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TRANSPORTATION: Students, teachers commute to class, p. 3

FOOTBALL: Tigers aim for balance, p. 7

Reveille The Daily

www.lsureveille.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 • Volume 117, Issue 18

BOMB’S AWAY

Bomb threat causes traffic and frustration Staff Reports

Exams, classes and meetings usually crowd the minds of University students on Monday mornings, but traffic, a closed campus and uncertainty replaced routine this week after a bomb was reported on campus. An emergency text message informing students, faculty and staff of a reported bomb on campus and ordering an immediate evacuation lit up phones at 11:32 a.m. on Monday. But an explosive was never found, according to Capt. Cory Lalonde, LSU Police Department spokesman. It wasn’t until around 11 p.m. that campus was deemed safe to return to normal operations and reopened to all students, faculty and staff.

The investigation is still ongoing, but no new information was available as of Tuesday, Lalonde said. The original threat was reported to the East Baton Rouge Parish 911 Call Center. Students began pouring out of classes, and while some were able to get away quickly, many were stuck in a campus-wide traffic gridlock. Many faulted the initial text message as being too ambiguous about whether buildings or the entire campus should be evacuated. As University personnel and students left, confusion ensued, according to business management sophomore Jessie Cline. “I sat down to eat lunch and within five minutes there were tons of students and cars BOMB THREAT, see page 6

Bomb effects could vary depending on motives Chris Grillot Staff Writer

CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

Louisiana Emergency Services unit’s bomb squad searches Evangeline Hall on Monday after the bomb scare.

Though no explosive devices were found in Monday’s bomb threat, the damage and loss of life could have varied significantly had the threat been real, according to Rick Blackwood, retired Navy captain and retired University English professor. Blackwood, who was an intelligence officer with the Navy SEALs and

director of intelligence for the Department of Defense, said in an email the damage would depend on “the motive or goal of the bomber; his skill as a bomb maker; his tactical anticipation as to what would be happening near the site of the explosion, that is, who or what was nearby at the instant of detonation.” He added that the loss of life would depend upon “how well the bomb BOMB EFFECTS, see page 6

ENROLLMENT

University brings in biggest freshman class yet Chris Grillot Staff Writer

Despite increased tuition costs ,the University reeled in its biggest freshman class since it added admission standards in 1988. The class comprises 5,725 new students, according to the Office of Budget and Planning. The previous largest freshman class had 5,700 students in 2004. In fall 2011, there were 5,290 new freshmen. The University’s total enrollment this year is 29,549 — ­ 2 percent more than the 28,985

students enrolled last fall. The University expected only a 200-student increase for the fall, but wound up with 564 more. Undergraduate enrollment increased by about 3 percent, going from 23,980 in 2011 to 24,641 in 2012. In July, the University announced a 10 percent in-state tuition increase and a 15 percent out-of-state tuition increase. Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management David Kurpius said interest in the University is growing although tuition has increased. “The interest in LSU has

never been higher and even with recent tuition increases, LSU remains an affordable option for students to earn a nationally recognized degree,” he said. Since the University has a larger freshman class than usual, and students are paying increased tuition, the extra money is plugging a $33.5 million budget deficit. Interim System President and Chancellor William “Bill” Jenkins said in a statement the University will strive to provide the best educational services it can. ENROLLMENT, see page 6

graphic by BRITTANY GAY / The Daily Reveille


The Daily Reveille

page 2

INTERNATIONAL Kate Middleton topless photos ruling: first battle in privacy war LONDON (AP) — Prince William and Kate Middleton’s aggressive legal strategy over topless photos of Britain’s likely future queen is the first salvo in what could be a decades-long tug-of-war over their family’s privacy. A French court ruled in favor of the royal couple on Tuesday in their fight over the photos, but the scope of that ruling will be limited. The unauthorized topless photos of Kate have already been widely published in France, Italy, Ireland and on the Internet. YouTube blocked in Saudi Arabia to stop viewing of anti-Islam film RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — YouTube said Tuesday that it was stopping users in Saudi Arabia from viewing an anti-Islam video that has sparked protests across the Muslim world, after the kingdom’s press agency reported that the ruler had banned all access to the film and the site appeared to be blocked there. The online video sharing site said that it was preventing “Innocence of Muslims” from being seen on its site in Saudi Arabia after being notified by the government there that the clip is breaking the country’s laws.

Nation & World

RICK RYCROFT / The Associated Press

Britain’s Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, smiles as she and Prince William prepare to depart Honiara, Solomon Islands on Tuesday.

South African miners sign wage deal, ending violent five-week strike MOOINOOI, South Africa (AP) — Striking platinum miners in South Africa have signed a wage deal ending a bloody five-week strike at the Lonmin PLC mine that had spread to the gold and chrome sectors of the industry, which anchors the economy of Africa’s richest economy. The agreement ends a strike with political and economic repercussions, but does not resolve rage engendered by the country’s huge inequality and the government’s failure to address massive unemployment and poverty.

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

NATIONAL

STATE/LOCAL

Chicago teachers vote to return to classroom after week on strike

Department of Environmental Quality fines company over leaks during Isaac

CHICAGO (AP) — The city’s teachers agreed Tuesday to return to the classroom after more than a week on the picket lines, ending a spiteful stalemate with Mayor Rahm Emanuel that put teacher evaluations and job security at the center of a national debate about the future of public education. Union delegates voted overwhelmingly to formally suspend the strike after discussing details of a proposed contract settlement worked out over the weekend. Classes were to resume Wednesday. Advocacy group: More than half of residents in 39 states will be obese

(AP) — State regulators say they are issuing a $12,189 fine against a chemical terminal flooded during Hurricane Isaac because it did not notify authorities fast enough about chemical releases. On Tuesday, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality said it issued the fine against Stolthaven New Orleans LLC, a company that operates a chemical terminal along the Mississippi River in Plaquemines Parish. DEQ says the chemicals — 1-octene and ethyl acrylate — leaked out on Aug. 30 but that the company told DEQ about it on Sept. 1.

NEW YORK (AP) — We Americans already know how fat we are. Can it get much worse? Apparently, yes, according to an advocacy group that predicts that by 2030 more than half the people in the vast majority of states will be obese. Mississippi is expected to retain its crown as the fattest state in the nation for at least two more decades. The report predicts 67 percent of that state’s adults will be obese by 2030; that would be an astounding increase from Mississippi’s current 35 percent obesity rate.

M. SPENCER GREEN / The Associated Press

Teachers picket outside Morgan Park High School in Chicago on Tuesday as a strike by the Chicago Teachers Union continues into its second week.

Stowaway cat back in Ohio after sneaking into owner’s luggage

Mandeville man pleads guilty, gets five years for “Ponzi scheme”

CIRCLEVILLE, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio woman says the pet cat that sneaked into her luggage for a flight to Florida has returned home safely and seems relatively unaffected by his surprise vacation in Orlando. Ethel Maze said that Bob-Bob the stowaway spent 10 hours in a suitcase before she opened it last week. She says he was lethargic and wet from perspiration, and she initially thought he’d died. Eventually he perked up, and he spent the week in a crate at Maze’s hotel.

COVINGTON (AP) — A Mandeville man who pleaded guilty to what prosecutors call a Ponzi scheme has been sentenced to five years in prison. Hugo Urrea pleaded guilty to securities fraud, felony theft and money laundering charges. The Attorney General’s Office says Urrea wasn’t a licensed securities dealer but lured acquaintances into investing money with him. Prosecutors say he deposited the money in his bank accounts and used it for personal expenses.

Weather

PHOTO OF THE DAY

TODAY Sunny

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84 59 SATURDAY AUSTIN BENNETT / The Daily Reveille

A crab spider spins its web Sunday by the University Lakes. Submit your photo of the day to photo@lsureveille.com.

CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS The Daily Reveille holds accuracy and objectivity at the highest priority and wants to reassure the reporting and content of the paper meets these standards. This space is reserved to recognize and correct any mistakes which may have been printed in The Daily Reveille. If you would like something corrected or clarified please contact the editor at (225) 578-4811 or email editor@lsureveille.com.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

TRANSPORTATION

The Daily Reveille

Many students, professors commute long distances with French instructor Amanda LaFleur. “The good thing about the commute is that we don’t have to go through Baton Rouge,” DiBen Wallace etz said. “The only time we have trouble is when there’s a bad acSenior Contributing Writer cident.” Biology professor Adam Blake Broussard works a part-time job, owns a house, Hrincevich, however, does travel raises a 19-month-old daughter through Baton Rouge, and he’s and drives at least 45 minutes to been commuting full-time from New Orleans for about five years. school most mornings. Hrincevich said he spends But like many students and teachers who commute to school about $600 a month on gas nowfrom places like Lafayette, St. adays, but it’s still considerably Francisville and New Orleans, he less than the $1,000 a month he doesn’t mind it too much, and he used to pay to rent a spare apartment in Baton Rouge. likes where he lives. “I don’t mind the drive, it’s “With traffic, I always leave about an hour-10 before my class actually therapeutic,” he said, starts,” said Broussard, a history adding that the other drivers can junior who lives in Gonzales but sometimes entertain him as much commutes to Baton Rouge every as anything else. “You see people putting on day for work and school. He, like many commuters, makeup, reading books, eating, listens to the radio during the foot driving — you really have to road trip. But even two of his fa- be a defensive driver to deal with that,” he said. vorite radio hosts, Although Mike Greenberg ‘In an ideal world, we’d he said he loves and Mike Golic have a train or a bus. LSU, Hrincevof ESPN’s Mike & Mike in the But unfortunately, we ich doesn’t see ever Morning, can’t don’t live in an ideal himself moving permaalways make it nently from New smooth sailing. world.’ Orleans, which “It’s definitehe described as ly monotonous,” Maribel Dietz “a much more he said, “You can History Professor culturally stimukind of zone out and just wake up when you find lating town…unlike any other place.” a parking spot.” Kathrin McLean, a wildHistory professor Maribel Dietz, who has worked at the life ecology senior, wakes University for about 15 years, up around 6:15 a.m. to make said she moved from Baton it on time for her 7:30 class Rouge to Lafayette about eight from St. Francisville. “[My parents and I] found years ago, switching commuting roles with her husband, who serves as the dean of the liberal arts college at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. Dietz usually finds carpooling buddies to lighten the load of an hourlong commute at least three days a week. This semester she splits driving duties

Cost of gas often worth the price

that between how much it would cost for me to have an apartment compared to the gas prices, that it’d end up being cheaper for me to just deal with the gas,” McLean said. Other students also reported that the savings from living at home more than compensate for the cost of gas, despite the average cost per gallon of regular gasoline rising to $3.66 for the Gulf Coast region, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some students try to schedule classes so that they only have to drive in two or three days a week. But others, like 34-yearold petroleum engineering sophomore Clayton Campbell, actually spend more time in a car than in the classroom each week. Campbell endures about an hour and 15 minute commute to and from Madisonville at least five days a week and sometimes six if there’s a weekend study session he needs to attend. “It’s about $140 to $200 a week [for gas], almost as much as tuition,” he said, adding that he budgets about $3,200 a semester for gas in his Chevrolet diesel pickup truck. Dietz calls gas a sunk cost in commuting, so she doesn’t worry about it too much. “In an ideal world, we’d have a train or a bus,” the history professor said. “But unfortunately, we don’t live in an ideal world.”

Contact Ben Wallace at bwallace@lsureveille.com

page 3

WHERE COMMUTERS LIVE

graphic by KIRSTEN ROMAGUERA / The Daily Reveille

Tonight on Tiger TV Newsbeat 6PM Sports Showtime 6:15PM The Ramen 6:30 PM Campus Channel 75 SENIORS Time to take portraits for the LSU Gumbo Yearbook! Sign up today at www.ouryear.com School code: 497 DEADLINE: September 27 Sign up for your LSU Gumbo Yearbook! Free Speech Plaza 10:30-2:30 TODAY Interested in making LSU history? Have free time? Be a part of a one-hour focus group To rename LSU Legacy Magazine Contact Shannon at marketing@lsureveille.com DO YOU HAVE AN OCCURRENCE? Call Joe at the Student Media Office 578-6090, 9AM- 5PM or E-mail: oncampus@lsureveille.com


page 4

TECHNOLOGY

The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Women in Technology Careers Forum to be held Thursday Olivia McClure Contributing Writer

A June 2012 Forbes article titled “Here’s the Real Reason There Are Not More Women in Technology” reported that many young women are unaware of the variety of career options available in the technology field. Harvey Mudd College President Maria Klawe, quoted in the article, said reasons why young women do not choose tech careers include a lack of interest in technology, little confidence in their abilities at a tech career, and a fear that they would have to work alongside people with whom they would not feel comfortable. Organizers and participants of the Women in Technology Careers Forum will meet to help reverse that trend on Thursday. Karen Sirman, the event’s chairwoman and a senior manager with University Information Technology Services, said the forum will strive to expose young women to professionals in technology careers while showcasing numerous different tech career opportunities and their benefits. “The purpose of the event is to make young women more aware of the potential and the advantages of a career in technology,” Sirman said. Sirman said the event will consist of a panel discussion, lunch, a career day-style networking session and drawings for door prizes. It is sponsored by ITS, Career Services and national technology companies. The panel is comprised of eight women who are University faculty members and high-ranking professionals in private industry and state government, Sirman said. According to the event website, panelists will discuss their accomplishments and ways young women can turn their interest in science, technology, engineering or math, commonly referred to as STEM, into a successful career.

Sirman said a central goal of completing internships. Feduccia said since women the forum is to encourage young women to examine any interests represent a minority, they are they may have in technology and highly recruited, especially by consider potential related careers. employers in STEM fields. She “All of these women have said events like the Women in been in technology careers and Technology forum are invaluable because they introduce young know the rewards,” she said. Sirman said organizers ex- women to jobs that demand their pect 150 to 200 students to at- skills that they may not have contend the event. Among those in sidered otherwise. “Often times, women are not attendance will be students from several local high schools, Sir- groomed to consider such fields because they have been maleman said. “Basically it says we need dominated,” Feduccia said. The forum will take place to work harder with high schools Thursday in to guide them, the Royal Coand that’s why If you’re going... tillion Ballwe’re invitroom on the ing local high Price: free second floor schools,” Sirof the Student man said, reTime: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Union from ferring to the 9 a.m. to 3 Forbes article, Sirman which is men- Location: Royal Cotillion Ballroom of the p.m. said students tioned on the Student Union planning to event website. attend must Director Register online at register online of Career Services Mary Fe- www.lsu.edu/womenintechnology at lsu.edu/womenintechnolduccia said it ogy. is important to Feduccia said a leaderpromote STEM careers as good opportunities to students while ship reception will also be held Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9 they are still in high school. She pointed out one attrac- p.m. for high school principals, tive element of tech careers is the STEM professionals and leaders on campus. financial rewards they offer. “The careers available in those disciplines are the highest-paying jobs available,” Feduccia said. In addition to reaching out to high schoolers, Feduccia said Career Services will be available at the forum to help students create a four-year career plan and Contact Olivia McClure at talk about steps they can take omcclure@lsureveille.com to prepare for a tech career, like

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

BATON ROUGE COMMUNITY

The Daily Reveille

page 5

Main Street Market gets facelift

Ferris McDaniel Staff Writer

The Main Street Market, a bustling weekday lunch location and Saturday morning hotspot during the Red Stick Farmers Market, is being renovated to better serve its weekly stampede of visitors. The makeover, tag-teamed by Commercial Design Interiors and a trio of University interior design students, will be funded by the Big River Economic and Agricultural Development Alliance, the organization that manages the Main Street Market, and the Louisiana Office of State Buildings. Matthew Edmonds, co-owner of Commercial Design Interiors with his partner Tracy Burns, said the renovation began when the Louisiana Office of State Buildings approached Commercial Design Interiors with the job. The company accepted, but Edmonds and Burns, both being interior design professionals-in-residence at the University, asked if three student interns could assist with the project. Logan Wheeler, Sarah AlleeWalsh and Madeleine Rappold were chosen as interns and worked on the undertaking for 40 hours per week, Edmonds said. Edmonds said the interns were allotted much of the responsibility in designing the new floor plan, conducting on-site analysis and precedent research, developing various design ideas and presenting them to clients. “We really let the students have a lot of the decision-making in this,” Edmonds said. “One of the things that the students identified through site analysis is what’s working well and what’s not working well.”

rendering courtesy of Matthew Edmonds

This rendering depicts the proposed renovations to the Main Street Market.

Functionality and aesthetics were the two main aspects considered when redesigning the market, Allee-Walsh said. Incorporation of local culture was also important, she said. “We started this whole process off by making multiple visits to the Main Street Market and studying the space,” Wheeler said. The students observed lengthy lines blocking different areas of the market, which obstructed circulation of foot traffic. Additionally, retail space was occupying too much square footage and blocking “great views” through store windows, Edmonds said. The solution was to better utilize the retail area while recapturing the market’s natural lighting and allowing people to easily maneuver, Edmonds said. “We really wanted to have a vibrant, thriving, sustainable marketplace for all of Louisiana’s farmers,” Allee-Walsh said. From an aesthetics standpoint, the rehabilitated market will include

farmer’s cart-styled kiosks rather than the current “batting cage” stalls. Historical images of Baton Rouge will be incorporated and new ceiling elements will capture the market’s natural lighting and acoustics and provide the illusion of the sky. The facade of the market will also be spruced up. The interns drew inspiration from the Mississippi River when designing the new layout, and their muse was a 19th century Mississippi River navigation map, which will be enlarged and pasted on the floor. “You can literally pinpoint New Orleans, Baton Rouge, anything on the river,” Allee-Walsh said. The total cost and start date for the renovation have not yet been determined.

