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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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INSIDE 5 NEWS

Three professors shared insights into this year’s presidential campaign.

6 SPORTS

Ash makes significant strides in second season.

LIFE & ARTS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 6

UT declines Butlers’ $33-million advance

4 OPINION

Afrobeat meditation teaches through movement.

UNIVERSITY

By Bobby Blanchard

You have control over your course requirements.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

facebook.com/dailytexan

UT officials are turning down an immediate $33 million donation for the music school because they say a string attached to the money would incur too many monetary costs. To get the donation, the University would have to separate the Butler School

of Music from the College of Fine Arts. In 2008, longtime music school patrons Sarah and Ernest Butler made a $55-million endowment pledge to the University’s Butler School of Music to be paid throughout their lifetime. This month, the Butlers offered to pay the remaining $33 million of their pledge in full if the

school became its own entity. College of Fine Arts dean Douglas Dempster said UT President William Powers Jr. decided against the split because he felt it was not in the best interest of the school’s students and programs. Dempster said if separated from the College of Fine Arts, the Butler School of Music would lose several

hundred thousand dollars annually in endowments. He also said the action would increase administrative and operational spending. “These expenses are now largely consolidated into the larger operation of the College of Fine Arts,” Dempster said. Ernest Butler said interest

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Grant funds coordinated health care By Carly Coen

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make students aware of who we are, and we hope that this event showcases the best that we can do as event planners,” Bowens said. All of these committees work together through the Student Events Center, bringing experienced speakers to campus, educating students about African American heritage and coordinating performances by renowned artists around the

Patients seeking both mental and physical health services may soon have a place to go for all-in-one care, a move proponents say could possibly prevent further health problems for patients. The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, an organization seeking advance treatment of mental health patients, is granting $720,950 to various Texas health care organizations to plan and implement coordinated mental and physical health care programs. The grant will help the organizations provide mental and physical health services in the same locations. Five health care organizations, including Harris County Protective Services in Houston and Austin’s Seton Fund, are receiving grants for planning. Six organizations, including Georgetown home health care provider Lone Star Circle of Care, are receiving grant money to implement integrated care. Rick Ybarra, program officer for the grant initiative at the Hogg Foundation, said any pairing of mental and physical disorders is detrimental. Ybarra said the Hogg Foundation has worked since 2006 for this initiative and making integrated health care a standard in Texas is

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LIFE & ARTS

Rooming together can drive a wedge between even the closest of friends.

TODAY HealthyHorns Fest

Study Abroad Financial Aid Info Session

Students interested in studying abroad can learn how to obtain funding and scholarships at JGB 2.324 noon - 1 p.m.

Emily + Ann’s Talk

Emily + Ann’s Talk This free event will feature artist Emily Roysdon presenting a short lecture on her new installation at the Visual Arts Center, followed by an interview with Ann Cvetkovich, a noted queer scholar, Ellen C. Garwood centennial professor of English and professor of women’s and gender studies at UT. Catch them tonight 7 p.m. 9 p.m. in the Art Building.

Today in history In 1957

On Sept. 19, The United States succeeded in testing its first fully contained underground detonation of a 1.7 kiloton nuclear weapon. As a result of this, 29 more tests were to be scheduled as part of the United States’ initiative to create the first nuclear weapon.

School of Music patron

HEALTH

CAMPUS

Texas soccer shouldn’t lose hope for a successful season.

This free event hosted by University Health Services will give students and staff the opportunity to learn about better sleep, warding off colds and the flu, managing stress and much more. Free chair massages, a photo booth and music from the UT Steel Pan Ensemble will be provided 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. at the Gregory Plaza.

Ernest Butler

Marisa Vasquez | Daily Texan Staff John Legend speaks to students about education issues and his involvement with philanthropies and Teach for America in Hogg Auditorium on Tuesday evening. Legend ended the lecture with a musical performance including his new song “Tonight.”

Legend hails education By Tiffany Himman Grammy Award-winning singer John Legend said during an on-campus lecture Tuesday that the solution to many problems of inequality and poverty lies in a wellgrounded education. Legend said in order for individuals to pursue their passions, it is necessary to repair inequalities in the country’s educational systems.

“I believe that each one of you in this room has potential and can create change,” Legend said. “We all possess the ability to think critically and question the status quo. Education is a gift. It can open doors. Without it, doors will remain closed and options will be limited.” Legend delivered his “Voices with Power to Impact the World” lecture in Hogg Auditorium and spoke to UT students about motivation, education and possi-

UNIVERSITY

Hispanic enrollment raises diversity rank By Christine Ayala The UT schools of business and law have developed a streak for enrolling and graduating Hispanic students and employing a significant percent of Hispanic faculty, according to a new ranking by an online magazine. The UT School of Law and the Red McCombs School of Business MBA program placed first and fourth, respectively, for Hispanic inclusiveness in a ranking by hispanicbusiness. com, which ranks schools on their diversity practices based on Hispanic enrollment, faculty and degrees awarded. The magazine also considers an institution’s plans to increase Hispanic enrollment. This is the second year UT’s School of Law took first place and the 14th year McCombs ranked in

the top five. According to the website, out of the total 534 MBA students enrolled, 33 are Hispanic, making its enrollment 6.2 percent. Out of its 273 total degrees awarded, the business school gave 21 to Hispanics. Out of a total 100 MBA faculty, three are Hispanic. The School of Law has 170 Hispanic students enrolled out of a total 1,130, making its enrollment 15 percent. Out of 386 degrees awarded, 60 were awarded to Hispanics. Five of the 92 full-time faculty are Hispanic. Matt Turner, marketing researcher for McCombs, said he gave hispanicbusiness.com the data used to rate the business school. Turner said the highestranking schools have either high Hispanic enrollment or are generally considered prestigious schools.

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ble economic issues they may encounter after graduation. The event was organized by the Student Events Center and its Distinguished Speakers Committee, Music & Entertainment Committee and African American Culture Committee. Deaunderia Bowens, a Student Events Center advisor, said the $55,000 that paid for Legend’s visit was pulled from student fees and revenues from University Unions. “The event is a way to

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CAMPUS

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Anthropology sophomore Taylor Carr speaks before an audience at the “Students Speak Out: Racism and Oppression” panel discussion in Hogg Auditorium on Tuesday evening.

Shelby Tauber Daily Texan Staff

Panel against bias makes headway By David Maly

Students raised their fists in solidarity Tuesday night as they came together to discuss recent experiences of bias in the UT community. Five student panelists shared their personal experiences with bias while at UT, specifically addressing the issues of race, gender and sexual orientation discrimination. Along with those students,

the event, called “Students Speak Out: Racism and Oppression,” was organized by seven other students in response to two summer incidents in West Campus where UT students said bleach-filled balloons were thrown at them, an attack those students deem racially-motivated, terming it “white-washing.” Anthropology sophomore Taylor Carr, who said she was hit with a bleach-filled balloon, shared the incident

Tuesday in an effort she hopes will shine a light on the reality of UT community bias. “I’m here to let you know that this has become a safety issue,” Carr said. Carr said she thought the event was effective in raising the UT community’s awareness of these issues because it led to students sharing their actual experiences with bias.

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THE DAILY TEXAN

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

RANKS

BOOTS ON BREAK

Volume 113, Issue 26

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CONTACT US

“Earning a degree has made me a better person. Not the piece of paper but the experiences and struggles I overcame,” Legend said. “I am now able to see the world in different ways.” He is a board member of Teach for America, an organization that places recent college graduates in teaching positions in areas with subpar educational systems. Legend said 61 UT graduates joined Teach For

America last year. Legend said there is a need to repair and make progress in the American education system. He said America has been deemed the land of opportunity but not every person receives the same academic opportunity. “Many high schools today are called ‘drop-out factories,’” Legend said. “This rate of high school dropouts is contributing to the perpetual cycle of poverty. In

some cities, where a child is born determines the quality of education and life prospects they will receive.” After the lecture, Legend performed a free concert for those in attendance. Students screamed and applauded in support of the singer. Theatre and dance senior Jessica Obilom, who attended the lecture, said Legend is a talented singer and she enjoyed the opportunity to see him perform.

