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discipline

architecture journal Arizona State University Herberger Institute of Design Spring 2018 | Issue 04


COVER IMAGE CREDIT: ZACH BUNDY AND NICK SHEKERJIAN


“In time, we will find our way and rediscover the role of architecture and man-made forms in creating a new civilized landscape. It is essentially a question of rediscovering symbols and believing in them once again.” 1 Re-Engagement At the core of architecture is a critical mastery of interaction, engaging with various dynamic stakeholders: clients, collaborators, and citizens. The profession has an innate habit of constant re-engagement, managing a fragile pendulum of site and context, temporal qualities, constraints and opportunities, and most fundamental, the encounters with people. The spaces we create should consider the values of human relation with hopes of evoking a sense of belonging and enhancement of place. These qualities inherently mark the industry as one that must continually reinvent and shed itself of old paradigms, reconnecting with its primary, fundamental obligations: to the public good, to the profession, to the environment. We should look to embrace this cycle, that much like the iterative process within design, allows us to be collaborative forward thinkers, unafraid to look back and engage one another in creating a finer composition for Architecture as a whole, and the societies it serves and influences. “In all the examples... there is a transformative intent to make the status quo better, but the means are very varied, from activism to pedagogy, publications to networking, making stuff to making policy - all done in the name of empowering others. In Bruno Latour’s terms, critical attention is shifted from architecture as a matter of fact to architecture as a matter of concern. As matters of fact, buildings can be subjected to rules and methods, and they can be treated as objects on their own terms. As matters of concern, they enter into socially embedded networks, in which the consequences of architecture are of much more significance than the objects of architecture.” 2 1

Jackson, J. B. (1994). A Aense of lace, a Sense of Time. New Haven: Yale University Press. 2

Awan, N., Schneider, T., & Till, J. (2011). Spatial Agency: Other Ways of Doing Architecture. WRITTEN BY: BRITTANY BAILEY, HECTOR DIAZ, NIKA PNIAK, BRANDON POWELL, NASRYNN CHOWDRY, AND ISAIAH JONES-LANE EDITED BY: PHIL HORTON

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PREFACE | A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

The journey of Discipline -- a student-created, student-edited journal of Architecture at ASU -- has now produced its fourth issue and is truly establishing itself a contemporary tradition within The Design School. This annual publication has become a valued representation of the culture of this school, showcasing content from students, alumni, faculty, and local professionals alike. With more than 13,000 reads in over 100 countries over the past few years, we are all astounded at the breadth and diversity of our growing audience. This year the journal had its largest student editing committee yet, comprised of five exceptional students, all of whom represent the various years in the Architecture program, both undergraduate and graduate. This team’s investment and commitment to the success of this fourth issue of Discipline was paramount, and I am so grateful for their support and collaboration in making this issue a success. This journal will without a doubt continue to thrive under their leadership. It has been an honor to have the opportunity to be involved with the publication throughout my graduate academic career. Curating this year’s issue was an immense privilege, and one that I hope is evident in the care and quality of it’s execution. I want to express my sincerest gratitude to Professor Phil Horton, and to M.Arch ‘17 alumna Cathleen Kebert, for their mentorship and constant expression of confidence in our team. I am excited to see how our journal will continue to both cultivate and demonstrate the ambitions and interests of The Design School and it’s community of future professionals.

A LETTER FROM THE COMMITTEE

EDITOR BRITTANY BAILEY

As a consistently dynamic process, the collaborative effort expended to create a unique and distinguished journal is an incredibly humbling experience. Each year we work together to heighten the growing legacy of the journal through the assembling of events, essays, and work which is created by skilled students and professionals alike. The process is one of design; it demands a captivating format which candidly showcases the work within. Annually, it is a strategic process of redesign and re-engagement. As a school, our ambitions, visions, and artistry consistently evolve. This year the ideals of re-engagement align with the collective goal of students, faculty, and administration; to ReDesign. As so, our intended purpose for this journal is to be a new catalyst added to the dialogue of what engagement means to the discipline of architecture. It has been an extensive and rewarding process of constant collaboration for us as a committee. Analyzing the different methods utilized in the work of re-engagement and the combined opportunities that reside within each project has been a source of intrigue and motivation for us. We know that the work exemplified is testament to the inclusive meaning of re-engagement, and we encourage readers to find inspiration in the complex thought and creativity throughout the Journal.

5TH YEAR REPRESENTATIVE HECTOR DIAZ

4TH YEAR REPRESENTATIVE NIKA PNIAK

3RD YEAR REPRESENTATIVE BRANDON POWELL

2ND YEAR REPRESENTATIVE NASRYNN CHOWDRY

EDITOR: BRITTANY BAILEY COMMITTEE MEMBERS: HECTOR DIAZ | NIKA PNIAK | BRANDON POWELL | NASRYNN CHOWDRY | ISAIAH JONES-LANE MENTORS: PHIL HORTON AND CATHLEEN KEBERT DISCIPLINE

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3+ YEAR REPRESENTATIVE ISAIAH JONES-LANE


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Workshop—198 Profile

54

SOWA + Allied Arts Interview

08

Francis Kéré Interview

55

Women in Architecture Event

10

Cathleen Kebert Redefining the Typology of the Desert Residences Through the “Family Energy Room”

56

Nenwe Geeso Everlasting Cycles

12

Amberley Johnson Offset

57

Christina Lufkin Assemble!

13

Yan Wang Rio Salado Revitalization Project

58

Josh Greene The Storytelling House

14

Matthew Boylan Construction of the Mind

60

Nasrynn Chowdhury Ephemerality

15

Jason Schupbach Interview

61

Nika Pniak Three Atmospheres

16

McConville, Medina, Rivera WTower01

62

Elena Rocchi What Shall I Love if not the Enigma?

18

Veronika Volkova (In)formal Madrid

64

Medina, Synacek, Zhao Windhover Contemplative Center

20

Switzerland Pilgrimage Travel

66

Noah Brown Imagination Jerusalem

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Switzerland Global Engagement Mind the Gap

68

Alharti, Calvendra, Dibella, Kamali, Martorano Urban Souk

24

Susan Liu Interspace

70

NOMA Arizona Job Search/Seminar Workshop

25

Boyana Babanovski Reflecting Light

71

Isaiah Jones-Lane Fabric Tempe

26

Bundy, Medina, Shekerjian Skin and Bones

72

Bryan Maddock ‘Using Utopia’ Introduction

28

Cecile Kim Solstice

76

Bailey, Diaz Interdisciplinary Atmospheres

29

Emily Kellogg The UnKnown Recognized

78

Carlson, Childress, Leavens, Nevarez CIRI

30

Claudio Vekstein Memorial Space and Monument to the 100th Anniversary of the Alcorta Shout

80

Rachel Frail House of Fashion

81

Rongting Jin Isolated on the Water

34

Cody Short F.A.B.R.I.C. Flagstaff

82

35

Stephanie Hernandez Fender Sound

Marlene Imirzian Concepts for Architecture: Methods and Artifacts

84

36

Camille Medeiros Layering Connections

Michelle Acosta AIA Award

85

37

Jessica Tsepal Drawings

Ryan McEnroe AIA Award

86

38

Bruna Nakhle Proteus: The Hybridized Neo-Nomadic Memorial

Ke Zhang Co-Exist

87

39

Brandon Powell Transition Phoenix

Zachary Bursi Weaving Spaces

88

40

Architekton Cloud Song Center

Foster, Knoebel, Leavens, Lin, Popovic Mesh

90

44

Boylan, Malouf, Shekerjian Architects of Change

Susan Liu Travel

92

46

Bailey, Ballard, Foster The Street

Nick Raccosta Texas A&M University Master Plan

93

48

Diaz, Fan, Joshi, Sanchez Battery Park City

Chicago Architecture Foundation CAF Teen Fellows Visit

94

49

Adrian Castro Adaptive Design

Alexandra Patrick Creating New Boundaries

95

50

Huft, Rodriguez, Zhao Compass

Aaron Amundsen River Trail Community

96

52

Abdallah, Fattahi, Iganian, Leonard, Strauss Pro-To-Type

Bundy, Shekerjian Ark

98

Submission Index ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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WORKSHOP—198 | PROFILE

GROUP MEMBERS: AARON CLEVELAND, GAUTAM PALAV, SPENCER BATES

The three of us graduated from the ASU Design School with Master of Architecture degrees in 2016, and started Workshop—198 that following summer. The “198,” in our name serves as an homage to our initial collaborations in Room 198 at the Tempe Center. We enjoyed working together, and looked for an opportunity to continue our collaborative efforts outside of studio. We each work at different architecture firms in Phoenix, New York City, and Tokyo, so Workshop—198 is our way to explore ideas outside of the office. While working in three different time zones does present some logistical challenges, it has given us the ability to view architecture and urbanism through the lens of these different cities.

Our design process attempts to find a balance between pragmatism and experimentation. These schools of thought, which are traditionally at odds, we use as opportunities to break from a more conventional approach while simultaneously

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respecting the realities of each project. We believe every formal gesture should have a logical significance. We are also strong proponents of contextual design. We seek to understand our site and context from both an environmental and cultural perspective. These are all lessons we were able to take from our time at the Design School, and they influence the philosophy we seek to follow in our work. Additionally, we have an interest in developing the role of graphic representation in our work. With each project we seek to find a graphic language that conveys the project and illustrates our concept most effectively. We are also cautious to avoid being superficial, and do not want our work to become subservient to its representation. We are less interested in maintaining a standard and static graphic approach between projects, but rather focused on exploring the best graphics for each unique circumstance and project. We want the rigor of our design to be the focus, but we also embrace the role graphic representation has in selling an idea.


As of now the majority of our work takes the form of architecture competitions, both locally and internationally. Competitions have helped us develop our position and voice. Whether working on a project in Latvia or Phoenix, we attempt to draw on Kenneth Frampton’s concept of “Critical Regionalism,” and design specifically for that place and time. We truly valued our time at the Design School studying architecture and urbanism, specifically as it relates to the Sonoran Desert, so we look for any opportunity we can to re-engage the concepts and contextual lessons we took from school. Culture Hub was our first project together that allowed us to continue exploring the context which we had been so focused on during graduate school. Spawning from two simple architectural elements, the tower and the canopy, our intervention provides a template for highly flexible public space within each district of Phoenix’s urban core. These spaces will become cultural hubs of evolving activity for the community. Designed to fit within a typical Phoenix parcel of 150 by 50 feet, this network of spaces highlights the unique aspects of each district, as well as the quintessential qualities of light and ecology of the Valley. Framing what makes Phoenix unique, while celebrating the distinct qualities of each neighborhood, these spaces promote inclusion rather than exclusion, and act as a gateway to each district. ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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Nota Elementis (familiar elements), one of our most recent competition entries, is designed as a prototype for a series of trekking cabins to be installed along the new Amber Road trekking path. Our proposal respectfully addresses the cultural and environmental context of the Latvian Coast while reinforcing the building traditions and architectural vernacular that have been part of the Latvian culture for generations. The materials are locally sourced and provide the most economical strategy for assembly, while dramatically reducing the embodied carbon footprint one might see in a typical project. This reinforces the model of sustainability at both the level of the cabin’s ability to comfortably house occupants, and a more holistic level of significantly reducing imported material sourcing and processing in the Baltic region. In the same way a Palo Verde tree’s shade nurses a young Saguaro, Canopy as Catalyst explores the effect shade has on expanding urbanism in downtown Phoenix. Positioned at underutilized, yet high-yield land parcels around Phoenix, the canopy initially encourages light programming to occupy the newly shaded space. Spurring from the success of this initial programming, more permanent structures, which can benefit from the shade and increasing public exposure, begin to arrive. This land parcel then transforms into a densely-programmed urban amenity which helps raise the property values and pedestrian experience of the surrounding blocks. The canopy can adapt to growing development and transform as buildings of varying heights are constructed. Once development becomes so dense

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that the canopy cannot adapt any further, sections of the canopy can be removed in order to allow for more vertical construction. These taller buildings will continue to benefit from the remaining canopy’s influence on the rest of the site. We are an ambitious group, and we hope that as Workshop—198 continues to mature we can eventually

become a more formal practice. We are currently working with two clients on small projects in Utah and Colorado and are hopeful they will get built. The practice of understanding the technical repercussions of our designs have been an exciting challenge. We are also hopeful that we can remain engaged with the Design School, and positively contribute to the evolving design culture of the University.

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FRANCIS KÉRÉ | INTERVIEW

AN AFTERNOON WITH AWARD-WINNING ARCHITECT FRANCIS KÉRÉ, FOUNDER OF KÉRÉ ARCHITECTURE BASED IN BERLIN, GERMANY. WRITTEN BY: BRITTANY BAILEY AND HECTOR DIAZ

What is architecture? What is architecture is very difficult to say. I will say, the core of my work is the making. And then to study material and just do it. I think that whatever you give me today I can tell you I will try to make out of it something that has a body, something that people call space or structure. If you can call this architecture, so then it is. What do you think sets you apart as an architect?

I think what I do doesn’t come just from teaching, the theoretical teaching and making drawing, no, it comes because I tried to build myself. I started to really build myself and I start to raise the money, and to just make it. So I start to study material in a very different way. So that is my way to do things. I won’t call someone and say “explain to me about…” I just start to study and then I ask someone “can we do that? Do you think this way is correct?” And someone will say, “oh no Francis, maybe we do it different” so my way is to cooperate always, but I try to understand material. Can you explain about your design philosophy? I mean it was not a philosophy, but today I can say yes, it is my philosophy. I started in the village and I wanted to use the most available material. That’s how I started. And then I wanted to get people to be involved because it would save money. And later, when the people get involved, they care for the project. Because they are proud, it’s our project. So here two things, material and community. So the philosophy itself appeared later. At what point in the design process do you determine what material you are working with and how you’re going to apply it? I think it is parallel, really at the same time. I love to combine material. What happens when material is exposed to the elements? How do you combine the materials? How do the people interact with the material? It’s all parallel. For instance clay, if you want to expose it you have to have a big canopy, a roof to protect against the elements, against the rain primarily. So then I start to think how can this roof be? Can I put the clay bricks on the soil? No, it is impossible. The material must be up to 40cm water resistant. So I have rocks, I have concrete, so I have to choose, and then I start to design them. So that is how we work. It all has to be parallel. The project can evolve from there. You think how can I integrate the structure with the material? And you just have to find a way to combine. That’s where the ingenuity is. Thinking about the alternative. What is it? What can I use? You have to go through the process. Can you share a little bit about the value and importance of community? I was always married to my community. While I studied I was growing ideas how I could work with them, I didn’t wait to do it. It’s not easy, if you want to do a similar project, you should not wait. There is no deadline. You should start now. And you have to be ready to sacrifice. Never wait. If you wait it’s going to be too late. This is my advice. DISCIPLINE

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Everyone has a duty to his or her own community. Like me, I had a duty to my community. This community used to work together, do everything together. If you have to build your house you don’t do it yourself. You need the neighborhood to help you. So again, if you have something public to do everyone will help you. Even for agriculture you have to harvest. There is a time limit, you have to finish quick, there is no machine. For example, if it’s the dry stuff you have to do it quick otherwise the rain will destroy it. So everyone comes to help you. Everyone is connected to the community. I wanted to do something because I belong to the very few that had the chance to attend education and I was thinking, why don’t you build a school in the village? So it just started like this. To teach my people, without saying “come, I’m teaching you.” I just make and they watch and they get inspired and do themselves. First you have to work with the people. The community will teach you how to build. If you have some passion for your community, you try to see what is important for the community and start from there. What can you deal with in that community to create something that serves the community and can be an example? In working with the community there is no road map.

“You try to see what is important for the community and start from there.”

What advice do you have for current architecture students? If I’m talking to my student or my people, if we have to deliver a project, I will ask everyone involved in the project “Would you be happy, if and when they publish this around the world, would you be happy?” So I am asking everyone to do the maximum, the best they can do. This is always what I’m trying to do. And I think with that I am very happy, because I see my people in the office are really really proud. I can see it.


I think the element of architecture, the basic, is to know how to draw. It is very important to try to express your ideas through sketches and don’t just use a computer, because the sketches are your own way to express an idea for yourself. I think the best thing we can do is to not just sit in the classroom, we have to just make. I am convinced that the making is the end result. It is up to you to push. We have to go and try. We have to prove through real examples, that is the only thing people believe in. We have to fight. We have to say it’s great. We have to dream big for ourselves. But you have to prove it. I do things and people see it. It’s your time. You have to prove through the real stuff. People want to see that it works before they believe in it. The making is important. If they see it they believe in it. And then it is important to be resilient. I think if you do a project at university and the teacher comes and didn’t like it, it’s up to you not to just change your project. You must be resilient in the way that you push and to make your idea very clear. I think at school we should encourage the student to be simple. If something is very simple you can push it very very far. I’m not talking about banal, I’m talking about simple ideas that embed complexity in the space that later you will have. This is important to teach at school. And then to push students to over come themselves and the fashion. Not to say, “okay he is doing it like this, we all will do that.” “There is a crowd of sheep that But to then request, “is that the best thing you go this way, and they’re eating. could have?” So just to say “why is this like this?” Eating, eating, eating. And you are in the back. And you follow them and try to eat. What are you eating? Shit. Only shit. But if you have the courage to go to the other direction, you will discover prairie. It is yours. ”

And so last, to be yourself. You have to be yourself. There is a crowd of sheep that go this way, and they’re eating. Eating, eating, eating. And you are in the back. And you follow them and try to eat. What are you eating? Shit. Only shit. But if you have the courage to go to the other direction, you will discover prairie. It is yours. So this is important, to just have the courage to step.

How do you see architecture adjusting in order to withstand natural disasters and issues like sustainability? This is a big big issue. We have to prevent rather than to repair. Natural catastrophes are always stronger than us. And that is something that will teach us to be even better. You know we think that we can control everything, and this is not true. Maybe building in a natural way may help us. I am happy we are still weak to nature. It’s still a challenge then. Our life will not be boring. We have to agree there is one thing that is clear, a little building alone can not make a big change. The profession itself and those that are providing money to do buildings have to invest more in infrastructure that serves people, rather than waiting for the catastrophe to appear and go in with this ‘helper syndrome.’ That is a risky and very dangerous thing. But we can make a difference if we try to think about the past. You have to think about all of that. So before you implement you have to think about the consequences. But friends, listen to me, our world today is living very fast. No one has time to think about it. If you don’t just come up with a concept, they will move on to the next architect. They are putting us in a bad competition. So if you have a chance, try to be resilient. This is the only way to come up better projects. If we just give ourselves to be used by the economy then we will never make the difference. That is what I can say. We have to think in a global way. And don’t think that everything is already developed and there is no way for you to make the difference. Don’t think everything is finished. There is still a lot of work for us, really. We have to find smarter solutions. There is no alternative to sustainability for you. We have to rethink how we do architecture. We have to be resilient. Architecture is to serve, to serve humanity. That is what I believe in.