Watch a video on the Main Street Market redesign at lsureveille.com. Contact Ferris McDaniel at fmcdaniel@lsureveille.com

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The Daily Reveille

page 6

BOMB EFFECTS, from page 1

BOMB THREAT, from page 1

going by. I stayed near campus just in case classes weren’t canceled.” Not everyone left campus immediately. Chemical engineering sophomore Tiffany Lyan finished her in-class assignments before evacuating. “My professor said we could leave if we wanted to, but also said we could stay to finish our lab,” she explained. “About half of the students stayed to finish titrations.” By midafternoon, campus was empty and bomb squads began searching buildings. At 2 p.m., it was announced that all scheduled campus activities including classes were canceled for the remainder of the day. It is not yet known if classes missed on Monday will require a make-up day, said Director of Media Relations Ernie Ballard. But as some students fled campus in the wake of the bomb threat, those living on campus were left in a confused limbo, said Cason Reeder, political science freshman. Students living on campus were not allowed to return to their rooms and apartments until seven hours after the ordered evacuation. “It kinda sucked,” Reeder said. “I was stuck for almost seven hours with nothing to do. I just wanted to go to sleep.” Aside from the initial warning, Reeder said he didn’t receive any instructions. He left his room in Herget Hall immediately after the 11:32 a.m. warning.  “I didn’t really know what to

ENROLLMENT, from page 1

“LSU’s faculty and staff, along with numerous programs and services, are available to

Learn more about a student arrested for theft in the LSU bookstore and read more crime briefs at lsureveille.com.

Check out lsureveille.com to read an online exclusive story about a visit from an alumni filmmaker, who spoke Tuesday night about pursuing future career goals. Check out today’s LMFAO entertainment blog at lsureveille.com:

“Bound for Books” reviews “Delirium.”

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 performed; did it work as [the bomber] intended it to; how well the first responders respond, that is, are the police and bomb squad guys and emergency medical personnel able to get in quickly and do their jobs effectively; and the bomb maker’s and his intended victims’ luck.” LSUPD spokesman Capt. Cory Lalonde reiterated Blackwood’s sentiments. “It’s nearly impossible to say what would happen if

someone used an explosive device on campus,” he said. Blackwood pointed out that if the four bomb threats in the last week — at LSU, at the University of Texas at Austin, North Dakota State University and Hiram College in northeast Ohio — lead to a trend of phony bomb threats across the nation, schools may stop evacuating when threatened. “That could be when the bomb Contact Chris Grillot at cgrillot@lsureveille.com

CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

The bomb threat Monday caused traffic to build up as students, faculty and staff evacuated campus.

do,” he said.  Reeder wasn’t alone in his frustration. Taylor Hart, business freshman, spent several hours in Highland Coffees watching Netflix until students were allowed back on campus.  “They were going to make us go to Evangeline Hall and just chill there until they decided that it really was a hoax,” Hart said. “The whole situation was just bad. Why is the University going to keep students on campus, where the bomb is?” Mass communication professor Rosanne Scholl also questioned the evacuation procedure. Many students were able to find space on a Tiger Trails bus, but were stuck in

traffic for hours. “Imagine if this were real,” Scholl said. “What would have happened if a bomb went off with traffic backed up around campus?”

Contact The Daily Reveille’s news staff at news@lsureveille.com

LSU students, faculty and staff evacuate campus Monday after a bomb scare.

assist students to make sure they are successful in their educationa endeavors,” he said. “We will make every effort to retain these students and see them

successfully complete their degrees at LSU.” The College of Humanities and Social Sciences remains the largest undergraduate college

after the University Center for Freshman Year. While undergraduate enrollment increased, graduate numbers decreased slightly from 4,604 in

News Editor Brian Sibille, Staff Writers Joshua Bergeron and Chris Grillot, and Senior Contributing Writer Wilborn Nobles contributed to this report.

Check out the Tiger TV tab on lsureveille.com for more coverage. CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

fall 2011 to 4,525 this fall. Contact Chris Grillot at cgrillot@lsureveille.com


Wednesday, September 19, 2012

PASS 33%

Sports OR LSU strives for offensive balance

RUN

page 7

67%

Spencer Hutchinson Sports Contributor

Passing Statistics

Rushing Statistics

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Or so the old adage goes, but the LSU Tigers are looking for a fix. They just haven’t found it yet. In the past, LSU coach Les Miles and his staff have received negative reaction to their lopsided play calling. Miles has said he wants to return to a more balanced attack that stays closer to 50-50 this season. But Miles said play calls depend on the current situation in a game. “There are pieces and times in every game where you must throw it, and there’s pieces and times in every game where you must run it,” Miles said. “The game dictates that many times.” In the last few seasons, the game must have dictated running. Last season, 68 percent of the Tigers’ total offensive plays were rushing plays, and 57 percent of their total yards were picked up on the ground. The Tigers have finished two straight seasons with more rushing yards than passing yards, and

North Texas: 26 attempts, 192 yards, 36 percent off. plays Washington: 19 attempts, 195 yards, 27 percent off. plays Idaho: 23 attempts, 222 yards, 38 percent off. plays 2012 Season: 68 attempts, 609 yards, 33 percent off. plays 2011 Season: 279 attempts, 2,135 yards, 32 percent off. plays

CONNOR TARTER / The Daily Reveille

LSU junior quarterback Zach Mettenberger throws a pass in the Tigers’ victory against North Texas on Sept. 1 in Tiger Stadium.

OFFENSE, see page 11

Should LSU pass more this season? Go to lsureveille.com to vote.

North Texas: 46 attempts, 316 yards, 64 percent off. plays Washington: 52 attempts, 242 yards, 73 percent off. plays Idaho: 39 attempts, 250 yards, 62 percent off. plays 2012 Season: 137 attempts, 808 yards, 67 percent off. plays 2011 Season: 591 attempts, 2,836 yards, 68 percent off. plays

BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

LSU sophomore running back Kenny Hilliard runs for a touchdown during the Tigers’ victory against Idaho on Saturday in Tiger Stadium.

FANS

Painted Posse bound by Tiger pride, religious beliefs Members involved in campus ministry Marcus Rodrigue Sports Contributor

They’re some of the biggest celebrities on LSU’s campus. They can be found in Tiger Stadium on Saturdays in the fall, Alex Box Stadium in the spring and even at some gymnastics meets. Cameramen love them. Fans want to be them. But fame is not the driving force behind the members of the Painted Posse. “Nobody knows our names,” said Joey LeBlanc, mechanical engineering junior. “It’s the fact that we’re doing it for something that we love, which is the same reason the players are out there.

They’re doing it because they love the game.” The Painted Posse has more than just a love of the game. They stake out in front of the gates to ensure they are the first ones in the student section, and the group doesn’t leave until the band is finished with the alma mater. The members of the Painted Posse follow the tradition of painting their bodies in the style of the LSU uniform and banding together in the front row of the student section. But at the end of the day, the purpose of the Painted Posse goes beyond school spirit. Most, if not all, of the Painted Posse members are involved in a Christian campus ministry and seek to exemplify their beliefs through their fandom. POSSE, see page 11

TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

The Painted Posse cheers at the front of the student section Saturday during the Tigers’ 63-14 win against Idaho in Tiger Stadium.