“McCombs has been in the top five for 14 years,” Turner said. “It’s easy to hit third or fourth a year or two in a row, but to be consistently ranked highly for a long period is the salient piece.” He said the hispanicbusiness.com ranking is the only diversity-based ranking for which the business school submits data. Rodrigo Malta, McCombs director of MBA admissions, said the business school has a consistent recruiting process both nationally and internationally. Malta said the school’s recruiting and the program’s welcoming environment contribute to the high ranking. “UT is known as a pretty prestigious university, and the ranking validates that,” Malta said. “We’re looking for diversity and diversity of thought, and these kind of rankings put a spotlight on that.” Marketing junior Omar Cisneros said the ranking makes him proud to be part of the business school. “Coming from a primarily Hispanic town, I think a good mix makes for a better learning environment,” said Cisneros, who is from Brownsville, Texas. Officials from the School of Law did not get back for comment by press time.

crimination and said she believes women are often unfairly held responsible when a rape takes place. “I’m not the only woman in this room who has been held responsible for men’s actions,” she said. “It’s my responsibility not to get raped? We live in a society that tells women not to get raped instead of telling men not to rape.” Waters said it is important for people to understand that anyone can make a difference.

“You don’t have to be an activist to offer social change,” she said. “Social change starts with all of us.” Doug Garrard, senior associate dean of students, said he hopes to meet with the students involved with the event to work toward a solution to these issues. “We are going to meet with them just to kind of touch base and see how we can work together,” Garrard said. Garrard said he believes the

University should be working toward a solution to these issues, even though these events are often happening off campus in West Campus and other UT-adjacent areas. “I definitely think if it involves UT students, then the University has an obligation,” Garrard said. Lucian Villasenor, Mexican American studies senior, said he knows the fight for campus equality will be a long one but he has hope that

it can one day be achieved. “We’re not going to get the stuff fixed after a forum or a rally,” he said. “It’s a longterm struggle. The next step is for people to start getting involved with the day-today organizing.” Villasenor said the concerned students who organized the event will now work mainly through campus organizations that promote equality to continue to spread their message.

Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

Emily Ng | Daily Texan Staff A stylist at Bird’s Barbershop puts her feet up while waiting for customers Tuesday afternoon.

Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com

LEGEND

Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

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country, respectively. Legend said he knew from a young age he wanted to attend college and get signed to a record label. He said after graduating from the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, he was happy to have completed college.

Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

FORUM

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

continues from page 1 “I feel better about people hearing me out and knowing that these things are real,” Carr said after telling her story. “We’re not making this up. These things are really going on.” Exercise science sophomore Katie Waters shared her views on gender dis-

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

HOGG

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TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

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Low

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Ryan Gosling is NOT at Kerbey Lane.

finally an attainable goal. “The Hogg Foundation strives to achieve a triple aim: better outcomes, greater patient satisfaction and decreased cost for treatment,” Ybarra said. “A patient does not need to go to the same old clinic down the road. They need coordinated care.” Currently Texas does not require mental and physical health care providers to coordinate services, a stance the foundation says leads to further health problems in patients. In a statement,

THE DAILY TEXAN

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joshua Fechter, Jordan Rudner Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reveena Bhakra, Chelsea Purgahn Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hank South Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jasmin Carina Castanon, Elijah Watson, Clayton Wickham Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Tori Eno, Jack Mitts Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meital Boim, Andrea Loera, Lauren Lowe Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ploy Barraparte, Laura Davila, Rory Harman, John Massingil, Andy McMahon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eischeid Nguyen, Riki Tsuji, Stephanie Vanicek, Colin Zelinski Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Peacock, John Solis

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(512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Chang, Zach Congdon, Draike Delagarza, Jake Dworkis, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ivan Meza, Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Kayla Oliver, Pete Stroud Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Samantha Katsounas, Jody Serrano Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Mary Ellen Knewsten, David Maly, Alexa Ura Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristine Reyna Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Amyna Dosani, Sherry Hu, Luis San Miguel Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Jorge Corona, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer, Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Wes Maulsby Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ghayde Ghraowi Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Omar Longoria Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

the Hogg Foundation said treating physical and mental issues simultaneously can lead to a faster recovery. Stacy Wilson, a lawyer for the Texas Hospital Association, said primary care physicians are not prepared for patients with mental health conditions. The association advocates on behalf of health care professionals and educates the public about health regulations. Wilson said these primary care doctors are on the forefront of this issue because simply referring a patient needing mental care to another physician only complicates treatment. “With this grant we have

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some really good starts, but we also have a long way to go,” Wilson said. Wilson said if patients cannot be treated all at once, they tend to become sicker, more aggressive, more harmful to themselves and others and require more resources. Bill Schlesinger, CEO of grant recipient Project Vida, said integrated health care seems like an obvious path. He said he believes that the state of Texas and the world will eventually move toward the integrated health care systems because they are more effective. Project Vida is the only organization receiving grant money for both planning and implementation. Schlesinger said Project Vida needs to hire a variety of physicians in order to provide mental and physical health services to patients. “A lot of people simultaneously suffer from anxiety or depression and diabetes or hypertension. Treating one of those at a time only makes it harder for the patient. We need to be able to treat those disorders at the same time,” Schlesinger said.

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BUTLER

continues from page 1 from the immediate $33 million donation would create additional scholarships for students and research funds for faculty. Butler said he and his wife will continue to pay the endowment even though the University turned down their offer. Butler said he gave the University no other conditions it would have to meet in order for it to take the rest of the e ndowment now. Typically at UT, a college is a stand-alone entity with its own dean. Some colleges contain schools and departments, such as the College of Fine Arts. The Butler School of Music is considered a school within the college and has a director, not a dean, who answers to Dempster. Proponents for establishing an independent UT music school say the school would benefit from having a dean, instead of a director, who is focused on the school exclusively. Butler said he does not see a reason why the Butler School of Music should remain part of the College of Fine Arts. He said the top music schools in the nation, including the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music, are not part of another college. He said separating the music school would elevate its prestige. Butler said UT gave him a lot of excuses, but in his opinion they did not provide any concrete reasons for why the Butler School of Music should remain in the College of Fine Arts. He said UT is “caught up in this bureaucracy,” which it does not want to change.

Garrett Keast, a 1995 alumnus of the Butler School of Music, said this is an opportunity the University should not pass up. Keast said while the music school has achieved more prestige in the past years, the school still has far to go. This is not the first time establishing the Butler School of Music as separate from the College of Fine Arts has been suggested. Dempster said separating the entities is a goal many faculty have had in the past, including the Butler School of Music’s former director, Glenn Chandler. “It has been proposed many times to former deans, provosts and presidents, and each time the decision has been to preserve the College of Fine Arts intact, including music,” Dempster said. Austin Ferguson, Student Government’s College of Fine Arts representative and music sophomore, said he understands both sides of the issue. “By splitting off, we do get to be our own entity and we do get everything specialized, and I do think that would help our presence grow nationally,” Ferguson said. “But on that note, I do think there would be repercussions that would be negative in that we would not get all the benefits that are available to College of Fine Arts students.” According to the 2011-2012 UT Statistical Handbook, the College of Fine Arts had 1,832 students in 2011. More than a third, 703, are Butler School of Music students. Music students make up the second largest number of students in the college, with the largest being theatre and dance students at 705.


World & Nation 3

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Kristine Reyna, Wire Editor

NEWS BRIEFLY Mexico pipeline fire leaves 10 people dead MEXICO CITY — Ten people were killed Tuesday in a fire at a gas pipeline distribution center near Mexico’s border with the United States. Mexico’s state-owned oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos, also known as Pemex, said the fire broke out Tuesday morning at a facility near the city of Reynosa, across from McAllen, Texas. The company said in a statement that the fire had been extinguished and the pipeline had been shut off. The pipeline serves wells in the Burgos basin that produce natural gas. The company said Tuesday that Pemex employees staff the center, but said it was not immediately clear whether those killed were Pemex employees. Nor did the company immediately offer the possible cause of the fire. Pipelines carrying gasoline and diesel in Mexico are frequently tapped by thieves looking to steal oil products. Several oil spills and explosions have been blamed on illegal taps. But thieves seldom target gas pipelines.

