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THE DAAILY IL TEXAN SPORTS PAGE 6

DT WEEKEND PAGE 8 ‘Don’t you forget about me’

McCoy, Bradford ‘the odd couple’ Friday, August 7, 2009

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UT prepares teachers for Bible classes By Ryan Moore Daily Texan Staff Over four days, UT professors and scholars from the Department of Religious Studies prepared high school teachers to teach a new and controversial addition to the state public school curriculum — the Bible. During the 2007 legislative session, Gov. Rick Perry signed a bill that requires Old Testament and New Testament history and literature to be added to Texas high school curriculum. The legislation states that all school districts must offer a course as an elective for the 2009-2010 school year if more than 15 students show interest. “We can’t impart a particular viewpoint on students, but we

also must acknowledge that other viewpoints exist and respect that,” said L. Michael White, a UT classics research professor. The “Teaching the Bible in Texas Public Schools” Summer Institute was hosted by the religious studies department and designed to give teachers the framework to instruct their students about the Bible in an academic and scholarly context. White, one of the biblical scholars who instructed the class, said the mandate came about without a set curriculum or training for the teachers, so they felt obligated to provide it. Some critics harshly oppose providing a Bible course in public schools, saying that it would

Sotomayor confirmed as Supreme Court justice By Hudson Lockett Daily Texan Staff The U.S. Senate confirmed Sonia Sotomayor as the first Hispanic justice of the Supreme Court on Thursday, although both Texas senators voted against the appointment. The vote for the 111th justice and third woman to serve on the court was 68-31 and largely followed party lines, The Associated Press reported. All but nine of the 40 Senate Republicans voted against her, while Democrats voted unanimously in favor of the appointment. U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., suffering from terminal brain cancer, was the only senator absent, according to the AP. Texas Sens. John Cornyn and Kay Bailey Hutchison voted against the confirmation, both having released statements during and after Sotomayor’s judicial hearings, respectively. “The hearings were an opportunity for Judge Sotomayor, and, ultimately, in my view, a missed opportunity,” Cornyn said in a statement released late last month. “She did not explain her legal reasoning or the constitutional arguments she found persuasive.” Hutchison, in a statement released the next day, said she would oppose the appointment due to concerns about Sotomayor’s position on Second Amendment rights and statements about the role of federal appellate courts in policy making. “Sotomayor’s appointment to the Supreme Court is not going to bring about change at all,” said Cal Jillson, a Southern Methodist University political science professor. “She’s a moderate to liberal justice, and she’s replacing a moderate to liberal justice.” Jillson said that the appointment still leaves the court 5-4 in favor of a conservative vote, and that the pronounced debate in the senate over Sotomayor’s appointment was an effort by Republicans to send a message rather than an effort to successfully oppose her appointment. “What the debate in the Senate was about was Republicans were putting down markers for the next Supreme Court nominee,” Jillson said. “The debate this time was not over whether she would be

JUSTICE continues on page 2

be nearly impossible to keep religious bias out of the classroom. “Clearly, the motivation is religious. It obviously violates the establishment clause,” said UT philosophy professor Sahotra Sarkar. “There is no question this is motivated by religious extremism.” On March 5, the American Civil Liberties Union won a lawsuit that challenged the constitutionality of a Bible course that was taught in a West Texas public school. According to the lawsuit, the course promoted religion, which is something the institute is trying to stop in these new course electives. The institute devoted the first day of the class to First Amendment rights. White stressed that it is essential for the classes to re-

main unbiased and examine the documents in a literary context. “There’s a constitutional issue there, and that’s when lawsuits happen,” White said. Other pitfalls in teaching such a class include upsetting someone who has been taught to interpret the Bible in a certain way according to their tradition, which may not match up with the way it is taught in their class, White said. The summer institute covered nearly the entire bible in less than a week, as well as the legal dangers that teachers and schools face when discussing what is a very personal subject for some people.

BIBLE continues on page 5

Edmarc Hedrick Daily Texan Staff

L. Michael White, UT classics research professor, delivers a biblical lecture to educators from around the state on Thursday.

Performing immigration’s history

Jordan Smothermon | Daily Texan Staff

Taylor Garcia talks with fellow Living Newspaper Project cast members after their last performance on Thursday at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum. Garcia and other cast members wrote their parts and perform them at least three times daily.

‘Living Newspaper Project’ teaches young minds in non-traditional way By Jessica Whitfield Daily Texan Staff In the tradition of the “Living Newspaper Project,” Central Texas middle school and high school students researched and performed the history of immigration at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum on Thursday. During the first week of the five-week program, students toured an immigration exhib-

it and researched contemporary human rights from an immigrant perspective. Throughout the past month, students were challenged to think about how they could tell the story of the exhibit with the knowledge they had gained through their research. After writing scripts, the students rehearsed their performances for tour groups. “An important thing is that

the students are encouraged through the process of doing this research, which is primarily about human rights, to become civically engaged in their communities and their country,” said Tessa Farmer, program director of the project. Farmer said the program is part of the legacy of the living newspaper project which started out as a federal works pro-

Fusion centers draw outcry from local residents Mayor Lee Leffingwell facilitates a City Council meeting Thursday morning.

Edmarc Hedrick | Daily Texan Staff

By Ben Wermund Daily Texan Staff John Bush stood before city council Thursday morning, his face half-hidden behind a red plastic mask. “You’ll have to excuse the mask,” he said, taking his place at the podium. “The whole idea of these fusion centers has me a little paranoid.” Bush was one of several Austin residents — some of whom’s faces were also concealed behind colored plastic — speaking out against the creation of a new Austin fusion center, a place where the police department will collect and monitor information on criminal activity. But the residents were concerned the center will have its eye on more than just criminal activity. Fusion centers, which began popping up across the U.S. with the purpose of preventing terrorism in a post9/11 America, started as a joint effort between Homeland Security and the

Department of Justice to coordinate intelligence between federal agencies and local police forces. The Austin City Council approved a resolution for the use of Homeland Security grants to turn an existing Department of Public Safety building into the new Austin Regional Intelligence Center. The issue will be brought before Austin residents and council again before the fusion center begins operation. The cost of transformation of the building was capped at $200,000. Laura Martin, an American Civil Liberties Union of Texas policy analyst, said already-existing fusion centers across the nation have tracked information beyond just criminal activity. “The ACLU of Texas believes these fusion centers undermine our basic right to privacy,” Martin said.

FUSION continues on page 2

gram of the New Deal. Farmer said the summer program was created to provide students with an experience in conducting research and performing. “The program encourages the students to do a few different things,” Farmer said. “One is to learn materials in a different way because they’re doing things with

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City workers protest new budget proposal Plan would suspend incentive pay, institute furlough program By Ben Wermund Daily Texan Staff Austin city employees gathered on the steps of City Hall on Thursday evening to say “enough is enough” to a budget proposal they feel asks the most loyal of them to shoulder too much of a burden. “They’re really smacking the loyalists the hardest,” said Greg Powell, a local member of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees union which helped organize the protest.

The employees argued against two main points in the proposed city budget: the suspension of incentive pay for city employees and the furlough program, which mandates employees take up to three vacation days without pay and which garnered backlash from council members when City Manager Mark Ott proposed the budget. Many employees said they rely on the incentive pay, which is up to $1,500 given as an annual bonus to employees who have worked for the city for at least five years.

