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Friday, April 19, 2013

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Little 5 Special Section

Rain or Shine

Ridin’ Tigers

Official Drink

get weather info on

check out the teams

check out the “Road Rash”

page 2

pages 4 & 5

page 7


WHY DON’T WE DO IT IN THE ROAD

ri b a

FRIDAY | APRIL 19, 2013 Section Editors Section Design Editor-in-Chief News Editors Features Editor Chief Copy Editor Photo Editor

Isabelle Chapman Joseph Fanelli Lizzie Hineman Franki Abraham Dana Ferguson Alex Paul Nicky Chokran Nettie Finn Becca Stanek Sunny Strader

Little 5 1951

Indiana University holds the first Little 500

1956

DePauw holds it’s first Little 500.

1966

Faculty bicycle race added to Little 500.

Senior Quinn Carrico competes on behalf of Delta Upsilon in the Little 5 Time Trials at Calbert Way Wednesday evening. The top sixteen finishers will race in street sprints on Anderson Street Friday at 5 PM. THUY NGUYEN / THE DEPAUW

FRIDAY

F

20% CHANCEOF SHOWERS

SATURDAY

55°

to

.

memories through the years

WEEKEND FORECAST

47°

is h f e

f.. o ry

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FRIDAY

SATURDAY

EVENT

EVENT

STREET SPRINTS

ALUMNI RACE TIME 11:30 A.M. LOCATION

TIME LOCATION

0% CHANCE OF SHOWERS

ANDERSON

1 P.M. LOCATION BOWMAN PARK

1976

Freshman rider Peter Weaver is killed in a bicycle-car collision while training with Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity brothers on a one-lane country road.

1993

Freshman Eric Brewe shocks crowd, riding Little 500 naked.

1997

DePauw’s Little 500 changes name to Little 5.

EVENT WOMEN'S RACE

1970

1973

Mason Hall, an all women’s dormitory, created a team and entered the race.

TIME

5:00 P.M.

Little 500 covered by Life magazine.

Race lengthened to 40 min.

BOWMAN PARK

F

1959

2006 First alumni race is held.

2008 Phi Gamma Delta fraternity win the overall men’s competition, ending Delta Upsilon’s 14-year run as champions.


Students face choice as Little 5 matches with IU By NICKY CHOKRAN news@thedepauw.com

DePauw will compete against Indiana University for student attendance this week, as both schools host their traditional bike races Saturday. According to the Indiana University Student Foundation, IU’s Little 500 is the nation’s largest bike race. The race attracts over 25,000 spectators annually. “At IU [Little 500 week], every single night something is going on and everybody gets into it,” DePauw senior Erin Cockrum, who attended Indiana University for her sophomore and junior years, said. “It’s a huge campus of everyone collaborating

for an entire week to party.” There are many competing factors pulling some DePauw students to IU during Little 5 week. “[Little 500] is a lot bigger at IU and there are different opportunities during the week,” senior Maggie Cohen said. “The concerts they have are really fun, and they have more school spirit.” Cohen has been to IU’s Little 500 twice since freshman year. She plans to return to Bloomington on Thursday night to celebrate IU’s Little 500 at the Krewella concert, and return to DePauw for class Friday. An advantage of IU’s larger student body is the presence of a larger social scene. Senior Sam Oliveri said he and some friends are going to Bloomington on Thursday. From there

they will take a bus with IU students to Bounce Music Festival. “Nothing like this comes to Greencastle,” Oliveri said. “There’s no opportunity to go to a 10,000 person plus party here on Thursday of Little 5 week.” Besides concerts, bars are also involved in IU’s Little 500 celebrations. “I think what makes IU’s Little 5 better is that IU has a lot better of a bar scene than we do,” Cockrum said. During the week leading up to the races, bars all over Bloomington have various specials to celebrate Little 500. “Also, IU’s Little 5 race is taken a lot more seriously,” Cockrum said. “The riders train all year round, not just a couple months.”

Yet despite IU’s big school advantages, most all students are staying at DePauw for the actual race day on Saturday. Cohen said she couldn’t imagine missing DePauw’s Little 5 race because she doesn’t want to miss the opportunity to hang out with friends and watch classmates race. “[Saturday’s races] are a DePauw tradition,” Oliveri said. “I don’t want to miss it.” Cockrum expressed similar reasoning. “Even though [IU’s] Little 5 might be crazier, I don’t want to miss this experience with my closest friends,” Cockrum said. “DePauw is my alma mater and my home.”