Mines shut down, 1,200 jobs eliminated MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Coal producer Alpha Natural Resources said Tuesday it was cutting production by 16 million tons and eliminating 1,200 jobs companywide, laying off 400 workers immediately by closing mines in Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. The mine shutdowns start Tuesday, while the rest of the layoffs will be completed by the end of the first quarter after Alpha fulfills current sales obligations, Chief Executive Officer Kevin Crutchfield said. In all, the layoffs amount to nearly a tenth of Alpha’s 13,000-person workforce.

LSU resumes classes after bomb scare BATON ROUGE, La. — Classes at Louisiana State University’s main campus resumed Tuesday as police searched for the person who called in a bomb threat a day earlier, causing the evacuation of thousands of students. Police have been tightlipped about the call, but U.S. Attorney Don Cazayoux said the male caller talked about “multiple bombs.” “The investigation is still ongoing. They’re being very diligent and aggressive about it,” he said. The threat was phoned into 911 Monday morning. The caller didn’t indicate which part of campus was threatened, so officials ordered a campuswide evacuation about an hour after the call. A majority of the 30,000 students, professors and university employees were probably on campus at the time, officials said. Police and bomb-sniffing dogs swept the campus, beginning with residential halls, and university officials gave the all-clear around 11 p.m. Monday.

Union teachers return to school after strike CHICAGO — The Chicago Teachers Union president says the city’s students will be back in class Wednesday after delegates voted overwhelmingly to suspend a seven-day teachers strike. Karen Lewis spoke during a Tuesday evening news conference after delegates met to consider a tentative contract proposal. The teachers walked out last week over issues including how they are evaluated and job security. — Compiled from Associated Press Reports

Bilal Hussein | Associated Press A Syrian refugee, who fled her home from Darya due to fighting between rebels and government forces, carries her baby as she waits to be registered at the UNHCR, in Baalbek Tuesday. There are more than 65,000 Syrian refugees in Lebanon living mostly in northern Lebanon and in the country’s eastern Bekaa region.

Syrian war looms over U.N. meeting By Edith M. Lederer Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS — Hovering over this month’s annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations is the international community’s failure to end the escalating war in Syria that is starting to spill over into a fragile and divided region. The Syrian conflict has bitterly divided the most powerful members of the Security Council, paralyzing the only U.N. body that can impose global sanctions and authorize military action. It frustrated former U.N. secretary-general Kofi Annan, who quit his highprofile role as special envoy to the country last month, giving reasons that amounted to scathing criticism of world powers for failing to

unite to stop the chaos in the Arab state. There will be a flurry of meetings on the sidelines of the VIP gathering at the General Assembly that begins Sept. 25, including a ministerial meeting of the Security Council’s five vetowielding members and lots of behind-the-scenes discussions among the more than 130 heads of state and government coming to New York. But frustrated diplomats don’t expect any breakthrough on Syria, and outside observers agree. This “means we’re heading into a very dark time in Syria — more violence and a slow grinding conflict that’s going to test everyone’s limits on non-intervention,” Andrew Tabler, a senior fellow and Syria expert at the Washington Institute for

Near East Policy, told The Associated Press in an interview Monday. “It’s a crisis the U.N. is unable to deal with,” Tabler said. “And so, basically what happens is that you’re going to have a lot of speeches ... but unless you get the Security Council agreeing I don’t see anything happening.” Since the Syrian conflict began in March 2011, the division among the five powerful permanent council nations has deepened. The United States, Britain and France have tried unsuccessfully to get the council to put pressure on President Bashar Assad’s government to halt the fighting and pull back its heavy weapons. Russia, Syria’s key protector, and China, which is supporting Moscow, are demanding equal pressure on

the opposition and say the West’s real goal is regime change, which could lead to a takeover of Syria by Islamist radicals. France’s U.N. Ambassador Gerard Araud said Monday that the Security Council “has never been as paralyzed as it is today since the end of the Cold War.” France is now working with the U.S., Britain, Turkey, Arab friends and the Syrian opposition in its fight against the Assad regime, he said. “It is essential that we support the democratic opposition in Syria,” Araud said. “Some believe it is possible to choose between Assad and the Islamists. We tell them, ‘If you keep blocking, you’ll get Assad and then the Islamists.’” U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice said the council’s

failure to support efforts by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Annan to end the violence is “reprehensible and has only intensified the suffering of the Syrian people. “ “I am not optimistic in the short term that the dynamic in the council is going to change,” she said. “However, the United States is not allowing that to block our efforts to speed the day when Assad departs, through sanctions and political and nonlethal support for the opposition.” President Barack Obama has called for Assad to step down, but the United States wants to ensure that whatever government replaces his regime is a democracy that respects the rights of all Syrians, particularly religious minorities and women.

Stocks receive blow after FedEx news By Joshua Freed Associated Press

Charles Dharapak | Associated Press Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks to reporters about the secretly taped video from one of his campaign fundraising events in Costa Mesa, Calif., Monday.

Romney displays tax philosophy By Ken Thomas Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — Republican Mitt Romney said Tuesday that Democratic President Barack Obama believes government should “take from some to give to the others” as he defended telling wealthy donors that half of Americans believe they are “victims” who are entitled to government assistance. Romney told Fox News during an interview that he views such redistribution as a “foreign concept” and that there is a “great divide” among Americans on the subject. The GOP presidential nominee said a growing federal government, driven

in part by people who want support from government programs, has jeopardized the country. “It’s a pathway that looks more European than American in my view. And it’s a pathway some Americans are drawn to,” Romney said. He said people who pay no income taxes would be unlikely to support his campaign because his plan to cut those taxes across the board wouldn’t help them. The Republican presidential candidate was reinforcing remarks he made at a $50,000-a-plate fundraiser in Boca Raton, Fla., on May 17, comments secretly videotaped and made public on Monday. Romney offered no apol-

ogies Monday night during a hastily arranged news conference in which he said the comments were not “elegantly stated” and were spoken “off the cuff.” He said the remarks showed a contrast between Obama’s “government-centered society” and his belief in a “freemarket approach.” “Of course, I want to help all Americans, all Americans, have a bright and prosperous future,” Romney told reporters. He said pushing Israel to give up disputed territory for a two-state solution with the Palestinians “is the worst idea in the world.” Romney has not addressed his remarks about the Middle East.

Glum economic news from FedEx left stocks mixed on Tuesday. The Dow Jones industrial average posted a slight gain, but other indexes fell. Declining stocks outnumbered those that advanced. And seven of the 10 industries tracked by the Standard & Poor’s 500 index declined. European stocks fell. So did oil prices. FedEx said it sees a worldwide economy that has stalled. Investors pay close attention to the company’s forecasts because its package delivery business spans the globe and offers a window into how the economy is doing. FedEx reduced its fiscalyear profit forecast sharply because its customers used its express air delivery service less in favor of slower and cheaper ground service. FedEx’s stock fell $2.73, or 3.1 percent, to close at $86.55. Apple climbed above $700 for the first time, rising $2.13 to close at $701.91. Apple shares have risen more than 19 percent in the past three months. The recent gain has been driven by strong sales of the company’s iPhone and related gadgets. “The market is at high levels, certainly due for

a pullback, and I suspect we’ll probably see one,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital. The S&P 500 index fell 1.87 points to close at 1,459.32. The Nasdaq closed down 0.87 point at 3,177.80. The Dow rose 11.54 points to 13,564.64. Markets had rallied sharply last week after the Federal Reserve announced aggressive measures intended to kick-start the economy. This week, investors appear more focused on the weak growth that caused the Fed to act in the first place. The Fed’s announcement was for open-ended asset purchases, noted Charlie Smith, chief investment officer for Fort Pitt Capital Group in Pittsburgh. That means investors may feel that they’ve gotten all of the gains they’re going to get after the Fed’s announcement, he said. Also on Tuesday, the Commerce Department reported that the current account deficit, the broadest measure of American trade, dropped 12.1 percent in the second quarter. That’s down from a record high in the Januarythrough-March quarter. The deficit shrank because of an increase in American exports and cheaper oil. But economists are predicting it will grow again because of the global slowdown.


Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Opinion 4

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

Viewpoint

Authentic Romney

The numbers count

On Sept. 17, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney made headlines when a recording emerged of him saying, “There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it. That that’s an entitlement. And the government should give it to them. And they will vote for this president no matter what … These are people who pay no income tax … [My] job is is not to worry about those people. I’ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.” Forty seven percent of all undergraduates received federal student aid in the 2007 and 2008 school years at an average of $6,600 per student, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. The threshold at which a single person with no children starts paying income tax is $13,401, according to the Tax Policy Center, a collaboration between the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution. These figures tell us most college students are firmly within the 47 percent of Obama supporters whom Romney believes his “job is not to worry about.” But college students’ problem with Romney’s remarks, which he called “off-the-cuff ” and “inelegantly stated,” was not just that the 47 percent disenfranchised many college students. They revealed the authentic Romney: a man not yet a White House occupant, but already planning to downsize the number of Americans he considers his responsibility. Both Romney and President Barack Obama are reserved, cautious presences, waiting before they speak and slow to reveal. This cautiousness means when either of these candidates inadvertently reveal true feelings, as Romney did, such moments make up a much larger percentage of college students’ perception of who the best man really is.

In a reply brief Abigail Fisher filed Sept. 5 with the U.S. Supreme Court, her lawyers argue UT defendants engage in “doublespeak.” Fisher is the plaintiff who in 2008 was denied admission to the University and sued UT for race discrimination in a case scheduled to be argued before the high court next month. In the reply brief, Fisher’s lawyers state that UT defendants have argued “race is only a ‘factor of a factor of a factor of a factor’ in the scoring of applications.” But, the Fisher lawyers argue, “by comparing percentages of students of different races in the total state population to those in UT’s student population to determine which races are ‘overrepresented’ or ‘underrepresented,’ the University is effectively using a quota system.” Earlier, in a brief filed Aug. 6, UT lawyers argued that the Top Ten Percent law “does not foreclose the individualized consideration of race in UT’s holistic review process,” and that “UT had a sufficient basis to conclude that adding race to its holistic review promoted its compelling interest in diversity.” The numbers the UT admissions office has scheduled to release in the coming days, which will describe the racial composition of the 2012-2013 freshman class, could address those two viewpoints. Look to see if UT identifies by race the numbers of students admitted through the automatic Top Ten Percent law and those admitted through UT admissions officers use of holistic methods that include consideration of race. Fisher’s claims about UT’s “doublespeak” could hinge on the racial composition of the pool of students admitted through its holistic process. The numbers to be released this week will provide a clearer picture of who is admitted to UT and how the arguments to be made before the Supreme Court in October.

Medical school a plus

Among the fifteen highestranked universities in the country, UT Austin is only one of four without an associated medical school in the same city.

Proposition 1 would increase Travis County property taxes to help fund a new UT medical school and teaching hospital. The proposition will appear on the Nov. 6 ballot and recently received support from more than 400 Austin-area doctors. In a recent editorial, we argued a new medical school would be a boon to Austin, creating jobs and bringing the advantages other Texas cities with medical schools have (Houston, Tyler, Dallas, Galveston and San Antonio). While Austin enjoys a robust health care infrastructure, the city and UT students will still benefit from the development of a leading medical school and associated research hospital. The school will not only increase access to health care for residents of Central Texas who travel to Austin for advanced medical treatment, but will also replace the aging and overtaxed facilities at University Medical Center – Brackenridge. Additionally, among the fifteen highest-ranked universities in the country, UT Austin is one of only four without an associated medical school in the same city. The addition of such a facility would build on the university’s existing relationship with the Dell Pediatric Research Institute, and would serve to strengthen UT’s already highly ranked nursing, pharmacy, biology and education programs. So we support Proposition 1.

Gallery

lauren Moore | Daily Texan Cartoonist

Take charge of your course requirements By Michael Morton Guest Columnist

As the fall semester begins, one academic area where students struggle for ownership is the University’s 42hour core curriculum. A common requirement for all students, the core curriculum features the first-year signature course as well as coursework in English composition, literature, American and Texas government, history, social and behavioral sciences, mathematics, natural sciences and technology and visual and performing arts. Students view these courses as simply boxes to check off on their degree plans. As the University’s Commission of 125 — a group of citizens chartered with formulating a vision for how UT Austin can best serve Texas and the world for next 25 years — stated in 2004, these courses “resemble little more than a vast a la carte menu.” While significant and innovative steps such as the creation of signature courses and the development of the School of Undergraduate Studies have been taken to strengthen the University’s core curriculum, for many students the courses encompassed in the 42hour core curriculum still resemble that of a Cheesecake Factory menu with little connection from course

to course. This lack of cohesion in the core curriculum prevents students from taking ownership of their core classes and seeing them as an enriching part of their academic experience rather than a hurdle they must hurry up and jump over in order to continue on the path to a degree. No matter what major students choose or field they enter, the subjects addressed in the core curriculum can help provide a well-rounded education. However, this can only be accomplished if students actually view these courses as beneficial and are able to make the core curriculum work for them by finding unique academic pathways. In order for these pathways to exist, students must take steps toward ownership of their education by providing feedback about their experiences with the core curriculum. Students can provide such feedback through a short survey, initially sent a few weeks ago to 8,000 randomly selected sophomores, juniors, and seniors. By simply completing the survey, students can help improve the university’s core curriculum and provide data to ultimately lay the groundwork for a more effective core with which students can find their own academic pathways.

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Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

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... the subjects addressed in the core curriculum can help provide a well-rounded education. However, this can only be accomplished if students actually view these courses as beneficial...

Despite great strides and improvements, the University’s core curriculum remains an area in dire need of strengthening if it is to fulfill its core purpose and truly allow students to see it for its benefit rather than the “vast a la carte menu” described by the Commission of 125. The University’s 2005 Task Force on Curricular Reform — a group led by now President Powers, then dean of the School of Law, designed to evaluate UT Austin’s core curriculum and make recommendations for improvement — reiterated the Commission’s finding that “course-selection decisions are frequently driven by class availability, convenience and whim.” Students now have a chance to have their voices heard and help positively reform the 42-hours, which affect every student’s degree plan. Students now have a chance to take ownership of it. — Morton is the president of the Senate of College Councils

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

News

5

university

Photo illustration by Lawrence Peart | Photos by emily ng | Daily Texan Staff History professor Henry Brand, journalism professor Regina Lawrence and government professor Daron Shaw spoke to an audience of freshmen on the importance of voting in the upcoming presidential election at Bass Concert Hall Tuesday evening.