ASU Architecture students with Francis Kéré at Taliesin West ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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CATHLEEN KEBERT | THESIS

INSTRUCTORS: DARREN PETRUCCI AND PHIL HORTON YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: REDEFINING THE TYPOLOGY OF DESERT RESIDENCES THROUGH THE “FAMILY ENERGY ROOM”

In order to redefine the typology of residences in the Sonoran Desert, two counterpoints were first identified: indigenous desert residences and market-driven developer homes. Indigenous desert residences evolved purely out of necessity to address their immediate context and climate while including an interior-exterior room shaped by support spaces. Market-driven developer homes are not typically contextual in terms of topography, orientation, and integration into the more natural or existing environment since technological and material innovations allow such detachment. This approach can result in low-density neighborhoods, such as Maryvale, where homeowners’ desire for private yards and privacy were granted; despite providing outdoor space for each lot, these developers ignored amenities afforded by the lots, resulting in an environmental disconnect. Additionally, high-density neighborhoods, such as a KB Home’s development, was driven by the developer maximizing profit by squeezing much larger homes onto meager .06 acre to .1 acre lots. The synthesis of the research manifests as a typology centered around the “Family Energy Room.” The three main goals of this design include: preparing households for future disruptive policy changes such as heightened water and energy restrictions, improving well-being through biophilic benefits such as reduced stress, elevated moods, and improved energy; and increasing the density of suburbia without sacrificing key amenities. The Family Energy Room embodies the contemporary atmosphere of the indigenous case studies in response to technological and material innovations. Everything that uses or produces energy is part of the thickened threshold. These components become the infrastructural core walls surrounding the Family Energy Room which mitigate temperatures, recover energy, and incorporate new technologies. This connectivity to the threshold is how other rooms are cooled. This threshold also acts as a porous

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improves the economy of construction. The targeted systems for this include the roof, wall, and floor systems. The roof and ventilation tower act as an engine to the home to allow hot air to be pulled through the structure and expelled through the stack tower at the top. During the spring and fall, the airflow follows this sequence: first, air is cooled via evapotranspiration by the biomass, passes over the misted patio surface, and is brought into the home. As it warms up, it is brought within the cavity of the roof structure and expelled upwards. During the summer, the house encloses itself from the exterior environment and the house becomes cooled through the radiant flooring system where cool air collects in the plenum beneath the floor panels and gradually raises through the panels’ perforations. As the air naturally warms, it collects in the volume between the ceiling and the roof.

and seamless framing device to its interior and exterior environments. Although the Family Energy Room is made up of several components, it functions as a single component. Using a Maryvale home and a KB Home as two bases and re-imagining them through the lens of the Family Energy Room synthesizes aspects of indigenous desert residences and market-driven developer housing. This methodology integrates interior and exterior environmentssuch as through extended landscapes and bracketing courtyards-not only reuniting individuals with their desert surroundings, but also improving their well-being through infused biophilic benefits. Additionally, an expedited construction timeline, very common to and preferred by market-driven developer home construction, is granted by technological and material innovations, integrations, and accommodations. Combining traditional methods with customized sources of mass production

Sources of heat, such as the oven and warm, humid air from the bathroom, also tie into this sequence in order to help propel the airflow throughout the home. The integrated photo-voltaic and solar thermal panel helps power a fan to pull air through the roof cavity and out through operable blackened steel louvers (which would help isolate the house from the exterior environment during the summer by closing). Insulation values exceed the requirement in order to protect the home from heat quickly transferring to the interior. In addition, this assembly also prepares the residence for intense, unpredictable temperature increases, as well as future policy changes and restrictions as it relates to energy usage. Ultimately, these environmental design strategies aim to transform the typology of desert residences as economic forces and climatic responses fuse together to redefine many necessary and functional aspects typically found in Sonoran Desert residences. In order to architecturally redefine future developer homes, the gap between environmentally opportune residences and current developer housing modules is reconciled, establishing the “Family Energy Room.� Aimed at reuniting individuals with their desert surroundings, their health and well-being are improved while incorporated new technologies and energy recovery systems respond adeptly to harsh climatic conditions.

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AMBERLEY JOHNSON | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JOE PRITCHARD YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: OFFSET

The site for a proposed housing development is Van Buren / Downtown Phoenix, which is in close proximity to notable art and music spaces.

The surrounding context is influential in the creation of an urban park (which features an amphitheater, movie theater, and more) accessible via ramp leading from downtown Phoenix onto a platform that acts like a stage. Almost half of the site is given back to the city and the design is a beacon that calls for expansion to the west. Van Buren was once an important gateway to Phoenix, but the area developed a reputation for crime and drugs. The historical development is influential in the design of the building form, appearing as though it may give way. Each unit goes through a process of stacking and offsetting, allowing the roof of the first level to become a balcony for the second and so on.

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YAN WANG | STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: JACOB ATHERTON, MICHAEL UNDERHILL YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: RIO SALADO REVITALIZATION PROJECT

Phoenix’s interest in redeveloping the Rio Salado has spurred requests for unique, responsible ideas for revitalizing the area using critical design thinking. The site aimed at this project’s focus is currently a brownfield. By restoring aspects of the historic Rio Salado, nature and architecture can co-exist in this design proposal.

Over time, the Rio Salado has been heavily damaged by the effects of human activity. However, nearby projects on the Rio Salado such as Tempe Town Lake and the Audubon Center help offset some of this destruction. By creating a terrain likened to the historic wash, this project aims to introduce bird habitats found around the Salt River to the site. The solution is to alternate nature and architecture together to establish an ecological urban environment which creates awareness of the distinctive habitat along the Rio Salado and humans’ impact on natural sites.

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MATTHEW BOYLAN | ESSAY

CONSTRUCTION OF THE MIND

I am constantly in motion, transporting myself between physical places on the earth. However, from my perspective, it feels as if I am stationary, while people and places orbit around me. The mind is always the center of its surroundings. It is the vessel that stores the knowledge and experience we collect, and provides access to this information when we need it. It allows us to exist.

In May of 2017, I graduated with a Master’s degree in architecture, having completed a Bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture three years prior, both from Arizona State University. Shortly thereafter, I simultaneously began teaching at The Design School, as well as working at the firm Orcutt Winslow. I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity to work in both of these settings: the dream of school, and the reality of an office. I label school “the dream” because in my experience, the nature of school is more into the exploration of the fantasies of architecture, the experimentation with ideas, and the freedom to fail. I was immersed in this dream for seven years. It seems long, but it went by quickly. I have just recently stepped into the reality of work. This is critical because in reality we move beyond the exploration of a concept and into the intricate execution of it. I am lucky to operate in both simultaneously. I take the knowledge and experience I collect from each and work to construct a more holistic understanding within myself. I am building a deeper and more robust foundation in my mind. This understanding is strengthened by the fact that I am always moving in between the dream and the reality. Because I exist in both, I am able to see connections between them that I would not otherwise detect.

The context of each affects the other; they leave traces as my mind shifts between them. In speaking with students about their ideas, I come to realizations about my own

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work. This incredible learning increases the neurogenesis in the brain, meaning I am physically evolving the brain’s architecture, and doing so more rapidly by being active in both. I am generating a mental infrastructure to support the connections I am discovering. But I wonder if these two realms should not be so distinct. In the film Inception, characters travel between reality and a series of nested dreams, so much so that they need totems, or objects, that indicate to them whether or not they are within a dream. I feel I need to better understand how to integrate the dream of school, the exploration and discovery, into the reality of architecture. Christopher Nolan, the director of Inception, says, “I feel that, over time, we started to view reality as the poor cousin to our dreams, in a sense ... I want to make the case to you that our dreams, our virtual realities, these abstractions that we enjoy and surround ourselves with, they are subsets of reality.” This can occur in the sense I have been speaking of, in which the education and profession of architecture have more influence on one another. But additionally, I can add my own personal dreams and passions, those I discovered and explored throughout my time in school, into the profession, and my work will be much stronger for it.


JASON SCHUPBACH | INTERVIEW

INTERVIEW: JASON SCHUPBACH: DESIGN.SCHOOL WRITTEN BY: NIKA PNIAK

What is ReDesign.School? Right now, it is a website, and students should participate where it says “Engage.” What we are asking people are the same 5 questions; I didn’t come up with them myself, the faculty worked together to create the following questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Where is design going? How can design education be more relevant (to students, community, to the US, and globally)? What are the future skill-sets designers need to learn now? Soft skills? Technical skills? Designers work in transdisciplinary ways now. What should a design school do to prepare students for that? What should a design school do to forward equity and inclusion?

I was hired to redesign The Design School, and I figured that the smartest way to do that would be to crowdsource design education. The speakers coming this semester and that came last semester are those that we thought have something to say about design education. What is a specific goal of ReDesign? Is it a combination of the faculty, administration, curriculum, and the design school building itself, or something else entirely? Right now, it is a conversation abut curriculum and what we want to be known for. We want to see what the future of the school should be. This is already a good design school, that is why you are here. The point is how can we be better and how can we meet ASU’s mission to be the most innovative? We are known as a large transdiciplinary school, and we want to solve how to embrace that complexity. We need complex skill sets for the complex solutions. We are asking different design entities from all over for their thoughts through round table discussions.

“This is about building excellence in something that is good already.”

Who are the participants of the roundtable discussions? Where are they taking place? In San Francisco, we had people from Apple, Pinterest, Google, Charles and Ray Eames’ granddaughter, and many others. In DC, we had a lot of the national organizations such as AIA, ASLA, ASID, etc. We have another coming up in LA at the end of this month, and one in New York at the beginning of May. Locally, we will have 5 local roundtables with our chapters of AIA, ASLA, AIGA, etc.

How has your background prepared you for this role and what made you decide that you wanted to make a change at ASU? I previously worked for the Obama Administration and the federal government, surrounded by really smart people who want to change the world, and I am do gooder type, so I learned a lot being a part of that. I was looking for another opportunity like that, and I was so impressed by ASU’s mission of inclusion, in lieu of exclusivity. I was speaking with President Crow and he mentioned that we are in a strange industry that measures its sucess based on who we exclude, and how is our country going to change if we do that? ASU’s dedication to be an innovator higher education made it the unique opportunity to make a change. When do you think the “listening” phase will lend itself to the next one? How many student responses would you ideally want? I would be happy if we had 3000 student responses, right now we have about 35. We are doing this for you. We want to do it with you, and that is why we are spending all this time now listening to you, the experts, and the community. But the point of this is to be very democratic, engage as many people as possible about what the future of the school should be. Since there is so much emphasis on listening, would you say that your most important tools for The Design School are your ears? Yes. They are the most important tool in your life, and you’ve already got them.

So you are canvassing the whole country to find the best and most diverse answers to your questions? Well this is also a public website, so everyone can access it, and we have a lot of international partners who are watching here. We want it to be open to everyone. How fast is the redesign going to happen? It is going to be on a rolling basis. This is about building excellence about something that is good already so we want to be consistently innovative. We aim to keep listening and trying to make consistent, constant changes, and not just once and say it is complete.

Do you have something to say? What to be a part of the conversation? Leave your response under the “engage” section at: redesign.school ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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MCONVILLE, MEDINA, RIVERA | STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: PHIL HORTON, SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: WTOWER01 GROUP MEMBERS: BRENDAN MCONVILLE, LUIS MEDINA, ANGEL RIVERA

Balata is a town in which 27,000 displaced people are crammed into an area of about 27 hectares, or 66 acres. According to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, this refugee camp produces 1,600 cubic meters of solid waste each month. These statistics are daunting; however there is an opportunity to be found in this crisis: Recycling plants in the surounding Nablus region have achieved great success by incentivizing people to collect and deliver plastic and metal waste. By designing an efficient infrastructure which builds on the current efforts of factory owners and everyday trash collectors, our team aspires to build a resilient circular economy that benefits all refugees by improving health, moral, and economic independence.

Nablus, West Bank, Palestine. Homes three refugee camps built in the 1960’s, including Balata Camp

Our team hopes that through a cooperative platform of urban and architectural design combined with independent organizations dedicated to human development work, a series of waste collection towers can begin a paradigm shift in the way Palestinians think about trash. There is hope that in the near future the towers can become a source of civic pride and a symbol of passive resistance, rather than simply being waste distribution centers. These towers will be seen as important economic centers and functional monuments in a new circular economy. Balata Camp, our site. The most populated refugee camp in Palestine (1km2 area)

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VERONIKA VOLKOVA | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CATHERINE SPELLMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: (IN)FORMAL MADRID

Informal Commons is a space for people and communities to claim ownership over the city, and for informal situations to unfold, fostering inter-personal connections locally with the means of personal mobility. A one-week trip to Madrid preceded the project, leading to serendipitous encounters within the “radical” landscape between the two neighborhoods, separated by the river and infrastructure. “The Spot” was discovered there – the arrangement of seemingly unrelated objects that occupied the space of approximately two by two meters, uncovering the transphenomenal rituals of informal space.

The project is envisioned through multiple aspects, one being the “common ground” between the two disconnected neighborhoods. It is also regarded as a “gateway” to the fragmented landscapes to the East of the site. The site landscape is one without an exterior or an interior, but rather a “necklace” of events on the “string” of existing infrastructures and the intervention of the project into the present landscape does not lead to the dismantling of any existing structures.

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SWITZERLAND PILGRIMAGE | TRAVEL

INSTRUCTOR: MICHELE FEHLER, HEIDI FISCHER, AND DARREN PETRUCCI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 STUDIO: SWITZERLAND GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT STUDIO WRITTEN BY: BRITTANY BAILEY AND NINA CALIC

During a seven day pilgrimage through Switzerland, our studio of interdisciplinary graduate students had the opportunity to experience Swiss culture and design. The first three days were spent in the Alps visiting remote Peter Zumthor projects, hiking within the UNESCO World Heritage Site Sardona, and exploring the unique affordances of mountain life. After this, we moved into the urban context visiting cities like Zurich and Basel with a short jaunt into Vitra, Germany. Being that the studio had a focus on mindfulness and biomimicry, these themes were identified and analyzed in the moments of our trip and later transferred to our design processes throughout the semester. Zürich, Switzerland

UNESCO World Heritage Site Sardona

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UNESCO World Heritage Site Sardona

Shelter for Roman Ruins

Therme Vals


Vals, Switzwerland

Therme Vals

UNESCO World Heritage Site Sardona

Saint Benedict Chapel

Centre Le Corbusier (Heidi Weber Museum)

Saint Benedict Chapel

Vitra Design Museum

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SWITZERLAND GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT | STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: MICHELE FEHLER, HEIDI FISCHER, AND DARREN PETRUCCI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: MIND THE GAP WRITTEN BY: DARREN PETRUCCI

Our advancement as a species depends upon our unique ability to develop new technologies to increase our quality of life. However, we are at a unique moment in our technological arc where our technology is an intense distraction in our everyday lives and in fact may be impacting our ability to advance as a society. Those most impacted by these “advancements” are the generations who were born native to these systems--our students.

Next the faculty and students traveled to Switzerland (ostensibly one of the most “mindful” countries in Europe) to immerse themselves in a culture that values thoughtful design, craft and identity. There the students and faculty visited the architecture of Peter Zumthor, engaged in the art of book-binding, and hiked in the Alps. At each stop, the studio engaged in a mindful meditation and discussion in an attempt to be more present and aware of the experience and engage in what we called a ‘deep looking’ into the space and/or place we were visiting. Collectively, these experiences brought students closer to understanding how a mindful practice can reveal the connections among things.

Arizona State University – the largest university in the United States created a new Center for Mindfulness, Compassion, and Resilience as a response to our students’ desire for a more present and balanced life amid the constant bombardment of information that pervades their everyday life.

Our Global Engagement Design Studio partnered with Terry Pipe the Director of the Center to imagine the role that design could play in helping to advance the Mindful Mission of the Center. Visual Communication Design faculty member Michele Fehler, Assistant Director of the Biomimicry Center Heidi Fischer, and Architecture faculty member Darren Petrucci developed a Design Studio proposal structured upon three processes: a daily mindful practice, exposure and analysis of mindful design, and a process for finding mindfulness in the everyday.

The students worked collaboratively for the first third of the semester defining mindfulness for the studio. Their research began with a round table discussion that included the Director of the Center for Mindfulness, Compassion, and Resilience Terri Pipe, Dean of the School of Sustainability Christopher Boone, author of “Designing Things” Professor Prasad Boradkar, and Assistant Director of the Biomimicry Center Heidi Fischer. The goal of the discussion was to understand the connections among Design, Sustainability, Nature, and Mindfulness. One of the significant statements from the round table speakers was Terri Pipe’s definition that “mindfulness is the gap between stimulus and response.” While not apparent at the time, this became the definition adopted by the studio for the project.

Once back at ASU, the studio began to look at the Main Campus of the University as a comprehensive site for the new Center’s impact among the student body. It became acutely clear that any attempt to engage the entire campus would require far more research and time than the remaining eight-week term of the studio. In a mindful moment, the studio decided to do a deep looking into the smaller (but well known) campus of The Design School as a prototype process for the greater University. Armed with their mindful experiences in Switzerland, their meditation practice, and their definition that ‘mindfulness is the gap between stimulus and response’, the students, working in transdisciplinary teams, began to look for the spatial and experiential gaps in and around the Design North and Design South Buildings. What they discovered was that much of the infrastructure (like the stairwells of the building) that connect one experience to another (walking on the sidewalk – studio space) represented both mentally and physically the ‘gaps’ between the stimulus (city street) and the response (design studio space). These building and landscape infrastructures were represented in a physical model that outlined the floor plan of the two buildings with the “gap infrastructure” modeled in three dimensions. This representation fundamentally transformed the context of the project and allowed the students to see more clearly their sites of intervention as well as the connections among the interventions.

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school. Each space is carefully considered and designed to create an initial shock that immediately causes the inhabitant to become aware of their surroundings, being more present. The constellation of spaces throughout the buildings promotes one to take a different itinerary or set of experiences every time that they move from one space to another, thereby maintaining curiosity and dispelling routine, both key attributes toward a more mindful life. The transdisciplinary team of students (architects, product designers, graphic designers, interior designers) resulted in refined integrated design solutions that defied authorship of any one discipline. Each design intervention was the result of a collaborative deep understanding of each site. The final proposals not only increase one’s awareness and presence in the space, but also help to define the culture of The Design School.