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News

Friday, August 7, 2009

living: Participants research, write, act

Fusion: Privacy a primary

concern about new center

From page 1 their body — they’re creating scripts, they’re doing research, so they do a lot of the things that students need to learn anyway but they’re doing it in a non-traditional way so it fits well with a lot of different learning styles.” Students who participated in the program were trained by graduate students and performance experts from various schools and programs. Rebecca Hewett, UT theater and dance graduate student, said the program is a great way to use theater as an educational tool. “I think it’s a really fantastic way to give students an opportunity to research, write and perform a play that they’ve written themselves,” Hewett said. “It also gets them thinking about contemporary human rights issues in a way that really makes a clear connection on how theater can get students to think in a different way about how to think, write and speak about contemporary political issues.” Natalie Goodnow, a counselor for the project, became involved with the program through Theater Action Now, a nonprofit educational program that travels to Central Texas schools to teach youth about theater and other arts. Goodnow said she was most grateful for the mean-

From page 1

Jordan Smothermon | Daily Texan Staff

Jenny Scouller, Tafari Robertson, Bella Cavello and Freddy Lopez talk after their Living Newspaper Project performance on Thursday afternoon at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum. The students write and arrange their own parts covering the state’s immigration history. ingful conversations she had with the students. “I really enjoyed the opportunities we had for dialogue with the youth — especially informed dialogue,” Goodnow said. “After going through the exhibit and in-

tensively engaging in discussion and doing research, they were able to form their opinions on the issue of immigration in ways that they otherwise wouldn’t.” Austin Garrard, a Westlake High School senior, said that he

Budget: Many workers could lose incentives From page 1 “A lot of people are going to have a bleak Christmas,” said Valerie Davis, a financial services employee of almost 12 years. “A lot of city employees depend on that money to pay for Christmas gifts for their kids.” Powell said the loss of incentive pay is about more than just Christmas bonuses. “Stability pay is based on years of service,” he said. “Two-thirds of city employees get it.”

“They were initially focused on terrorism, but have grown to include not only arrest information, but also credit reports, library records, bank statements and travel records.” She said the fusion centers not only invade privacy, but are also ineffective when trying to solve crimes because of the sheer volume of intelligence they hold. “With so much info on ordinary folks, this creates a needle in a haystack scenario,” she said. “They undermine democracy by chilling free speech.” Jim Stetsman, a local business owner, said the police department does not need to know private information. “What do you want my Randall’s card for? Why do you need to know how much beer I drink?” he said. “This is a camel’s nose under the tent.” Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo said the center will only be used to solve crime, not to monitor residents. “It will only have predicated information that the agencies already have access to,” Acevedo said. “The only difference is, at a local level, there will be an automated process where we can connect the dots.”

Despite Ott being told to take another look at the proposed furlough program by council members, many city employees said they are still not comfortable. “I want to know they are taking it off the table completely,” said Sandra Guerra, an Austin Energy employee of more than 23 years. “I want to know that my stability pay is going to stay on the table. That pay is part of my income — it shows me the city really appreciates me for being dedicat-

ed throughout the good economic times as well as the bad.” Mayor Lee Leffingwell, Councilman Mike Martinez and Councilwoman Randi Shade all spoke to the crowd. “You have shouldered a tremendous burden that will not go unnoticed,” Martinez said. Leffingwell said before he was mayor, he was a member of the union for many years. “I want you to know I’m one of you, and I’m going to be fighting for you,” Leffingwell said.

joined the program after his theater teacher recommended it. “It seemed like a cool thing to do because not only is it theater, but with the immigration theme, it’s theater with an objective,” Garrard said.

NEWS BRIEFLY Statesman no longer for sale after lack of adequate offers The Austin American-Statesman has been taken off the market after the paper was put up for sale last August. Statesman publisher Michael Vivio said the newspaper’s parent company, Cox Enterprises, put the paper on sale along with 28 other newspapers while reassessing their national holdings in response to effects of the economic recession in 2008. He said many of the other papers owned by Cox Enterprises were smaller weekly publications, and most of them have been sold to other media groups. “The Statesman was the largest of the group,” Vivio said. “The executives at our parent company were responsible for taking the paper off the market.” The newspaper was put up for sale following the beginning of the economic downturn, a time when many of the nation’s papers were facing declining profits. Cox Enterprises and Statesman executives decided not to sell the paper because they did not feel other media groups provided adequate offers for the local publication, which is continuing to expand its holdings and circulation. He said despite the difficult economic climate facing the nation, the Austin American-Statesman has been profitable and successful in sustaining its readership. “This past year, we have grown our audience by 5.7 percent,” Vivio said. “We’ve added two com-

munity newspapers, and we launched an iPhone application on Tuesday, so the company is growing in all different ways.” — Syeda Hasan

City contractors hit with nondiscrimination resolution Austin City Council passed a resolution Thursday preventing city contractors from discriminating against employees based on sexual orientation. The resolution, co-sponsored by Councilwoman Laura Morrison and Councilman Bill Spelman, requires a copy of the contractor’s employment non-discrimination policy when applying for city contracting opportunities. It directs City Manager Marc Ott to create a model non-discriminatory policy for city contractor’s to refer to and specifies that any contractor that does not comply with the resolution will lose their contract with the city and risk eligibility for future contracts. “It basically establishes that we have this value to be open,” said Heidi Gerbracht, Spelman’s policy director. “We want contractors to specifically confirm they are including gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals.” Gerbracht said the city will work with contractors to help them develop a compliant nondiscrimination policy. “We’re making it a little more of a proactive thing,” she said. “We’re absolutely willing to work with contractors to help them incorporate the appropriate language.” — Ben Wermund

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He said APD is aware of the problems that have developed at other fusion centers. “We are well aware of the mistakes of the other fusions centers,” Acevedo said. “I share these concerns. It’s kind of like an older brother — we learn form his mistakes. Well, those older fusions centers, we’re going to learn from theirs.” Before council passed the resolution, councilwoman Laura Morrison, who originally proposed the resolution, withdrew her motion and asked to postpone the vote until the matter could be discussed with the community. “I think that what the comments have made clear is that we, as a community, have not finished this conversation,” Morrison said. “There needs to be a broad and inclusive conversation.” The resolution to fund the building passed shortly afterward, with a stipulation that the police department takes measures to ensure the fusion center will have community approval. “I want to vet it out to the public and these folks before we even bring it to [council],” Acevedo said. “The bottom line is, we cannot go operational until you feel comfortable.”

justice: Party

lines decided vote’s outcome From page 1 confirmed, but they articulated a number of themes that they would use next time and that they would require that the next nominee would reflect.” Jillson said that while some efforts were made to vote for Sotomayor based on her qualifications, for the most part, party lines determined the outcome. He said Sen. Kit Bond, R-Missouri, one of the nine who voted in favor of Sotomayor, had done so in hopes of drawing attention to the candidate’s credentials and judicial history. “I think that’s a faint hope,” Jillson said.

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CORRECTIONS The photo in Wednesday’s article “Web site focuses on Texas politics, explores medium” was a file photo and the caption should have read Evan Smith, former Texas Monthly editor, speaks to a crowd during magazine’s 2009 Best Legislators Reception at Scholz Garten on June 18. The pull quote in Thursday’s article “The Mohawk puts Warhol’s ‘Factory’ back into motion” should have read Jon Lerner, resident event planner. The Texan regrets the error.