Faculty lecture prepares students for election season By David Loewenberg

With fewer than 50 days until the U.S. presidential election, first-year students flooded Bass Concert Hall to listen to professors from three different fields offer their take on the race. The talk, entitled “Election 2012: History, Rhetoric, Politics,” was the second lecture in this year’s University Lecture Series, which aims to give

first-year students the chance to interact with acclaimed faculty. History professor Henry Brands, government associate professor Daron Shaw and journalism professor Regina Lawrence spoke about campaign issues related to their respective fields of study. In the lecture Tuesday night, Brands cautioned students against hoping the new president will be a hero. “Will President Obama, if reelected, will Governor

Romney, if elected, rise to the ranks of a Lincoln or a Roosevelt? You better hope not,” Brands said. “Because if either one does, what that means is that the country will experience some crisis comparable to the Civil War, comparable to the Great Depression.” Patricia Micks, senior program coordinator for the School of Undergraduate Studies, said the University Lecture Series, which all students enrolled in a first-year

signature course are required to attend, aims to promote a dialogue among students and draw their attention to what the campus has to offer. “The hope is that each lecture will create a campuswide conversation and will highlight some of the exciting research and scholarly work being produced on our campus,” Micks said. With a record amount of money being raised and spent this year, Lawrence urged

students to not let their voices get drowned out despite the significant and often unappealing role money has in influencing the political conversation. “When the discussion is dominated by money and by the kinds of political negative non-factual ads that we’ve been talking about tonight, that’s not a very inviting conversation,” Lawrence said. “That doesn’t invite you to take part. Frankly, for a lot of you it’s a turn-off.” All speakers dedicated part

of their time toward encouraging student civic engagement. David Bishop, international relations and global studies freshman, said the talk could encourage students to get involved in the electoral process early. “I think it’s important for freshmen,” Bishop said. “If they target freshmen as we come in, then we’re engaged in the political process throughout college instead of waiting until we leave to get going on it.”

the texAs triBune

Sadler aims to establish ethos with voters by citing experience By Aman Batheja The Texas Tribune

In 2002, state Rep. Paul Sadler of Henderson was one of the most powerful Democrats in the Texas Legislature when

he announced he was not running for re-election. At the time, he was the chairman of the House Public Education Committee and a force that even the state’s governor had learned to be mindful of when it came to

anything involving schools. Ten years later, Sadler, 57, is the unequivocal underdog in his bid for U.S. Senate against Ted Cruz, a rising national star in the Republican Party. While the U.S. Constitution does not require senators to

have experience in elected office, Sadler has made it clear that Texans should demand nothing less from whomever they elect to replace Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, who is retiring. Cruz, a lawyer, has never held elected office. For more than five years, he defended Texas in court as the state’s solicitor general. Before that, he was a domestic policy adviser to President George W. Bush. He has argued before the U.S. Supreme Court nine times. He

pulled off a political upset in July by defeating Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst for his party’s Senate nomination. Last month, he was a featured speaker at the Republican National Convention. Sadler, who fully expects Cruz and his supporters to outspend him, contends that Cruz’s views are too extreme for Texas. He said Texans usually laugh when he tells them that Cruz wants to eliminate several federal agencies including the Department of Education and the IRS.

“If we in Texas are laughing at the Republican nominee for United States Senate, what do you think the rest of the country is doing?” Sadler said. “We’ve had enough of politicians standing up on the national stage and everybody else laughing at us.” Texas Democrats have not won a statewide race since 1994. Sadler is hoping to break the streak, though many pundits have written off Cruz’s victory in November as a foregone conclusion.

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Sports 6

FO R G FORR SI N UP UP FO SIG GN SI W NOW W AL UR NO ALSSS NO AM URAL IN TRAM INTR TEAMWORK TEAMWORK TEAMWORK

www.utrecsports.org www.utrecsports.org www.utrecsports.org

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

football

One year wiser, Ash takes command by Chris Hummer

Three weeks into last season, David Ash was just a freshman and was splitting snaps with Case McCoy. He had only completed six passes and had yet to throw a touchdown. Now a year later, Ash is the undisputed starter and has been lauded with national recognition after his 326-yard, four-touchdown performance against Ole Miss. “He’s been doing great all of these games we’ve had so far,” offensive guard Trey Hopkins said. “He really took charge of the huddle, took charge of the game in general. He led us out there, and as you can see, it worked for us.” A year ago Ash had a hard time even calling plays in the huddle, let alone taking charge of the offense and directing his teammates. This season he’s significantly more confident around his teammates and isn’t afraid to tell a lineman where to go or to correct a receiver after he runs a bad route. “Confidence. David’s confidence was so much better,” said head coach Mack Brown. “He never panicked. I really just feel like he’s got a good presence about him right now.” His leadership skills have improved exponentially, but what’s really been augmented is his decision-making. Last year Ash completed just 57 percent of his passes and had a 1-to-2 touchdown-to-interception ratio — a terrible ratio

Mlb atHletICS

ReD SoX

RayS

aStRoS

CaRDInalS

elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff David Ash had the best performance of his career Saturday when he went 19-for-23 and had a career-high 326 yards.

considering quarterbacks during an outstanding year will have a 3-to-1 ratio or better. Ash has almost completely turned those numbers around. Ash has completed 76 percent of his passes thus far in 2012, and even more impressively, he has yet to throw an interception. This means Ash is making excellent judgements when moving through his reads. He’s doing it quickly, too. He looks at his first and second options and doesn’t force the ball

anywhere; if they’re not open, he hits his hot read or takes off for a few yards on the ground. “He’s made good decisions,” co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin said. “He’s made very good decisions in our run game with some of the checks and things like that that we have to do and getting us out of bad situations.” But the area he’s shown the most improvement in is throwing the deep ball. Last season he was very hesitant

to push the football down the hash marks, but against the Rebels he let the ball fly. He observed one-on-one coverage on the outside and just launched the ball deep — there was no hesitation. It worked, too: Ash completed touchdown passes of 46 and 55 yards in the 66-31 win. Ash hasn’t been perfect, though. He’s underthrown quite a few of those deep passes. He is still a bit conservative at times with the football, and there are times

when he will stare down a wideout instead of looking off the defense. But if the Longhorns can continue to see a 76-percent completion percentage out of Ash while making defenses think twice about totally keying in on the running game, Texas will be in good shape. He may not put up prolific stats like he did against Ole Miss this season, but that’s OK. Ash said “stats are for losers, anyway.”

Stat Guy

Sloppy TCU nabs win, Big plays becoming problematic WVU’s Smith shines Change is tough, as the Horned Frogs will surely realize when acclimating to the Big 12. They will be tested every week that they step up onto the field. Against Kansas, however, TCU sent a message to the rest of the conference though it didn’t showcase everything it has in the tank. TCU’s 20-6 beat down of the Jayhawks allowed for the usually prolific Gary Patterson offense to take shape. Quarterback Casey Pachall was impressive with a 24for-30 and a 335 passing yard performance. However, the Horned Frogs amassed four turnovers. If they are expected to compete every single week in this conference, the team needs to step up. “We just have to get our minds right,” Pachall said. “We know how well we can perform and that wasn’t our

SIDelIne

tIGeRS

football notebook

by Matthew Warden

STARTS HERE STARTS STARTS HERE

normal way of performing.” Whatever way you look at the first conference game of the year, TCU officially sits at the top of the Big 12 through three weeks of football.

by Hank South

Daily Texan Columnist

Smith, WVu offense impress Another new addition to the Big 12 is West Virginia. A perennial Top 25 team, the Mountaineers are loaded again and look poised for big things through three weeks of the season. West Virginia currently ranks as the No. 8 team in the nation, and ranks third in total offense. They haven’t faced equal opponents yet but the numbers speak for themselves. Quarterback Geno Smith is the player every other Big 12 team should make a note of as he has already compiled 734 yards passing with 9 touchdowns through two games. The Mountaineers

A big play can change the landscape of an entire game. A team can shift momentum in its favor and never look back. Through three games the Texas defense has given up its fair share of big plays only to be aided by the resurgent Longhorn offense. However, with Big 12 competition rapidly approaching, these excusable defensive lapses could very well decide Texas’ overall fate. Here’s a look at the stats. Let’s define a big play as an offensive gain of 25-plus yards. If that’s the case, the Texas defense gave up three big plays Saturday against Ole Miss, not including the 100yard kickoff return by Jaylen Walton in the fourth quarter. Ole Miss wide receiver Donte Moncrief caught a 75-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Bo Wallace, and running back Jeff Scott added a

TCU continues on page 7

STAT continues on page 7

Jackson Jeffcoat @Yung_Jack44

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SPoRtS bRIefly young struggling with finances

DALLAS — Six years after entering the NFL as the third player taken in the draft, Vince Young finds himself without a team and with just a fraction of the money he received from a contract that guaranteed him $26 million. In an increasingly caustic war of words, attorneys have been arguing for months over whether Young is an out-of-control spender who put himself deeply in the hole or simply a victim of inexperienced advisers, one of whom was his own uncle. Young was cut by the Buffalo Bills, his third NFL team, in August. Young is suing his former agent, Major Adams, and a North Carolina financial planner, Ronnie Peoples, alleging that they misappropriated $5.5 million. In some instances, the pair forged his signature or impersonated him on the phone or in emails, according to the lawsuit, filed in Houston in June.

nerve treatment in Campbell’s future elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Carrington Byndom (23) has struggled with big plays this season.

