work is required. Later, when all is done, you can

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THE DIAMONDBACK | TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009

Diversions

ALSO RELEASED THIS WEEK: HEAVEN & HELL The Devil You Know

BEN LEE The Rebirth of Venus

NOFX Coaster

BEN FOLDS Ben Folds Presents: University a Cappella!

arts. music. living. movies. weekend.

Ben Folds recruited a series of university a cappella groups to cover his songs for a new album.

REVIEW | BOB DYLAN

Back on the borderline Bob Dylan knocks out another late-career gem BY ZACHARY HERRMANN Senior staff writer

Together Through Life — Bob Dylan’s 33rd studio LP — is a border album in the same sense that Orson Welles’s Touch of Evil is a border film. Both works focus on the physical boundary between the United States and Mexico (though Dylan is a little less explicit). But more importantly, they thematically ride the line between past and present, love and loneliness, light and darkness. Since Newsweek started streaming “I Feel a Change Comin’ On,” a lot has been said of Dylan’s supposed optimism in connection to President Barack Obama’s election. Depending on your political persuasion, though, this theory reeks of wishful thinking. “Well now, what’s the use in dreaming?/ You’ve got better things to do/ Dreams never did work for me anyway/ Even when they did come true,” Dylan sings (or, more appropriately, croaks). As the years have gone on, the man has certainly gotten more literal-minded and direct in his writing, but his songs are no less interesting for the shift. The “change comin’ on” doesn’t real-

ly come off as the same “change” Sam Cooke sang about before Dylan had even gone electric — it’s a more personal change on Dylan’s mind. Now that the possible trilogy the elusive artist hinted at after the release of Modern Times has come to a close, he’s in transition. And he knows it. Musically, Together Through Life fits in pretty comfortably with Love and Theft and Modern Times. Even at 67, Dylan is evolving and looking forward. He’s gone Tex-Mex before (“Romance in Durango”) — after he was a recluse and before he was a born-again Christian — and across an entire album, the aesthetic fits him well. In addition to his regular backing band, Dylan has assembled quite a few significant representatives of Americana for his latest album: guitarists David Hidalgo (Los Lobos) and Mike Campbell (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) and Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter, who receives writing credits on nine out of 10 album tracks. Sure, Dylan’s voice is a froggy notion of its former self (OK, so it wasn’t much to start with), but he’s the imperfect singer America has always deserved.

Classified CALL

That Dylan remains forcefully creative — unlike a certain electric car-slinging contemporary — this deep into his career is a blessing. Together Through Life gives off the impression we’ll never have to watch the legend fade into irrelevance. “Beyond Here Lies Nothin’” (see the Obama Age optimism?) sends us straight to the “boulevards of broken cars” in a sultry swing of trumpet, accordion and some ripping rhythm and lead guitar work. At the other end of the album, the finale paints a collapse of modern society, shrugged off by the narrator’s repetition of the song’s title: “It’s All Good.” Clearly, Dylan sees darkness on the horizon — remember, he sang out against Vietnam and the Cold War well before it was fashionable. However, not all is lost. Together Through Life gets both sides of the story. “Forgetful Heart” and “This Dream of You,” though admittedly sorrowful, are love (lost) songs, the former punctuated by some wonderfully murky lap guitar. Conversely, “Jolene” and “Shake Shake Mama” strut their lustiness, burning hard at a bluesy mid-tempo. Dylan’s post-millennial work has had a

Former Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter co-wrote nine of the 10 tracks on Bob Dylan’s latest album, Together Through Life. COURTESY OF ISOLATION.TV

pleasantly anachronistic quality, many thanks to his deft production under the Jack Frost pseudonym. Unlike Love and Theft and Modern Times before it, Together Through Life gets a little grittier. The cleaner sounds on the first two albums appear to have been Dylan’s (or Frost’s) reaction to Daniel Lanois’ shadowy production on Time Out of Mind. It’s nice to hear the reverb sink in a little around the edges, making for something of a compromise between Lanois’s echoing, underwater ambiance and Dylan’s more classic-inspired sound. Old folk singers do learn new tricks. But then again, at this point in his career, Dylan has seen and absorbed it all.