The Daily Reveille

page 8

FOOTBALL

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Multi-sport freshman athlete has Olympic aspirations Holmes to play football, run track Chris Abshire Sports Writer

There’s speed and then there’s football speed. Someone forgot to tell LSU freshman cornerback Kavahra Holmes. From the gridiron to the track, Holmes is used to sprinting past his opposition. “Speed is the advantage in almost any sport,” he said last month at Football Media Day, the only time true freshmen are allowed to speak with the media. “It’s my specialty.” The Breaux Bridge native is on scholarship with the No. 2 Tigers this fall, HOLMES but his athletic season won’t end after an LSU bowl game. He’ll hop across Nicholson Drive this spring and join the track team, where he is expected to run the 400-meter dash and several relay events. Multi-sport athletes are nothing new for LSU coach Les Miles. Trindon Holliday and Xavier Carter each split time between the track and the turf, former safety Chad Jones pitched on LSU’s 2009 baseball national championship team and sophomore safety Ronald Martin dabbled in basketball last season. But there’s always the whispers. “I’m always being asked

about one sport or the other,” Holmes said. LSU track and field coach Dennis Shaver said Holmes shouldn’t feel pressure to choose. “He’s a genuine two-sport athlete,” Shaver said. “He’s on scholarship for football, but it was important to show how many past guys have succeeded doing both under Miles. We’re all looking for great athletes.” The 6-foot-2 product entered fall camp as a wide receiver, mostly running deep routes and even taking a few reverses after catching 23 passes for 377 yards alongside fellow incoming LSU wideout Travin Dural at Breaux Bridge High School last fall. But the coaching staff switched him to cornerback for depth purposes after Tyrann Mathieu’s dismissal last month, an abrupt change for a top-100 receiving recruit. “We’re not necessarily saying [cornerback] is the place he’ll end up,” Miles said during fall camp. “...He came in and did a great job at receiver.” While his football pads and LSU’s classic white jersey may obscure Holmes’ lanky 180-pound frame, there’s no hiding it on the track. There’s also no hiding his speed. Holmes was the No. 2-ranked 400-meter high-school runner in the country, setting a state record with a 46.07 time during the 2011 AAU Junior Olympics in New Orleans. He also led Breaux Bridge to the 2011 state title, anchoring two relay teams and winning the individual 400-meter dash. Then the Olympics came calling.

Holmes was invited to the playing pranks,” Thomas said. U.S. Olympic Track and Field “But obviously, it’s an adjustment Trials in June, a dream opportu- for anybody. I’ve been here a year, so that benefitted Lamar and nity for the sprinter. him. We get to stay close.” He declined. One of those adjustments in“I was in summer school for LSU,” Holmes said. “I had to volves Holmes’ lean frame. It’s an focus on academics to be ready ideal figure for speeding down the for football. The Olympics are track. For Saturdays in the Southmy dream and there’s no doubt I would love to be ready for the eastern Conference? Not exactly. Holmes said he had to bulk 2016 Rio Games. That is on my up to hold his own list, but footon the football ball was first this ‘Speed is the advantage field. time.” “The main That left him in almost any sport.’ focus is about hitwatching the Lonting the weight don Olympics room and getting from his West Kavahra Holmes more physical,” Campus apartLSU freshman cornerback he said. “That’s ment, wondering what could have been if he had not the goal for track. It’s about lean muscle and sleek speed.” made it. But Shaver, who also laudBut Holmes had his second family to remind him why he ed Holmes’ decision to skip the Olympic Trials as “wise,” said stayed. Holmes is one of four Tigers football training doesn’t impede a from Breaux Bridge, a town of track athlete as long as he or she stays injury-free. just 8,139 people. “What they do during the Sophomore defensive lineman Quentin Thomas and fresh- fall really does prepare them to man Lamar Louis each grew up transition sports,” he said. “We’ll with Holmes and are now his bring him along slow, but he’s roommates, creating a family used to switching. Football speed atmosphere an hour away from and track speed are two different things, but Kavahra is blessed home. “I’m pretty sure his mom with both.” could whip me and my mom could whip him — that’s just how tight we are,” Louis said. “We know he’ll eventually be running for Team USA. It’s no limit on his opportunities because we’ve seen the work from the beginning.” Thomas said Holmes is almost as quick with a joke as he is on his feet, but still needed to Contact Chris Abshire at learn the rigors of being an athlete cabshire@lsureveille.com; at LSU. “Such a funny guy — always Twitter: @AbshireTDR

RECENT LSU TWO-SPORT ATHLETES Ronald Martin: Intercepted two passes last week against Idaho, walked on to the LSU basketball team where he played one minute against Florida. Spencer Ware: Rushed for 707 yards with eight touchdowns last season, played 21 games for LSU baseball in 2011, totaling five RBI. Chad Jones: Drafted in the 3rd round of the 2010 NFL draft by the N.Y. Giants, drafted in the 13th round of the 2007 MLB draft by the Houston Astros. Trindon Holliday: Recorded four career touchdowns on punt and kick returns, won the 100-meter dash title at the 2009 NCAA Outdoor Championships. Jared Mitchell: Joined Jones as the first two athletes ever to win both a BCS National Championship (football ’07) and a College World Series title (baseball ’09).

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The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

page 9

Depth is an advantage for strong Tiger team MIC’D UP MICAH BEDARD Sports Columnist Depth is a word synonymous with success in college football. To be the best, coaches strive to put together teams who possess toptier talent at every position. Teams with superior talent across the board like LSU, Alabama and USC are extremely tough competitors. There’s no substitute for having the best 22 players on the field. Or is there? On Saturday night, the whole country saw what happens when future NFL stars are backed up by players whose closest NFL experience will be managing their fantasy football teams. USC most likely put itself out of the national championship conversation in only the third week of the college football season, falling to then-No. 21 Stanford, 2114, for the fourth straight season. It’s going to be tough for Trojans’ quarterback Matt Barkley to bring home the BCS National Title he passed up the NFL for. The loss wasn’t because Barkley and wide receiver Robert Woods aren’t significantly better than their Stanford counterparts. It came down to the fact USC has a bunch of nobodies backing up their superstars. Talent only takes a team so far. Having backups and third-stringers who give the starters a run for their money in practice only improves competition and the overall talent level of the entire team. Barkley and Woods practice against walk-ons everyday. Maybe if the Trojans weren’t paying for the transgressions of former coach Pete Carroll they would have more scholarships available to make sure the first-teamers don’t just waltz through practice. LSU doesn’t have that problem. Injuries? No sweat. Having a high-caliber player like junior starting running back Alfred Blue go down with a leg injury for a few weeks might cause a coach to panic. Coach Les Miles will simply reach into his bag of running

AUSTIN BENNETT / The Daily Reveille

LSU freshman running back Jeremy Hill (33) runs the ball Saturday during the Tigers’ 63-14 win against Idaho in Tiger Stadium.

backs and grab one of the four quality rushers still left at his disposal. Not many other teams in the country have a sixth-year player waiting in the wings who can play any offensive line position. The Tigers have exactly that in senior offensive line utility man Josh Dworaczyk. Losing junior offensive tackle Chris Faulk to a season-ending knee injury should have had a significant impact on LSU’s national title aspirations. Because of Dworaczyk’s versatility and experience, the Tigers won’t miss a beat as he fills in for Faulk at left tackle. Starting strong safety Craig Loston could have been spotted during LSU’s game against Idaho on the bench nursing an injured toe. To say sophomore safety Ronald Martin was a suitable replacement would be an understatement. Martin had two interceptions against the Vandals, taking one back for a touchdown. Loston better get back on the field quickly before he finds himself playing the part of Martin’s understudy. The element of competition among the LSU players makes them a unique, cohesive group. For some

teams, vying for starting spots could drive a wedge between teammates. That’s not the case at LSU. Knowing nobody’s spot on the depth chart is safe makes it necessary for each player to come out and compete every day. Taking dismissed All-American cornerback Tyrann Mathieu’s place opposite Tharold Simon is true freshman Jalen Mills, a young man who wants to play so badly he brings a pen and pad to practice every day to take notes. These kinds of players make LSU such a beneficiary of addition by subtraction. When one quality player goes down or acts out, another is chomping at the bit to show he has what it takes to be at the top of the depth chart. Controversy only makes the Tigers stronger and deeper. And that’s a scary thought.

BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

LSU sophomore safety Ronald Martin (26) celebrates Saturday after catching an interception in the Tigers’ 63-14 victory against Idaho in Tiger Stadium.

Micah Bedard is a 22-year-old history senior from Houma.