Each student team relied on their ‘deep looking’ experience in Switzerland to find the latent potential for their respective building sites. Stairwells became either contemplative spaces or reflective spaces based upon their location, lighting, materiality, and associated program. Bathrooms are reconsidered as gender neutral and reclassified based upon mood. It was agreed that the building should not prescribe a mood but provide a mood based upon individual students’ feelings at any given time. Spaces like ‘dead square’ were embraced for their lack of use and reframed as a ‘secret garden’ hidden in the belly of the

In keeping with the exploratory nature of the studio and deep looking into the problem, the students challenged the conventions of a typical “Final Review” and choreographed the presentation as a “day in the life” of a student in The Design School. This presentation strategy demonstrated how the interventions could become part of each student’s everyday life within the school. Full scale prototypes combined with projections, models and drawings were installed in their respective locations throughout the school. The review began with coffee at Charlie’s Café, then a mindful meditation in the center of the School, interventions were visited as the reviewers and students moved from classroom spaces to studio space. In addition to the review materials, the students developed a video documentary (http://mindfulnessasu. com/about/) of the design process and a website: http://mindfulnessasu.com/#student

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SUSAN LIU | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: AMIT UPADHYE YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: INTERSPACE

The goal of this housing project is to create an ecofriendly, energy efficient, and sustainable student housing development while incorporating public green spaces to encourage social life and the use of sustainable elements.

Living in Arizona always challenges people’s tolerance of heat. The land is a stretched triangular site located in Tempe, AZ. To conquer the heat in an eco-friendly and efficient way, all units are placed on the east side of the site with a wall for heat-blocking along the west side. The shape of the land drives the layout of units, public area, and circulation from north to south. The green spaces encourage social interaction between residents while decreasing heat with vegetation. Further, gaps between units stand as wind tunnels which cool down living areas by using the advantages of wind orientation. Perforated metals are applied to create privacy in the gap for each unit and to reinforce the function of the

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wind tunnel. A long curved gabion wall is constructed on the west side with a height more than a floor, which blocks most of the burning sunlight in the afternoon. The fabric extending roof canopy connecting the roof and gabion wall allows light to come into the apartment area but keeps the heat out.


BOYANA BABANOVSKI | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CATHERINE SPELLMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: REFLECTING LIGHT

This artist’s shelter resides within a desert wash, surrounded by ascending topography and minimal vegetation. The space seeks to imitate the phenomenon of light passing through a diamond; its hexagonal structure forms angular walls, animated by an ever-changing quality of light. Openings are placed along the north and south faces in order to reflect light off of the polished concrete surfaces within the interior space. The western studio space stands taller than the parallel eastern living quarters, capturing the morning sunlight while casting afternoon shadows to guard against the harsh sun.

The act of reflection and refraction are further explored by embracing the seasonal floods that fill the wash. The split form is bisected by an exterior patio composed of platformed layers that assume natural irregularities within the wash, beckoning the seasonal flood water, which marries the two interior spaces. As the floods rise, the rushing water crashes over the structures, consequently augmented by the ephemeral spectacles of light. Though flooding may only occur a few times throughout a single year, any presence of water on the surface will elicit a compelling movement of light.

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BUNDY, MEDINA, SHEKERJIAN | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: ITALIAN FASHION HUB YEAR COMPLETED: 2018 PROJECT NAME: SKIN AND BONES GROUP MEMBERS: ZACH BUNDY, LUIS MEDINA, AND NICK SHEKERJIAN MENTOR: ELENA ROCCHI

This project proposes the renovation of an existing fast-fashion commercial complex in Bologna. The Centergross company operates the whole complex from a single, kilometer-long building which houses many elements of the fashion industry, including design, production, advertising, runway shows, and sales. This long building acts as a datum line, bisecting a neighborhood of warehouses, garment factories, and textile mills. Our entry proposes the preservation of the building’s existing facades while simultaneously skeletonizing the interior, stripping the building to its structural elements. The grid of columns becomes the basis for a flexible network of resizable rental spaces for fashion vendors. A system of movable shelves

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allows for stores to grow and shrink as needed, while a tensile fabric storefront can be reshaped as an entry/exit, privacy screen, or product display. The roof is replaced and envisioned as a “skin.” The interior of the roof/ceiling contains more private functions such as gallery spaces, classrooms, event halls, etc., while also using its “pores” to establish a visual connection to the shopping area below, as well as a comfortable microclimate. The floor of this inhabited ceiling is almost topographic in form, while remaining open and reprogrammable. The innovation proposed by this project is in the juxtaposition of two programs which serve two sides of the fashion industry, one which is public, and the other which is behind-the-scenes. By superimposing the old building, all stages of production in the fashion industry are capable of occupying the same general space, without compartmentalizing programs into different buildings and rooms.


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CECILE KIM | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: VICTOR IRIZARRY YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: SOLSTICE

Solstice is a multi-use housing project located in the Arts District of downtown Phoenix. On the summer and winter solstices, the surrounding buildings create a diffraction of shadows along the ground.

The shadows of surrounding structures from the solstices were interpreted as a central void that spanned the entirety of the site. The masses, units, are the positive spaces in the light. Solstice is derived from the Latin words Sol (Sun) and Sistere (to stand still), and the exact time of the winter and summer solstices is hard to determine.

Similarly, the project serves to blur the line between downtown and housing. Residents of the complex should not escape the urban feel both in the city and in the site. All balconies either face east toward the skyline, or toward the central void. The void aims to become a bustling and vibrant space that is reminiscent of the Arts District and downtown Phoenix.

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Mimicking the function of the central void throughout the site, the terraces between the units on each floor serve as a secondary void. The terrace allows for no two units to share a wall to create a more private space within the complex while still having a shared outdoor space between the residents when engagement is desired. The open terrace also serves as a form of vertical circulation. Two identical shade structures are at each end of the site to involve residents and members of the community alike; their form is inspired by the sun’s rays at the two solstices.


EMILY KELLOGG | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2018 PROJECT NAME: THE UNKNOWN RECOGNIZED

The Unknown Recognized is located on Pioneer Memorial Cemetery in Phoenix, Arizona. This project aims to give notice to the Hispanic minority groups buried without headstones or any documentation, despite their strong prevalence in the neighborhood at the time of the cemetery’s use.

The form of my site plan is derived from a map created of potential locals where unnamed people are resting, in comparison to the mainly affluent white community which of whom were allotted headstones. Out of this project I gained not only a deeper understanding of architectural drawing techniques, but also the significance of history, its intentions, and a passion for bringing light to these issues.

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CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN | PROFESSIONAL

PROJECT NAME: MEMORIAL SPACE AND MONUMENT TO THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ALCORTA SHOUT YEAR COMPLETED: 2011-2018 TO BE EXHIBITED IN THE 16TH INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE EXHIBITION OF THE VENICE BIENNALE 2018 “FREESPACE” IN THE ARGENTINE PAVILION PHOTOGRAPHY BY: FEDERICO CAIROLI

The Argentinean Government and the Commune of Alcorta in the Province of Santa Fe agreed in 2011 for the design and construction of a Memorial and Monument in honor of the 100th Anniversary of the agrarian rebellion called “The Alcorta Shout “ (1912) that gave rise to the Argentine Agrarian Federation (FAA). The Federation donated a plot of land to the Commune to place the Memorial Space and Monument, and requested a design project of the Unit of Special Projects of the Ministry of Public Works and Housing of the Santa Fe Province, who then entrusted the work to Arch. Claudio Vekstein [eCV_Opera Publica]. The Province Department of Architecture and Engineering (DIPAI) was in charge of its construction development, being financed with the funds initially provided by the Argentinean Government and the Government of the Santa Fe Province, who undertook it until its completion. In the 100m. x 75m. plot of land, located parallel to the Provincial Route 90 (south of the Alberdi access to the Alcorta Commune), there were only 4 large exposed concrete foundations built in 1962, as part of a previous project developed at that time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the agrarian movement. The Program provided for the current occasion by the authorities of the FAA included the following: a Memorial for the Alcorta Shout, an exterior civic Plaza in connection to the monument that allows the celebration of commemorative events of the deed, an Auditorium or screening room for around 150 people, and a Gallery or small exhibition hall where the historical reminder objects brought from the Argentine Provinces are located that serves as an Interpretation Center for the events that occurred in 1912.

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The Memorial Space and Monument celebrate the agrarian feat carried by the small and medium rural tenants known historically as the Alcorta Shout. Their rebellion shook the south of the Argentine Province of Santa Fe and spread throughout the Pampa “Gringa” region —as it used to be called at that time, referring to the Italian and Spanish immigrants who came to the region massively encouraged by the Argentine government to cultivate the land— and then to the rest of the country. With epicenter in the town of Alcorta, the event marked the irruption of the farm workers in the national politics of the 20th century, giving origin at the same time to its representative union organization. The meeting in which the Agrarian Strike was actually decided and farmers decided to stop sowing happened in the Italian Society of Alcorta on June 25, 1912, with the support of the Italian lawyer and legal counsel Dr. Francisco Netri. The Provincial Government then intervened in the conflict, and managed to bring the parties closer by means of a relative improvement in the contracting conditions. On August 15, 1912, the farmers founded the Argentine Agrarian Federation, whose main objective was to obtain leasing laws, that is, an institutional legal framework that regulated the use and possession of the land in Argentina. While commissioning the Project, the FAA requested to embed the farmers and their work, the union struggle, the use and possession of the land, the cooperativism and the


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democratic institutions as founding ideas into the Memorial Space and Monument. Thus, the actual 400m2 covered spaces not only recall, but also celebrate the Alcorta Shout in a present and active way, serving as a daily gathering environment for citizens and farmers meeting, overcoming the passive, solemn, and distant traditional monument’s model of the past. That is why the building develops and unfolds diverse public cultural programs —auditorium for events, cinema, theater along a permanent and temporary exhibition hall about the events that transpired. These spaces intensely construct the medium and intimate interior scale, articulated by an extensive, comprehensive and folded exterior element, which provides monumental scale and carries the strongly expressive and commemorative aesthetic content. A slightly inclined plane of great dimension and rugged texture on their northwest face contains these volumes that house active cultural spaces. In the way of a classic scenery, this plane tensions a forced perspective for those who circulate at a certain speed on Route 90. This large screen is structurally articulated by means of large steel rhythmic porticos, inclined frames and modular pre-molded panels made out of resin reinforced with fiberglass and crude burlap cloth. These precast panels recreate the popular historic “stockpiles” of corn bags (rescued from dated pictures found at the FAA archives) that the producers piled up in the open, since they are the collective fruit and pride of the agrarian farmers’ hard work. For its materialization, an insistent, alternating, and syncopated relief of bags made on specially prepared curved wooden molds return back to the large scale a textile, rugged and tactile texture, while at the same time geometrically pixelated. This massive grain recalls the formidable constructed accumulations of stacked burlap or tow bags, turning this surface into a solar field or agricultural clock which marks the times of the year.

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The rear volumes in the west pavilion offer other smaller interior functions of a more private nature, as they contain the office rooms for the Agrarian Federation and public toilets that serve the larger interior public areas of the building or the large events to the exterior. This pavilion, built with a lower reinforced concrete structure and steel profiles, emerges from the plowed earth as a large hand wrinkled by time, and it is completed with plywood panels that pierce the ears of wheat on their surface. Above the offices and toilets, descending terraces are accessed by an exterior ramp along the main screen on the east, and a staircase that surrounds and follows the stepping to the west. From these terraces one can contemplate the vast horizon and Pampean sunsets, while they also serve as a stage for artistic shows or political events that will extend through the civic square and open-air side amphitheater. This exterior surface, striated by a relief of ‘quebracho’ wood sleepers between the pavers, evokes the Argentinean map and the railroad origin of the town, framed by the exposed old concrete foundations of the previous monument that was never completed.


The site is landscaped with afforestation of different species of trees, the indigenous Ibirá-Pitá that accompany each of the old foundations, the dense forest of Italian and Silver Poplars to the south and east —evoking the numerous Italian immigrants or “gringos” who came to live and work the pampas, furrowed with curved trails with low lighting which open themselves to the countryside and the horizon. Verdant groups of native grasses of elongated spikelets, such as the Stipa or feather grass, are moving in the wind over the large grooves that expand and rise towards the west sun from the excess civic space. This area to the north is completed with benches made with the same bags of resin and crude burlap, disorderly detached from the vertical plane close the big stowage, to sit or lie down on in order to look at the starry sky next to the route, and the adjacent parking for private vehicles or buses of contingents and visitors. A common language arises from all these materials as an expression of rugged textures at different scales that reflect the accumulation of work engraved by the agrarian workers on the earth. From their tanned skin to the rough bag, and the pride that manifests at the moment that the bag is stacked in the stowage waiting to be sold. The stowage enigmatically reflects this process, built as a wall in the formation of folds, through technical procedures of the stacking and repetition of structures arising from the earth, to the formation of porticos that conjugate these lines in continuous vertical sections. This continuous folded surface is replicated and deployed in two by differentiation, then a horizontal sectioning in the staggered sheet metal panels reunites the building across the horizon. The external plowed surface finally becomes intimate with the interior by forming the plywood furniture as a way to extend the greatest possible exhibition surface through the stretching of the inner lining. And the display rows extend through the floor planes to the offices, the bathrooms even envelope the auditorium in the correlated series of ascending panels that retain the motif of the grooves in the furrowed interiors and wheat ears.

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CODY SHORT | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: MAX UNDERWOOD YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: F.A.B.R.I.C. FLAGSTAFF

During the first half of our fall studio, we focused on a well-known fashion incubator, Fabric, in Tempe. The second half of the semester shifted focus to a satellite campus in Flagstaff. My project explores how the values that we associated with Fabric Tempe– individual empowerment, community outreach, and creative engagement–are well suited to both transform the creative community in Flagstaff and also help bring economic vitality to the downtown area. I argued that to be successful, Fabric will need to speak to local values, specifically the pride of place and heritage that many residents share, and the relaxed, spontaneous atmosphere that characterizes Flagstaff’s downtown.

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The building that Fabric occupies will therefore be instrumental in allowing it to serve as a kind of bridge between what Flagstaff is currently and what it could potentially be for local creatives and those visiting from other areas. It is important that Fabric’s programs and the spaces that house them connect with Flagstaff’s past while also serving as a symbol of economic progress and creative energy in the downtown area. For example, the building’s façade should make use of local materials with a modern application appropriate for the activities taking place inside. The project also attempts to incorporate the fact that the building would serve as a gateway for locals and tourists who might be interested in participating in the programs Fabric offers.


STEPHANIE HERNANDEZ | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: GWEN JARICK YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: FENDER SOUND

Since 1946, Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has been shaping the world of music. Without compromising the products’ quality and craft, Fender continues to push innovation and new methods. The three design considerations for Fender’s Flagship store included retaining the historical buildings’ integrity, recognizing the demand for online shopping to deliver a unique in-store experience, and understanding the arts and music educational funding decrease affecting instrument sales.

Through projection mapping technology, guests may step into a legendary room and play the strings of the guitar. The interaction between the guest and guitar will active the room for the ultimate legend experience. Installations may change monthly. Guests are welcomed to touch and play any fender product. Sound studios are conveniently located behind for guests to try their future products! After the store’s regular hours, the venue remains open for late night entertainment. The second level transforms into exclusive lounge and viewing areas.

At Fender Sound, the sculptural sound wave curving from the exterior to the interior is the visualization of sound, extruded as the architectural shell to connect the past and future of both Fender Inc. and the site’s historical buildings.

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CAMILLE MEDEIROS | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: TOM HARTMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: LAYERING CONNECTIONS

Layering Connections is a multi-family residential project located in the warehouse district of Downtown Phoenix. Its stepped design accommodates units to the south rising above the units to north. The units are also staggered so that they are not directly one behind another. This ensures that each unit has access to plenty of northern sunlight and a view of Downtown. The project recreates a neighborhood within an apartment style community to encourage connection and interaction between the residents. The circulation spaces are designed to foster causal collisions. Through this, these circulation paths mimic streets found in a typical neighborhood, providing a space for neighbors to bump into each other after a day at the office and pause to catch up.

There are twelve units with three different unit styles: three bedroom units (6 total), two bedroom units (3 total), and studio units (3 total). These different unit styles foster a diverse community. Just as in a neighborhood, where not all the houses have the same number of bedrooms and some are populated with families, while the others with young singles, the variation in unit style creates the same mixed community. Parking is located on the levels underneath the

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units and are connected through a series of ramps which connect all the levels. Circulation for cars and circulation for pedestrians are kept separate to promote a feeling of safety. Beneath the entire structure is a large gathering area with six spaces for retail, two spaces for food service, and a space to park and lock bikes.


JESSICA TSEPAL| DRAWINGS

Art is becoming a lost tool within the field of architecture, but is a beneficial skill to have. Learning how to draw by hand offers a huge advantage and allows designers to approach a project with a different way of thinking. Drawing promotes an intimacy and understanding between the viewer and the surroundings discovered only through this process.

Dissection of a Pepper was the first set of plans I created. Shown in the example are four elevations, sections, top view, bottom view, and perspective. Along with hand drawings, Watercolors allowed me to create a balance between the rigidity of architectural drawings and fluidity of painting. A later piece exemplifies how the combination of watercolor and architectural line drawings can be integrated together as an expression.

Although these are brief examples of how I leverage my passion for drawing and painting, I find it paramount that the hand of the designer should always be exploring. Find inspiration anywhere and record it, let it influence our critical design thinking. Kogod Courtyard National Portrait Gallery; Landscaping I

Dissection of a Pepper; Architectural Presentation and Graphics

Autumn Tree; Watercolor II

Winter Tree; Watercolor II

National Geographic Museum; Landscaping I

Rainbow Eucalyptus; Watercolor III ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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BRUNA NAKHLE | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: VICTOR IRIZARRY YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: PROTEUS: THE HYBRIDIZED NEO-NOMADIC MEMORIAL

Proteus is a migrating, neo-nomadic memory tool. It migrates at one hundred percent capacity, but likes to shed seventy-five percent of its adopted traits and retain twenty-five percent in order to re-shift itself within new environments. Proteus does not remember where it came from, so its caretakers, the first Proteans, take it around the world to try and help it remember. They ask neo-nomads to share their memories with Proteus in hopes that it might remember something about itself. Proteus is trying to re-root... to re-align with its past.

Thus, it leaves behind relics for people to continue to record their thoughts and memories so that, when it returns, it can share in their experiences. It is always searching for the answer to its origins and, in the process, teaches its followers, the Proteans, to cherish their roots and always come back to who they are and where they came from. Proteus’ walls are made of a conglomeration of different fabrics and materials it has collected from the locals of all the places it has traveled, embedded discreetly into a steel structure that can be taken apart and remade with relative ease. Its guests are invited to participate in making their very own mark on its colorful skin. The prompt for Proteus was to explore the interpretation of what a nomad is today. In this case, anyone can be a hybridized neo-nomad: someone who feels they belong to two or more things (be it culture, organizations, ethnicities, or anything that one can self-identify with) but does not seem to fit into any of them. Proteus, in this way, acts as an architectural structure and “place” that the hybridized neonomads can use to situate themselves both physically and mentally. Its purpose it to help people both commemorate where they came from and reconnect to their origin and roots. Where a traditional nomad’s home and place is their tent and encampment, Proteus is the link to the home and place of the hybridized neo-nomad or Protean.