SoCCeR

Zachary Strain | Daily Texan Staff The Longhorns have struggled this season, but freshman goalie Abby Smith has returned from the U-20 Women’s national team and will help as they attempt to turn their season around.

TOP TWEET

Horns still fighting after dreadful start by Wes Maulsby Daily Texan Columnist

Texas won consecutive conference tournaments in 2005 and 2006 but has since struggled to finish near the top of the league. Out went Chris Petrucelli and in came Angela Kelly. Texas wanted to return to the top of the Big 12 conference, and it may have chosen the right coach for the job. Before she was named head coach at Tennessee,

the Volunteers were an afterthought in the SEC. All of that changed when Kelly took over. Tennessee had never been to the NCAA tournament or won an SEC tournament game before she arrived. She left the Tennessee program with five Sweet 16 appearances in the NCAA tournament, three consecutive SEC regular season titles and four SEC tournament championships between 2000 and 2008. She was also named SEC Coach of the Year for

KELLY continues on page 7

NFL Hall of Famer Earl Campbell said Tuesday he is undergoing nerve treatment after doctors ruled out concerns that he might have Lou Gehrig’s disease. Campbell, 57, will receive treatment and testing in Austin this weekend aimed at trying to “trigger the nerves a little faster,” said Tyler Campbell, his son. He said his father was otherwise doing well but acknowledged the process will affect the former Heisman Trophy winner’s recent physical rehabilitation to move around quicker. Earl Campbell, who uses a walker, underwent knee surgery last year and has other health problems from a punishing football career spent as one of the game’s great power running backs. He said he suspects the nerve damage was also the result of his playing days. By Paul J. Weber. —Compiled from Associated Press reports


sports

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

STAT

TCU continues from page 6

continues from page 6

TCU quarterback Casey Pachall looks to be a threat as he leads the Horned Frogs in their first season in the Big 12. He went 20-for-30 during the team’s victory over Kansas.

LM Otero Associated Press

are averaging 55.5 points per game, which means that Smith accounts for nearly half of the team’s total points on the year. Even though the defense ranks 80th in total defense, West Virginia has all the firepower it needs to run the table in its first season in the Big 12. OSU still a powerhouse Oklahoma State has put up numbers through Week 3 that would make video game statistics seem real. The Cowboys are currently

KELLY

continues from page 6

three consecutive seasons from 2003 to 2005. Texas has enjoyed championship-level play from a variety of sports over the past decade. Championship-level performance is expected from all aspects of Texas athletics, and when not playing at a championship level, changes are made. Kelly has had some experience with taking programs to the next level, and Texas has some room to grow. Since finishing third in the conference regular season in 2006, Texas has only finished in the top four once. So far in her inaugural season, things haven’t quite

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ranked No. 1 in scoring nationally with just over 62 points per game. If that isn’t enough, their offense ranks No. 4 in passing and No. 6 in rushing yards. Nothing appears to be wrong with the offense, but Arizona State found a weakness in the No. 37 defense in the nation and derailed the Cowboys’ quest for a national title, defeating them 59-38 in Week 2. With Big 12 play starting for the Cowboys when they face Texas in Week 4, the

team still looks to stake its claim as a conference force with one of the most balanced offensive attacks in the nation. The Cowboys feature two quarterbacks who have each amassed at least 450 yards passing, two backs with at least four touchdowns each and two receivers with at least 10 catches and 200 yards each. Expect to see fireworks any time Oklahoma State takes the field during Big 12 play this season.

gone as planned. Texas is last in the conference with a 3-61 record and is one of only three teams in the conference not to be riding a win streak into conference play. A big reason for this is that Texas has allowed the most goals in the conference, with 18 goals allowed. Only Oklahoma and West Virginia have also allowed at least 10 goals. However, Texas is coming off of what may be its best weekend of non-conference play. It got a much needed win over Fresno State last Friday and forced a tie at home against a Denver team that had just beaten Kansas in Lawrence. Kelly has also dealt with this kind of adversity before. In her first season, Tennessee took a 5-6 record into conference play, where a 7-2 record

was good for second in the Eastern division. Her nonconference record doesn’t exactly stand out with a .640 record, but her .721 record in conference play does. Kelly’s teams win the crucial games and are always dangerous. Despite a 5-5-1 conference record going into the 2008 SEC Tournament, Tennessee was able to win the conference title and secure an NCAA tournament bid. It’s not time to panic over the state of the Texas soccer program. If Kelly’s history is any indication, things may be starting to turn around on the field. And with freshman keeper Abby Smith returning from her one-month stint with the U.S. U-20 National team, things could start to get interesting starting with Friday’s match against Iowa State.

48-yard touchdown run in the third. Moncrief also hauled in a 36-yard catch in the second quarter. All this against a defensive unit projected in the preseason as one of the best in the nation. To be fair, the Longhorns still picked off Wallace three times and racked up five sacks, but when it comes to the likes of West Virginia or Oklahoma, three or four big plays given up can all but decide the game immediately. This wasn’t just a onegame slip-up, either. The Texas defense has showed signs of vulnerability all season. In the home opener, Wyoming quarterback Brett Smith exposed a weak spot in the secondary, hitting receiver Robert Herron for an 82-yard touchdown in the first quarter as two Longhorns whiffed on tackles. Even while pitching a shutout against New Mexico a

couple of weeks ago, the Longhorns gave up a multitude of 10-12 yard runs early on, including a 29-yard burst by quarterback B.R. Holbrook. For the most part, these big plays are happening not because of missed assignments or lapses in judgment but because of not wrapping up on a tackle attempt, one of the biggest fundamentals in all of football. While most fans can agree a big hit is exhilarating to watch, a sound tackle for a minimal gain can be just as effective. The Longhorns missed 16 tackles against Ole Miss, which in turn allowed the Rebels to rack up 214 extra yards. Three of the Rebels’ touchdowns came off of missed tackles that could have ended the play near the line of scrimmage. The Longhorns currently

rank 60th in rush defense (48 yards per game), 27th in passing defense (180 yards per game), and 32nd in total defense (328 yards per game) — numbers that Texas fans wouldn’t typically expect against a relatively soft preconference schedule. If the Longhorns don’t correct these mistakes, the next few weeks could turn south quickly. In the next five weeks, Texas faces Oklahoma State, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Baylor; the 1st-, 3rd-, 11th- and 8thbest offenses in the country, respectively. While big plays can be brushed off as earlyseason rust, the Longhorn defense will face a bitter reality against the heavyweights of the Big 12 if adjustments are not made.