From then to now, the history of Little 5 DPU teams up with law enforcement for weekend By NETTIE FINN

features@thedepauw.com

Since 1956, students on campus have been pumping up bike tires and donning helmets to race each other to the finish line during one of DePauw’s most celebrated weekends and longest running traditions. Now closing in on 57 years, Little 5 has remained, in essence, the same. Through spiking and waning interest, changes to the race itself and even lifeending injuries to its riders, the race has remained. Little 5 has long been a tradition of boasing athleticism and entertainment, though in its advent race riders did not appear to have fully comprehended how demanding the event could be. “Out-of-shape fraternity men found too late that being in prime physical condition could mean a great deal in the grueling thirty-five contest,” the ’57 “Mirage” wrote. The events prior to the 1979 race were many and varied, including burrito-eating, pie-eating or pyramid building contests. According to the Mirage, there was even a “Cyclerama Sing.” Then, in 1993, freshman cyclist Eric Brewe combined the Little 5 with a boulder run when he shocked spectators by competing naked. It is also true that Little 5 has had its share of tragedy. In 1976, Pete Weaver was killed by an automobile while training for the race. The April 30, 1976 issue

of The DePauw included Weaver’s obituary and noted that he had been training for that year’s race since September 1975. The 2000s were a time of big changes to Little 5. Kent Menzel, Little 5 advisor and communications professor, has been at DePauw since 1993 and has been heavily involved in the race since the beginning of his time here. When Menzel arrived in 1993 he said, “the race had settled into a relay format.” However, in 2001, the Little 5 steering committee made a decision to change the overall structure of the race. The event had been losing popularity and it had become a struggle to find enough competitors, not to mention spectators. Within the old format, the criterium race was done as a relay over a stretch of 160 laps. “The spectators really didn’t understand what they were seeing, and the race was unintelligible sometimes even to the racers,” Menzel said. The changes, discussed in 2001 and put into effect in 2004, left the old format far behind and transformed Little 5 from a weekend to a week. Instead of a relay, racers would all take to the track at once and the addition of the time trials and street sprints was made. “Ever since we made that change it’s grown in popularity,” Menzel said. Also in 2004, the Little 5 racing loop was moved from the track onto campus,

where, after a brief stint back at the track due to construction on the GCPA, it has stayed ever since. “That’s the original loop as well, so it’s kind of back to its roots from where the race was held in ’56,” Menzel said. Another big change to the race, involved its name—and a possible lawsuit. “Indiana University got wind of what was going on and threatened to sue us if we didn’t change the name of our race,” Menzel recalled. DePauw’s cycling race, which until that point had been called “Little 500” adopted a new name in 1997 in response to IU’s claims: “Little 5”. “Up here nobody really fussed about it. We were happy to keep our race and we had been calling it Little 5 anyway,” Menzel said. No matter the name, Little 5 has managed to remain a tradition at DePauw for nearly 60 years. However, Menzel still feels there are some changes for the better that could be made. “I think Little 5 can be made more of an overall festival through adding more events. I would love to see a big name concert go along with Little 5,” he said. While Little 5 might not yet be offering the carnival-like atmosphere that Menzel feels it should aspire to, that won’t stop students, faculty and alumni from piling onto the sidelines to watch as cyclists pedal their hearts out this Saturday.

By NICKY CHOKRAN news@thedepauw.com

Police officers from Greencastle Police Department and the Putnam County Sherriff’s office will join forces this weekend with DePauw Public Safety to help regulate events on campus during Little 5. According to Angie Nally, Director of Public Safety, the university will contract off duty police officers from these departments to help on race day Saturday. “[We] are looking for people who are really drawing attention to themselves,” Nally said. “If people are acting within reason then we’re not going to know they’re drinking anyway.” All officers will be dressed in their own uniforms, and incidents between students and officers from Public Safety, the GPD, and the Sherriff’s office will be referred to community standards. Because Little 5 is posted on the university’s public calendar, Nally said that there is a chance that Excise officers will be present on campus over the weekend. “I haven’t heard anything from them,” said Nally. “[But] I would never say they wouldn’t be there. They know it’s our Little 5.”