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BRANDON POWELL | STUDIO

While able to provide these specific needs, the Transition Phoenix community would further allow existing and currently separate centers providing relief in Phoenix to create collective relief in a localized center, so homeless individuals as well as homeless families can be aided.

INSTRUCTOR: TOM HARTMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: TRANSITION PHOENIX

In an area struggling with a high demographic of homelessness, the aim of the Transition Phoenix housing center was to provide missing resources which would both aid and unite the key demographic --homeless families-- and the surrounding community.

Having community events, and opening resources such as a library and resident run shops help to aid the existing local economy help to encourage greater community interaction.

Researching what Phoenix organizations currently do and do not provide relief to the collective issue of homelessness became a key research focus.

In addition, understanding the demographic of the site as well as the local community became crucial. Holding a major presence in the area were homeless individuals. While usually under a negative connotation, homelessness is compromised of more than individuals.

An often overlooked demographic, homeless families require specialized needs which local relief efforts often cannot fully provide. Childcare, food resources, and safe places for growing are examples of these needs.

37% of the homeless population in Arizona are families.

30% of the homeless population in Arizona are teenagers and children.

+

+ Homeless Families

34% of the U.S. homeless population are families.

Resources

Existing Community

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ARCHITEKTON | PROFESSIONAL

PROJECT NAME: CLOUD SONG CENTER PRIMARY ARCHITECT: ERIC STERNER PROJECT TOTAL: 31,500 GSF PROJECT SCHEDULE: FALL 2015- FALL 2018

Nearing completion on SRPMIC land and situated at Scottsdale Community College, the CloudSong Center invites users to experience a space that tell stories to those who see it and those who enter and use it. With the ultimate goal of housing the Business School and Indigenous Scholars Institute, the building showcases Scottsdale Community College’s commitment to the education of and service to Native American students, tribes and community members. As such, it affords all students the opportunity to learn about indigenous peoples – from pre-historic and historic times, to tribal communities of today. This building will support many functions for all students, but will be a ‘campus’ home for the activities, the stories, the displayed talents of indigenous peoples. From the beginning of design, the user groups expressed the desire for equal but unique identities for the Business School and the Indigenous Scholars Institute. Although simple in concept, the building also aesthetically wanted to appear to be of the same language and material. Creating different identities for such disparate user groups

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became the core challenge and opportunity for shaping a unified building. The design that evolved offered Architekton the ability to organize and allocate space in a push/pull methodology that allowed for the Business School to have a physical connection and presence to the campus to the west and the Indigenous Scholars Institute to have a visual connection to Red Mountain and the Community to the east, as well as a significant amount of outdoor space for community events. Additionally, both the Business School and the Indigenous Scholars Institute have different material selections on the interior of the building to further create a subtle visual differentiation between the two programs. This building serves a purpose that is missing in most buildings being constructed today. There is a vernacular to our land, to the way we build, to the way we engage with one another that is specific to this place. With the universal progress that we see happening today, it is easy to forget where we have been. The building serves as a reminder and a moment in the understanding of the SRPMIC community that invites users to take a moment to pause and discuss, if even just for a moment, where we are, where we have been and where we are going.


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There is a traditional story of a mother losing her child that is saved from starvation by being turned into a saguaro cactus. The community treats this noble cactus as one of their own. From the fruit that is collected and fermented to bring the summer rains to the ribs that are used in the walls as a traditional building materials, it plays an important role in everyday life. The design celebrates this relationship by casting the ribs into the concrete wall at strategic locations like the Story Telling Room. After the concrete panel has been lifted into position, the wood rib is burned out releasing the soul, while the imprint serves as a reminder of the importance of this plant to the Community.

The Saguaro Harvest, Pima. (c1907)

Cortaro Farms, Pinal County, Arizona. Yaqui Indian “Jacal�.

Amigos Saguaros, Saguaro Spirits Series, 2000 by Larry Walker

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Jacal (c. 1937)


Cast + Capture

Remove + Reveal

Burn + Release ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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BOYLAN, MALOUF, SHEKERJIAN | ESSAY

ARCHITECTS OF CHANGE WRITTEN BY: MATTHEW BOYLAN, VINCENT MALOUF, AND NICK SHEKERJIAN

“I often think about how much beef it would take to turn the Lake of Geneva into consommé.”

We are the Experimental Room. One class, comprised of 91 environmental designers, coming from various backgrounds such as architecture, fashion, engineering, business, mathematics, and more. We have all gathered under the same desire to surpass the traditional definitions of design practice. As we have arrived from unique pasts, we will depart into diverse futures. But in this moment, we are together, constructing a dream for the future of design education, a way of discovering how we create design jobs according to ourselves and our desires, as a response to the contemporary state of practice and the changing, self-determined future of our job markets. We are “Architects of Change.”

“Elephants are generally drawn smaller than life size, but a flea always larger.”

As our name indicates, the entire class is suffused with a spirit of experimentation. It is the core principle by which we operate. We challenge ourselves to think radically, and to experiment boldly in new ways and our experiment is manifold.

This semester, we are dreaming intensively about the future of design education. We work simultaneously in the physical reality of the university and the urban context, as well as with our own perceptions, in order to construct this radical vision for the new school. As a part of this experiment, we have partnered with the Phoenix Art Museum. This allows us to embed ourselves within the public and civic environment, creating a critical bridge between theory and praxis. The movement between ASU and the museum means we are constantly crossing the thresholds that exist between the university and the city. Our work with the Phoenix Art Museum includes crucial interactions with the public, as well as participation in the Museum’s College Night event and a final exhibition of our work at the First Friday in May. Ultimately, with the exhibition of our work at the Phoenix Art Museum, we spark dialogue with our community about the unknown, yet hopeful, future. In order to structure ourselves in this experimentation, we looked toward historical precedents that were immersed in their contexts and their own personal environmental intrigues. The Oulipo group, including Georges Perec, creates particular importance for the Experimental Room’s experimentation. As writers, mathematicians, and theoreticians they practiced “constrained writing” and occupied a sort of professional space where experimentation led directly into utility. This method of writing, in which seemingly futile constraints are used, breaks down traditional patterns of thought through a release of the personal ego’s debilitating grip on design thinking. Perec is our master of experimentation through constraints. The playful function of his work as an introspection becoming “extrospection” is what defines the attitude of our experimentation. In Species of Spaces, Perec analyzes and rejoices in the world around him through playful questioning, but according to his personal experiences and daily encounters. This is the sort of experimentation that becomes an attitude for the beginning of a design. He contemplates “two brilliant thoughts:” DISCIPLINE

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The broth and the drawing of an elephant-- artefacts that likely filled the in between moments of Perec’s daily, unassuming life. Artefacts that he encounters, chuckles to himself about, and stores in his mind for later exploration. These surrealist thoughts become foundations for us to launch into a design; a process that formed the attitude of this studio. What would really be required to transform The Lake of Geneva into consommé, a broth, or to actually draw the flea and the elephant to their correct sizes? As Georges Perec used the movement of a knight piece on a chess board to construct the story for Life A User’s Manual, we look for constraints in our passions to build our own unique structures of design thinking. This is the Experimental Room’s response to discovering contemporary space in a world with ever-increasing accessibility to information. How should these ancient university structures stay relevant in the age of the “Internet of Things?” Is it still ethical for universities to build pedagogies focused on hard skills or to become a platform for students to learn and discover how to quickly engage hard skills to manipulate their passions in physical space? Is “information delivering” the ultimate goal, or the “development of personal attitudes of design?” We are prompted to believe in the latter.


As such, our semester begins by first looking inward. We examine the relationship between ourselves and a designed artefact that has significance in our lives. We seek to discover a personal insight and to convey something crucial about ourselves, our history, and ultimately an environment. Having uncovered something about ourselves and our personal dreams, we then look outwards and study various contexts. The physical and spatial area of the university, people within the community, current societal and cultural issues, and existing models of education, both past and present, become our context. We synthesize the data we gather about our context and anti-context, and use this information to generate theses

about our dreams for the future of design education. With a trajectory as a guide, we model three dimensional structures as a representation of the structure of our new model of education, in order to understand the composition of classes and the movement of a student through this new program. As “Architects of Change� our radical, speculative visions of the unknowable future imagine structures of education that do not yet exist. This is exactly the purpose of the Experimental Room, a design education focused on persuading students to build personal attitudes as a way of designing their own future practice. The future will be vastly different from the past and the present. It is crucial that we use methods of experimental design, coupled with our own passions, to uncover the future we desire and design a path to reach it.

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BAILEY, BALLARD, FOSTER | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: AMIT UPADHYE YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: THE STREET GROUP MEMBERS: BRITTANY BAILEY, JASMINE BALLARD, AND MILES FOSTER

Our concept for this project is to re-imagine the typology of a community space. One that is inserted into an area of need. The typology change is necessary to reflect the ever changing nature of Los Angeles and promote a sense of awareness. We believe that by accompanying a program of awareness with business and mixed use, a dynamic space of more value can be created for the diverse community.

This concept is realized through three fundamental notions of our idea. The first being the manifestation of “the machine wall,� a vertical mass intended to provide the life and support for the building. The second ideal being to promote walkability in a car driven city via the exploration of the performance of the street. And third is the intention for future implementation in other neighborhoods where need is identified. These three core ideas begin to challenge the way that Los Angeles plans for the future and our hope is that this can become a model for re-thinking the way large urban cities progress.

DISCIPLINE

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DIAZ, FAN, JOSHI, SANCHEZ | STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: JACOB ATHERTON, MICHAEL UNDERHILL YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: BATTERY PARK CITY GROUP MEMBERS: HECTOR DIAZ, XUEYING FAN, VAISHNAVI JOSHI, AND EDUARDO SANCHEZ

During America’s industrial boom, the island of Manhattan, specifically it’s lower west side, was a shipping haven. It served as a major seaway at the mouth of the upper New York Bay, with the Hudson River and East River at its sides. As the city evolved with commerce and industry, the need for such an intense industrial pier district subsided. The Manhattan skyline began to develop and life throughout New York was changing. Densification of the city raised the common issue of space, where is everyone going to fit?

There have been ideas on how to develop the lower west side as early as the 1920’s. In the 1960’s, city planners looked to the shores of the island and proposed various schemes that were, for the most part, not well received until 1968 when it was decided to “extend the island”. Expanding the island was left to the Battery Park City Authority (BPCA) who hired a team of consultants and contractors. They intended to take the excavated earth from developing Manhattan neighborhoods which included towers in the financial district and Minoru Yamasaki’s World Trade Center. The BPCA also dredged the Hudson and East Rivers for more soil to engineer into the land mass we know as Battery Park City.

residences, commercial real estate, and vast green spaces. The most influential changes happened in city zoning ordinances. The code broke away from a rigid structure that dictated entire neighborhoods having only one major identity like industrial, commercial, or residential. Instead the BPCA pushed for a code that would allow various land uses to interact safely.

New York Battery Park ca. 1920’s, courtesy of AIG Archives

Development started with creating the land mass, but it was integral to connect the site back to the city. Planners chose to extend the existing street grid from Manhattan to seamlessly transition the new development to the existing. They also implemented a public transit system that would reconnect the site to the rest of the city with three transit lines. In all, Manhattan expanded its west shore developing a 92 acre site that helped redefine urban development strategies. Battery Park City is a true mixed use site that allowed for

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Battery Park City, land created from excavation of WTC. Credit Port Authority of New York and New Jersey


public and students living there. It also has space for events to be held on and for people to do a diverse set of activities.

At the beginning of the semester, we were given the challenge to design a dwelling space. Through my process, it became necessary for the project to foster a space which created a sense of community, a space to grow food, and a space that was resident flexible. The site for the project was located at 6th Ave and Monroe Street in downtown Phoenix.

In this space, a single concrete slab was not suitable for the project. With changes in elevation and differing materiality of multiple slabs, the ground level creates a dynamic atmosphere for social events. This decision influenced areas where food planting could occur. These areas are to be used by the coffee shop, the library, and the students who live there.

This housing project is focused on college students due to close proximity from the downtown ASU campus. It can be difficult for a student to find where to live in downtown, and it is harder to find a place that creates a welcoming community. The housing portion of the project is lifted 20 ft above ground level for public use. The ground level has a library and a coffee shop to be used by the

A flexible aspect of the design is that only part of the units are designed; the rest is free space for the user to utilize in different ways depending on their individual necessities. The part that was pre-designed was a simple rectangle with the bare essentials of a dwelling space. The extra space of the unit was kept clean for the user to design as they wish or need.

ADRIAN CASTRO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: VICTOR IRIZARRY YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: ADAPTIVE DESIGN

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HUFT, RODRIGUEZ, ZHAO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELENA ROCCHI YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2018 PROJECT NAME: COMPASS GROUP MEMBERS: BRIAN HUFT, ANGEL RODRIGUEZ, YUCHEN ZHAO

The Montello artists have gone before us as explorers into the landscape, revealing the beauty that is to be found within the desert and the fragility to behold therein. Compass orients the visitor to the intersection of the natural topography and human development; expressing a stark form that minimizes the impact of the structure upon the site, while using what form exists to maximize the experience. Developed in a studio partnering with a precast concrete company, the monolithic construction itself is built of structural pieces - originally used to carry high speed vehicular

traffic - that have been reclaimed as instruments of rest and contemplation, expressing the weight that human artifacts have had on the natural landscape. Along the axis of travel stands the gallery, a human expression of the environment, reflecting the sagebrush steppe as the artists themselves have done before us.

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ABDALLAH, FATTAHI, IGANIAN, LEONARD, STRAUSS | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: ULI HINES STUDENT COMPETITION YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2018 GROUP MEMBERS: OMAR ABDALLAH, SAMAN FATTAHI, JASMINE IGANIAN, ROBERT LEONARD, CASSANDRA STRAUSS MENTORS: KRISTIAN KELLEY, MARK STAPP

Pro-TO-Type offers a new social and economic heart to neighborhoods east of Toronto’s historic downtown with the first true mixed-use development east of the Don River. The approximately 14-acre site presents a once-in-a-generation opportunity to re-imagine the notion of the urban Toronto neighborhood. Proposed is an elevated urban living experience that is socially conscious and environmentally sustainable, that is seamlessly engaged with surrounding established neighborhoods and proposed development, and has the flexibility to evolve to meet changing community needs.

An emphasis on open space, walkability, and easy access to public transportation promotes an ideal healthy urban environment within the development. The proposal’s vertical integration means city living is happening on all levels. Ground level supporting retail and service amenities are quickly accessible to residents, on and off-site office workers, travelers and neighborhoods nearby. Above, sky gardens punched through the towers offer recreational space and create an iconic architectural identity for the community. Garden bridges connect the towers at their sky lobbies, creating open-air dog parks, cafes and other spaces to enjoy the sweeping views of Downtown Toronto. Dynamic spaces with a polarity of activities reinvigorate the eastern core. A lively streetscape complete with shopping, dining and entertainment welcomes visitors into its highly animated public realm. Large, vibrant green spaces are well programmed and capture the passerby.

An adaptive reuse of Studio Row preserves the authenticity of the neighborhood to the north with gradually sloping building heights that respect its scale, and newly carved alleys that invite them into its POPS. The International Market attracts Toronto’s increasingly diverse population, fostering unique cultural encounters in and around the site. Connectivity is enhanced with a new web of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure that complement the incoming multimodal transit hub, and weave together existing and planned neighborhoods as one cohesive network of pedestrian oriented spaces.

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A linear park runs along the western edge linking new greenspace to the Don River Valley Park system, creating new connections. Pro-TO-Type joins the West Don Lands in the Waterfront Intelligent Communities Initiative and encourages East Harbour’s participation to digitally integrate the region, creating technology-enabled neighborhoods that will attract residential and commercial tenants of the new economy, and foster new development in the Port lands and further. As finger parks weave green space throughout the site, green roof terraces become urban gardens and insulate the buildings. Truly flexible buildings provide cost-saving and smarttechnology features, and are strong structured to evolve and be re-purposed to meet market needs, or upon further public and city engagement. Together with public agencies such as Waterfront Toronto and the TRCA, Pro-TO-Type implements a comprehensive flood protection plan that promotes green space and is climate resilient. Flood protection earthworks and increased green space along the western edge, coupled with green building standards complying with City Living Policies protect the site’s natural functions and mitigate risk. The proposal is well aligned with the objectives of the proposed Eastern and Broadview Flood Protection EA project, and incorporates measures critical to removing the site’s floodplain designation for development. Pro-TO-Type accommodates a combination of physically and functionally integrated uses and connections that respond dramatically to the needs of the 21st century citizen. It boldly meets the demands of a demographically changing and culturally shifting Toronto that is rich in both its culture and economy.


master plan

0.5%

scale 1:1000

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

181357

30-44

29%

al ad

28%

A Aerial walkway

B SmartTracks & GO Transit Hub

parc at gr

C Building 1: Sauriol Station Skyview Residences

14 ac

Office Transit station retail + restaurants

J

Glass galleria shops

G

D Building 2

Ashbridge Condominiums Office

I

Retail + restaurants E Building 3

K H

International Supermarket + retail Office Apartments

70,800 56,600

F Building 4

Sauriol Residences

E

Office Transit station retail + restaurants

L D

A

Innovati creates integrat plazas a create a oriented realm a

Glass galleria shops G Building 5

Condominiums Health clinics

F

Neighborhood-oriented retail B

H Building 6

Sotto Hotel Offices Boutique retail + restaurants

C

I Studio Row

FilmBar Theater Creative workspaces Local cafes + bars

J Developable parcels 1 + 2

K Bird habitat

L Showroom Building Vehicle retail

A

Showroom Restaurant + Bar

connections Site transit connections

As a hub for public transit in East Toronto, walkability is prioritized. Underground vehicle circulation and parking allows grade-level land to be a safe pedestrian environment.

Pedestrian + bicyclist circulation

Don River Valley Park Greenbelt

Neighborhoods, districts and developments

Vehicle circulation

Regional transit connections

Site transit connections

As a hub for public transit in East Toronto, walkability is prioritized. Underground vehicle circulation and parking allows grade-level land to be a safe pedestrian environment.

Pedestrian and bicyclist circulation

Don River Valley Park Greenbelt

Neighborhoods, districts, and developments Regional transit connections

Vehicle circulation

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SOWA + ALLIED ARTS | INTERVIEW

INTERVIEW : SOWA + ALLIED ARTS INTERVIEWEES: CO-PRESIDENTS NENWE GEESO + CECILE KIM WRITTEN BY: BRANDON POWELL

SOWA + ALLIED ARTS is an emerging Student Organization of Female design and art students, with the goal of empower women through the built environment. On a somewhat chaotic afternoon as a break from the intense planning and structuring of their new organization, Nenwe Geeso and Cecile Kim sat down over coffee to discuss relevant topics.