In contrast to Modern Times’ impossibly lofty, though largely successful, title, Together Through Life evokes something more intimate and relatable. As he once suggested on “If You See Her Say Hello,” maybe he’s too sensitive or just getting soft, but Dylan really has let his guard down. The default title track of sorts — “Life is Hard,” which Dylan wrote for director Olivier Dahan’s (La Vie En Rose) upcoming film — says it all. His road has been a bittersweet one thus far, full of love and loss. But it’s also getting richer all the time. zherrm@gmail.com

ALBUM: Together Through Life | VERDICT:

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THE DIAMONDBACK | TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2009

More NFL Draft coverage online

Sports

The five former Terp football players selected during the NFL Draft aren’t the only ones who will be joining NFL teams this offseason. A slew of Terps signed undrafted free agent deals after the draft, including center Edwin Williams, who will participate in the Washington Redskins rookie minicamp this week. Read an interview with Williams on TerrapinTrail.com.

Women’s lax surging late in games Despite trailing by one at halftime, Terps used another secondhalf scoring outburst to beat Duke in Sunday’s ACC title game BY KATE YANCHULIS Staff writer

Midfielder Bryn Holmes won 14-of-26 faceoffs in the Terps’ loss against North Carolina on Friday. JACLYN BOROWSKI/THE DIAMONDBACK

The ‘X’ man Holmes uses physical style as Terps’ premier faceoff option BY MICHAEL KATZ Staff writer

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - Bryn Holmes is tough. It's the first adjective off the tongue of anyone asked about the contact-ready faceoff specialist for the Terrapin men's lacrosse team. It was a word that came up often in the press conference following the Terps’ 16-10 loss on Friday to North Carolina in the ACC Tournament semifinals. “We had one of the toughest kids I've ever coached in 30 years facing off for us today,” coach Dave Cottle said of the junior, who sat stoically at the table. “I knew we were going to be more competitive on faceoffs, and I thought that was one thing we could change.” Holmes was sidelined with a groin injury during the two teams’ first meeting of the season in March. In that game, North Carolina's Shane Walterhoefer ran amok at the faceoff “X,” meeting little resistance. The Terps won just two faceoffs in 19 chances in that game. Holmes had won two faceoffs after the third draw of Friday’s game. With Carolina converting 50 percent of its shots in the first half, Holmes gave the Terps a chance by winning 11-of-17 faceoffs. His 5-of-6 mark in the second quarter kept the ball away from the Tar Heels, who looked poised to run away with the contest before intermission. “He’s a very, very tough competitor,” said Walterhoefer, who ranks second in the

nation with a .627 faceoff win percentage. “He may not have as good of technique as some other guys, but his toughness makes up for all the technique that he may not have.” That grit has earned Holmes the fourth-highest faceoff win percentage in the nation (.604). Friday, he battled Walterhoefer to a virtual stalemate, going 14-of-26, while the Tar Heel senior went 14-of-27. But in the second half, Walterhoefer said he began to hear the whistle better. As he got in a rhythm, Walterhoefer became unstoppable. As the Tar Heels continued to lengthen their lead, Holmes’ first-half impact became more obvious. Holmes, who has known Walterhoefer since their days in youth lacrosse, was too upset after the loss to revel in his personal success. “I don’t really care about winning faceoffs if we don't win,” he said after the game. But Cottle looked at the effort as a positive among the disappointments in the Terps’ firstround tournament exit. With the team needing to lean on someone at this late juncture in the season, perhaps that stability will come from the force in faceoffs. “The stats say 50-50, but I bet there are five or six faceoffs that might have gone possession one way or possession the other way,” Cottle said. “Bryn Holmes competed his tail off. … I thought Bryn was as tough as anybody on the field.” mkatzdbk@gmail.com

Baseball pressing forward after difficult weekend Terps got close, but didn’t finish at UNC BY MICHAEL LEMAIRE Staff writer