Saturday’s races will take place on 4/20, an unofficial holiday celebrating marijuana. “We are aware of the folklore around that number,” Nally said about 4/20. Nally said she cautions students not to participate in 4/20 celebrations, as possession and consumption of illegal substances is an arrestable offence. Nonetheless, Nally communicated confidence for the weekend. “We are prepared for a large crowd, [and] interacting with people who have chosen to become really intoxicated,” said Angie Nally, Director of Public Safety. “As well as provide a safe course for the Little 5 riders.” During the race, crowd control barricades will be set up at points around the course where increased pedestrian traffic is expected. Officers will also be placed at busy crosswalks to help facilitate safe crossings. However, there will be areas of the course that are less regulated and will require more caution by pedestrians. “It is very important that students are aware of the racers when they choose to cross the street,” said Nally. “Students will have to be individually responsible.”


M EET PI BETA PHI

TEAM MOTTO: “I got you from behind.” WHY WE RIDE: “We want people to be afraid of how much they love us.” WHY WE’LL WIN: “Because everyone loves an underdog.”

THE

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA HOW WE TRAIN: “We ride bikes.” HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Edward 40 Hands.”

WHY WE’LL WIN: “Are we?” IF WE COULD BIKE ANYWHERE: “We’d go to SAE.”

SIGM HOW WE TRAIN: “We were supposed to train?” WHY WE RIDE: “Because Logan Patterson needs a formal date.”

IF WE COULD BIKE ANYWHERE: “We’d bike to bed.”

BETA THETA PI HOW WE TRAIN: “We started Wednesday. HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Listen to Daft Punk and/or T. Swift and fist pump. FAVORITE ROAD TO RIDE: “Anderson Street (back and forth) WHY WE RIDE: “We’re still trying to figure that one out.”

KAPPA ALPHA THETA

PHI DELTA THETA HOW WE TRAIN: “Ride fast, turn left.”

HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “It’s all about the pre-game.”

WHY WE RIDE: “First team in two decades.”

PUMP UP SONG: “Around the world by ATC.”

TEAM MOTTO: “I get knocked down but I get up again (in 30 seconds for Menzel)

TEAM MOTTO: “Don’t crash again.”

FI

HOW MUCH WE TRAIN : “Only a lot.” HOW WE TRAIN: “Better than DU.”

WHY WE RIDE: “Love me some thunder thighs.” HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Tour de Franzia.” PRE-RACE RITUALS: “Yes - Theta business.

DELTA GAMMA HOW MUCH WE TRAIN: “We don’t. We don’t need to.” WHY WE RIDE: “We were forced to.” FAVORITE ROAD TO RIDE: “A flat one or downhill.” PUMP UP SONG: “Thrift Shop.”

INDEPENDENTS

WHY WE RIDE: “Independent domination.” HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Thinking about overthrowing the system.” PRE-RACE RITUALS: “Nervous vomiting.” WHY WE WILL WIN: “Because we have two teams.”

TEAM bike.”

HOW “We w

HOW “Does swim als co

PUMP SONG DePau


E

TEA MS

MA CHI PUMP-UP SONG: “I Can’t Make You Love Me by Bon Iver” IF WE COULD BIKE ANYWHERE: “Go back to PCB.”

DELTA UPSILON HOW MUCH WE TRAIN: “LOTS.”

PRE-RACE RITUALS: “We poop.”

WHY WE RIDE: “To get out of Little 5 sober duty.”

PUMP-UP SONG: “Big Papa by the Notorious B.I.G.”

DELTA TAU DELTA HOW WE TRAIN: “Like champions.” HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Clear our minds and get cool, calm, collected and clear.” PRE-RACE RITUALS: “Get Weird. No restrictions.” IF WE COULD BIKE ANYWHERE: “We’d circumnavigate the earth.”

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON HOW MUCH WE TRAIN: “Annually.” HOW WE TRAIN: “With shake weights.”

IJI PRE-RACE RITUAL: “Beer showers and abstaining from urination before racing so as to encourage a quick finish.”

M MOTTO: “BYOB - Bring your own ”

WE GET PSYCHED: watch Miracle.”

MUCH WE TRAIN: s going to NCAA mming nationount?”

P UP G: “The uw Toast.”

PHI KAPPA PSI TEAM MOTTO: “Shake and bake.” HOW WE TRAIN: “Jazzercize, two times a week and yoga at dawn.”

HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Sit in a room with all our gear on for an hour in silence. Meditating.” PRE-RACE RITUALS: “We tron for a good hour.”