20-plus yard plays by Texas opponents Team

Yards

Total offensive yards

Ole Miss

75, 48, 36, 30

399

New Mexico

20, 29

241

Wyoming

82, 25

345

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8 COUPS/L&A

Life & Arts

8

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Trends

By Faith Ann ruszkowski Mustaches are growing on everyone, whether it be on their faces or in their wardrobes. Francesca’s, a national retail boutique with three stores in Austin, recently started selling mustache iPhone cases, handlebar mustache watches, mustache bottle openers and notable mustache disguises in the styles of Hulk Hogan and Salvador Dalí. It appears, as a trend in pop culture, the ’stache is back. Shirts can be seen around campus with slogans that read “I mustache you a question, but I’ll shave it for later” and “come and shave it,” a la the notable Texas Revolution flag reading “come and take it.” A simple search for “mustache” on Pinterest results in tutorials on how to paint mustaches on fingernails and how to bake mustache cupcakes. Mustaches are even reappearing where they originated, on men’s faces. The surge of mustache popularity has not gone unnoticed among UT students. While many female students sport mustache accessories, many males choose to embrace the facial-hair-friendly culture in Austin. “My high school had a ‘no facial hair’ policy, so I started growing out my mustache when I came to UT,” said

DORMS

computer science sophomore Dan Rutledge. Mustaches have clearly grown in popularity. What is unclear is exactly what spurred the renewed interest in hair above the lip. Janet Davis, an American studies associate professor who specializes in pop culture, noted that while the mustache is making a comeback, it is still not part of the mainstream culture. “Having a mustache is a marker of difference,” Davis said. “It is bohemian chic, a kind of eclectic retro cool.” Mustaches and facial hair have only appealed to a niche of the population for the majority of the 20th and 21st centuries, said Bryan Nelson, president of the Austin Facial Hair Club. He cites the Industrial Revolution as the last time facial hair was widely accepted in mainstream culture. “Throughout history, prior to the Industrial Revolution, men around the world celebrated their facial hair with unique creations and styles,” Nelson said. Davis noted that the last U.S. president to sport facial hair of any kind was William Taft, who left office in 1913. Nelson and Davis both used U.S. presidents as an indicator of cultural norms, a reflection of American society at the time they served in office. After Taft’s presidency, Davis

continues from page 10

in order for a relationship to withstand the tests of belligerent sleepwalking and compulsive hoarding. In a more scientific light, roommates are a well-researched subject area for clinical psychologists. After moving away from parents and old friends, college students enter the final period of adolescent development ominously dubbed “trial independence,” according to Dr. Carl Pickhardt, graduate of UT and a local Austin developmental psychologist. Pickhardt explains that the ages between 18 and 23 constitute a time when young adults grapple with their sense of identity. Other researchers have concluded that roommates in this formative stage can sway racial prejudices, drinking behaviors and even grade point averages, for better or for worse. New environments, though stressful, can also help break bad habits since they detach people from familiar cues that trigger them. By eliminating occurrences of pencil-tapping and cerealslurping, no roommate should ever have the need to hire a social assassin, i.e. an uninhibited, verbal gunslinger who points out every

perturbing habit, like Larry David from HBO’s sitcom “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” The level of commitment involved when two or more people are confined to the same 200 square feet can forge either best friends or fervent enemies. Against all odds, Jake Hiebert, Plan II Honors freshman, and Kevin Chen, mechanical engineering and computer science junior, have thus far overcome the anxieties of living together as assigned bunkmates. “Even if you’re roommate isn’t the greatest, at least you’re encouraged to experience life outside your dorm by escaping it,” Hiebert said. Escaping, however, is in no way a component of their relationship. Within the first day of meeting each other, this textbook pair made sure to lay down basic modus operandi for the dorm. Dr. Phil would’ve been proud. “No visitors when I’m trying to sleep, that’s all I ask,” Chen said while laughing. Some smaller schools take a more active role in limiting the culture shock of dorm life and mitigating roommate catastrophes. From Reed to Dartmouth

AFROBEAT diaspora music. It’s a mix of quotes, Black and Latino artists, modern hip-hop, traditional music, chants and more,” Jones said. The practice begins with the placing of a spiritual item on the altar in the center of the group circle. Slowly, each member of the group passes around burning white sage, whose smoke is said to purify the body. In today’s meditation, the purification of the soul is brought about through powerful repeated movement and polyrhythmic music. Offering verbal guidance, Jones helps the group focus on the idea of cleansing. From fears to relationships, members of the group write down what they hope to cleanse. They then meditate on the release of these concerns. Toi Scott, an avid participant in Afrobeat Meditation, uses the practice

points to increasing immigration from Eastern Europe and an association of facial hair with radicalism as a potential cause for the decline of the mustache. “Many Polish, Italian and Jewish immigrants, who were not really perceived as white, had long ethnic traditions of very prominent facial hair,” Davis said. “This marked them as different and alienated them in America.” Additionally, American sentiments were not aligned with radical political figures, such as Karl Marx and Hitler, who had very distinctive facial hair. Though mustaches and facial hair made brief comebacks in the 1960s and 1970s, they maintained an association with counter-cultural movements, Davis said. She suggested that much of the consumer-oriented mustache products play off of society’s perception of mustaches as offbeat and quirky. “Society probably sees [mustaches] in many different lights: anything from evil, to hippie, to lazy, to scary, to weird, to funny, to interesting,” said Taylor Welden, a mustached member of the Austin Facial Hair Club. “For me, it’s not really about how other people see it. I feel natural with my mustache. I feel naked without one.” The growth in appreciation of the mustache among consumers signals a slight shift in America’s acceptance of

Even if your roommate isn’t the greatest, at least you’re encouraged to experience life outside your dorm by escaping it. — Jake Hiebert Plan II Honors freshman

to Georgetown, colleges now profile individual students and match more compatible personalities. Despite the sheer volume of residents moving in and out of the 40 Acres, this eHarmony level of finesse is possible even at UT. In addition, students living in campus residency halls are encouraged to sign “agreements” that clearly define the responsibilities of new roommates. While it’s in no way binding, at the very least it opens a line of discussion about keeping the room from the verge of destruction without requiring prodigious amounts of duct tape.

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to achieve calmness in her life. “Afrobeat Meditation moves your energy in a different way,” Scott said. “It keeps me grounded and gives me a different perspective. When I meditate I get a peace of mind, and I can tap into it daily. It’s a peacefulness.” But Afrobeat Meditation does much more than relax participants; it allows students to better understand themselves. Self-recognition and realization are equally important. It seeks to enlighten as much as it seeks to liberate. It excites within them a connection to their past. “This is a rich black community. I research here, but I also see something special about the history. There’s something symbolic about teaching here,” Jones said. Jones’ connection with the community began with her graduate research

in East Austin. Jones balances school and a career with her spiritual quest. Using Afrobeat classes at the Orun Center, she combines both her desire to help better educate the community and to learn from it. “I feel that my place in the community has two parts,” Jones explained. “I am a meditation facilitator, and I’m here intentionally to connect with my community. But I’m also here as a researcher and for community activism.” Like the Orun Center and Jones, the practice of Afrobeat Meditation is multifaceted: it bridges cultures, genres and eras. Tying the history of a community to the diversity of the globalizing world, Afrobeat Meditation offers participants from all backgrounds the opportunity to engage both their bodies and minds in the practice of meditation.

Austin keeps it weird as residents of the city support the comeback of trendy mustaches.

Photo courtesy of Taylor Welde

facial hair. Retailers such as Francesca’s and websites like Pinterest have found a national audience for mustache merchandise. All the better

BAND

continues from page 10 ourselves so seriously to the point where nothing’s funny.” This blase attitude radiates throughout the band’s two previously released EPs. With track titles like “Cheat on Each Other” and “I Slept With Her, Too,” it is

for facial hair enthusiasts in Austin like Nelson, who thinks “that bald-faced men are akin to the 90-pound supermodel. Much like the

supermodel is not a repr sentation of a real, desirab woman, the smooth, ube exfoliated man is not a rea istic or desirable man.”

clear Whalers is not trying to hide or overcomplicate anything. Their straightforward approach to songwriting is refreshing, but it may lack the depth that keeps people listening. It could be that the banal nature of their songwriting is purposeful. While some bands and musicians have lofty, grandiose and somewhat pretentious dreams of inspiring

generations with their deep misunderstood and angst-fill tunes, Whalers has one ove reigning reason for choosing make music. “College girls,” Smalley sai “That’s our answer to ever thing: college girls.” Whalers will be playing free set following the Bea House concert at Stubb’s Ba B-Q Thursday.