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World&NatioN

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Friday, August 7, 2009

T he Daily Texan

NATION BRIEFLY New influenza vaccinations could require three shots ATLANTA — Get ready to roll up your sleeve three times for flu shots this fall. Most people will need one shot for the regular seasonal flu and probably two others to protect against the new swine flu. Experts suggest you get that first shot as early as this month — if you can find it. “We’d like to get to Job 1 and get most of it done,” said Dr. William Schaffner, a Vanderbilt University flu expert, referring to seasonal flu vaccinations. “Get it done before we start to tackle Job 2 — the more complex task of swine flu vaccinations,” he added. Health officials say they expect about half of the more than 120 million doses of seasonal vaccine to be available by the end of this month.

Petitions for US worker green cards down sharply DALLAS — The number of petitions from employers trying to bring foreigners to work permanently in the U.S. has declined dramatically over the last two years, an Associated Press review of government data has found. With the nation facing a deep recession and high unemployment, the government has received about half the number of employer-sponsored applications for work-based green cards in fiscal years 2008 and 2009 than it did in each of the previous years. There were almost 235,000 applications submitted in fiscal 2007, almost 104,000 the following year, and fewer than 36,000 through the first eight months of fiscal 2009, according to data obtained by the AP. In addition to the weak job market, long waits for immigrant visa availability and deep job cuts in sectors that have traditionally lured large numbers of applicants have led to the sharp decline, experts say. Compiled from Associated Press reports

Pakistani Taliban chief could be dead By Ishtiaq Mahsud & Zakar Khan The Associated Press ISLAMABAD — U.S. and Pakistani authorities are investigating reports that Pakistani Taliban chief Baitullah Mehsud was killed in an American missile strike, officials from both countries said Friday. If confirmed, Mehsud’s demise would be a major boost to Pakistani and U.S. efforts to eradicate the Taliban and al-Qaida. Mehsud is believed responsible for dozens of suicide attacks, beheadings and target killings in Pakistan. He is allied with al-Qaida and has been suspected in the killing of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. Pakistan views him as its top internal threat and has been preparing an offensive against him. The U.S. sees him as a danger to the war effort in Afghanistan, largely because of the threat he is believed to pose to nucleararmed Pakistan. The missile strike hit the home of Mehsud’s father-in-law in Pakistan’s South Waziristan tribal region early Wednesday. Intelligence officials say Mehsud’s second wife was among at least two people killed, and Mehsud associates have claimed he was not among the dead. Pakistan army spokesman Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas cautioned that the reports of Mehsud’s death are still unconfirmed. “We are receiving reports and probing,” he said. The U.S. government is also looking into the reports, according to a U.S. counterterrorism official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly. The counterterrorism official indicated that the United States did not yet have physical evidence — remains — that would prove who died. But he said there are other ways of determin-

Ishtiaq Mehsud | Associated Press

In this photo taken on Tuesday, Pakistani villagers look at a house belonging to supporters of Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud which was destroyed by authorities in Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan. ing who was killed in the strike. He declined to describe them. For years, the U.S. has considered Mehsud a lesser threat to its interests than some of the other Pakistani Taliban, their Afghan counterparts and al-Qaida, because most of his attacks were focused inside Pakistan, not against U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan. That view appeared to change in recent months as Mehsud’s power grew and concerns mounted that increasing violence in Pakistan could destabilize the U.S. ally and threaten the entire region. In March, the State Department

Edwards’ mistress testifies in court By Alysia Patterson The Associated Press RALEIGH, N.C. — The exmistress of John Edwards spent much of Thursday in a federal courthouse in Raleigh where a grand jury was meeting, at a time when federal investigators are examining the two-time presidential candidate’s finances. Rielle Hunter walked into the building in the morning through a back entrance, holding a young child. She left with the child about nine hours later. Neither Hunter nor her attorney, Michael Critchley, responded to reporters’ questions. Edwards adamantly denied during a confessional interview with ABC News last summer that he had fathered a child with Hunter, and he welcomed a paternity test. His wife, Elizabeth, has said while promoting her book that she doesn’t know if her husband is the father. Former Edwards aide Andrew Young, who made a similar courthouse visit while the grand jury was sitting last month, said in 2007 he was the child’s father.

Jim R. Bounds | Associated Press

Rielle Hunter, center, is escorted into the Terry Sanford Federal Building and Courthouse in Raleigh, N.C., on Thursday. Hunter said around the same time that Young was the father and the birth certificate does not list a father’s name. Hunter ’s attorney, Michael Critchley, said outside the courthouse he did not expect his client to comment when she emerges.

Edwards has admitted to an affair with Hunter that he says ended in 2006. That year, Edwards’ political action committee paid Hunter’s video production firm $100,000 for work. Then the committee paid another $14,086 on April 1, 2007.

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authorized a reward of up to $5 million for the militant chief. And increasingly, American missile strikes — falling by the dozens over the past year — focused on Mehsud-related targets. While Mehsud’s death would be a big blow to the Taliban in Pakistan, he has deputies who could take his place. Whether a new leader could wreak as much havoc in Pakistan as Mehsud could depends largely on how much pressure the Pakistani military continues to put on the Taliban network, especially in South Waziristan. Pakistan’s record is spotty on that front. It has used both mil-

itary action and truces to try to contain Mehsud over the years, but neither tactic seemed to work, despite billions in U.S. aid aimed at helping the Pakistanis tame the tribal areas. Mehsud was not that prominent a militant when the U.S. invaded Afghanistan in 2001 after the Sept. 11 attacks, according to Mahmood Shah, a former security chief for the tribal regions. In fact, Mehsud has struggled against such rivals as Abdullah Mehsud, an Afghan war veteran who had spent time in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay. In June of this year, Pakistan said

it would launch an offensive against Mehsud in South Waziristan. In the weeks that have followed, the army has relied heavily on airstrikes to target areas under Mehsud’s control, but it has never quite gone full-scale with the offensive. Meantime, the missile strikes continued, raising speculation that the U.S. might get him first. Pakistan publicly opposes the missile strikes, saying they anger local tribes and make it harder for the army to operate. Still, many analysts suspect the two countries have a secret deal allowing the strikes.


4 Friday, August 7, 2009

OpiniOn

Editor-in-Chief: Jillian Sheridan Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Jeremy Burchard Roberto Cervantes