Contact Micah Bedard at mbedard@lsureveille.com; Twitter: @DardDog

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The Daily Reveille

page 10

GOLF

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

FOOTBALL

Freshmen step into key roles Lawson still learning Wright, Dreher at defensive tackle solid in first tourney James Moran Sports Contributor

Early in the season, both the Tigers and Lady Tigers looked to true freshmen to help fill voids left by departing No. 1 golfers. The Tigers lost Sang Yi to graduation in May. Yi was named first team All-Southeastern Conference last season and finished his LSU career with nine top-five finishes, 15 top-10 finishes and a 73.28 scoring average. The Tigers returned players to step into Yi’s top spot, but there was still a hole in the lineup. Enter true freshman Zach Wright. Wright came to LSU as a highly rated ju‘I can improve nior golfer and top ranked quickly because the high school I have only golfer in Aribeen playing zona. He was for five years. I considered a can be No.1. ’ top-10 recruit in the nation when he signed Nadine Dreher with LSU. freshman golfer While still in high school, Wright reached the Sweet 16 in match play at the 2010 United States Junior Amateur Championship and scored ten career top10 finishes in American Junior Golf Association events. The highly decorated

freshman was able to crack coach Chuck Winstead’s lineup for the season-opening Carpet Capital Collegiate Classic at the Farm Golf Club on Sept. 7. “I wanted to come in and contribute to the team early,” Wright said. “I wanted to come in and help the team as much as I could. So far, I think I have done that.” Wright posted solid rounds of even par, 2-over and 4-over to help the Tigers secure a tie for fourth place at the Collegiate Classic. The Tigers, with Yi, finished eighth at the same tournament a season WRIGHT ago. At 6-over, Wright finished in a tie for No. 31 individually. “I just want to help the team,” Wright said. “I want to play well myself. If I play well myself, then I won’t be hurting the team, and that is what matters.” The Lady Tigers were left with just as big of a hole in their lineup when sophomore Austin Ernst left the program last May. Ernst was the NCAA individual champion in the 2010-11 season after shooting a schoolrecord 7-under over four rounds, and was the driving force behind the Lady Tigers’ back-to-back third-place NCAA finishes. With the Lady Tigers returning only three golfers from last season, they are relying heavily

upon freshman Nadine Dreher. Dreher is a true freshman who came to Baton Rouge from Vienna, Austria, where she was a member of the Austrian National team in 2011. In the season-opening Cougar Classic, Dreher posted rounds of 6-over, 2-over and 6-over to finish No. 91 individually. Though collegiate golf teams only take the top four scores on the team, each of her scores contributed to the Lady Tigers’ team score. “I think it was a great experience for her,” said LSU coach Karen Bahnsen. “I DREHER think she was a little apprehensive in the first round, and once she settled in, she played really well in the second round. I see a lot of great things ahead of her.” Dreher said it was a decent start, but she plans to keep working on her game. “Right now I am in the middle [of all of the golfers],” Dreher said. “I can improve quickly because I have only been playing for five years. I can be No. 1.”

Contact James Moran at jmoran@lsureveille.com

LSU recruit struggles in loss Lawrence Barreca Sports Contributor

It’s not easy keeping a tiger under control, but Catholic High managed to contain an LSU commit in its recent matchup against Denham Springs. Any onlooker at Olympia Stadium could point out the towering figure sporting the purple and gold for the Yellow Jackets. Denham Springs’ Tevin Lawson, a 6-foot-4, 275-pound defensive tackle who has verbally committed to LSU, garnered the most attention from recruiters Friday night in Catholic’s 42-13 victory. Known for his Southeastern Conference build and the ability to play on both the offensive and defensive line, Lawson is the type of athlete that coaches look to add to their programs. “He can run and he has a body that can add weight,” said Denham Springs head coach Dru Nettles. “He’s a prototypical LSU lineman and athlete who’s going to be a special one once he fills out in college.” Lawson only recently began to flash his abilities at defensive tackle after being a left tackle on offense for the majority of his high school career.

ESPN ranked him as the No. 135 recruit in the 2013 class, and Catholic was well aware of his presence. Catholic repeatedly ran plays to the left side of the offensive line, away from Lawson. Though he successfully drove opposing offensive linemen into the pocket, they continuously double-teamed the senior and made him a nonfactor. Lawson’s performance may not have had a major impact on the game, but his head coach said he knows his defensive lineman has potential. “Tevin’s a disruptive guy inside, and he’ll get doubled a lot,” Nettles said. “He’s got some big upside, though. He’s going to get better, and two or three years from now, he’s going to really grow into [a defensive tackle]. He needs 30 more pounds to really be a defensive tackle like they project.” Lawson wasn’t pleased with his performance against Catholic High, but he intends to continue to work toward being at LSU next season. He feels he is more than ready to play in Tiger Stadium. “I feel that I can go [to LSU] and get better, stronger and faster,” Lawson said. “I’m going to do what I can to be on the line for the Tigers.” Contact Lawrence Barreca at lbarreca@lsureveille.com

MLB

Escobar suspended three games for slur Ben Walker The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Toronto shortstop Yunel Escobar was suspended for three games Tuesday by the Blue Jays for wearing eyeblack displaying a homophobic slur written in Spanish during a game last weekend against Boston. Escobar apologized “to all those who have been offended” for what he said was meant to be “just a joke.” “It was not something I intended to be offensive,” he said through a translator. “It was not anything intended to be directed at anyone in particular.” The suspension — issued after input from Commissioner Bud Selig, the players’ union and team management — was to have started Tuesday night at Yankee Stadium. The game between Toronto and New York was rained out. As part of his penalty, Escobar’s lost salary during the ban — about $82,000 — will be directed to two advocacy groups, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against

Defamation and You Can Play. Escobar will also take part in an outreach initiative to promote tolerance to others based on their sexual orientation, and participate in a sensitivity training program. Pictures posted online showed the 29-year-old Cuban infielder with the message written in his eyeblack, a sticker players wear under their eyes to reduce sun glare, during Saturday’s home game against Boston. Major League Baseball regulations prohibit derogatory words and symbols on uniforms. Writing something of that nature on eyeblack would fall under that category, said MLB spokesman Pat Courtney. “Mr. Escobar has admitted that his actions were a mistake and I am hopeful he can use this unfortunate situation as an opportunity to educate himself and others that intolerance has no place in our game or society,” Selig said in a statement. Contact The Daily Reveille’s sports staff at sports@lsureveille.com

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012 OFFENSE, from page 7 they’re well on their way to a third. Many people expected LSU to pass more often this season, led by junior transfer quarterback Zach Mettenberger who was hailed by many Tiger fans as a savior from the run-heavy days of the past. But that hasn’t been the case. In LSU’s first three games, the run game has dominated the offensive gameplan with 67 percent of the calls — nowhere near the 50-50 Miles said he hopes for. Against Washington — the Tigers’ most lopsided play-calling game this season— the Tigers ran the ball 52 times and passed only 19, meaning a whopping 73 percent of the Tigers’ plays from scrimmage were rushes. But even though the Tigers are passing at almost the same rate, Mettenberger has increased their effectiveness in the passing game. Last season behind the arms of senior quarterbacks Jordan Jefferson and Jarrett Lee, the Tigers averaged 7.7 yards per completion. This season Mettenberger and his receivers have averaged 9 yards per completion. Mettenberger is also connecting on a higher percentage of his passes, completing just more than 72 percent compared to the 62 percent the Tigers posted last season. Senior wide receiver Russell Shepard said the threat of Mettenberger leading a revamped Tiger passing attack is enough to worry opponents. “We’ve shown we can throw the football,” Shepard said. “We’ve shown we can throw it down the field, short and all types of different ways, and I think that keeps defenses on their toes.” Against Idaho on Saturday, the Tigers came the closest to 5050 this season. The Tigers threw for 222 yards, breaking the 200yard landmark for the first time this season. At halftime, the Tigers actually had more passing yards than rushing yards. But as the Tigers ran away with the game, they kept the ball on the ground. By the end of the

game, the Tigers were back to 62 percent run plays with 52 percent of their 472 total yards coming from the run. Maybe there’s a method to the Miles’ run-heavy madness. LSU’s recent history proves that the Tigers are less successful the more they pass. In the only game LSU lost last season — the 21-0 throttling at the hands of Alabama in the BCS National Championship Game — the Tigers had more passing yards than rushing yards. The last time LSU ended a game with more passing attempts than rushing attempts was in 2009 in a 25-23 loss to Ole Miss. LSU has now spent 19 straight weeks ranked in the AP top 5 — a school record — and in that time, the Tigers have relied most heavily on the run game. Senior offensive lineman Josh Dworaczyk said his opinion of the coaches’ play calling fits the old adage, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Mettenberger reiterated Dworaczyk’s thoughts, saying that if the running game is working, there’s no reason to abandon it just for the sake of throwing for more yards. “As a thrower and a quarterback, I’d love to throw the ball downfield a little more, but like I always say, ‘whatever gets victories,’” Mettenberger said. “If we keep pounding the ball like we do, we’re not going to throw the ball downfield 40 times a game.” Dworaczyk said he sympathizes with LSU fans who would like to see more passing in the Tigers’ gameplan. He said he knows running the ball most of the time doesn’t make the most exciting offense, but it works for the Tigers. “I hope our fans realize that whenever this offense is rolling and we’re running the ball like we are, we’re demoralizing defenses,” Dworaczyk said. “And I enjoy it.”