With the score 2-2 in the bottom of the seventh inning on Sunday, all the Terrapin baseball team needed to do was have reliever Ian Schwalenberg get two outs. On the road against No. 4 North Carolina, the Terps (20-24, 6-18 ACC) had an opportunity to steal an impressive win. Instead, Schwalenberg threw a fastball that hung over the plate, and Tar Heel second baseman Levi Michael hit a two-run home run that led to a 4-2 North Carolina victory and a series sweep. That situation embodied the type of weekend it was for the Terps, who had a chance to win in two of the three games only to watch the Tar Heels flex their muscles. “You have to give them a lot of credit,” coach Terry Rupp said. “They are the best team in the country and they showed it. I think Friday and Sunday we put ourselves in a position to win those games with the way we played.” Aside from allowing Saturday’s game to get out of hand late, the Terps played the Tar Heels fairly evenly throughout the weekend. After being down early on Friday, the team rallied and had the tying run at the plate in the bottom of the seventh inning before the Tar Heels ended the inning and finished off the game. On Sunday they outhit North Carolina (35-11, 16-7) 10-6, but once again failed to muster hits in key situations. Even in Saturday’s matchup, a game the Terps eventually lost

Terps vs. James Madison Where: Shipley Field When: Today, 4 p.m. Radio: WMUCsports.com 14-3, they were still in decent position to come back when pitcher Adam Kolarek entered the game with the Terps trailing 3-1. Kolarek only got one out while allowing four hits and six runs. “Adam just needs to develop an out pitch that he can throw with two strikes. He just couldn’t get guys out and that is a direct result of his breaking ball being below average right now,” Jim Farr said. “This series showed our guys that we were right there with the exception of one pitch here, one pitch there.” Now the Terps are preparing for two difficult midweek games against James Madison and West Virginia. Rupp emphasized that the team is still motivated to play well, even if their ACC Tournament hopes are on life support. “We want to win all our remaining games,” Rupp said. “The ACC Tournament isn’t out of reach yet, mathematically it’s getting there, but we still have a lot to play for.” lemairedbk@gmail.com

After Duke’s eighth consecutive goal, the Terrapin women’s lacrosse team found themselves down four with less than 24 minutes left in Sunday’s ACC Championship game. But the Terps never doubted their ability to stage a comeback. “I knew we could get back in it,” said midfielder Caitlyn McFadden, the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. “Duke was down four in the first half and came back. I said, ‘You guys, listen. We’re still in this, we still have plenty of time.’” She was right. At the end of the season, the Terps (18-0, 5-0 ACC) have thrived on pressure in the last 30 minutes of games and grabbed victories with second-half surges. Against the No. 3-seeded Blue Devils, the top-seeded Terps had two four-goal runs late in the game, doubling their firsthalf goal total to snatch a 1211 victory and their first ACC title since 2003. “We’ve been playing our best lacrosse in the second half,” McFadden said. “We just keep our heads up, keep having fun and work together. So we knew we could come back in it.” In four of the team’s last five matches, including the conference tournament, the Terps have been separated from their opponents by one goal at halftime — down one to Duke and

Midfielder Brandi Jones scored a late goal in the Terps’ 12-11 win against Duke in Sunday’s ACC Tournament final. The Terps scored eight goals in the second half. ALLISON AKERS/THE DIAMONDBACK

Johns Hopkins, tied with North Carolina, and up one against the Cavaliers in the ACC semifinals. But despite these close scores, runs in the second half ensured victory. “You just play those 30 minutes as hard as you can,” said goalie Brittany Dipper, who had six of her 10 saves in the second half. “Just step up, go out there and play the Maryland way.” The Terps haven’t just scored more, but have also performed better all around the field in the latter 30 minutes. In those four

games, they scored 20 more goals during second half of the matches than in the first half, controlled 18 more draws and had 16 less fouls, especially important against Duke, who notched three man-up goals in the first half thanks to Terp yellow cards. Their game against Virginia Tech on April 18 serves as the only exception in the last five games. The Terps held an 11-4 lead at the half and needed no late onslaught of goals to win.

But even though McFadden and attacker Karri Ellen Johnson acknowledged that neckand-neck first halves can be frustrating, the Terps said being able to step up in stressful situations gives them an edge. “Our girls have just been fighting all season,” coach Cathy Reese said. “Whatever happens, they just take it and they fight for it. There’s been a lot of challenges and everybody’s stepped up.” kyanchulisdbk@gmail.com


April 28, 2009