T he Daily Texan

GALLERY

VIEWPOINT

Bible in public schools The University’s Department of Religious Studies is hosting a new Bible curriculum instruction course to prepare Texas public school teachers to teach the Old and New Testaments in elective courses across the state. The four-day-long course covers topics such as “the Bible and the First Amendment” and successful methods for teaching the Bible in a historical and literary context. University scholars specializing in the material are leading the sessions in order to ensure the teachers are prepared and knowledgeable enough to foster discussions in the classroom. Kent Richards, executive director of the Society of Biblical Literature, Hebrew Scriptures scholar and a key lecturer for the instruction course, lectured on the First Amendment. He discussed a recent lawsuit in which parents successfully sued the Ector County School Board in Odessa, Texas, after discovering two of its high schools were offering extremely subjective, inaccurate and religiously slanted courses. He noted it is imperative that teachers understand their role is to educate, not to impart religious favoritism. Apparently, Texas’ government didn’t pay much attention to that lawsuit — in 2007, Gov. Perry approved of a bill mandating all public schools must offer an elective course on the Bible, and only the Bible, if 15 or more students express interest. Keeping Texas’ religiously conservative base in mind, it’s fair to assume Perry signed the bill with strict political motives in mind. The bill did not set standards for curricula or qualifications for teachers, almost assuring they will violate the First Amendment. The Texas Legislature didn’t so much approve of a Bible course as it did dozens of inevitable lawsuits. As UT is the only public institution in the state with a religious studies department, UT is an exemplary resource for educating teachers on leading Bible courses. The University’s involvement is the only hope these classes will be anywhere close to constitutional and educational. Because the state didn’t set any specific requirements for teaching the elective, much less provide the additional training essential to keep courses legitimate, UT and the Society of Biblical Literature stepped up to offer their resources. Considering the lack of help from the state and the probability that legal trouble will surround such a controversial course, the University’s voluntary involvement is an absolute necessity. The Daily Texan sat in on a morning lecture to better understand the University’s role in educating teachers and, ultimately, avoiding lawsuits. The session revolved around the first few sentences of the Book of Isaiah. After a few minutes, it became stunningly clear that the teachers, though extremely eager to learn, are unprepared to offer insights on the Bible’s historical and literary contexts. Granted, the Bible is a difficult text to understand, but the teachers struggled with the simple nuances of passages. Of course, as nearly none of the participants have formal experience in teaching the Bible, such a nascent scholarly understanding of the Bible is expected. But these educators, still learning themselves, should not be asked to teach such demanding and potentially controversial courses. Richards compared the Legislature’s Bible-course bill to asking somebody to teach high school art history or math without giving that person having any legitimate art history or math experience. Teachers are certainly familiar with the Bible, and perhaps may know a good deal concerning Scripture — but that doesn’t give them the authority or expertise to lead a course that demands much more than attending Sunday school. The only specific requirement in the bill states “A course under this section shall not endorse, favor, or promote, or disfavor or show hostility toward, any particular religion or nonreligious faith or religious perspective.” But a “religious studies” course designed specifically around the history and influence of one religious text will be far from neutral and impartial to any specific religion — especially in practice. Having University experts instruct public school teachers is a better alternative than simply leaving teachers unprepared and uninformed to handle such an explosive topic. But even with the guidance of biblical scholars, teachers are attempting to learn the entire Bible, teaching methods, constitutional practices and curriculum development, all while placing aside any religious biases for the sake of education — in less than a week. In most classrooms, the elective will quickly devolve into nothing more than a course that politically and religiously polarizes students. Unfortunately, as the school year approaches, it’s not too far-fetched to predict this bill will lead to controversy on the national level. — Jeremy Burchard for the editorial board

Energizing clean energy tion of our clean energy revolution. Furthermore, we need this new program to maintain global competitiveness. Other counRE-ENERGYSE, President Obama’s propos- tries such as China boast 50 percent of their al for catapulting the United States into a clean college graduates have degrees in math and energy future, has recently been shot down by science fields, compared to 15 percent in the the infamous enemy of all innovative initia- U.S., according to the National Academies. We tives, the U.S. Congress. need incentives for would-be graduates to inRE-ENERGYSE, or Regaining our Ener- crease that percentage in order be able to comgy, Science and Engineering Edge, is a high- pete on a global scale. er education program designed to enhance our This country’s past successes depended on math and science curricula and guide science industry, just as China’s current rise to power and engineering students toward a career in depends on industry. If we want to maintain new, clean energy. If it had received funding, our “superpower” status, we must take drastic the program would have potentially prepared measures to improve our concrete industries up to 8,500 new students to enter and lead the and focus less on the abstract capital on Wall clean energy workforce by 2015. Street. Concentrating on enhancing the eduThis would have been cation of the people who are the catalyst needed to bolcapable of improving those ster our slowly deteriorattypes of industries would go ing math and science proa long way in improving the grams throughout the counstability of our economy as try by preparing students to a whole. enter a new field and ensurNew industry means more Furthermore, ing the U.S. is a global comjobs, and more jobs means petitor in the new energy less people unemployed. we need this economy. Nobody in their right mind new program to It is no secret that eduwould speak out against job cation is the key to change creation at a time like this. maintain global in our country, and withWell, except Congress of competitiveness. out the properly trained course. workforce, there will be litDon’t get me wrong, this tle, if any, potential to make would not have been the sildrastic change for a cleaner ver bullet that solved all of energy future. our problems. But it would The nation is finally wakhave set the process in moing up to the need for renewable energy sourc- tion. es — if not for environmental reasons, then for As long as there are students who are interthe simple fact that non-renewable resources ested in a career in clean energy, what is there will eventually run out and become increasing- to lose in fully preparing them to do their ly more expensive on the way. But if we have jobs? no one to continually innovate the industry, all While most opponents would argue govthat clamoring will eventually be silenced. ernment involvement would cost too much People who have already entered the work- money, the money needed for this program is force are changing their fields of study in at- money already budgeted for clean energy. We tempts to solve this problem (and it is because wouldn’t be spending anything outside what of them that we have been able to come as far has already been appropriated. as we have), but imagine if instead of constantThis initiative would have been the investly pumping out our best and brightest as pe- ment required to ensure the industry grows, troleum engineers, we convert some of them but unfortunately Congress voted once again to renewable energy specialists. If we were for mediocre education and, consequently, the able give them a solid education with a viable mediocrity of what could potentially be the career option, then we could use those same next great American venture. bright minds that created our now very sucTigner is a government and communication studies senior cessful dirty energy industry to be the foundaBy Drucilla Tigner Daily Texan Columnist