WHY WE RIDE: “We like the way we look in bike shorts.” WHY WE WILL WIN: “We want the bell!”

ALPHA PHI WHY WE RIDE: “Because Arezoo tells us to.” HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “We drink, we cry, we have a really really really good ride.” PRE-RACE RITUALS: “Chase raw eggs with muscle milk.” PUMP UP SONG: “Country Grammar by Nelly.”

ALPHA CHI OMEGA ALPHA TAU OMEGA HOW MUCH WE TRAIN: “As much as it takes to make the ginger a little less pasty.” HOW WE GET PSYCHED: “Sling as many insults as possible at the ginger.” PRE-RACE RITUALS: “Ritualistic five stars.” PUMP UP SONG: “Red Headed Stranger by Willie Nelson”


Learning from Experience Take a word of wisdom on riding Little 5 from veteran senior riders Max Blankenhorn and Abigail Ginn

Little5 Jams By JIM EASTERHOUSE

On a special weekend like Little 5, emotions run wild. They can range from motivation before the race, excitement during it and euphoria while celebrating afterwards. There are many upbeat songs that can apply to each of these. I chose 20, ranging from rap to alternative and indie to electronic, that epitomize these feelings. This variety of classics and new-coming gems can make your Little 5 a jam-tastic time. 

1 MAX BLANKENHORN

ABIGAIL GINN

What advice would you give to new riders? “Train a lot. Being comfortable on the bike is the most important thing that can help you. Most new riders aren’t comfortable.”

What advice would you give to new riders? “Be confident. Try not to be super nervous. It’s all about having fun and being safe.”

What’s your favorite part of the race? “The atmosphere is cool. Campus out cheering makes the pain worth it.” What’s the scariest thing that’s happened to you during a race? “Freshman year I was run over by the majority of the field. I suffered a major concussion. None of that was cool.” What motivated you to ride senior year? “I was guilted into it by most of the fraternity. I’m glad they convinced me to do it. I’m less slothful after two months of training.” Best memory of Little 5? “Hopefully that’s yet to come.” WIll you come back and ride in the alumni race? “Never say never. But it may be a few years before I return.” How have you changed your training methods since freshman year? “Not much. We’ve had pretty good regimen. I’ve always been in pretty good shape come race time.”

What’s your favorite part of the race? “Competing and working together with riders from other teams. It becomes a collective effort towards the end of the race.” What’s the scariest thing that’s happened to you during a race? “Falling last year in the last turn unexpectedly. Luckily, I wasn’t hurt.”

PUMP IT UP

5

“Jah No Partial” — Major Lazer

“Joy Ride” —The Killers “Swerve” — Baauer

Will you ever come back and ride in the alumni race? “Once I buy my own bike I would love to one day.” How much have you changed your training methods since freshman year? “I recognize how much effort it takes to be successful. I am safer and more conscientious. The more experienced you are, the better off you are.”

2

13

“Campus” — Vampire Weekend

“Road to Nowhere” — Talking Heads

1 5 4

“Summer Mood” — Best Coast

6 17

“You Only Live Once” — The Strokes “Naked Kids” — Grouplove

9

14

“Dissolve Me” — Alt-J

“Yoga Pants” — Minnesota

7

12

“Go Outside” — Cults

What motivated you to ride senior year? “Helping to teach new riders in my chapter and giving it one last go around.” Best memory of little 5? “Winning last year in the time trials. And overall, us winning as a team on the actual race day. It proves hard work pays off.”

11

10

“Barely Standing” — Diplo

“Consolation Prizes” — Phoenix

“B.O.B.” — Outkast

3

“Don’t Stop (Color On The Walls)” — Foster the People

“Words” — Givers ft. Theophilous London

8 19

“Drunk Girls” — LCD Soundsystem

16

“Wild For The Night” — A$AP Rocky ft. Skrillex

18

“Backstreet Freestyle” — Kendrick Lamar

“Take Me With You When You Go” — Jack White

20


RACE COURSE

A word from your co-chairs

SPECTATORS

Paul Dugdale & Margaret Distler

GRAPHIC BY ISABELLE CHAPMAN / THE DEPAUW

21 and older? Try our

Little 5 cocktail

The Road Rash • 1 part vodka •1 dash of pepper • Tomato juice • 1 celery stick • 1 dash of tobasco ...ice would be nice.

Enjoy!