Contact Spencer Hutchinson at shutchinson@lsureveille.com

The Daily Reveille POSSE, from page 7

page 11

“We’re a Christian group, and our job is to represent Christ,” said civil engineering senior Chad Roe. Roe first got involved with the Posse through his involvement in Baptist Collegiate Ministries, which is also the case for LeBlanc and political science senior Cameron Cooke, who is the captain of the Posse. Membership in the group is somewhat handed down, as the Posse was founded in 2003 by four students who participated in BCM. Those in the Painted Posse do have their fun, but they must follow guidelines. They cannot sit during the game (halftime and commercial breaks excluded), and they are not allowed to swear or make obscene gestures. TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille “I’ve made that mistake be- Members of the Painted Posse perform the second down cheer from the front of fore,” LeBlanc said. “Sometimes you get excited. … But we keep Tiger Stadium’s student section Saturday during the Tigers’ victory against Idaho. each other in check. We try to be a off their paint in the fountain. really does make my college cagood representation [of Christ].” Members choose numbers reer fun. I look forward to every The members of the Paint- based on a certain player or po- game starting Monday.” ed Posse also use their jerseys sition that they want to represent Roe, who is from Fairbanks, to show their true colors. Since for that season. LeBlanc wears Alaska, shares the same passion 2005, the members of the group No. 30 for the kickers, Roe wears for LSU football even though he have been required to have a No. 99 for junior defensive end grew up some 4,000 miles away cross painted on the left side of Sam Montgomery and Cooke from Baton Rouge. their jerseys. Roe grew up as a fan because wears No. 24 for junior cornerThe jerseys are important to back Tharold Simon. his grandfather and uncle played the image of the Painted Posse, Some members of the Posse football for LSU, but he fell in as they are painted to be nearly are friends with football players, love with the program when he exact replicas of who personally attended his first LSU game. the players’ jer“It’s that pure love of LSU thank them for ‘The Painted Posse seys. According their passionate football,” Roe said. “It was somereally does make my displays on Satur- thing that embraced me back in to Cooke, anywhere between 12 2004 when I heard the band play days. college career fun. ’ and 20 members “They all ‘Touchdown for LSU’ for the first participate each very much appre- time.” Cameron Cooke week, congregatThe Painted Posse has forged ciate it,” Cooke political science senior ing around the said. “It’s good to a camaraderie through countless student section gate about five know that the players appreciate Saturdays of cheering the Tigers hours before the game to begin it just as much as the students do. on. the painting process. “[Chad and I], as engineering It really is ultimately all about the Melissa Schroeder, an el- players.” students, don’t get out a whole ementary education junior, paints Cooke and LeBlanc are both lot,” LeBlanc said. “I mean, all the white letters and numbers from Baton Rouge and were we’ve got college stories, but this to maintain consistency, but she raised as Tiger fans. Cooke has is something that I know is never is assisted in painting the two been participating in the Posse going to go away.” purple coats and stripes by other since fall 2009 and even decided female painters. They paint num- to spend a little more time in colbers on the back and letters on the lege just for one more year of front, and they have spelled out football. such gems as “No Saban Novem“I could have graduated in ber” and “Put ‘Em on a Spit.” three years, but I decided to make Following the games, the it three and a half just so I could Contact Marcus Rodrigue at Posse makes its way up the hill get that extra football season,” mrodrigue@lsureveille.com and to the Quad, where they wash Cooke said. “The Painted Posse


The Daily Reveille

The

page 12

OUR VIEW

Peanut

Gallery

What did you think of the University’s response to the bomb threat? Compiled by JACY BAGGETT

Kari Taylor

secondary English education freshman

‘It took me two hours to get home, and I live 20 minutes away.’

‘It was very timely. I got the message immediately and everyone got out very quickly.’

Victoria Harrison nursing freshman

‘I thought it was all right. I live off campus, so it took me five minutes Dominik Pecoraro to get off business sophomore campus.’ ‘If we have to make up another day of school on a Saturday, that would be annoying.’

Paisley Balthazar psychology freshman

Opinion

Questions unanswered after bomb threat

Daily Reveille Editorial Board Rain boots and water puddles always make for gloomy days, but there’s never been perhaps a more depressing moment in our time on the LSU campus than Monday, when the bleak scene was accented by thousands of students rushing off campus only to be gridlocked in traffic. As we look back on Monday’s bomb threat — and it’s important to note that nobody seems to recall when the University last experienced a bomb threat — a number of problems occurred, not that anyone would be able to tell based on the cheery news conference University officials delivered Monday afternoon. Among the questions swirling through our minds after the text message snapped us into reality were: Is there really a bomb? What do they mean by “evacuate”? How long will sitting in traffic take? Judging from Facebook and Twitter, most other students wondered the same things. We hope whoever did this, whoever threatened our lives and our University, pays for it to the fullest extent. The University officials and police who are investigating should stop at nothing to ensure the safety of students, faculty, staff and whomever else was on campus. As the investigation continues

WEB COMMENTS The Daily Reveille wants to hear your reactions to our content. Go to lsureveille.com, our Facebook page and our Twitter account to let us know what you think. Check out what other readers had to say in our comments section: In response to Taylor Hammons’ column, “Fuel efficiency standards to raise gasoline prices,” readers had this to say:

Joel Meservy

philosophy graduate student

‘They were on top of letting us know what was going on.’

“Mr. Hammons, It’s great that you are writing about these important issues, but I think you should reconsider your chain of reasoning. There is no causal link between greater fuel economy and higher gas prices. Rather, the converse effect is likely. You claim Sec. Chu will raise taxes but he has no power to do so and there is no active proposal to do so from anybody in the Administration. Your article seems to say that surely somebody will raise gas prices because otherwise there will be no demand

The Daily Reveille Editorial Board

Andrea Gallo Emily Herrington Bryan Stewart Brian Sibille Clayton Crockett

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor Managing Editor, External Media News Editor Opinion Editor

and suspects appear, we want justice for our campus and for students across the nation who bear the consequences of such outrageous and unsettling threats. We also demand that our administrators better prepare for this type of incident, should it happen again. University Relations told The Daily Reveille, “Our plan in this type of situation is to communicate to students, faculty and staff to evacuate campus using their best method possible.” What about students who live on campus? After receiving that text message, they had no idea where to go if they couldn’t take shelter at a friend’s apartment. They would have had to return to their on-campus housing to find out that dorms and apartments were being evacuated. Then there’s the question of the text alert that told everyone to evacuate. Evacuate where? Out of your building? Off of campus completely? What about nearby campus locations — is The Chimes OK? Those answers never came. Neither did an answer for how anyone could evacuate “as calmly and quickly as possible.” It would be a miracle if someone managed a speedy exit amid the unending lines of cars that tangled across Highland, Nicholson and nearly every other path that exited the University. If a bomb had detonated within

CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

LSU President William Jenkins speaks at a news conference about a bomb threat made to the University Monday, causing a campus-wide evacuation.

30 minutes of students receiving the text message, not only would thousands of lives — or possibly 10 times that — have been lost, it also would have been nearly impossible for emergency vehicles to navigate the gridlock to set up a triage. How is it that on gameday, 90,000 people can get on and off campus in a somewhat orderly fashion, but during a bomb threat, chaos ensues? We understand that games are planned for and bomb threats are out-of-the-blue, but the University should have procedures in place for

contraflow and orderly evacuations. Given the bomb threats on college campuses that came before LSU’s, it’s hard to believe that our University officials wouldn’t have re-evaluated our evacuation plans before Monday, but it appeared that they had not. We hope University officials used Monday to set a precedent for future emergencies.

WHAT’S THE BUZZ?

In response to David Scheuermann’s column, “People should be better protected from surveillance,” readers had this to say:

accept the truth: that governments can never be trusted, absolutely, to guard citizens rights and freedoms. Governments are always the greatest threat to freedom. Not ‘terrorists’ or their state sponsors. These measures are preparations for the identification and punishment of ‘Thoughtcrime.’ They do not target those who’ve committed crimes, or even those who plan to commit crimes; it attempts to identify those who, by their behavior, words or deeds, and their associations, are considered potential ‘enemies of the State.’ These measures target freedom of expression, freedom of thought, and freedom of association. Essentially, they target freedom itself. Thanks, David, for writing this. You best protect your freedoms by using them.” - CAulds

“It’s not important that people like me understand the implications of these government surveillance initiatives; it is important that young people do, and that they also

Contact The Daily Reveille’s opinion staff at opinion@lsureveille.com; Twitter: @TDR_opinion

for fuel efficient vehicles. But you cannot conclude that the one policy necessarily entails the other. Most importantly, you are omitting 3 key points: - consumers are actively seeking more fuel efficient vehicles under current prices. - vehicle manufacturers support the new CAFE standards, with NO promise of or policy for higher gas taxes, - and most importantly, greater fuel economy is expect to reduce U.S. imports and LOWER global oil prices, thereby lowering prices of gasoline and all other petroleum products we use.” - ridgepablo

Editorial Policies & Procedures

The Daily Reveille (USPS 145-800) is written, edited and produced solely by students of Louisiana State University. The Daily Reveille is an independent entity within the Manship School of Mass Communication. Signed opinions are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editor, paper or University. Letters submitted for publication should be sent via e-mail to opinion@lsureveille.com or delivered to B-26 Hodges Hall. They must be 400 words or less. Letters must have a contact phone number so the opinion editor can verify the author. The phone number won’t be printed. The Daily Reveille reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for space consideration without changing the original intent. The Daily Reveille also reserves the right to reject any letter without notification of the author. Writers must include their full names and phone numbers. The Daily Reveille’s editor-in-chief, hired every semester by the Louisiana State University Media Board, has final authority on all editorial decisions.