Misunderstanding feminism now to expect less.” By Mary Lingwall While the entire article is rife with illogical Daily Texan Columnist argumentation and overarching assumptions of Last February, when Chris Brown assaulted his feminism based on stereotypes rather than any girlfriend Rihanna, the media went haywire trying sort of real understanding of the movement, there to decide whom to blame. How much punishment are three fundamental points in desperate need of Brown deserved and how we were supposed to clarification in this single facet of Lopez’s argureact to Rihanna’s “situation” were discussed all ment. over our television and Internet screens. First of all, the stereotype that feminism is about In the past seven months, the situation has only “remaking woman in man’s image” is one of the become an even more popular subject. This week most pervasive misunderstandings about the in particular, every media outlet from The Huff- movement. The feminist movement is not about ington Post to the L.A. Times reported on rumors “remaking” one gender or another, but rather is that Brown would make a second apology this about recognizing and respecting the equality Wednesday night after his scheduled sentencing of both. that afternoon. Secondly, the idea that Lopez refers to about In his first apology, released earlier this summer feminism purporting that men and women, if via YouTube, Brown said that he was sorry for his equal as human beings, are inherently equal re“mistake” and “what happened.” garding physical strength is simply silly. Feminism The conspicuously tight leash that Brown’s is not about denying the biological differences of publicists and/or media advigenders, but is instead about sors kept on him make the apolgranting equal legal protection ogy little more than an exerto both genders despite said cise in vagueness. Brown nevbiological differences. er even says what it is he is And finally, Lopez undercuts apologizing for. a sentiment that I can’t stress Not once does he admit that enough: the confusion of a postThe feminist what he did was abusive. He feminist America. movement is not mentions “domestic violence,” Almost everyone walking but only insofar as to give himaround campus has heard the about “remaking” self a copout. Brown’s sharing word feminist; but when they one gender or with his YouTube audience that hear it, chances are they think he witnessed domestic violence of something insane, irrational another, but while growing up is just smoke and man hating. rather is about and mirrors as far as an apoloThey are confused. gy for his own physical abuse of And Lopez would like to recognizing and a woman. blame the feminist movement respecting the Then again, public apologies itself for that confusion. equality of both. are pretty pointless anyway. But the reality of the situation Brown owes the public far less is that it’s the propaganda like than he owes Rihanna and our Lopez’s article that fuels this justice system. sort of confusion. Lopez paints But leave it to Kathryn Jean Loa picture of feminists according pez at the National Review Onto her own stereotypes and her line to turn this already sad stopersonal inferences about the ry about an abused woman into a plea for Ameri- raw data from a 200-person informal survey. ca to become even more anti-woman. But as the surveyed Boston teenagers pointed The Boston Globe reported on an informal sur- their fingers at Rihanna and Lopez pointed her vey wherein the majority of a 200-person sample finger at feminists, Brown managed to fall below of teenagers responded that they thought Rihanna the radar at last. At the last minute, Brown’s camp was “asking for it.” announced that he would not appear on “Larry According to Lopez’s March 20th article “What King Live” Wednesday night. Feminism Wrought,” all of this — the beating and So, as of today, Brown has not made his televiyoung people’s willingness to take Brown back af- sion apology for abusing his girlfriend. His senterwards — is feminism’s fault. tencing been rescheduled for Aug. 27, as I as“What has happened — and what Rihanna and sume his appearance will be. Let’s see if this Brown have to do with Gloria [Steinem] and us time his publicist will even let him say what he is — is that by inventing oppression where there is apologizing for. none and remaking woman in man’s image, as the But more importantly, I wait with baited breath sexual and feminist revolutions have done, we’ve for the blame game to begin. Because let’s face it, confused everyone,” wrote Lopez. Lopez has got to be correct. The only reason any Lopez finishes her argument with a statement man would ever hit a woman is because of femequally base, “…We’ve so confused ourselves inism, right? Because before feminism became a that now many teenagers in Boston are excusing full-fledged movement in the 1970s, women were Chris Brown. Why wouldn’t they? He and Rihan- never physically abused. na are equal, and we expect no more from men Lingwall is a plan II honors junior — in fact, we’ve conditioned a generation or two

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News

Friday, August 7, 2009

Activists push for a greener East Austin By Syeda Hasan Daily Texan Staff Local activists pleaded for more environmentally friendly policies and practices to boost sustainability in Austin at City Hall on Thursday. The demonstrators were part of the Eco-Change Exchange, a coalition of 40 organizations in Austin seeking to pass environmentally beneficial legislation in several areas including clean energy, water conservation, sustainable food and energy-efficient transportation. Carmen Llanes, a research analyst and community organizer for People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources, said the group would present its policy agenda Thursday afternoon to the City Council as a plan of action to improve sustainability. She said city officials should work to end gentrification, the process of commercial builders buying property in lowincome areas, which raises property taxes and forces East Austin residents out of their homes while increasing harmful emissions. “Gentrification of East Austin continues a legacy of institutionalized racism,� Llanes said. “It is this same system that enables pollution just east of the highway. Relentless developing over environmentally sensitive areas is destroying precious land.� Llanes said industrial factories are disproportionately located in East Austin, and the pollution generated by the buildings harms residents by damaging the area’s environment. She said the Eco-Change Exchange is proposing several solutions to counter East Austin pollution and gentrification which can be easily implemented by city officials. “This plan of action offers a way to bring real justice to our city,� Llanes said. “We are looking to this new City Council to act boldly and to act now, implementing a new day, month day, 2008

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BiBle: Secular

impact of text ‘is important’ From page 1

Edmarc Hedrick | Daily Texan Staff

Susana Almanza, director of People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources, and Reed Sternberg, president of Texas Green Network, gather at a press conference to speak out for environmental changes on Thursday at City Hall. course for Austin and making it a true leader in building a just and sustainable city.� PowerSmack.org publisher Mike Sloan said Austin’s elected officials should make pursuing renewable energy a top priority in the city’s budget. “To do that, there is likely going to have to be a reform in the business model for Austin Energy,� Sloan said. “Currently, our city makes revenue on burning fossil fuels. That ultimately is going to have to change.� Austin Energy spokesman Ed

Clark said the company is taking proactive steps toward sustainability. He said Austin Energy aims to have 35 percent of the city’s energy come from renewable resources by 2020. “It’s one of the highest goals you’ll find among utilities nationwide, and we’re on track to achieve that,� Clark said. “I think that speaks to how we feel about renewables.� He said Austin Energy effectively promotes green energy use as the company has one of the most successful sales programs for re-

newable energy nationwide. “I think that being proactive to design a program that allows you to grow a green power program at a pace that is significant says something about our attitude on sustainability,� Clark said. He said while Austin Energy is pushing for green energy through solar and wind power, it is necessary to have fossil fuels for additional generations be1 cause natural sources may not always be dependable. Brandi Clark, Austin EcoNetwork founder, said the city would

CLASSIFIEDS

benefit from increasing its local food-production programs since growers would not have to travel as far to reach their markets. “Many people don’t think about food when we’re talking about environmental issues, but it’s one of the most critical things that contribute to the health of our community, the environment and the planet,� Clark said. “Food is big business. By making safe, nutritious, locally and sustainably grown food available to all residents, it will help protect our physical and economic health.�

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

There are no special requirements or training necessary to teach one these classes, noted Kent Richards, executive director of the Society of Biblical Literature and one of the institute’s lecturers. He said the Bible could be a valuable tool to help a well-rounded education if taught properly. “This is why it’s important to have an 11th and 12th grade bible course to get them to understand the wonderful dynamic between people, cultures and religions in the past,� Richards said in the class on Thursday. Brant Bird said he enjoyed the summer classes and said they would be very helpful for the class he will be teaching in the upcoming year for the Pleasanton Independent School District. He said he could see some people becoming upset but is not worried since the Legislature backs the courses. “It’s important. I think the Bible has had influence over so many things in our world today in a non-religious way — like art, movies, literature� Bird said, “It’s the most-sold book; seeing it in a non-religious way is important.� The instructors said they hope the class will give the teachers a suitable foundation to competently teach students about the texts without infringing on students’ religious beliefs. “We’re not trying to make them biblical scholars,� Richards said. “We’re trying to help them become intellectually responsible.�

3B

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6A SPTS

SportS

6

Friday, August 7, 2009

Sports Editor: Austin Talbert E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T he Daily Texan

The Associated Press

By Austin Talbert Daily Texan Staff The odd couple — Colt McCoy and Sam Bradford. Not that they don’t have anything in common, but it is hard being friends as the starting quarterbacks for Texas and Oklahoma. “We have a lot in common,” McCoy said. “We both went to small schools, played every sport, weren’t heavily recruited. We both went to the big state schools we grew up watching.” Now, they are two of the biggest names in college football, leading each other on a collision course for the Big 12 Championship. Emerging from similar backgrounds, the two quarterbacks have followed similar paths to stardom, both exploding with huge years last season when they finished as the top-two in Heisman voting. The closer the two get — a tie in the Big 12 South standings, hundredths of points separating their two teams in the BCS poll, the Heisman voting — the tighter their friendship becomes. “If you would have told me five years ago that I would become friends with the quarterback at Texas, I would say, ‘That is strange,’” Bradford said. While the hatred continually boils between their respective fan bases, Bradford and McCoy, who are the faces of Oklahoma and Texas football, have built a stronger bond. “From a fan’s perspective, they are thinking, ‘What in the world are they doing? They can’t be friends,’” McCoy said. They both know it is weird, it is bizarre, it is flat-out wrong. McCoy and Bradford buddying-up is like Khrushchev and Kennedy kidding around,

Jefferson and Hamilton chumming it up, the Hatfields and the McCoys (no relation to Colt) meeting for a nice picnic together. But while their connection may defy the rules of college football physics, the two similar quarterbacks have nonetheless become friends as they follow strikingly similar paths. This summer, while both were preparing to win a Big 12 title and compete for a national championship, both worked as counselors at the Manning Passing Academy in Louisiana where they were randomly assigned as roommates.