How do you hope SOWA will influence women as they continue to move forward in their design and careers in the creative field? CK: We hope to equip anyone who is entering into the workforce to change their view of the traditional role of women in the design, arts, and even construction “For example, in the profession fields. Having firm principals, project managers, of architecture only an average and curators take on traditionally male respected of 18% of licensed professionals are women.” and dominated roles with confidence is our ultimate goal. What advice do you have for a student who is interested in becoming involved with your organization?

What is SOWA, and who do you hope to reach? NG: SOWA is the Student Organization of Women Architects + Allied Arts. It is our hope to reach the greater portion of female students in all design disciplines. Both academia and the professional world currently lack female leadership. For example, in the profession of architecture only an average of 18% of licensed professionals are women. We want SOWA to become a platform for females in the design school and beyond, as an opportunity to find mentors and foster relationships with professionals we as students can relate to. CK: We also want to provide educational outreach, the illumination of career opportunities, and hope to narrow gaps such as gender inequality and poor female representation which become so prevalent post graduation. With the new initiative here at ASU to “redesigning the design school,” how do you feel that SOWA can contribute to this redesigning? How do you see SOWA impacting the design school overall?

CK: Well, shameless plug, follow SOWA_ASU on Instagram! Yet, we’re aiming to have at least one event and one meeting before the (Spring 2018) semester ends and working on partnering with women leadership in Arizona for future discussions and events this upcoming Fall (2018). NG: Especially underclassmen, reach out to anyone and everyone, and do not be afraid. It’s difficult when looking for a female mentor or someone to look up to. Reach out to them! Because the worst they can say is “no I can’t help you.” Not being afraid to put yourself out there is important. Be human. Professionals are human too, and being genuine and interested can go a long ways. CK: I’m so glad to be a part of this organization as it becomes founded, as I’ve grown in my friendships already, especially with Nenwe and Alexandra (Patrick) as we all work to grow the board. NG: It’s helped us all to grow. It has pushed my love for what I do, and made me even more excited to be in this field of work knowing that there are already a growing amount of women in the artistic and design professions at large. We hope that we can make an impact!

CK: We’re hoping that with the new initiative, we can begin to foster dynamic collaborations with existing organizations such as AIAS, LASO, IDSA, IIDA, ASLA and many more. We’re also excited to be hosting mentoring opportunities. NG: Yes! With such strong females in the fields of design and arts here in the valley, having the ability to discuss with professionals and even professors is a large benefit to students in learning how to become licensed or even how to advance in a chosen profession. CK: We’re particularly excited, as the Design School just hired Wanda Dalla Costa. Having the opportunity to learn from professors who has practiced in many different areas is incredibly encouraging for other women in the program and even in other design programs. NG: We want to be sure to include any ASU students, especially male students, in this conversation and organization at large, too. Oftentimes, for women it can become an echo chamber of “YES! CHANGE!,” yet the only change that will come will be from both male and female collaboration. It’s about finding equality; assisting in the advancement of talent and skill regardless of gender, sexuality, and race. DISCIPLINE

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Alexandra Patrick, Nenwe Geeso, and Cecile Kim (left to right)


WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE | EVENT

WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE - ASU HOSTED BY: LASO, AIAS, AND ALPHA RHO CHI WRITTEN BY: BRANDON POWELL

As the culmination of professionals and students together, the Women in Architecture student event was the first open and fostering conversation of female experiences in the profession of Architecture. Hosted as a partnership event between the female leaders in the ASU design organizations of LASO, AIAS, and the Satyros Chapter of Alpha Rho Chi, the event goal was to connect students with local professionals in order to establish a framework for the success of students. Through the shared experiences of professionals, students would be encouraged to take over leadership roles in their future architectural and design careers.

At the conclusion of the three presentations a panelist discussion was opened up, and Olga Ibarra (a current graduate student) and Olivia Raisanen (recent undergraduate student of 2017) were invited to join the discussion. Pictured left to right: Nika Pniak, Oriana Gill, Christiana Moss, Caroline Lobo, Rachel Rasmussen, Olivia Raisanen, and Olga Ibarra.

With a strong sampling of the experienced and diverse female architects in the Phoenix valley, speakers including Christiana Moss of Studio Ma, Caroline Lobo of suoLL architects, and Rachel Rasmussen of Architekton, shared personal experiences, design accomplishments, and confident words of wisdom with students. Through these three presentations, highlights of travel, raising families, and positive experiences were mentioned. The importance of balance was also discussed which is a growing conversation pertaining to healthy mental habits that are crucial to the success of any individual in the profession of architecture.

The new student organization of SOWA + Allied Arts was also announced at this event. As a new student organization focused on the empowerment of future female designers, the conversations and topics mentioned at the conference will continue to be reengaged throughout the year. From the newly navigating to the seasoned and experienced, the shared discussion on positive and negative experiences by the panelists was a strong moment at the event. Open discussions such as the one presented to students are a crucial part in the open understanding between sexes, sexualities, and genders. An understanding which is essential to the creation of equality and, most importantly, equal equity in salaries and recognition of women in the architectural profession.

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NENWE GEESO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: EVERLASTING CYCLES

The challenge began with the creation of a history center, interpretive park, and memorial cemetery at the Pioneer and Military Memorial Cemetery in downtown Phoenix. Dating back to the early 1900’s, the site is the burial place of many of Phoenix’s early founders.

To symbolize childhood as the start of beginning of a life cycle, playfully curved edges remind us of youth. From our adolescence into adulthood, we continually face many obstacles; as represented by the jagged edges of the terrace as it slowly inclines. As our time winds down we reminisce on our past, ultimately reaching the conclusion of our life. Visitors in the reflection space are encouraged to reminisce, and view out over the burial space. Beneath the reflection space, the building stands as an everlasting legacy of those who gone but not forgotten.

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CHRISTINA LUFKIN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: TOM HARTMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: ASSEMBLE!

The question of how to create a sense of ownership was then applied to the community.

How do you create a sense of ownership and preserve community amidst the temporality of low-income apartment living? This question was first asked in regard to developing the unit.

The goal of the neighborhood plaza is to engage, unite, and empower the local community by giving them agency over its function. The shiftable planter boxes and patio furniture provide this flexibility, while the variety of fruit trees offer visitors shade and nourishment. A variety of events and activities may take place within this democratic outdoor space: a community garden, movie night, performance space, neighborhood yard sale, public lecture, farmers market, opportunity for civic engagement, and so on.

By redefining the traditional apartment scheme and giving the tenants agency over the creation of their unit layout, this project addresses the issue of affordability and establishes a sense of ownership amidst temporality. Catalog pieces are stored on site, transferred via freight elevator, and assembled within the unit. Users rent the pieces monthly according to their lifestyle and have the freedom to arrange them as they please.

While the ground floor of this project is defined by its porosity and relation to the surrounding neighborhood, the upper levels offer security and opportunity for more private and intimate interactions among residents of the apartment community.

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JOSH GREENE | THESIS

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: THE STORYTELLING HOUSE

This creative project responds to the current housing development in Blackwater, Arizona. Blackwater or “Shuckma hudag,” is the most eastern district on the Gila River Indian Reservation consisting of roughly 580 square miles and is home to around 1,000 residents with about 940 of them being Native American. The area consists mostly of farmland and open desert and is bordered by the dry Gila River bed with a view of the San Tan Mountains beyond. The project addresses the high demand of housing units in the Gila River Indian Community and proposes an architectural intervention with the intent of bringing tribal culture into the everyday context of the home. Initially, the existing condition is critiqued from an architectural and cultural lens, and establishes the current realities of the residents. An investigation of the existing conditions and the surrounding context determined that the immediate contradiction to the existing house is the storytelling tradition of the Akimel O’odham and Pee Posh tribes. This project accepts and revises the existing condition and attempts to combine it with the fundamental traits of storytelling culture to create a house that encourages storytelling across generations while also serving as a space that allows residents to practice culture in the everyday.

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The Storytelling House is a synthesis at its core. There is an evident push and pull between the abstract and the negative conditions of the research. At a basic level, it aligns with the argument of architectural theorist Kenneth Frampton’s Towards a Critical Regionalism: “how to become modern and return to sources; how to revive an old dormant civilization and take part in universal civilization.”[1] But as a native community, the design must go deeper. This synthesis aligns even closer with the ideas of the contemporary indigenous architect Daniel Glenn (Crow). This project strives for an architecture that “plays a role in the preservation and celebration of ancient traditions, while appropriately serving the needs of today.”[2] The existing abstract condition is an efficient method and follows standardized building principles, while the negative condition describes the more sensory discoveries of the history and culture of storytelling. Architecturally this contradiction is observed in the Schindler House, because it aligns with the open and continuous flow of storytelling. “The question arises as to why indigenous building traditions tend to be ignored (when not actually denigrated) by the agencies charged with building for indigenous, peoples.”[3] By contradicting the abstract condition, a concrete form emerges that addresses both. Through its synthesis, the storytelling house promotes an increased frequency of cultural narratives. A re-


organization of space allows family members have adequate spaces that enable them to tell stories across generations. It is through these stories that the culture of the Gila River will continue to live. An interview with Muriel Miguel reveals that “Storytelling is the way you feel and know where you are within your family, your clan, your tribal affiliations, and from there into the history of how you fit into the world. Storytelling starts at the kitchen table, on your parent’s lap, on your Aunt’s and Uncle’s laps. Storytelling begins there, about who you are… Then it continues from there about who you are in the family; of where you are as a tribal member, as part of the particular nation; then where that nation is in the community; and where that community belongs in the world. There are always circles upon circles upon circles.”[4] Native stories are essential to communicate a worldview. When the importance of story is incorporated into the design process, the built environment has the ability to increase stories told within a space, and allow for the preservation of culture.

Sources [1] Frampton, Kenneth. Towards a Critical Regionalisim. [2] Glenn, Daniel [3] Malnar, Joy Monice, and Frank Vodvarka. 2013. New architecture on indigenous lands. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. [4] Uno, Roberta and Lucy Mae, The color of theater: race, culture, and contemporary performance. ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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NASRYNN CHOWDHURY | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CATHERINE SPELLMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: EPHEMERALITY

“You must live in the present. Launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this.” “Seasons.” Henry David Thoreau 1859 in Walden. New York: Norton: 57.

This project was driven by the intention to create remarkable yet fleeting moments in time and the discovery that the ephemerality of being kindles mindfulness. The dwelling, nestled within a trio of trees, makes itself home within a cavity in the dense forest, almost as if it has assumed the form and function of another tree: its concrete piles, like permeating roots, burrowed beneath the ground; its pivot, like a stubborn trunk, unwavering in its tectonic duties; and its steel-frame structure, like branches, reaching outward and upward, gently brushing against their organic counterparts. Most

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importantly, the artist’s studio, like a canopy of leaves, is lofty in its endeavors to flourish into an ecosystem in and of itself. This creative ecosystem mirrors the symposium of the artist’s thoughts and imagination, free to roam past the confines of the canopy. The space embraces the role of an organism, mimicking the biologic process of heliotropism, or the tracking of the sun. It enhances the process of photosynthesis and increases growth rate, just as sunlight aids concentration and boosts serotonin levels within the human body. Each artist works to an idiosyncratic rhythm of light, meaning optimal sunlight does not, in every case, mean the maximum. Thus, essential to the structure is the inhabitant’s ability to dictate the quality of light allowed into the space. The studio, as a singular body, pivots 90 degrees to the south with the capacity to adapt to fleeting light. Each micro degree elicits another untrodden yet short-lived moment. The resulting spontaneity the artist feels suggests a unity within the natural milieu. In time, the understanding of ephemerality will augment her mastery of mindfulness, evoking a harmonious coexistence between humankind and nature.


ATMOSPHERES NIKA PNIAK | STUDIO

N

L O W

INSTRUCTOR: KASEY JOSEPHS YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: THREE ATMOSPHERES

For me, architecture has always been about the way it makes the user feel. When I was working on this project, I started to research how to express this desire. Through the use of a derive, I discovered six spiritual elements that occurred throughout the site. I felt that the location of each of these spiritual experiences that naturally occurred were sites in themselves, and the real project was to capture and frame them through the architecture.

MY MO INGS, OF PETER

DERIVE AND ANALYSIS

Three

Atmospheres

are

achived

through

through

analysis

of

the

site

and

the

natural occurences that surround it. By shaping the building to embrace and l

naturescapes of the site, the design fosters: Focus, Interest, Peace, Sanctity, Meditation, by

creating

program

elements

below,

above,

and

on

the

grou

The program elevations respond to the height of the mountain, increasing as th

Thus, Three Atmospheres are achieved through this analysis of the site and the captivating natural occurrences that inhabit it. By shaping the building to embrace and lead to the naturescapes of the site, the design fosters Focus, Interest, Peace, Sanctity, Meditation, and Energy by creating program elements below, above, and on the ground level. The program elevations respond to the height of the mountain, increasing as they near it.

SECTION A

C D

B

If asked what moved me to select all these focal points, I would to refer to Peter Zumthor’s description of atmosphere and how it influences his work. From the beginning I could not help but find that the “people, the air, noises, sound colors, textures, forms, my mood, my feelings, and my sense of expectation” were the driving forces behind this project. By considering the effects of creating spaces below, on, and above the ground, several atmospheres are achieved.

A

LEGEND

VIEW B

Garden Space

Sacred Space

Gathering

Areas of interest

Building Elevation

Walkable Roof

VIEW C

SECTION A

VIEW D

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ELENA ROCCHI | ESSAY

Et quid amabo nisi quod rerum metaphysica est? What shall I love if not the enigma?1 To better understand the topic of my Ph.D. dissertation, I would like to read the page on the enigma taken from “The Enigma of an Autumn Afternoon” in which De Chirico,2 one of the most important artists that have shaped the collective imagination of the West in the past century, narrates the beginning of history of Metaphysical Art:

“I will explain how I had the revelation of the painting I exhibited this year at the Salon d’Automne entitled The Enigma of an Autumn Afternoon. On a clear autumn afternoon, I was sitting on a bench in the middle of Piazza Santa Croce in Florence. Indeed, it wasn’t the first time I had seen this square. I had just recovered from a long and painful intestinal illness and found myself in a morbid state of sensitivity. All of Nature surrounding me, even the marble of the buildings and the fountains, seemed to me to be convalescing also. In the center of the square stands a statue of Dante cloaked in a long robe, hugging his oeuvre to his body, thoughtfully bowing his pensive laurelcrowned head slightly toward the ground. The statue is of white marble, to which time has given a grey tinge that is very pleasing to the eye. The autumn sun, lukewarm and without love, lit the statue as well as the facade of the temple. I then had the strange impression that I was seeing everything for the first time. And the composition of my painting came to me, and every time I look at it, I relive this moment once again. Still, the moment is for me an enigma, because it is inexplicable. And I like to define the resulting work as an enigma.”3 This account is the story of metaphysics as the enigma of the hour, it is said the conception of the painting for Piazza d’Italia by De Chirico occurred while he was looking at the Basilica di Santa Croce in Florence. It is the description of the circumstances in which, an imprecise concept such as the enigma, arises, a metaphysical moment with a morbid state of sensitivity in which the estrangement of the world occurs. A memory, coming from somewhere else, emerges to frame the experience of that reality (which he thought he knew) as a strange impression he is suddenly unfamiliar too. As art critic Philippe Daverio4 revealed in 2011 during a conference on De Chirico, the Piazza d’Italia the painter described in details from the height of a bench in Santa Croce, was instead seen, as in an Eisenstein’s movie, from the second floor of a historic theater in Munich where he lived as a child. In his false account, De Chirico confirms somehow that hypotheses, dreams, things of our consciousness, and images coming from somewhere else, are the dominant imagery of past experiences: immersed in circumstances of a morbid state of sensitivity, they frame present situations as a future past. With my obsession with the details of this account, and convinced that it is in the details that one can find the explanation of things, I started to play passionately with details, and in August 2017, with being a student, again, in the Ph.D. program for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Design, Environment, and the Arts at Arizona State University. My chair is Jason Davids Scott, Ph.D. and Assistant Professor at Asu the School of Film, Dance, and Theatre. My dissertation’s topic is “the realness of frames” in visual arts, films, and on stage, where “frames” are the physical DISCIPLINE

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Giorgio De Chirico, “L’Enigme d’un apres-midi d’automne” (The Enigma of an Autumn Afternoon), 1910, Florence, Oil on canvas, 45cm x 60 cm, Private Collection

boundary which artists and designers place in between the space that “is” and the one of “everything else” as the enigma. After so many years, I study again, in search for ways to extract interpretation’s process of the world’s objects from the mind, to distills mechanisms of thought that are neither in the head nor the heart, but somewhere else, precisely where Pre-Socratic philosophers thought of the soul would be: in the liver. The secret purpose of my investigation is to observe the practical dimension in the architecture’s translation action, the fragmentary nature of the world’s experience, and its multiple reflections. In search of a process of extraction of enigmas as intuitions, I started looking for the equivalency in-between words and things of different realms as theater, movies, and architecture, in order to observe what gets lost in translation, but that

TITLE:

What is a “relevant” translation?

EPIGRAPH

THE WORD

Merci relevant, irrelevant travailing

relève traveling word-to-word

THE ANTINOMIC AXIOM 1. NOTHING IS TRANSLATABLE 2. NOTHING IS UNTRANSLATABLE

()

THAT IS TO SAY

) (

1. TRANSLATION IS IMPOSSIBLE, THEREFORE 2. TRANSLATION IS NECESSARY

THE PLOT OF THE FOURTH ACT

When Mercy Seasons Justice

THE ENIGMA


still exists on a kind of experiential level. Are we aware as architects of our personal choice of a translation method? What is it about a good translation of an idea? After the first year of investigation, the study is revealing that, since ideas are attached to words more than sounds, to images more than concepts, and that to read an image is different than hearing it, as there is a differentiation between interpretation and translation of images because of framing activity. Adaptation, version, translation, trans-creation, translational action, are all terms to define the many ways design occurs: to interpret and then, to translate, or to translate first and then, to interpret. Reality and the personal vision of reality are initially two incommensurables, as for Derrida the flesh and the money in the William Shakespeare’s play, “The Merchant of Venice:” our translation of reality becomes metaphysical in its incapacity to draw the perfect equivalence. But this impossibility of equivalence throughout introduces the dimension of the gift of the experience we must translate into the visual design. “Any given translation,” as Derrida remarks, “stands between absolute relevance, the most appropriate adequate, unequivocal transparency, and the most aberrant and opaque irrelevance.”5 Derrida’s concept of the inscription, together with Peirce’s notion of ‘interpretants,’ and Venuti/Berman’s idea of ‘foreignization’ will interface in my dissertation to formulate fundamental research questions: how does a personal visual language translation action house the enigma as a reaction to reality and circumstance? How can architects translate/transfer those illogical aspects?