Contact The Daily Reveille Editorial Board at editor@lsureveille.com

Once the bomb threat was announced, were you able to get off of campus in an hour?

Yes No 44% 56% Total votes: 265

Participate in today’s poll at lsureveille.com.

Quote of the Day

“For an adult, eating alone at McDonald’s is admitting a kind of defeat.”

Jonathan Carroll American author and novelist Jan. 26, 1949 — present


The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Opinion

page 13

New law highlights youth prison policy injustice BUT HE MEANS WELL GORDON BRILLON Columnist Jerome Richardson is 46 years old. He has spent more than two-thirds of his life as a prisoner. But now, thanks to a new Louisiana law, he is eligible for parole for the first time since he was handed a life sentence in 1986 for aggravated rape. The law was passed in response to a Supreme Court decision two years ago, in which the court ruled that sentencing minors convicted of crimes besides homicide to life imprisonment without a chance for parole constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. Richardson, a Jefferson Parish native, was 15 when he was convicted of aggravated rape along with a 19-year-old accomplice.

He was told, before he was able to vote, before he could go to his high school prom, that he would be in jail until the day he died. Does this help society? Who benefits from destroying the dreams and prospects of children? The Court’s decision and the new law are steps in the right direction, but they barely scratch the surface of the problem. What we need is an entirely new approach. In 2010, more than 70,000 juveniles were under incarceration, according to the Justice Department’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. While the number has been on the decline over the past decade, it is still a staggering statistic. Studies have shown time and time again that putting youths in jail or training school has no effect on decreasing delinquent behavior. For too long, the corrections system in the United States has

been focused on punishment for crimes and not rehabilitation of criminals. Prisons have developed an entire culture of gangs and repeat offenders caused by appalling conditions. The U.S. has the highest percentage of the population in jail of any industrialized nation. The prisons are overpopulated, which leads to increased prison violence and lower quality of life. Contrast that to Norway, home of “the world’s cushiest jail,” Bastoy Prison, where inmates hold keys to their rooms and help raise farm animals in their spare time. Norway’s rate of repeat offenses is about 20 percent, compared to approximately 67 percent in the U.S. Here in America, we’re tough on crime. We’re not like those hippie Scandinavians — we teach our prisoners with discipline and good old American grit. But good old American grit has never worked. It’s not the way

to re-teach our prisoners, and certainly not the way to treat our children. Each year, as many as 200,000 juveniles are tried as adults in the United States, according to estimates by the Campaign for Youth Justice. These children are forced into a boiling-pot environment with our nation’s most depraved rapists, murderers and gangsters. Is it any wonder they continue to commit crimes? We cannot continue to try minors as adults. Throwing hundreds of thousands of juveniles into the adult system every year defeats the purpose of the juvenile system that we bothered to establish. Though it’s unlikely we’ll see a drastic change in the adult prison system any time soon, an overhaul of the juvenile system is not impossible. Juvenile detention centers should be revamped into rehabilitation centers focused on job skills and psychiatric therapy.

Here in Louisiana, we have a proud history of improving prison conditions for children. The Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2003 resulted in the closure of the notorious Tallulah Correction Center for Youth and an increase in alternative methods of delinquent rehabilitation. It was a great moment of justice in a state with a reputation for brutal and overstuffed prisons. With the new law, Louisiana has momentum again, and now a real change can come. Gordon Brillon is a 19-year-old mass communication sophomore from Lincoln, R.I.

Contact Gordon Brillon at gbrillon@lsureveille.com; Twitter: @TDR_gbrillon

McDonald’s calorie count won’t make significant impact LA SEULE FEMME KATE MABRY Columnist As McDonald’s embraces some new changes, many other national fast food chains aren’t lovin’ it. Following the Supreme Court ruling to uphold Obama’s healthcare law requiring national restaurants with at least 20 locations to post their calorie counts, McDonald’s U.S. President Jan Fields announced that all nationwide McDonald’s restaurants have posted the calories of their menu items on the menu boards and drive-thrus as of Monday. But the question remains: Will the addition of calorie counts alter consumer habits? I doubt we’ll see significant changes in a state that loves food as much as Louisiana. Although the healthcare law has not yet gone into effect, other fast food restaurants will likely feel obligated to follow in McDonald’s footsteps, and while it’s good to see the chain stepping up to inform customers on the nutritional facts of their food, the food remains unquestionably unhealthy. The world’s largest hamburger chain has made attempts to offer the public healthier options with the inclusion of the “Favorites Under 400,” which lists several items on the menu with fewer than 400 calories. But a combination of these items still adds up to a high-calorie meal. For example, a classic combo includes a cheeseburger at 300 calories, a carton of medium

French fries at 380 calories and a large Coca-Cola at 310 calories. You would assume most people would begin to change their eating habits with information like this available to the public, but according to the New York Times, a study at Stanford University found that the addition of calorie counts created little change in the behavior of customers. Fast food is infamous for its connection to obesity, and fast food frequenters go to McDonald’s because they want that fatty burger and fries, which can be viewed as a treat. After an eight-hour day at work, the convenience of fast food is undeniable, and despite the study’s results, some will opt out of their usual Angus bacon and cheeseburger — which now will be unable to deny its 790 calorie deliciousness — for a healthier option. You are what you eat, though, and those people will continue to eat what they please whether the calories are posted or not. Louisiana is a perfect example. It was named the fifth fattest state in the country in 2011 with the adult obesity rate at 31.67 percent, according to a report from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Obesity is becoming an evergrowing epidemic in the state and country, and fast food restaurants play a major role in the blame game. But I didn’t always think that way. Since I can remember, there have always been warnings against the excessive consumption of fast food, but until I was about 16, I never contemplated

ROLAND PARKER / The Daily Reveille

the importance of a well-balanced diet. In my high school nutrition class, we were assigned to watch the 2004 documentary “Super Size Me” by Morgan Spurlock, which exposed the dramatic truth about fast food. Spurlock ate McDonalds every day for a 30-day period in the documentary despite protests from his vegan wife. At the end of the experiment, he gained nearly 25 pounds and a 13 percent body mass increase. A few years ago, Taco Bell,

another favorite among college students, introduced its diet “Fresco” menu, but the Taco Bell in the 459 Commons doesn’t offer this healthier version in its limited selection. However, LSU Dining has taken a big step to enlighten students about food selection on campus. LSU Dining’s website includes the menus and nutritional facts of almost all the on-campus dining options to accommodate students who are interested in counting calories.

So while the addition of McDonald’s calorie counts is a move in the right direction, the fast food industry could use a drastic makeover in creating this classic all-American food. Kate Mabry is a 21-year-old mass communication senior from New Orleans.

Contact Kate Mabry at kmabry@lsureveille.com; Twitter: @KateMabry1


The Daily Reveille

page 14

PRE-K COMPUTER TEACHER: 10-15hours/ week $10/hr mornings only. Start immediately. Experience as leader over group of preK is must. Resume to kmcvi@yahoo.com

PARKVIEW BAPTIST PRESCHOOL Afternoon Teachers needed 3-6pm Please email your resume to parkviewbps@gmail.com SOMETHING GREAT, SOMETHING NEW Now Hiring for Technology Store and other positions. The new Barnes and Noble at LSU is hiring friendly, outgoing, and technologically-savvy team members. Fill out an application at the LSU bookstore, located in the Student Union, today! (Technology/ Computer background preferred) NOTHING BUNDT CAKES Now hiring enthusiastic guest greeters who can deliver WOW service! $8/hr! Contact Allison 225.921.3675 DOES INCREASING OMEGA 3 IN your diet improve health’Pennington Biomedical is looking for individuals to participate in a nutrition research study. The purpose of this study is to determine how increasing the amount of Omega 3 in your diet can improve physical fitness, body composition and other factors influencing overall health. If you are aged 18-40 years and in overall good health, you may be eligible for the OO3 study and earn up to $700 for participation. Call 225.763.3000 or visit http://www. pbrc.edu/oo3 DUNKIN DONUTS Now hiring shift leaders, bakers and crew members for Blubonnet / Burbank location. Only five miles from campus! Send Resume to dd350623@gmail.com 225.302.7737 PART-TIME OFFICE ASSISTANT Growing company needs help answering phones, filing, data entry, running errands, etc. Junior or Senior majoring in Business or Finance. E-mail resume to francis@premierchemicals.net. HELP WANTED P/T Sales Associate Needed @ Local Gift/Interiors Store, MWF 9:45-6, some Sat, Sun & Holidays. Must be Outgoing & Friendly. $9/hr DOE. Great place to work. Email Resume 2222gift@gmail.com