‘‘

If you would have told me five years ago that I would become friends with the quarterback at Texas, I would say, ‘That is strange.’” — Sam Bradford, Oklahoma quarterback

Before the teeming throngs of future quarterback campers arrived, two other highly successful quarterbacks, Peyton and Eli Manning, led McCoy and Bradford through passing drills. “We got to work with Peyton and Eli, it was really good to go through that and get to pick their brains,” Bradford said. At the camp, Bradford said the 7-on-7 team he coached went undefeated. “He didn’t tell you he was coaching the four-and five-yearolds?” McCoy joked. “My team wasn’t very good. The only game we won was rock-paper-scissors at the end.” Whichever account you believe, the roommates enjoyed their time together at the camp. After long days of coaching future quarterbacks, the two even found a little time to talk football. “We did [talk football] sometimes at night,” Bradford said. “I would ask him questions, what he looked for in defenses, what he would do, but we kept it to a minimum.” McCoy was a bit more guarded with the recounting of their summer nights in the bayou. “We talked a little bit,” McCoy said. “Talked about fishing, a lot of outside stuff, but not too much about football.”

Not that they didn’t want to stay up talking all night. The quarterbacks were just too tired after a long day of work in the summer heat. “At the Manning camp, they work you to death,” McCoy said. The way the two rivals describe each other would make the other blush. “Colt has all the tools to be a tremendous quarterback,” Bradford described McCoy. “Fast with his feet. When he doesn’t have time, he can make something, and when he does, he can pick you apart. Bradford continued his praise of the Texas quarterback. “I feel like if I could run and use my feet like [McCoy] does I would be a better player,” Bradford said. “He is able to create something from nothing.” While McCoy isn’t ready to give up his feet to Bradford, he does envy the Sooner slinger’s presence on the field. “Sam is a great quarterback,” McCoy said. “He does a great job faking, he doesn’t make mistakes, knows where he is going all the time.” Both in their final collegiate seasons, the two friends are pushing for the same goal, though only one can win. A Saturday date in October will give the quarterbacks an opportunity to do what they really love to do — compete. “We have a great friendship,” McCoy said. “I don’t think that will change.”

Caleb Miller | Daily Texan file photo

Rivalry makes for odd bedfellows

Sooners aim for another Big 12 title with Bradford back Team name: Oklahoma Sooners Head coach: Bob Stoops Conference: Big 12 2008 record: 12-2

No. 3

Key players: • Sam Bradford — Junior — QB 2008: 180.84 rating, 4,720 YDS passing, 50 TDs Reigning Heisman Trophy winner – what else needs to be said? Excellent pocket passer who will be playing even smarter after another year under his belt and an offseason watching film. • Jermaine Gresham — Senior — TE 2008: 66 receptions, 950 yards, 14 TDs A first-team All-American that turned down the NFL for another shot at a national title. The John Mackey Award finalist in ’08 is on the watch list again at the start of the 2009 season. Game to watch: October 17 vs. Texas in Dallas This game will likely determine who wins the Big 12 South, the Big 12 Conference and who will play in the national championship. Blood will be boiling in this grudge match between bitter rivals — especially after the way last season panned out. The word on Oklahoma: If Bradford can have the same type of protection as he had last season, OU should be just fine. Oklahoma always has a wealth of talent that helps it never miss a beat from one season to the next. If they can improve their defense, the Sooners will be virtually unstoppable.

By Chris Tavarez Daily Texan Staff Oklahoma’s season got a lot better when Sam Bradford announced that he would be coming back in 2009, and that he was able to convince DeMarco Murray and Jermaine Gresham to do the same. With the return of one of the best trios in college football came the return of OU as one of the best teams in the nation. With the reigning Heisman Trophy winner at the helm, Oklahoma should put up Madden-like numbers on offense yet again. Last season, the Sooners set an NCAA record with five-straight 60-point games in a row. Bradford ranked in the top three in the nation in quarterback rating (first), passing yards (third) and touchdowns (first). Helping Bradford achieve those numbers was an offensive line that an army would have a hard time penetrating, but for the 2009 campaign, OU will only have one of those brick walls back, Trent Williams. And therein lies Oklahoma’s only weakness. From an offensive line that allowed only 11 sacks — the third best in the nation — Williams is the only returning starter. In an attempt to protect Bradford’s blind side, head coach Bob Stoops moved Williams from right tackle to the left side, placing the only veteran in the most important spot on the line. Aside from that one and only problem spot, the offense is loaded. Gresham, who is on the John Mackey watch list for best tight end in the country and

One call could save you hundreds. Do the math. • • • • • •

The Associated Press

Jermaine Gresham, right, will be one of Bradford’s top looks in 2009 with the departure of receiver Juaquin Iglesias. was an All-American last year, hauled in 66 receptions for 950 yards and 14 touchdowns and should be one of Bradford’s go-to guys with stand-out receiver Juaquin Iglesias gone. And helping to keep defenses honest will be Murray, an All-Big 12 first team running back in 2008. Last year, Murray was one of the team’s leading rushers and the leading kick returner who could also serve as a receiver out of the backfield. On the defensive side of the ball, OU

must replace its two safeties, but with a squad that ranked in the bottom half in the nation in total defense last year, they aren’t missing much. If Oklahoma wants to buck its recent trend of losing in a BCS game in January, it will have to step up their defensive play. Fortunately for the Sooners, they have time on their side. Playing in a league that hasn’t put much value on defense recently — Texas was the only Big 12 squad in the top 50 in team defense last season— they can hone their defensive skills in the best of-

Texas volleyball pegged as No. 2

Joe Buglewicz | Daily Texan file photo

Destinee Hooker, last year’s female Big 12 Athlete of the Year, will return as a part of the Longhorns’ second-ranked volleyball squad.

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fensive conference in the nation before they have to face whoever it is they will play in their bowl game. OU did a good job putting some big names on its out-of-conference schedule. The Sooners open the season in the new Cowboys Stadium against BYU, a perennial non-BCS powerhouse that will provide some decent competition and a gauge of how good this OU squad will be. After that, the Sooners head south to Miami to face off against the Hurricanes, a team that’s down but on the rise. The game should help to give OU some extra points with its strength of schedule. But without a doubt the Sooners’ biggest test will come again in the Cotton Bowl against their rivals from the across the Red River. If the Sooners can get by a Texas team that has beaten them three times in the past four years, they should be able to win the Big 12 and head straight to the national championship. But if they lose to the Longhorns, their season finale against Oklahoma State could be the key to it all. Last year, OU went into Stillwater and put up another 60-point game and pulled away from the Cowboys late in the contest. This year though, Oklahoma State must travel to Norman where the Sooners have been virtually unbeatable in recent years. So if Texas beats OU, Oklahoma State beats Texas and the Sooners beat the Cowboys, it could be last season all over again, with the final answer coming with the final BCS poll.