NOTES: 1. Giorgio De Chirico inscribed ‘Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est?’ (‘What shall I love if not the enigma?’) on a 1911 self-portrait. 2. Giorgio de Chirico (Italian: [ 1888 – 1978) was an Italian artist and writer. In the years before World War I, he founded the “Scuola Metafisica” art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919, he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work. In the paintings of his metaphysical period, de Chirico developed a repertoire of motifs— empty arcades, towers, elongated shadows, mannequins, and trains among others—that he arranged to create “images of forlornness and emptiness” that paradoxically also convey a feeling of “power and freedom”.According to Sanford Schwartz, de Chirico—whose father was a railroad engineer—painted images that suggest “the way you take in buildings and vistas from the perspective of a train window. His towers, walls, and plazas seem to flash by, and you are made to feel the power that comes from seeing things that way: you feel you know them more intimately than the people do who live with them day by day.” Retrieved at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_de_Chirico on March 4, 2018. 3. Translation of a page taken from Picozza, Paolo, Giorgio De Chirico and the birth of Metaphysical Art in Florence in 1910, retrieved in http://www. fondazionedechirico.org/wp-content/uploads/056-092Metafisica7_8. pdf on 02/19/18. Original italian version of the text in G. de Chirico, Méditations d’un peintre. Que pourrait etre la peinture de l’avenir, in Giorgio de Chirico, Scritti/1 (1911- 1945). Romanzi e scritti critici e teorici, edited by A. Cortellessa, Bompiani, Milan, 2008, pp. 649-652. 4. Philippe Daverio (1949, France) is an Italian art critic, teacher, writer, author, politician and television personality. 5. What is a “relevant” translation? by Jacques Derrida, original title “Qu’est-ce qu’une traduction ‘relevante’?” lecture delivered in 1998 at the annual seminar of the Assises de la Traduction Littéraire à Arles (ATLAS)

REALNESS OF THE FRAME

All these questions will be answered by understanding the disruption of frames in visual arts, to investigate the role of the interpretive act, the process of signification,

and the translation of architectural design. The architect is a poet, and design is an interpretative act of the invisible, not merely a reproduction, as the audience takes an active role in theatre, in front of a painting, watching a movie, or standing in a room. Architecture can recover the presence of enigmatic contents as the re-creation of extraneousness by means of the designer’s translation action as drawing.

THE ROOF

DISRUPTION OF THE FRAME

UPPER FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

THE FRAME

THE GROUND

THE ROADMAP

FOUNDATIONS

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MEDINA, SYNACEK, ZHAO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: MICHAEL UNDERHILL YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2016 PROJECT NAME: WINDHOVER CONTEMPLATIVE CENTER GROUP MEMBERS: LUIS MEDINA, ANDREW SYNACEK, YUCHEN ZHAO

only light needed within the space throughout the daylight hours. Benches and cushions are strategically placed to allow visitors to quietly view both the paintings and the adjacent landscape simultaneously.

Windhover is a spiritual refuge on the Stanford University campus designed to both inspire and promote personal renewal. Named from the series of paintings by Nathan Oliveira that grace its walls, the one-story, 4,000-square-foot building provides an environment for quiet reflection throughout the day for Stanford students, faculty, and staff.

In conjunction with landscape, water is used throughout as an aid for meditation; fountains within the building and the adjacent courtyard provide ambient sounds, while a still reflecting pool and garden to the south reflect the surrounding trees. Exterior contemplation spaces are integrated into the use of the center, further intensifying the connection of nature, art and contemplation. These courtyards, coupled with the expansive glass wall to the east, allow visitors to view the paintings without accessing the building, effectively creating a sanctuary for the Stanford community day and night.

The Center is located in the heart of the campus, adjacent to a natural oak grove. The extended progression to the building’s entry through a long, private garden is sheltered from its surroundings by a line of tall bamboo, allowing visitors to shed the outside world before entering. Within, the dichotomy created by the thick, rammed earth walls and dark wood surfaces with the lightness of the fully glazed east wall enhance the view to the oak glade beyond. Louvered skylights wash Oliveira’s 15 to 30 foot-long paintings with natural light, providing the

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Windhover embodies the message that, in the 21st century, the quality of intellectual endeavor is directly linked to the fulfillment of emotional and spiritual needs. The university envisions that community members will visit regularly to replenish their inner spirits—the source of their creativity, energy, and endurance.


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NOAH BROWN | THESIS

INSTRUCTORS: MAX UNDERWOOD, RENATA HEJDUK YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2018 (IN PROGRESS) PROJECT NAME: IMAGINATION JERUSALEM

I started this project thinking that it was going to be an interfaith center based in Jerusalem. That is, until I visited the Old City in January 2018 and came back with a completely changed perspective. I thought to myself, why would I propose to add more places of worship into the city that is already full of them, and think that by doing so I would create dialogue around them to help begin the peace process among the three Abrahamic faith groups? It didn’t make sense. It was trying to force dialogue to happen, rather than let it occur naturally.

Now this project has developed into an interfaith camp – a place where children can learn to be independent and interdependent upon one another. Imagination Jerusalem is a system among the three Abrahamic faith groups – inclusive to all religious and non-religious groups – for the education and enrichment of children ages 7-12 to create and enable dialogue around issues such as intense conflict, shared values, and celebrated differences. Thus, it cultivates new

History Sites

Play Sites DISCIPLINE

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Key Locations


leaders in the interfaith community, allowing independence and interdependence among the children for lifelong learning and relationships. My current thought process has been to analyze a few common elements that connect us as human beings – food, history, home, and play – observe

how each of these themes plays out within the camp, and begin to introduce subtle interventions. Initially, the thought was to create temporary “pieces” – you could call these the things in the home. However, in the current state of the work, it is becoming more about designing the home itself. The camp becomes the medium through which the project happens. The project itself is “the city in the city,” meaning I am exploring what the new Jerusalem looks like through the eyes of a child. The city is the camp, but there is a new city within the Old City – the playground. I have also been inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude who did The Gates in New York and Valley Curtain in Colorado, specifically the act of radically shifting perspectives of different spaces, but only with temporary works.

New City: Through the Camp, Through the Eyes of the Child

My goal is to challenge the notion of space and the political boundaries that can exist in it. By allowing the camp to move throughout the Old City, spaces are always changing and being disrupted, but by the next day, the space is back to normal; what remains is the shift in perspective for those that were a part of it. The project is continuously evolving, and I am very excited to see how it manifests in the end.

Home Sites

Food Sites ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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ALHARTI, CALVENDRA, DIBELLA, KAMALI, MARTORANO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: PHIL HORTON, SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: URBAN SOUK GROUP MEMBERS: OMAR ALHARTI, MAURICE CALVENDRA, ERIC DIBELLA, YARA KAMALI, AND COREY MARTORANO

The residents within the Balata Refugee Camp, situated in Palestine, are experiencing an unstable and unreliable food and water supply. This poor supply impacts the quality of life for the people within the camp. It is controlled by Israel, and is used as a “chokepoint� for the economy as well as a way to control the residents of the camp .The people of Balata rely on weekly produce and water shipments from Israel, most of which are not always available. Insufficient space, water and supplies prevent the possibility of residents growing their own food. By designing a space that uses systems, methods, and technologies that can alleviate some of the water and food shortages

DISCIPLINE

without requiring a complete overhaul to infrastructure, the residents of the Balata refugee camp can start to become self-sufficient and regain their independence from Israel. The covered plaza utilizes shade structures that work collectively to harvest both natural energy from the sun as well as clean water. This shade structure comes fully equipped with two systems that provide water throughout the year. A solar technology by the name of Zero Mass Water tops each shade structure; this solar panel draws water from humidity in the air, providing up to 5L clean drinking water per panel each day. The second system is the structure of the shade system itself. Taking advantage of the surface area of the shading system, rainwater is collected, then funneled down through the columns into a storage tank below ground. This water can then be used to grow food and crops on the plots of available land within the plaza space.

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NOMA ARIZONA | EVENT

JOB SEARCH/SEMINAR WORKSHOP WRITTEN BY: ISAIAH JONES-LANE AND NASRYNN CHOWDRY

In 1971, the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) was established by twelve ambitious AfricanAmerican architects. The formation of this organization was unprecedented, for minority architects had rarely banded together under a single alliance due to the rampant discrimination in the U.S. It has since evolved into a nationally recognized professional organization dedicated to celebrating diversity within the professional world of design. ASU established their own NOMA chapter in the spring of 2018.

One of their first events was a job search/seminar workshop that was sponsored by PHX Architects, Gensler and DLR Group. At the event, students were able to receive tips on creating their resume and cover letters, advice for successful job searches, and networking tactics. A round table discussion also took place to address some workplace challenges and further your career as a minority or a woman. The attendees were also able to meet with professionals one-on-one to conduct mock interviews as well as receive feedback on their resumes. The event was successful in encouraging budding young architects to affirm their diversity within any design discipline. NOMA’s dedication to combating the effects of discrimination in the design profession spurred participation between students and professionals alike and created a positive, inspiring, and encouraging environment. With emerging plans to re-design The Design School at ASU, NOMA Arizona will prove to be an excellent partnership to ensure that all students are supported and valued. NOMA Arizona will be an excellent segue to achieving increased diversity throughout the design field by networking and mentorship. From NOMA Arizona: Our mission is driven by the desire to create a team… i. “With the goals to inspire/empower and be a resource to under-served communities in Arizona, regardless of socio-economic status, culture, language, race, religion, national origin, ethnicity, disability, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, or age .” ii. “Where our strength will be our diversity, where we are not only interested in teaching the community, but also learning from it.”

DISCIPLINE

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iii. “That supports professional and personal growth and development, with a proactive approach to reach out to the design and construction community to enrich knowledge of industry practices. iv. “That strives to increase the number of women and minorities in our profession, and to help advance their careers in an upward trajectory and extract each individual’s potential. v. “That is welcoming, a resource, reliable, educated, sustainably minded and encourages fellowship/social awareness.” “The NOMA mentorship program is intended to be a multitiered resource to meet our members and greater community at their specific needs. The vision is to expose minority youth to design-related fields such as architecture and landscape architecture, whereas they might not otherwise get the opportunity. It is our goal to make this vision come to pass by the commitment of the membership to usher the next generation into the design world at a pace equal to their academic level.” For more information on this organization, please visit https://www.nomaarizona.org/


ISAIAH JONES-LANE | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: MAX UNDERWOOD YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: FABRIC TEMPE

At heart of Downtown Tempe is FABRIC. Fabric Tempe is a fashion incubator, and a learning and co-working space for fashion designers, media producers, and aspiring young designers alike. Part of the mission is to engage the community and provide a service to emerging designers. FABRIC is a place “Connected by FABRIC” to engage both people, resources, and creativity. The space holds fashion shows and both public and private events.

Considering this project as an adaptive reuse mission, the result is an effect of evidence-based design and investigation. Wayfinding, space planning, building modification, and aesthetic creativity were essential to the renovation of Fabric. To connect people to this space, different user groups where evaluated based on the need and services FABRIC currently offers. Spending a day in the

shoes of each person allowed me to view the initial reaction and the behaviors and activities of those who would occupy the space. The analysis considers the mission of FABRIC, its vision, and the opportunities that each developing interpretation offered. One question arose and remained constant during the design process: “how can I, meaning each user, better use this space?” The design shows a creative method of wayfinding and connectivity. The concrete impregnated fabric, “Qora” provides direction and acts as a structure as it moves through the space with the user. The material opened many possibilities for connection as it changed from the floor to the wall to the ceiling. The major place where all fashion was is connected is the runway. The relocation of various spaces created a more user-friendly environment. This allowed once difficult and unapproachable spaces to become visually accessible and easier to locate. The open floor plan fed the current activities and event spaces for the current fashion shows, and private affairs grew exponentially.

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BRYAN MADDOCK | ESSAY

‘USING UTOPIA’ INTRODUCTION FACULTY ASSOCIATE BRYAN MADDOCK DRAWINGS BY FANTASTIC OFFENSE CO (FOCO)

Established around a body of ongoing research clarifying the concept of utopia as a critical agent of change, Fantastic Offense Co is a collaborative practice that acts as a proactive offense in support of the city. Directed by Bryan Maddock, FOCO has divorced itself from architecture as a service profession by instead advancing tools such as utopia, as evolving models for design process, social critique, documentation and practice. This holistic approach has allowed FOCO to focus within the parameters with which it operates as it continues to research, design and build (soon). The following concepts on utopia are foundational to Fantastic Offense Co’s continuing efforts.

Utopia is an ambition seldom pursued within the profession of architecture today. Stigmatized for being unable to deliver evidence that better societies can be achieved, utopian intentions that were once central to architectural imagination are now taboo. But while utopia has remained held in exile, architectural production has inevitably continued to provide necessary products in service of market forces. This collective professional preoccupation has polluted through the disparagement of utopian dreams that have always been the carriers of revolution. Anxiety and insecurity caused by the disappearance of utopian hopes have created a scenario in which the possibility of conjecture falls outside the increasingly limited scope of architecture as a service industry. The problem with losing utopia is not in regards to any specific architectural use, but of a loss in overall optimism and transformative momentum associated with architecture desirous of bettering society. Utopian imagination is a vital mechanism for confronting and questioning reality, without which, architecture is left incapable of having a position on the ever-changing forces of the city. Utopia doesn’t describe or establish an end destination, but is instead a pervasive form of agency that guides humanity’s longing for a better way of being—or as Lewis Mumford explains of the pursuit: We can never reach the points of the compass; and so no doubt we shall never live in utopia; but without the magnetic needle we should not be able to travel intelligently at all.1

naive fantasies. While capitalism could have delivered a form of social betterment, we have instead been provided a built environment that is difficult to claim as being socially superior to those that came before. This lack of social production, or even its acknowledgment, is not only a crisis of creation, but a crisis of intention that points to the general loss of morality in architecture.3 Because of this failure, tracing architecture’s utopian past is an action that is crucial for understanding and recovering the agency of utopia as a methodology against the present status quo. While the day-to-day perpetuation of architectural production without utopia continues as a civil and aesthetic profession, the non-existence of an element of social dreaming restricts the profession to a commodification of its procedures and objects: to doing work and making icons. We exist in a hypocritical moment in architectural history where we are simultaneously frustrated with our limited disciplinary scope and yet unwilling to identify utopia as the primary tool that had once given architecture the possibility to actively confront the complex social, political, and spatial forces of the city. Fundamentally a critique of social ethics, utopia gives voice to groups with no hold on power.4 While globalization, defined as the free movement of goods, capital, services, people, technology and information between nations, has the general effect of homogenizing cities and cultures, cracks in its falsely smooth surface continue to offer glimpses of optimism for the emergence of architectural counter-spaces grounded in social responsibility.5 Exemplified by peripheral cities and neighborhoods that never ‘succeeded’ in globalizing, architecture within these contexts cannot be conceived of other than as a social practice.6 These openings in the global narrative provide insight into a resurgent role for social imagination within design that renews utopia as a necessary and useful tool for creating alternative possible futures. In order to reconsider the social aspirations of architecture within the contemporary context, utopia must separate its intentions from its presumed connections with particular forms of orthodox urban planning and architecture. Untangling its core values from retrospective architectural accusations may begin to provide indications of

Recovering and recuperating the use of utopia in architecture will not be an easy task as the profession continues to view any call for utopia as deeply suspicious. Fulfilling Manfredo Tafuri’s prescient declaration of architecture’s growing submission and subservience to capitalism, the loss of a resistant methodology within the profession has left it without a defense against these totalizing forces.2 Between the dissociation of architecture from strategies of revolution and the expanded and sustained authority of globalization, we have been handed down a situation where the architect is unable, and often unwilling, to communicate professional values beyond the provision of stylish spaces for further consumption. In the absence of a collective moral or ethical motivation, architecture has increasingly become preoccupied with image, marketability, and fashion. Setup as a defense for diffusing conflict, the global market’s ubiquitous conditions discredit any dreams of alternative futures as DISCIPLINE

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KING STREET WEST (2016), Bjarke Ingels Group As the Project Designer for KING, Bryan Maddock conjured up the ghost of utopian thinking by reinterpretting Moshe Safdie’s Habitat ‘67 as an infill project in an urban context.


naturally imperfect state rightfully displays hostility toward architecture that attempts to be a stable embodiment of utopia. Instead, reality is messy and anticipates an architecture of constant feedback and critique that may one day realize partial visions of a better world. In this way, design as a stand-alone goal must be abandoned if utopian dreaming is to return. The targeted discrediting of utopian visioning and social pursuits has led us to a reality that becomes ever out of step from the aspirations of a more just society. Though misguided at times, architecture’s pursuit of alternative concepts of living, producing, and existing are always instrumental in offering clues for better possible worlds than those in which we presently live. Aspiring to resuscitate a fundamental concept of ought within the profession,architecture desirous of creating social betterment is always in part utopian.10

INFILL PHOENIX (2017), Fantastic Offense Co Imagining Phoenix as an unprecedented future form latent in the existing unused parcels of downtown, INPX asks if infill itself could be the urban identity that re-establishes the city.

tactics that may eventually guide us to renew a social claim to the city.7 At the center of this process of untangling is a clarification and alternative reading of the historic and political conditions that denounced utopia as a ‘failure’ associated with a troubling relationship with modern architecture. Typically targeting projects that more closely resembled totalizing ‘blueprints’ for new societies, critics of utopian efforts mistakenly generalized connections between specific architectural forms and overall utopian methodologies. Thus dissatisfied with architecture’s real-world attempts to produce a more just and humane city, architecture became implicated as an increasingly inadequate and naive social science.

The primary concern of this objective is to begin a process of re-establishing a connection between architects and the city. Increasingly separated, the city and its buildings continue to operate as disconnected realities. Utopia has the potential to reclaim the right to the city and in this projection may prove to be the link that reconnects the architectural object to the social function of the city. Redefined as a constitutive process, the new ambivalence of utopia in finding permanent models reflects our modern understanding of the city as a living laboratory. Inherently utopian under conditions of active criticism and revolt, the city, as the space of the people, may be the ultimate test for architecture to reclaim a social function. If the present can be seen as an impermanent moment primed for disruption, then the function of utopia has never actually failed. This reading would reconfirm sociologist Karl Mannheim’s determination that “utopia emerges as a periodic response to an established

With an understanding of the dangers posed by the pathological blueprints with which architecture attempted to realize some form of utopia, returning instead to the fundamental function of utopia as a visioning practice remains absolutely essential if we are to question the already existent views of the established social order. The act of imagining opens connections to an infinite number of emancipatory realities that disrupt the closure of the present.8 Not accepting that the fall of modernism eliminated the use of utopia as a strategy, the associated stigma that utopias always have pathological intentions must be disproved to preserve the visioning aspect of utopia. If there is one lesson to be learned that could revive utopian dimensions to practice, it would be that the traditional model of utopian completeness must be dismantled in favor of one that defends incompleteness.9 The dynamism of reality as a

NORDEN TRAVEL FUND (2016), Fantastic Offense Co Sponsored by the Architectural League of NY, the analysis of Affonso Eduardo Reidy’s serpentine housing pair uncovered an evolving social housing section in response to the people.