When cyclists approach a gravelcovered section of road, they are taught to keep their front wheel straight. If riders keep their line and maintain a light grip on their handlebars, they can prevent swerving or losing control. Meanwhile, they must also be aware of their surroundings, particularly obstacles on the road ahead. In many ways, planning Little 5 week is akin to riding a bike. That’s not to say that either of us claim to be expert cyclists. Rather, the stages required for planning campus events parallel those required for competitive riding. Unlike many campus leadership positions, co-chairing the Little 5 Steering Committee is a two-year commitment. Thus, we used last year’s events as a “test run” for this spring, trying to understand how to organize one of the most anticipated spring weekends. But as anyone who has ever been on a bike knows, it takes some time to get comfortable in a new position. There are times when you should speed up, and times when it’s best to slow down. With comfort comes confidence. In the fall, we began to envision what changes and improvements we wanted to make to the 2013 Little 5 week. While some of these ideas were more realistic than others, we entered the spring semester with Little 5 on our minds. We wanted to put on a series of events that made our classmates excited about the sport of cycling, the month of April, and the 57-year-old campus tradition. This year, it’s become apparent that even the best cyclists encounter obstacles on their rides. These

include, but are not limited to, poor road conditions, sharp objects, aggressive dogs, parked vehicles, as well as the consistently inconsistent Indiana weather. While Paul and I would have loved to cruise through our Little 5 responsibilities, on-campus construction and spring storms created some challenges. Riders know that accommodating obstacles often requires shifting gears. During the planning process, we’ve had to make countless adjustments to our event line-up. That said, these changes would have been nearly impossible without the flexibility and support of our 2013 Steering Committee members: Clarke Brennan, Patrick Carter, Laura Gerhardstein, Jake Hemrick, Lizzie Hineman, Kylie Maloney, Stephen McMurtry, Alex Landreville, Braydon Lucas, Connor McAndrew, Anna Gawlik, Doug McCrary, JD Powell, Meredith Reed, Aubrie Scott, Drew Stutzman, and Kyle Zachary. Yes, there are obstacles involved in riding and event planning. But there are also opportunities to sit back and enjoy the ride. Most students will be experiencing Little 5 as spectators, not cyclists or crowd control monitors. Regardless of how an individual chooses to embrace the Little 5 fever, we encourage everyone to relax and take in their surroundings. Just keep a close eye out for gravel. We hear it causes a pretty bad road rash. ­ Seniors Margaret Distler and Paul — Dugdale are co-chairs of the 2013 Little 5 Steering Committee.


Wednesday’s Time Trial results WOMEN’S

MEN’S

1. Nicole Rossillo

AXO

1:04:42

1. Troy Stratford

Delt

57:46

2. Kara Caskey

Alpha Phi

1:05:37

Delt

58:41

3. Amanda Repass

Alpha Phi

1:05:38

2. Forrest Kunkel 3. Connor Miller

ATO

58:86

4. Erin Komornik

Independent A

1:06:43

4. Max Blankenhorn

ATO

59:82

5. Chrissy Wildt

Kappa

1:07:96

5. Andrew Ledbetter

Phi Delt

59:88

6. Abbey Ginn

Theta

1:08:08

6. George Morrison

Sigma Chi

1:00:47

7. Abby Prine

AXO

1:08:12

7. Aaron Krabill

DU

1:00:53

8. Jordan Roller

Alpha Phi

1:09:77

8. Chris Roslender

Beta

1:00:53

9. Katie Thrapp

Theta

1:10:10

9. Grant Clary

ATO

1:00:57

10. Stephanie Sladnick Pi Phi

1:10:66

10. John Bennett

ATO

1:00:97

11. Paige Sandgren

Independent B

110:77

11. Luke Miller

Beta

1:01:27

12. Caitlin Hickey

Theta

1:10:92

12. Chase G. Hall

Sigma Chi

1:01:45

13. Hannah DeLucio

Theta

1:11:50

13. Christian Rector

Sigma Chi

1:01:90

14. Emily Weber

AXO

1:11:64

14. Ryan Heeb

Phi Delt

1:01:96

15. Jocelyn Jessop

Independent A

1:12:25

15. Mitchell Reavis

Phi Psi

1:02:33

16. Clark Edwards

Independent B

1:12:66

16. Rob Watson

SAE

1:02:61


The 57th Annual Little 5 Bicycle Race