The Longhorn volleyball team is the No. 2 squad in the nation, according to the preseason poll released by Volleyball Magazine on Thursday. Texas finished 29-4 last season and made it all the way to the NCAA semifinals before falling to Stanford, which finished 2008 as the country’s second best. The Cardinal enter this season as the fifth-ranked team in the nation, while last year’s national champ, Penn State, retains its No. 1 ranking for 2009. Nebraska and Washington complete the poll’s top five. This season, the Longhorns will face four teams ranked in Volleyball Magazine’s top 20 poll during the out-of-conference season. They will also play Nebraska and 11th-ranked Iowa State twice each in Big 12 competition. — Will Anderson

NORMAN, Okla. — Two Sooners are among the 15 players around the nation on the preseason watch list for the Ted Hendricks Award presented each year to the nation’s top college defensive end, Oklahoma announced Thursday. Jeremy Beal and Auston English are among those the judges will keep track of as the season progresses, according to a news release. Beal started all 14 games last season, logging 61 tackles, 15.5 tackles for lost yardage and 8.5 sacks. English played in 11 games last season, with nine starts. He sustained a sprained knee in the 10th game (Nebraska) of the season and saw a reduction in playing time. He still finished with 33 tackles, nine tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks, a recovered fumble and one pass broken up.

A&M requests review of Structures LLC facility DALLAS — Texas A&M University has requested an inde-

pendent safety analysis of the school’s massive new athletic center, a steel and fabric structure that was built by the same company that erected the collapsed Dallas Cowboys indoor practice facility. Texas A&M interim president R. Bowen Loftin ordered the independent analysis on Monday, and the university is now in the process of identifying a firm qualified to do the job, according to an e-mail sent to The Associated Press Wednesday by a university spokesman. The spokesman, Jason Cook, wrote that the building on the school’s College Station campus meets university construction standards and has withstood previous weather events. However, an independent evaluation is warranted, he wrote, “to ensure the ongoing safety of our student-athletes, coaches and guests.” The Texas A&M building is one of the largest built by Summit Structures LLC of Allentown, Pa. The 191,000-square-foot McFerrin Athletic Center at Texas A&M houses both an indoor football practice facility and a track. It was completed last year at a cost of $35.6 million. Compiled from Associated Press reports


7

COMICS

Friday, August 7, 2009

POKER: Lonestar Poker brings out top area competitors From page 8

Shelley Neuman | Daily Texan Staff

Members of the Lonestar Poker League play in a tournament at the Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tomato Pizza Company on Tuesday evening.

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local Lonestar Poker games. The league is ages 18 and up to join and play, but depending on the venue, you may have to be 21 to get in the door. Being the whip-cracker responsible for raising the blinds (increasing the minimum bet to play a hand) every 15 minutes is a tough job. Coincidentally, 15 minutes is also the average speed it takes the good-natured host to polish off a pint of Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #4. With local leagues popping up all across the country and the world, Lonestar Poker is our home grown felt field for Hill Country competition.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are very prominent poker leagues all across the states, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making their way down here,â&#x20AC;? said league founder Cameron Keel, bringing me up to speed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the name of the game is Texas Holdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;em.â&#x20AC;? This is, after all, the capital of Texas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We may as well show the rest of the country how this game is played,â&#x20AC;? said Don Spencer, the leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief of operations and referee for the Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tomato competitions on Tuesday and Thursday nights. Lonestar Poker hosts its games with a level of family comfort I have only found in games at friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homes in warm garages with the ticking of an old beer-

filled fridge. Not having played a live game in years (all hail to the hermitage of online poker), I was slightly concerned with the socially caustic repercussions poker is known to have for those who flub at the table. I did make a few mistakes, such as my turning over a burn card (a discarded card that no one at the table should see) when it was my turn as dealer. Noticing my error the split second it happened, one of the bigger faux pas in poker, I prepared to make apologies and excuse myself from the table before a shouting match could start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK man,â&#x20AC;? the players to my left and right quickly said in unison. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make sure everyone

at the table has a chance to see it, since it came out, then turn it back over and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get back to the rest of the deal.â&#x20AC;? When I looked into every face at the table to confirm they had taken note of the card, I was surprised. Sure I had goofed, and at the break I would probably get razzed a little in good fun, but everyone was there to have a good time and no one was going to let me slow them down, or lose out on the fun myself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great game,â&#x20AC;? Spencer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been a poker player for over 20 years and it never gets old.â&#x20AC;? Locations, times and additional information about Lonestar Poker available at lonestarpoker.net.

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The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 500 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, August 07, 2009

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30 Office bldg. division 33 Hot stuff 34 Half a 1980s TV duo 35 One might stand in a chamber of horrors 37 Calligraphy, some say 39 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joy to the Worldâ&#x20AC;? penner Hoyt ___ 40 Army of the Potomac commander 42 They may get waived: Abbr. 43 What you may experience when going around the world? 44 Muhammad Ali cornerman Dundee 46 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Unanswered Questionâ&#x20AC;? composer, 1908 47 Alternative to Genuine Draft

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8A ENT

WEEKEND DT

8

Friday, August 7, 2009

Life&Arts Editor: Leigh Patterson E-mail: lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

When I was in ninth grade, my social studies class convinced our substitute teacher to let us watch “The Breakfast Club” during first period. Like any in-class movie, no one was really paying attention, but when the term “hot beef injection” rang out, unedited, from our corner-mounted television, the class erupted into pure anarchy. As we brazenly repeated John Bender’s sexual taunt to each other, I felt like, this time, we had really gotten away with something subversive. — Brad Barry Illustration by Carolynn Calabrese | Daily Texan Staff

SIXTEEN CANDLES

THE B R E A K FAST CLUB

T HE DAILY TEXAN

Illustration by Rachel Weiss | Daily Texan Staff

I spent the greater part of my adolescence having a crush on Jake Ryan, the heartthrob boy of Molly Ringwald’s dreams in “Sixteen Candles” (Something about Jake’s knit sweater vest and perfectly groomed hair was so appealing). Regardless of what you think about ‘80s teen movies, there’s no denying that the scene at the end, when Ringwald walks outside to see Jake waiting for her by his car, is the most romantic thing ever. At least it is when you’re 15. — Leigh Patterson

FERRIS BUELLER’S D AY O F F

Matthew Broderick’s Ferris Bueller is the James Dean of our generation — even if he is goofy and flustered. He still treats life with wild abandon, and he has all the things I wanted when I was younger — a totally gnarly bedroom, a gorgeous girlfriend and a morose-but-loyal best friend. Growing up, I looked up to John Hughes’ portrayal of the reckless teenager, and even now, I find myself wondering, “What would it be like to sing ‘Twist and Shout’ on a parade float in downtown Chicago?” — Francisco Marin Illustration by Rachel Weiss | Daily Texan Staff

HOME A LO N E

john hughes The Daily Texan Staff John Hughes, the writer and director of iconic teen movies of the 80s and 90s such as “The Breakfast Club,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” and “Pretty in Pink,” died Thursday in New York City. Hughes, 59, died of a heart attack during a morning walk, according to the Associated Press. John Hughes’ most famous films idealized snapshots of suburban teenage life and often featured the same cast ensemble of young stars of the time like Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall. Among other titles in his massive filmography, he also wrote the script to “Home Alone,” the phenomenally popular film starring Macaulay Culkin and produced movies as widespread as “Uncle Buck” and “101 Dalmations.” To honor John Hughes’ life, here are our memories of him — depicted in favorite scenes, associations and ways the director, writer and producer affected our lives.