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order gone stale which has seen its full development from origin to decline.”11 In his terms, the present global state of ‘matter-of-factness’ is a likely indication of the completion of a dominant movement, and therefore, the moment where an ideological shift will occur. When reality is no longer able to be represented by the existing order, utopias are created as a revolt by those who have been marginalized. Contemporary problems in architecture remain problems of utopia, as utopia alone has the capacity to instill the profession with the social functions that move it beyond its marginalized role in capitalist society. While the documenation of our utopian experiments of the past is the preliminary first step toward reformulating the framework for utopia to reemerge in practice, the demand for the impossible may indeed be the only realistic means for architecture to be proven relevant as a social practice toward the renewal of the city.12 This is not a call for all architects to reframe themselves as utopians, but instead a rallying cry for raising awareness that our complacency within the dominant system of production has distorted our once critical ambition of social progress. If one were to set out in pursuit of utopian ambitions, it is clear that there are possibilities among the constitutive utopian trajectories that were not dismantled with modernism. Revitalization of a utopian methodology will require proof that we can focus on the improvement of social and political conditions while showing an awareness and ability to resist the mistakes of our pathological past. The renewal of utopia, as an offense for societal betterment, sets out a proactive agenda that can restore social dreaming to architecture.

INFRASTRUCTURAL INFILL (2016), Fantastic Offense Co Studying alternative uses of the median on Park Avenue as a linear social housing bar, the proposal illustrates that there are still untapped housing opportunities in Manhattan. DISCIPLINE

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1 Mumford, Lewis, The Story of Utopias (1922) 2 Tafuri, Manfredo, Architecture and Utopia: Design and Capitalist Development (The MIT Press, 1976) 3 Johnson, Philip, ‘Where are We At?’, Philip Johnson Writings (New York: Oxford University Press, 1979) 4 Mannheim, Karl, Ideology and Utopia: An Introduction to the Sociology of Knowledge (Connecticut: Martino Publishing, 2015) 5 Barraza, Hansy B., Where are the Utopian Visionaries? (Pittsburgh: Periscope Publishing, 2012) 6 McGuirk, Justin, Radical Cities: Across Latin America in Search of a New Architecture (Verso, 2015) 7 Lefebvre, Henri, Writings on Cities (Malden, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishing, 1996) 8 Levitas, Ruth, ‘For Utopia the (Limits of the) Utopian Function in Late Capitalist Society,’ Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy (2000) p. 39 9 Coleman, Nathaniel, ‘Introduction,’ Imagining and Making the World (Oxford, 2011) 10 Giedion, Sigfried, Space, Time and Architecture: The Growth of a New Tradition (Harvard Press, 2009) 11 Mannheim, Karl, Ideology and Utopia: An Introduction to the Sociology of Knowledge (Connecticut: Martino Publishing, 2015) 12 Sargent, Lyman T., Utopianism: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010)


HELLINIKON (2014), Fantastic Offense Co: Strategically inserting a transitional zone that splits Athens’ unused Ellinikon Airport, architecture becomes a simple science for urban reorganization and discussion.

CITY (2018), Fantastic Offense Co: Ongoing documentation of immeuble citĂŠ proposed throughout history recovers concepts of architecture as a proactive offense in support of the city as the space of revolution. ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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BAILEY, DIAZ | ESSAY

INTERDISCIPLINARY ATMOSPHERES WRITTEN BY: BRITTANY BAILEY AND HECTOR DIAZ PHOTOS BY: BRITTANY BAILEY, HECTOR DIAZ, JENNIFER GRYSHO, AND ELENA ROCCHI

Interdisciplinary is a word quite often thrown around in the design fields, yet very seldom is it truly realized. The first year Design Fundamentals course is an instance where this manifests in the purest form. Students from varying backgrounds and all with diverse objectives assemble in this course to learn how to become designers. Regardless of their intended program of study, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interior Design or Environmental Design, the course deliberately focuses on design critical thinking as a process and skill set sensitive to global variables. The curriculum and lectures break down the students’ perspective of the world and trains them both to perceive and rationalize as a designer, providing the students with the ability to be inspired, intentional, and innovative problem solvers. The course summons its strength from its foundation of teachers. Conceived by Professor Elena Rocchi, Architect, and Professor Kristian Kelley, Landscape Architect, there is a vital balance embedded not only in the curriculum, but in the essence of the course as a whole. The two find a symbiotic relationship, interacting together as well as with the students that allows for a commingling of poetics and practicality that reaches all students. The pair is further reinforced by the team of interdisciplinary Graduate Teaching Assistants that add another dimension of diversified balance to the mix.

The interface between professors, teaching assistants and students is unique in the sense that they each build off of one another. There is a woven, cyclical process that takes place through a cause and effect kind of attitude embedded in the way the professors allow the course to manifest. They are constantly monitoring students understanding through weekly observation during the ‘Bridge Pin Up’ as well as through the feedback provided by the teaching assistants who interact with students one-on-one in the studio setting. This approach leaves room for quick adaptation, which enables an opportunity for customized learning environments and strategies best suited for the current students. The course is in a constant state of re-imagination. The students are taught to have this same ethic of malleability, equipping them with the tools to encounter a context through the lens of an anti-context, translating and synthesizing a design solution. Each project is intended to teach a skill and design process that can be utilized in future projects. Even more so however, the skills and processes are strategies used to decipher a problem and generate a response. They are learning to be systems thinkers. These are skills that cannot only cross pollinate among varying design disciplines, but can also add value to other markets, thus making these young designers a commodity in any circumstance. That is the beauty of this course. The value is truly found in the interactions; the interdisciplinary atmospheres curated by the students, teachers, knowledge, and experiences – Interdisciplinary Creative Thinking.

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CARLSON, CHILDRESS, LEAVENS, NEVAREZ | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: PHIL HORTON YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: CIRI GROUP MEMBERS: ANDREW CARLSON, JOSEPH CHILDRESS, AVALON LEAVENS, AND MANUEL NEVAREZ

The Los Angeles metropolitan area is home to one of the fastest expanding technological industries in the world. With the newly expanded Expo Line, downtown Los Angeles is now connected to many of its neighboring cities along the California coast. The CIRI (California Institute of Research and Innovation) is located at the start of the Expo Line in Santa Barbra, giving the California University System a facility in the heart of Silicon Valley. CIRI provides a live-work opportunity for students from local universities around LA who strive to develop their business ideas into successful ventures. In addition, CIRI provides outdoor and indoor recreation facilities, gallery and presentation spaces, and a technological work and office space. By creating a central spine that houses the core of the building’s infrastructure, flexible floor plates were created to accommodate the multifunctional program spaces as well as provide views to the ocean and down town Santa Barbra.

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RACHEL FRAIL | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: BRIE SMITH YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: HOUSE OF FASHION

“House of Fashion” focuses on creating an inclusive environment where a career in fashion design becomes accessible to members of the community. Through the use of collaborative work and learning spaces, “House of Fashion” provides makers the opportunity to form networking connections and refine their craft in a homelike setting.

The design deconstructs the concept of the home into three basic elements: the hearth, the house, and the yard. The hearth provides intimate spaces of gathering, including a small catering kitchen in the basement where

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designers can sit around the kitchen counter to explore ideas over a meal. The house provides plenty of open living rooms where designers can curl up on the couch with their sketchbook and explore their next masterpiece. Finally, the yard provides access to the public as an alternative to the alley and becomes an exclusive environment for fashion shows through the use of large gates at the East and West entrance. “House of Fashion” aims to grow the fashion design community in Flagstaff through the design’s comfortable nature and accessible resources. Through the use of the open yard and the homelike atmosphere, ‘House of Fashion’ becomes a continuous invitation for the public to engage in the Flagstaff fashion scene and the art of fashion design.


RONGTING JIN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: ISOLATED ON THE WATER

This project explores the concept of isolation as an approach to the motif of amplification. The desert shelter, located in Papago Park, is projected from the hillside of a basin which retains a 3-foot-deep pool of water during the rainy season. The dwelling is isolated both physically, exalting the idiosyncrasies of the sight, and spiritually, gifting the tired mind a release within nature.

The form resulted from the shifting of a rectangle, creating a public-private hierarchy throughout the various interior spaces. The artist’s studio, lone on the heart of the basin, can only be accessed by a platform that bridges the pair. Though the essence of its architecture suggests absolute seclusion, its conversation with both the site and the alternative program advocates instead for an equilibrium between exertion and leisure in tune to a dynamic habitat.

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MARLENE IMIRZIAN |PROFESSIONAL

CONCEPTS FOR ARCHITECTURE: METHODS AND ARTIFACTS

How do we do architecture? Ideas for architecture are highly complex and include form, performance, place, use, connection. A highly exploratory method is key for developing design ideas and investigating project aspirations and potential. Developing concepts, materials, and fabrication are carried out through the design effort. Artifacts are part of the process of investigation: sketches, massing studies, 3D modeling of custom components, fabrication options. 1 Artifacts of study; material, fabrication, form

An architectural design must investigate community - site - aspirations - spacial form inside and out. The key is to use a process to test, revise and improve the design from start of design through construction with the same intent - search for comprehensive spacial and overall performance. Team collaboration in every aspect is key; engineering, site, landscape concepts, special systems are all investigated simultaneously to pursue potential for each to inform the building concepts. Together the team develops choices to build on and evaluate with the entire team.

2 Design methodology is unique to each project 3 Massing alternatives 4 Study form - site - construction When designing the Paradise Valley Community College Life Science Building, the science faculty had a very clear aspiration: Science is collaborative. Science should incorporate community engagement in the development of scientific efforts and investigation. Through the use of exploratory methods, and many fabrications, we were able to collect a series of artifacts which were crucial to the aid of the client aspirations. The

building design represents a vision of what science can be for the community – a catalyst. Site design is inextricably linked to building design. Arterial walkways of the existing campus are extended through the new building, enhancing the campus community on all sides. On the east the walkway becomes a pedestrian bridge, floating lightly above the desert landscape – visually and physically uniting the building to the campus to the north and extending it to future campus expansion that is planned south of the ring road. A large roof canopy and collaboration pods are a dynamic public Portico which defines the edge of the future campus green, and create an important public space for the campus and surrounding community. The collaboration pods include power, data and blackboards. 5 Concepts for collaboration & community connections 6 Concepts for massing The sloped roof shades the glazed east façade and collects rainwater which is directed to two large vertical collectors serving an underground cistern that is designed to provide for irrigation. Innovative planning is modular and flexible with a lab zone on the 1st floor in an” L” shape connecting to a lab support zone. All primary mechanical directly above the lab support zone to minimize shafts, and a light filled office and instructional zone on the 2nd floor. Sustainable features include rainwater harvesting, xeriscape landscape, recycled content materials, and materials that need little maintenance, including concrete floors and copper panels. The design demonstrates best practices for desert building, sustainability and performance. 7 Concepts for sustainability, mechanical distribution, air flow 8 Collaboration with steel contractor for design to allow for on grade prefabrication of collaboration pod structures that were then lifted onto columns 9 Collaboration Porch - concept from aspiration

Existing

The existing site grade drops approximately 5’ below the existing campus. The grade change was seen as an opportunity to create connections and views to the context.

Scale

Rather than raise the site, the design used the lowered grade to lessen impact of the new, two-story buildings on campus, allowing the new building to sit in accord with the scale of the existing campus

Connection

The relationship to the existing campus provided an opportunity to easily connect existing pathways to both floors of the structure and to the future campus location. This was achieved through the use of bridged connections.

Landscape

By elevating the bridged connection, the Desert landscape passes under, uninhibited by the built environment.

H2O Conservation

The design incorporated a roof that directs rainwater to an underground cistern where it is allowed to locally percolate into the ground water.

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Efficiency

The Laboratories and Laboratory Preparation spaces align and allow for all labs to have direct access to a single prep space.

Fit to Site

The scheme is bent to fit the pie-shaped site, turning to address the existing campus.

Extend Green Space

The campus green is extended to overlap with the new building zone.

Extend Collaboration Space

Collaboration pods are extended out under a great roof into the campus green, providing outdoor classrooms set in nature.

Connect Campus

A new shaded campus walk is inserted between the pods and the building connecting the main campus, to the north, with the sports fields and future development, to the south.

East-West Building Section

Exterior Air Circulation Diagram

Solar Diagram

Sustainability Concepts 1 Glazed corridor provides borrowed daylight to all spaces 2 Optimized mechanical distribution from roof directly above lab support minimized shafts 3 Clerestory glazing provides daylight to all occupied spaces 4 Roof directs all rainwater to vertical collector and underground 75’ long cistern

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MICHELLE ACOSTA | PROFILE

AWARD: AIA YOUNG ARCHITECT AWARD YEAR AWARDED: 2018

At the start of her career, Michelle Acosta decided to attend Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute of Design. However, Michelle began her involvement in the world of architecture early in life.

Michelle says “I’ve known since I was ten years old that I wanted to be an architect. My family was relocating to Tucson from Los Angeles, and my father (an engineer) asked me to measure the rooms in our potential new house, draw the floor plan, and layout all the furniture to make sure the house would fit our needs. Suddenly I was hooked on space planning, and it grew into a passion for architecture as I gorged on design magazines and learned everything I could about the profession. At seventeen years old, I began my first semester of architecture school at Arizona State University and never looked back.”

She made the conscious choice to become a member of AIAS at Arizona State University. Michelle was elected to be the secretary of the AIAS board at Arizona State University during her freshman year. Additionally, she was the AIA Student Representative for the Rio Salado and Contemporary Arts Center CAC. While acting as secretary to the AIAS, Michelle was responsible for helping to cultivate the AIAS chapter to almost 100 members. She assisted in the start-up of a number of programs, including the award-winning Mentoring Program. Within the following year, Michelle was elected President of the AIAS and began reconstructing the by-laws for the responsibilities of the AIAS committee chairs. This shift was a huge success in the history of AIAS chapter. The board grew from four members to twelve. The magnitude of her leadership that year allowed for Arizona State University AIAS to host a successful West Quad Conference and ultimately led to Michelle’s AIAS National Honor Award and the Honorable Mention received by the chapter.

AIA Alumni Chapter. Later, Michelle was selected as the Associate Director for the AIA Western Mountain Region. After receiving her license, Michelle continued her involvement in the West Mountain Region as the Regional Secretary through 2013. She remained connected at the national level as she served on the Board Community Committee. In 2014 she relocated to California and joined AIA Pasadena & Foothill. Michelle’s involvement in AIA was well-regarded, and in 2016 she was selected as the President of the AIA Pasadena and Foothill. Michelle was one of the six female Presidents for this chapter in their 68 years of existence. As President, she created a multi-generational board that now includes women, and increased the Associate membership by 10%. Michelle was acknowledged with an Academy for Emerging Professionals award from the AIA California Council. Michelle is now receiving the AIA Young Architect Award and has been recognized for a number of her works. AIA Pasadena & Foothill. “2018 Young Architect Award Nomination.” 4 Oct. 2014.

AIACC College of Fellows Reception, Philadelphia Role: Chapter President Participation Date: 2016

Michelle’s resilience in her AIA involvement continued and in 2007 she was invited to be a part of the AIA Phoenix Metro Board of Directors. There she served as Associate Director and helped AIA Associates with prep classes for ARE 4.0. As the Associate Director, Michelle found the annual Associates Conference which today is going into its tenth year. At the same time, Michelle was serving as a President of the Arizona State University’s DISCIPLINE

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Utah Valley Hospital - Completion 2018 Role: Project Architect Architect Record: HDR


RYAN McENROE | PROFILE

AWARD: AIA YOUNG ARCHITECT AWARD YEAR AWARDED: 2018

Ryan McEnroe started his career in design at Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute of Design. He received his undergraduate degree in Environmental Design with a minor in Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning. Ryan began his involvement in AIA early in his design career. He became a member of AIAS in 2001 and remains an active member. Today, Ryan is both a registered Landscape Architect and an Architect.

Since then, Ryan has made a number of contributions to the profession. He co-founded the Christopher Kelley Leadership Development Program (CKLDP) in 2013, a program dedicated to the progression of young architects in the beginning stage of their careers.

Ryan continues his dynamic participation with the AIA DC Chapter’s Emerging Architects Committee. He was appointed to the position of Knowledge Director for the AIA Young Architect Forum. This involvement allowed him to collaborate at the national level and bring forth the AIA Leadership Institute. The Conference of Architecture for young architects has received tremendous educational value and pertinent information due to his contributions. After receiving his license, Ryan began serving on several NCARB committees and a task force. Ryan has a passion for the appropriate development of future architects as evident through his various contributions to the architecture and design world. In 2005, Ryan began serving on the National Accreditation of Architecture Board, and still serves today. This position was a nomination that happened during his graduate school career and continues today as he works through the process of accreditation for Architecture schools around the country. In 2009, he contributed to the Architecture Review Conference (ARC), and he took the active role in writing the Conditions and Procedures for Accreditation. The knowledge of accreditation and experience directed his nomination to represent NAAB on a 2011 appeal panel. Ryan stays committed in his contributions to the design profession. He was chosen to join the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture ACSA|NAAB Path Forward Task Force. He has served on nine NAAB teams and continues to be recognized as a team chair. Ryan has a thoughtful expertise in leadership that will continue to enhance the future of architecture.

Those whom are selected have gone on to advanced position in their firms and even to leadership roles within the AIA. Ryan has since shared his resources from CKLDP with other AIA entities which gave birth to three other CKLDP’s in Denver, Detroit, and Miami. This year, Indianapolis and Houston are also committed to adopting CKLDP.

Over the course of his still flourishing career, Ryan appeared at a variety speaking engagements in the design field and written a number of publications sharing his immense knowledge of the industry. He is active in professional and educational service activities. Ryan has received several honors and awards in landscape architecture as well as architecture honors: Society of College and University Planners, AIA| Virginia, AIAS 60th Anniversary, DC Council of Engineering and Architectural Societies, AIA|DC, AIA|DC Washington UNBUILT. This year, Ryan is receiving the AIA Young Architects Award. AIA Washington DC. “2018 Young Architect Award Nomination.” 5 Sept. 2017

Project: National Zoological Park Bird House Completion Date: Scheduled 2020 Role: Project Architect ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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KE ZHANG | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CATHERINE SPELLMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: CO-EXIST

What can possibly create the most dramatic contrast within the vast desert landscape? Ice. Inspired by the art installation, “Ice Watch,” created by the Danish artist, Olafur Eliasson, this project aims to build an experimental environment in the Phoenix area that connects the three art studios and the ASU Climatology Center. Global climate change has already had observable effects on our environment; Phoenix is currently the fastest warming big city in the U.S., according to meteorologists.