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Puzzle by Ian Elizabeth Livengood C. Gorski

34 Really, 35 Curry who really tough formerly co-hosted 35 Hanoi holidays “Today” 36 ___ Chicago 36 Italian writer Grill Primo 37 Really looksstate up 37 “What ___ to affairs!” of 38 “No Populous area, 39 problem informally here” 40 Bell tower 39 More, on a instrument score

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

Name: 365/Vulcan Video; Width: 29p6; Depth: 1 in; Color: Black,

denny taylor


Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

Music

Whalers sail past marketing, focus on music By Hannah smothers There is a line that separates cool impartiality from blatant unprofessionalism, and local alternative-rock band Whalers is attempting to build their career by flirting with that line. Made up of five members ranging from ages 27 to 31, Whalers is the quintessential picture of how a small band comprised of five men might look. When they aren’t playing music, they are probably discussing the acting career of Diane Keaton, drinking Guinness at their favorite dive bar or criticizing drummer Milos Bertram for his love of ‘90s rock music. If there is anything that can be said about Whalers, it is that there is no predicting what they will do or say next. Their animated and impulsive atmosphere could be one of the key factors to the band’s live performance energy. “In addition to being a fun live band, one of the things I find great about them is their ability to promote,” said Kristyn Ciani, talent buyer for C3 Presents. However, according to Gus Smalley, lead singer and University of Texas alumnus, Whalers has yet to really promote an album. “Every time we release something, we’re just like, ‘Hey guys, new album,’ and when we say ‘Hey guys,’ we mean no one,” said Smalley of their laid-back approach to the business side of the music industry. Whalers chooses to let the steady beats and punchy tones of their alternative, surf-rock music speak for itself. For this

Members of the local alternativerock band known as Whalers agree that their main focus is not about marketing themselves, but having fun making and playing music together. “We all generally have the same type of humor, which leads to some pretty crazy antics,” says bassist Amir Mozafari.

Photo courtesy of Benjamin sklar

group of men, the mundane matters of music business, image and marketing are not top priority. “We’re 99, if not 100, percent committed to making the best music we can and don’t spend a lot of time thinking about image or marketing,” Smalley said. “We’re definitely not cool-looking. None of us are trying to look like we’re in a band, except maybe me. And if I didn’t, we’d just look like the biggest bunch of squares.” This simplistic, almost humorous approach to the blood-

sucking monster that is the modern-day music industry has worked for the band thus far. Whalers has played shows around Austin and in various venues across Texas. But the group has some goals for the future that involve more national exposure and could require a bit of straightening up. “We want to write the next hit song for the next hit sitcom on CBS,” said guitarist Kyle Rother. “Yeah, like something somewhere between ‘Charles in Charge’ and ‘Growing Pains,’” the vocal and pragmatic

HealtH & Body

Bertram added. Bertram’s naturally outspoken and sardonic nature almost perfectly fits the mold of the stereotypical rock-band drummer. When he’s not banging out driving rhythms from behind his drum kit, his booming voice is filling the void. “I beat on things. I beat on shit,” said Bertram in his trademark boisterous tone. “I live on one philosophy: I make it go boom-boom.” The entire band follows suit when it comes to the playful, self-described goofy atmo-

genre: Alternate SurfRock Where: Stubb’s Bar-B-Q When: Thursday, Sept. 20 after the Beach House concert Price: Free

BAND continues on page 8

Dorm life spurs maturity

Fanny trang | Daily Texan Staff Naya Jones, an Afrobeat Meditation instructor, performs at the Orun Center for Cultural Arts, situated in East Austin on Monday afternoon.

Meditation class promotes culture Across from East End Barber Shop and next door to several abandoned buildings in East Austin, the Orun Center of the Cultural Arts looks to be little more than a run-down, graffitied shack. But this multicultural haven serves as a mediator between the distinct cultures of the changing East End community. Devoted to promoting diversity and the development of a cultural identity, the Orun Center hosts a variety of exotic activities, from reggae nights to capoeira rodas. Orun seeks to open the eyes of the community while honoring its roots in African and Latin American traditions. “Growing up in the East End, I saw a lack of educational programs, cultural programs and the arts,” said Dorian Layssard, founder of the Orun Center. “I saw the necessity of having a space like the Orun Center that creates an environment where people can learn and develop individually and as a community.” The center focuses on

WHaleRs

HoMe-living

By stuart Railey

By olivia arena

sphere surrounding the table where they sit and share a plate of fried pickles. “We all generally have the same type of humor, which leads to some pretty crazy antics,” said Amir Mozafari, bassist and UT alumnus. Whalers isn’t in the habit of taking themselves too seriously. In fact, they do quite the opposite. “Why not make it so overthe-top that it’s ridiculous?” Bertram said. “We don’t take

aFRoBeat Meditation Where: Orun Center of the Cultural Arts, 1720. E. 12th St.. Austin, TX 78702

When: Once a month, next meditation is Sunday October 14, 4 pm Price: Show your student I.D. and pay $10 for your first class. Bring a friend and it’s $8. (Regularly $12-15)

opening the eyes of the individual in a welcoming environment. As part of a dynamic and transforming community, the center must be willing to adapt and welcome all cultures. “The Orun Center is definitely changing; it’s not a stagnant energy,” Layssard said. “It’s very fluid and open to change and fluctuation. But we keep love in spite of everything we do. All the programs bring love.” One of the programs at the Orun Center is a meditation class that draws on the ancestral traditions of Afro-Caribbean societies and focuses on the mind-body relationship. Afrobeat Meditation allows community members to connect with their pasts while embracing elements of an ever-changing global world. Naya Jones, UT geography doctoral student and founder

of Rootwork Austin, leads Afrobeat Meditation classes. Rootwork Austin focuses on promoting community and individual spiritual development through movement, music and meditation. This varies from standard meditation in that it emphasizes the importance of the body in motion. “Rather than leaving our identities (cultural, gender, etc.) and our bodies outside of the space, we bring our bodies into the room,” Jones said. “We get in touch with our bodies.” Feeling the beat pulsating through her body allows Jones to move freely throughout the room. The music alternates between soulful jazz-influenced tunes and quick African-inspired beats. “The music is African

AFROBEAT continues on page 8

For all 8,000 freshmen and other miscellaneous new students here at UT, the angst of arriving on campus is guaranteed to overwhelm even the soundest of minds. Separation from familiar environments is stressful even to people who experience it on a regular basis. All too often, a key component of that stress is sharing space with assigned roommates. The loss of privacy, differing celebrity crushes, food allergies and spontaneous flatulence can drive a furtive wedge of frustration between even the strongest of friends, more so perfect strangers. And the yearly influx of macabre roommate horror stories perpetuates the need for vigilant floor monitors. At the UT Honors Quad, veteran residential assistants find solace and solidarity in the company of their emotionally maimed brethren. This peaceable, sequestered community of dorms, located north of the tower, is

the final stop on a residential assistant’s tour of duty. It is also the best place to find gritty tales from the front lines of disaster. “There was duct tape in the center of the floor that went over the microwave and over the fridge, over the blinds, ceiling, over the door and back to the floor again,” said a three-year residential assistant who requested anonymity because of their job status, referring to a noteworthy instance. “And this was before these people had even met.” So why put up with a random dorm assignment in the first place? Considering the extent of roommate misfortune, it is easy to understand why some may not find value in the struggles associated with confined living space. Between the vaporized stench of unwashed clothing and uncomfortable disagreements over who devoured the last Pop-Tart, the silver lining may appear faint at first. Nonetheless, victors and victims of potluck

residency are given the opportunity to develop the quintessential ingredient of any successful relationship: communication. After the honeymoon phase wears off and the realities of dorm life settle in, the patience for early morning door slams and cheesecrusted microwaves vanishes. Even in cases where friends agree to share a dorm ahead of time, cohabitation is not made easier by a prior relationship. Just ask a newlywed couple: Dating and friendship take on a whole new meaning when they involve cleaning a communal toilet. Thankfully, Dr. Phil always knows what to say: “Instead of just complaining, be specific about what it is that you want. No one’s a mind reader, so don’t expect your [roommate] to be able to figure out how you’re feeling.” Whether it’s voicing complaints, establishing rules or making concessions, communicating is a skill that must be honed

DORMS continues on page 8

Check out this video on roommate dynamics: bit.ly/ODjiD3

Pu ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff Jake Hiebert, Plan II Honors freshman, and Kevin Chen, mechanical engineering and computer science junior, are potluck roomates that get along with each other.

The Daily Texan 09-19-12  

The September 19, 2012 edition of The Daily Texan.

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