The Associated Press

This 1984 file photo shows director John Hughes. Hughes is the man who wrote “National Lampoon’s Vacation,” “Mr. Mom” and “National Lampoon’s European Vacation.” Hughes, who was 59, died in New York on Thursday. The most beautiful thing about “Uncle Buck” is that, for so many children, John Candy was that silly, portly uncle, everyone should have. Only he lived on the Silver Screen and not in Illinois. That big, red face, those crazy eyes — everyone in poor ol’ Buck’s family resented him, but everyone in the audience knew he was the coolest uncle on the planet. The audience welcomed his antics, because they were hilariously embarrassing. But even bigger than the man was the heart — a heart that was anything but embarrassing. — Ben Wermund

MOVIE REVIEW

A long, slow journey for ‘A Perfect Getaway’

By Robert Doty Daily Texan Staff It’s often said that novels must have a good beginning and films must have a good ending. David Twohy, writer and director, takes this maxim too much to heart in “A Perfect Getaway.” Despite the frenzied, spine-tingling finale, the film goes almost nowhere for the better part of the running time. The first two-thirds trudge along with the perfunctory spooks and mild character development found in any thriller without ever establishing any true tension. Cliff (Steve Zahn) and Cydney (Milla Jovovich) take the lead as newlyweds hiking through Hawaii when they hear that another newlywed coupled has been murdered. The authorities suspect a man and a woman working together, so when the couple meets Nick (Timothy Olyphant) and Gina (Kiele Sanchez), their first thoughts are the same as ours. Toss into the mix Chris Hemsworth and Marley Shelton as the unstable couple Kale

Courtesy of Davis Entertainment

Milla Jovovich in Universal Pictures’ “A Perfect Getaway.” Jovovich stars alongside Steve Zahn, Timothy Olyphant and Kiele Sanchez. and Cleo, and we’ve got our pick as to whodunnit. The problem here isn’t the barebones setup but the utter lack of tension. Sure, each character does weird things and has their “Do you sympathize with me now?” moment, but when Nick talks about

a plate in his head or Gina slaughters a goat, we see these moments for what they are. With so many strands thrown in this and that direction, all the audience can do is wait for the twist, never really investing in whatever weird possibility pops up next.

But once the movie hits its final turn, it kicks off a fevered finish that makes up for the somewhat slow beginning. Oddly enough, it’s not the twist that makes it so exciting but the action that follows. Finally stripped of the burden of keeping his twist a secret, Twohy lets the B-movie humor, thrills and gore out to play. It’s easy to tell that this is what he was waiting for all along and the audience feels that joy. Every character pulls through to a fitting end and you almost forget that you spent the better part of an hour waiting for it. It’s understandable since Twohy’s twist makes the pre-twist portion structurally difficult to manage, but there must have been a better way to keep the audience’s attention at the beginning. Nonetheless, the saying proved itself right. I exited the theater having enjoyed myself thoroughly despite the slow beginnings. And there’s not much else I can ask for.

UNCLE BUCK

I was terrified of the premise of “Home Alone” — a kid who ends up being forgotten by his family before the era where every child has a cell phone. Instead of finding Culkin’s antics amusing, I’m pretty sure the movie left me with chronic anxiety about being left behind, and for years afterward my imagination was consumed with cunning escape scenarios should the same thing happen to me. — Audrey Campbell Illustration by Edgar Vega | Daily Texan Staff

IN MEMORIUM

Illustration by Edgar Vega | Daily Texan Staff

Tournament tests who has best ‘poker face’ By Joseph Bassi Daily Texan Columnist You know the feeling: the Texas Hold‘em twinge of primal hunger that tightens your eyes when you catch a three of a kind on the turn, and the predatory grin that pulls your heartbeat into your ears as you stalk the green felt table for unattended chips. “You’ve got that three of a kind don’t you,” my opponent correctly assumes, searching for a reason to call my stack of chips. Pink Floyd washes over the bundles of poker chip-hungry nerves at our table in the Rockin’ Tomato, a pizza joint on South Lamar Boulevard. I slip, and the left corner of my

mouth hooks upward. I slowly tap my chips together in the time-honored poker mantra to relax the tell. With the top-10 point leaders in Austin gathering for the Tournament of Champions on Saturday, the four-table competition resonates with competitive daydreams and chipguarding anticipation. L o n e s t a r P o k e r, f o u n d ed in 2006, sets up games all over town all week long. The league runs on a point system, and awards gift certificates and cash prizes to the winners of every nightly game. It costs nothing to play in these

POKER continues on page 7

Weekend Picks By Leigh Patterson & Brad Barry Daily Texan Staff

Method Man, Redman, Ghostface Killah

Public School Art Show and Tell

Ghostface Killah and Method Man were part of the aforementioned groundbreaking hip-hop supergroup and are arguably the most commercially successful of the original nine. Though Redman was never in the group, he and Method Man have a history of putting out amazing music and some not-so-amazing television (does anyone remember FOX’s “Method & Red?”). This motley trio is comprised of three of the best rappers of the past decade.

Public School is a studio space for a set of young, local photographers, illustrators and designers. Even though the eight artists at the studio have unique styles and specialize in different mediums, the group’s work shares a refreshingly sharp aesthetic. Saturday night is the opening of a monthlong showing of their creations at Thunderbird Coffee. All of the artists will be on hand to offer prints, shirts and $1 beers.

WHERE: Emo’s, outside WHEN: Sunday, doors open at 9 p.m. TICKETS: $23 in advance, $25 at the door

WHERE: Thunderbird Coffee (1401 W. Koenig Ln.) WHEN: Saturday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Free Press Summer Music Fest Normally, we would never, ever advise this, but seriously: Go to Houston this weekend. Saturday and Sunday at the first Free Press Music Fest, you can see for $16 Broken Social Scene, Of Montreal, Voxtrot and Explosions In the Sky, just to name a few on the FPMF lineup. Plus, event planners promise to have free water for patrons braving the 100+ degree weather. Dare we say it, ACL has some competition.

WHERE: Eleanor Tinsley Park, Houston WHEN: Saturday and Sunday TICKETS: $10 for one day, $16 for the entire weekend

MORE INFO: freepresssummerfest.com

The World’s Best Commercials! at the Alamo Drafthouse Watching two hours of straight commercials sounds like the worst idea ever — unless you’re at the Alamo Drafthouse, in which case we wholeheartedly endorse it. Featuring more than 140 commercials, the night includes the Drafthouse’s favorites from its ever-increasing stack of really obscure footage. From Estonian musical homages to panty hose to those bizarre ‘90s ads David Lynch made for Alka-Seltzer, it’s just like those times when you watched YouTube videos all night. Except better.

WHERE: The Alamo Downtown (320 E. Sixth St.) WHEN: Sunday at 10:10 p.m. TICKETS: $8.50 MORE INFO: originalalamo.com


08-07-09