Instead of designing for each individual studio, it is more important to carry a consistent design language throughout each studio in order to find a relationship in which they stand strong on their own, but also compliment one another. Most importantly, in this laboratory of juxtaposition, the shelters’ users, artists, are provided with a work and living space that simultaneously benefits the community by creating a public art piece within the chaotic desert.

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ZACHARY BURSI | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: WEAVING SPACES

Weaving Spaces attempts to engage the surrounding bosque and amplify the phenomena of light and view. The dwelling’s form emulates both the stretching branches of a mesquite tree and the weaving expression as one navigates the dense forest. The programmatic spaces are “branched” throughout the site and are connected solely by snaking concrete pathways. This system forces its inhabitants to traverse the external before reaching their destination, in hopes that the simple act of stepping into nature inspires creativity or eases the mind preceding or subsequent to a long day in the studio.

Each structure grasps at the sky, filling the voids within the otherwise condensed canopy. The sloped roofs carry skylights that provide a view to the heavens while suspended below the canopy, limiting sun exposure. In order to let an optimum amount of light enter, the roofs are sliced at an angle rather than connecting at the apex. The view of the starry skies stresses celestial bodies, which held a sacred significance to the Hohokam Indians, the inhabitants of the site centuries back.

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FOSTER, KNOEBEL, LEAVENS, LIN, POPOVIC | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: ULI HINES STUDENT COMPETITION YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2018 PROJECT NAME: MESH GROUP MEMBERS: MILES FOSTER, NICHOLAS KNOEBEL, AVALON LEAVENS, HAO LIN, ALEX POPOVIC MENTOR: MARK STAPP

Mesh: A mixture of cultures, people, and communities, Mesh represents the vibrant life of Toronto. Our goals are to bridge the gaps between the varying neighborhoods and create a contextual gradient between the future East Harbor Towers and the local neighborhoods. We look to revitalize the Don River area through 5 key points: River Revitalization, Community Engagement, Affordable Housing Integration, Sustainable Principles, and Anticipation for the Future development of Toronto. The first goal is to revitalize the river and its embankment, as well as engaging the user and the surrounding context. By naturalizing the river from an under utilized and polluted canal to a more natural environment, it will improve storm water management and the quality of the water. Submerging the freeway and the rail line across the river allows pedestrians to have a stronger connection to the river, as well as improving traffic flow and mitigating flooding.

Toronto is a vibrant and culturally diverse city, we want to capitalize on that and integrate cultural exchange along the Don River. To the North are large singlefamily neighborhoods and with the future development of East Harbor, we aim to gradualize the transition between nearby neighborhoods and the forty-five story towers to the South East. Providing public space to host events helps to improve walkability and connectivity to local businesses and cultures.

The cost of living in Toronto is extremely high and as a result, affordable housing is in desperate need. Our aim is to make more than 50% of the housing available to lower income families. We will achieve this by reusing shipping containers as a modular system that is quick and easy to assemble

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and which enables lower building costs. The inhabitants will have the ability to take ownership and personalize their own container configuration. A modular and affordable building type, benefits include, easy LEED certification, cheap and rugged, durable, fast construction and mobility. To achieve sustainable goals, we will integrate tracking photovoltaic systems to provide sustainable energy while providing shading and protection for pedestrians, while the water management on site allows us to collect and filter excess storm water. On site there are two existing buildings used by locals, we aim to adaptively reuse these structures as amenities and infrastructure for the community. With all of these sustainable goals we were able to meet the LEED standards. With the cities drastically high housing costs, Mesh will offer a large amount of Affordable Housing that will propel Toronto into the future. Along with the revitalization of the River, we feel that we are following the history of Toronto and the important role the river has played by re-introducing the river back into the communities of the Don River Area. Leading in sustainability Mesh is only the first example of many projects that could take place along the river. We see the future of this site being a catalyst for change in the city of Toronto.


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SUSAN LIU | TRAVEL

YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2017 PROJECT NAME: CLASS OF ‘77 SCHOLARSHIP

First of all, I would like to give the most honorable appreciation to the Class of ‘77 Alumni for sponsoring me on this study abroad trip. None of the stories could start without your support and encouragements. I spent days to come up with a topic for this trip abroad. Traveling has been a part of my life so I asked myself: “Why don’t I just put everything I love together?” I strongly believe that people gain the most out of doing what they love.

There are many interpretations to define what is a sustainable restaurant, mostly depending on where the ingredients come from. It could be either self-grown organic vegetables or rescued food from the grocery stores. The fascinating aspect I picked up from this is that most of the sustainable restaurants have subtle relationships with green architecture, such as greenhouses or adaptive reuse of historic sites. Therefore, I planned to travel one week through Amsterdam and one week through Copenhagen. Interviews were essential parts of my research. I talked to as many people as I could, especially the founders, staff members, customers, and local residents. Not only because they are two of the world’s most sustainable cities, but they also were reliable places to visit for my research topic.

Next, I went to Rotterdam and Zaanse Schans in Netherlands, and Malmo in Sweden during the trip. Although I did not make any appointments for restaurants, it was delightful going around these cities. I learned countless things on this trip but one main point resonates with me: Food and Architecture might not be related when you first think of it; however, when you spend time experiencing the cities, connections between architecture and food can be incredible and charming and it can be everywhere in life. At last, I would like to give a big thank you to every teacher, friend, founder, and stranger who gave me their hand when I was struggling, you are the reason I can still be here sharing the stories.

I vistied the following sustainable restaurants in Amsterdam: Cafe De Ceuvel, Restaurant De Kas, Instock Restaurant Amsterdam. I also went to ØsterGro in Copenhagen. Gert-Jan Hagerman (left) from De Kas, Amsterdam

ØsterGro, Copenhagen

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Co-Founder Livia (left) from ØsterGro, Copenhagen


ØsterGro, Copenhagen

Nina (left) and Kate (right), Amsterdam

Cafe In De Waag, Amsterdam

Cafe de Ceuvel, Amsterdam

Windmill Village, Zaanse Schans

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NICK RACCOSTA | PROFESSIONAL

PRACTICE: AYERS SAINT GROSS YEAR COMPLETED: 2017 PROJECT NAME: TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY MASTER PLAN

The 2017 Campus Master Plan Update builds on the foundation of the 2004 Campus Master Plan and focuses on building a new campus framework and an open space network to both enhance and better connect underdeveloped areas of the campus. Shown is the Campus Development Plan (CDP) for the future planned build out of the campus. This begins to focus on the implementation of phasing for the build-out over the next 15+ years. Mobility systems are planned to better support and serve pedestrians and thus increase safety and the experience of the campus. Sustainability systems are focused on creating a more efficient campus through building adjacencies and campus relationships. The final step is to create a guideline, a standard for the campus at Texas A&M University. Planned build-out

Phasing 0-5 years

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Phasing 10-15 years


CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION | EVENT

EVENT: CAF TEEN FELLOWS VISIT DATE: MARCH 30, 2018 WRITTEN BY: BRANDON POWELL

On March 30, 2018, the Chicago Architecture Foundation sponsored a class of Teen Fellows to visit the campus of Arizona State University. The Chicago Architecture Foundation, as a nonprofit cultural organization with a home base in Chicago, Illinois, has the mission to inspire people to discover why design matters. The Teen Fellows are a select group of Chicago Public High School students who commit to a two year discovery of how architecture and the built environment apply to their lives. The visit began with a warm introduction of The Design School buildings, the campus, and the new net-zero Student Pavilion designed by local architects Weddle Gilmore.

After these tours, the Teen Fellows headed to Tall Hall in the Design School to hear a design presentation from students showcasing their studio work and their process. As a virtual interview, the Teen Fellows were also able to hear from the Architecture students who have been working with An-Najah National University in Israel.

As the conclusion to the day the Teen Fellows headed back to the Student Pavilion to listen in on the Women in Architecture event hosted by the ASU Student chapters of LASO, AIAS, and Satyros Chapter of Alpha Rho Chi. Throughout the day it was a wonderful privilege for the Design School to host these amazing students. With the help of the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the Teen Fellows hopefully walked away from the day instilled with fresh inspiration and ideas.

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ALEXANDRA PATRICK | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JOE PRITCHARD YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: CREATING NEW BOUNDARIES

Site: 5th Ave. & Monroe Phoenix, AZ

Street Art

As a form of expression, street art touches on the concept of layering, while serving as both a permanent and semi-permanent surface that can constantly change and evolve. This same concept can be applied to a museum which would, in essence, take the standard definition of a museum and flip it inside out. Alley connecting to the north boundary

By reversing the traditional museum typology, the building becomes its own canvas. The artwork is displayed for what it is and enables the users to define the structure. A residential component was added which allows artists to live close to where their own work can be displayed. This in turn, helps foster a new community. Announcements of upcoming shows can be displayed on community “billboards� which layer announcements of nearby shows and events, becoming another form of street art throughout the intimate spaces.

Box

DISCIPLINE

Skew

SPRING 2018

Splitting

Peeling


AARON AMUNDSEN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JACOB ATHERTON YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2017 PROJECT NAME: RIVER TRAIL COMMUNITY

Strategically located near Downtown Phoenix, this large-scale master planning project aims to stitch together and revitalize the communities along the north and south banks of the Rio Salado River between 7th Street and 16th Street. It also aims to restore the river corridor to its former glory. This project was not without its challenges.

This site has no street frontage or access, which makes it unattractive to the possibility of future development. To solve this issue, a new vehicular corridor was opened up to allow traffic to flow directly through the site, connecting with the Audubon Center and other significant landmarks. This corridor has moments that showcase the beauty of what will be a restored riparian habitat as well as provide meaningful public transportation options.

Pedestrians were given a separate circulatory system. To maintain porosity through the site, the buildings were oriented north-south to allow for a multiplicity of uninterrupted paths towards the river. These walkable corridors feature a transition of natural vegetation from desert to the lush riparian and blend seamlessly with the river corridor.

Programing of the masterplan was organized to allow for the more public spaces to be located next to the river and the private spaces away from the river. This organization also allowed for the high density mixeduse functions to be located next to the river and low density residential functions further down the site. The building form was developed to transform as response to each building’s proximity to the river. The buildings furthest maintain a rectilinear form whereas the buildings adjacent to the river take on a fragmented form as they intersect with large shade canopies. The fragmented pieces then create cross avenues through buildings and redirect the user towards the river.

Commercial Building

Residential Building

Shade Structure Added

Shade Structure Added

PEDESTRIAN PATHS

Corridors Introduced

Rotated and Divided

BICYCLE PATHS

SECTION AT OBSERVATION BALCONY SCALE : 1”= 20’ 1

1

Section at Rec Center outlook 1" = 20'-0"

VEHICULAR PATHS

VIEW DIAGRAM

2

MASTER PLAN

A301

at OBSERVAION PAVILLION

SCALE : 1”= 300’

ZONE 3

ZONE 4

1

A301

UP

UP

ZONE 2

PLAN AT MIXED USE BUILDING

SCALE : 1”= 30’

Riparian

Sparse Desert SECTION AT CORRIDOR SCALE : 1”= 30’

section at basement cafe 1" = 20'-0"

1

Organic Flow

1

Detail Section at Building Opening 1" = 20'-0"

1

2

SECTION AT FRONT WALKWAY 2

section at basement cafe 1" = 20'-0"

2

City Grid

SITE PLAN

PLAN AT MULTI-FAM HOUSING

SCALE : 1”= 100’

SCALE : 1”= 30’

PRIVATE PATIO

More Density

SCALE : 1”= 30’

A303

ZONE 1

Less Density

COMMUNITY AREA

PRIVATE PATIO

SECTION AT TOWNHOMES SCALE : 1”= 30’

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1

95


BUNDY, SHEKERJIAN | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: AIA METRO PHOENIX INFILL YEAR COMPLETED: 2018 PROJECT NAME: ARK GROUP MEMBERS: ZACH BUNDY AND NICK SHEKERJIAN MENTOR: ELENA ROCCHI

The character of an urban environment is important in supporting the design for its future development and in this case, Phoenix’s infill. This is particularly important in order to ensure that this development celebrates the characteristics which make Phoenix unique, however those characteristics are regarded, good or bad. With this in mind, there is an interesting contradiction in studying urban infill in respect to urban distinction and “uniqueness” in Phoenix:

Phoenix’s uniqueness is in its abundance of vacancy, the very thing which contradicts the subject of urban infill. This project proposes to deal with urban infill not by imagining the specific characteristics of the infill itself, but in the result of infill on Phoenix’s unique characteristic of vacancy. What should we do to preserve an aspect of vacancy when infill takes over? It proposes to preserve one existing vacancy with a perimeter on the South East corner of E. Jackson St. and S. 1st Ave. which borders on the future “Old” Downtown Phoenix and the future “New” Downtown Phoenix (the industrial part of the city). In the same manner Romulus demarcated the perimeter of Rome thus creating a city center and setting forth an image of what is considered a formally positive urban environment in western culture, The Ark creates Phoenix’s first city center through the demarcation of a perimeter of its past.

DISCIPLINE

SPRING 2018

As the extremes of urban density take over the city, clouding previous existing streets and continually rising higher into the sky, The Ark remains as a mark of Phoenix’s only unique quality, an escape to the past and to its unique sunsets and sky conditions, and creates a space where the people can protect themselves and their city in a cultural performance of vacancy through an architecture.


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SUBMISSION INDEX DISCIPLINE

Contributor 52 84 40 68 95 25 8, 20, 46, 76 46 14, 44 66 26, 96 87 20 78 49 68 78 60, 70 8, 48, 76 68 56 58 48 52 46, 88 80 35 50 52 82 81 12 70, 71 48 68 10 29 28 88 78, 88 52 88 24, 90 57 72 44 68 16 85 36 16, 26, 64 38 78 94 22 15, 61 88 39, 54, 55, 93 92 16 62 50 48 26, 44, 96 34 52 64 37 30 18 13 4

SPRING 2018

Abdallah, Omar Acosta, Michelle Architekton Alharti, Omar Amundsen, Aaron Babanovski, Boyana Bailey, Brittany Ballard, Jasmine Boylan, Matthew Brown, Noah Bundy, Zach Bursi, Zachary Calic, Nina Carlson, Andrew Castro, Adrian Calvendra, Maurice Childress, Joseph Chowdhury, Nasrynn Diaz, Hector Dibella, Eric Geeso, Nenwe Greene, Josh Fan, Xueying Fattahi, Saman Foster, Miles Frail, Rachel Hernandez, Stephanie Huft, Brian Iganian, Jasmine Imirzian, Marlene Jin, Rongting Johnson, Amberley Jones-Lane, Isaiah Joshi, Vaishnavi Kamali, Yara Kebert, Cathleen Kellogg, Emily Kim, Cecile Knoebel, Nicholas Leavens, Avalon Leonard, Robert Lin, Hao Liu, Susan Lufkin, Christina Maddock, Bryan Malouf, Vincent Martorano, Corey McConville, Brendan McEnroe, Ryan Medeiros, Camille Medina, Luis Nakhle, Bruna Nevarez, Manuel Patrick, Alexandra Petrucci, Darren Pniak, Nika Popovic, Alex Powell, Brandon Raccosta, Nick Rivera, Angel Rocchi, Elena Rodriguez, Angel Sanchez, Eduardo Shekerjian, Nick Short, Cody Strauss, Cassandra Synacek, Andrew Tsepal, Jessica Vekstein, Claudio Volkova, Veronika Wang, Yan Workshop—198

86 50, 64

Zhang, Ke Zhao, Yuchen

Competition 96 26 52, 88

AIA Metro Phoenix Infill Italian Fashion Hub 26 ULI Hines Student Competition

Drawings 37

Jessica Tsepal

Essay 44 14 76 62 72

Architects of Change Construction of the Mind Interdisciplinary Atmospheres What Shall I Love if not the Enigma? ‘Using Utopia’ Introduction

Event 93 70 55

Chicago Architecture Foundation Teen Fellowship Visit NOMA Arizona Women in Architecture

Interview 8 15 54

Francis Kéré Jason Schupbach SOWA + Allied Arts

Professional 40 82 30 92

Cloud Song Center Concepts for Architecture: Methods and Artifacts Memorial Space and Monument to the 100th Anniversary of the Alcorta Shout Texas A&M Unviersity Master Plan

Profile 84 85 4

Acosta, Michelle McEnroe, Ryan Workshop—198

Studio 49 57 48 78 86 50 94 60 56 34 71 35 80 18 24 81 36 12 38 25 13 95 28 22 46 29 61 16 39 68 87 64

Adaptive Design Assemble! Battery Park City CIRI Co-Exist Compass Creating New Boundaries Ephemerality Everlasting Cycles F.A.B.R.I.C. Flagstaff Fabric Tempe Fender Sound House of Fashion (In)formal Madrid Interspace Isolated on the Water Layering Connections Offset Proteus: The Hybridized Neo-Nomadic Memorial Reflecting Light Rio Salado Revitalization Project River Trail Community Solstice Switzerland Global Engagement The Street The Unknown Recognized Three Atmospheres Tower 01 Transition Phoenix Urban Souk Weaving Spaces Windhover Contemplative Center

Thesis 66 10 58

Imagination Jerusalem Redefining the Typology of Desert Residences Through the “Family Energy Room” The Storytelling House

Travel 90 20

Class of ‘77 Scholarship Switzerland Pilgrimage


Studio Lead 13, 48, 95 20, 22 20, 22 36, 39, 57 66 10, 16, 68, 78 28, 38, 49 35 61 52 16, 68, 81, 87 10, 20, 22 26, 50, 96 12, 94 80 18, 25, 60, 86 52, 88 13, 48, 64 34, 66, 71 24, 46 29, 56, 58

Atherton, Jacob Fehler, Michele Fischer, Heide Hartman, Tom Hejduk, Renata Horton, Phil Irizarry, Victor Jarick, Gwen Josephs, Kasey Kelley, Kristian Murff, Scott Petrucci, Darren Rocchi, Elena Pritchard, Joe Smith, Brie Spellman, Catherine Stapp, Mark Underhill, Michael Underwood, Max Upadhye, Amit Vekstein, Claudio

Contact Us asuarchjournal@ gmail.com

ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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asuarchjournal.wordpress.com DISCIPLINE

SPRING 2018


Discipline: ASU Architecture Journal 04  

This is the AY 17/18 volume of Discipline, the Architecture Journal for Arizona State University (ASU), produced entirely by students. Highl...

Discipline: ASU Architecture Journal 04  

This is the AY 17/18 volume of Discipline, the Architecture Journal for Arizona State University (ASU), produced entirely by students. Highl...