LEGAL ASSISTANT WANTED Responsible person needed for a position in a small firm. At least 7 yrs exp in PI work needed. M-F 8:304:30. 13862 Perkins Road. Must be an excellent typist. Send resume to redsticklaw@aol.com 225.752.5959 $BARTENDING$ $300/Day Potential NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. Training Available AGE 18+ OK 1-800-965-6520 ext127 STUDENTPAYOUTS. COM Paid Survey Takers Needed In Baton Rogue. 100% Free To Join! Click On Surveys. DELIVERY DRIVERS $8-15/ Pluckers Wing Bar is now hiring delivery drivers. Please apply at 4225 Nicholson or at www.pluckers.net MAXFITNESS Looking for enthusiastic and motivated individuals for Front Desk, Sales and Personal Training. If interested come by and fill out an application. 225.768.7150 THE CHIMES at the north gates of LSU is now hiring experienced servers. Work in a fun atmosphere with flexible hours. Apply in person between 2-4 PM. 225.383.1754 WANTED Part-time clerical staff for doctors’ office. Duties include filing charts, faxing, and answering phones. 8-10 hours per week/flexible. $9 hour. Call Donna at 769-7575 ext. 0. AFTER SCHOOL HELP WANTED to assist with Middle School homework and some transportation. 225.756.6485 ACT TUTOR FROM PRINCETON paying $100 apiece for high school student directories from Episcopal, Dunham, Runnels, Parkview Baptist, LSU Lab, St. Joseph’s, Baton Rouge Magnet, and Catholic High. E-mail John Burford at burfordj4@ gmail.com PAINTING CONTRACTOR looking

for enthusiastic, dedicated people. Flexible hours. Call and leave name and number. 225.445.1834

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

ances and washer & dryer provided. Lewis Companies Inc. 225-766-8802 or 907-9180

CHICK-FIL-A MALL OF LOUISIANA Now Hiring! Flexible Schedules, Competitive Wages. Stop by the mall and fill out application!

DO YOU LIKE PONIES? Are you a Brony? Join our herd! lsubrony@yahoo.com CHATEAU DU COUR Large Updated 1 or 2 BR, 1 Ba apt in Tigerland. 32 unit complex gated entry. $495, 595. $300 dep. 767- 3935 772-2429. cdc-tigerland.com 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT Wood floors & crown molding. Nice courtyard area. Water, sewer, garbage included. Near LSU. $485/ month. Call today for a showing. 1330 Jim Taylor Drive 225.615.8521 TOWNHOUSES & CONDOS FOR LEASE 2 & 3 bedrooms FOR LEASE in the LSU and surrounding areas! Gated Communities, New Construction, Great Amenities & Rent Specials! Call Keyfinders Realty, Inc. @ 225-293-3000 for additional Info on available rentals! Visit www.keyfindersBR.com for weekly updates on new rentals! 1 BEDROOM FOR LEASE! LSU AREA CONDO @ BROOKE HOLLOW $595

DEAR TRI DELTA I am a 25 year old political science student. I am going to graduate in May. I am shy and have been called a sweet guy. All I want is to go on one date with a member of the tri delta sorority. They have some of the smartest and prettiest girls. Looking for one dinner and a movie or maybe to spend a game day together. I just want this more than anything in the world. bwood8@ lsu.edu INTELLECTUAL NICE GUY looking for a female friend to do things with. (i.e. texting, getting lunch, hanging out...) Emphasis on person to person activities. Not looking for anything fancy just someone to talk to while getting lunch or over coffee or just hanging out when there is nothing better to do. I understand people are busy so not looking for something everyday but every once in a while would be nice to actually have someone to hang out with. SERIOUS offers only please. If interested or have any questions, contact me at pumpitup120@yahoo. com. Put personal ad or something to distinguish your email in the subject line in case it goes in spam.

DOWNSTAIRS CORNER UNIT. WATER & SEWER INCLUDED! BEST DEAL IN THE LSU! AVAILABLE NOVEMBER FIRST! Keyfinders Realty, Inc. 225-293-3000 WWW. KEYFINDERSBR. COM 3 BEDROOM 3 br 2 ba at Brightside Park Condominiums. Recently updated. Water, sewer, & garbage included. Extended basic cable too. All kitchen appli-

LICENSED COUNSELOR (LPC) Offering individual, coulples and adolescent counseling. $25.00 per hour. Contact: Cheryl Robin, LPC, at 225-235-1689.

The Daily Reveille presents...

TIGER BITES A free tastING event featuring Baton Rouge's best food

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The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

RUNNER Runner needed for BR CPA Firm 20-25 hours per week. Hours are flexible. Accounting/Finance major preferred. Fax resume to 927-9075 or email to dcarter@psha.com 225.924.1772 PRE-K COMPUTER TEACHER: 10-15hours/ week $10/hr mornings only. Start immediately. Experience as leader over group of preK is must. Resume to kmcvi@yahoo.com LEGAL ASSISTANT WANTED Responsible person needed for a position in a small firm. At least 7 yrs exp in PI work needed. M-F 8:30-4:30. 13862 Perkins Road. Must be an excellent typist. Send resume to redsticklaw@ aol.com 225.752.5959 HELP WANTED P/T Sales Associate Needed @ Local Gift/ Interiors Store, MWF 9:45-6, some Sat, Sun & Holidays. Must be Outgoing & Friendly. $9/hr DOE. Great place to work. Email Resume 2222gift@ gmail.com SOMETHING GREAT, SOMETHING NEW Now Hiring for Technology Store and other positions. The new Barnes and Noble at LSU is hiring friendly, outgoing, and technologically-savvy team members. Fill out an application at the LSU bookstore, located in the Student Union, today! (Technology/ Computer background preferred) THE CHIMES at the north gates of LSU is now hiring experienced servers. Work in a fun atmosphere with flexible hours. Apply in person between 2-4 PM. 225.383.1754 PART-TIME OFFICE ASSISTANT Growing company needs help answering phones, filing, data entry, running errands, etc. Junior or Senior majoring in Business or Finance. E-mail resume to francis@premierchemicals.

net.

com 225.302.7737

WANTED Part-time clerical staff for doctors’ office. Duties include filing charts, faxing, and answering phones. 8-10 hours per week/flexible. $9 hour. Call Donna at 769-7575 ext. 0.

DELIVERY DRIVERS $815/ Pluckers Wing Bar is now hiring delivery drivers. Please apply at 4225 Nicholson or at www.pluckers.net

CHICK-FIL-A MALL OF LOUISIANA Now Hiring! Flexible Schedules, Competitive Wages. Stop by the mall and fill out application! $BARTENDING$ $300/Day Potential NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. Training Available AGE 18+ OK 1-800-965-6520 ext127 ACT TUTOR FROM PRINCETON paying $100 apiece for high school student directories from Episcopal, Dunham, Runnels, Parkview Baptist, LSU Lab, St. Joseph’s, Baton Rouge Magnet, and Catholic High. E-mail John Burford at burfordj4@gmail.com STUDENTPAYOUTS. COM Paid Survey Takers Needed In Baton Rogue. 100% Free To Join! Click On Surveys. PARKVIEW BAPTIST PRESCHOOL Afternoon Teachers needed 3-6pm Please email your resume to parkviewbps@gmail.com DOES INCREASING OMEGA 3 IN your diet improve health’Pennington Biomedical is looking for individuals to participate in a nutrition research study. The purpose of this study is to determine how increasing the amount of Omega 3 in your diet can improve physical fitness, body composition and other factors influencing overall health. If you are aged 18-40 years and in overall good health, you may be eligible for the OO3 study and earn up to $700 for participation. Call 225.763.3000 or visit http://www.pbrc.edu/oo3 DUNKIN DONUTS Now hiring shift leaders, bakers and crew members for Blubonnet / Burbank location. Only five miles from campus! Send Resume to dd350623@gmail.

NOTHING BUNDT CAKES Now hiring enthusiastic guest greeters who can deliver WOW service! $8/hr! Contact Allison 225.921.3675

page 15

Realty, Inc. @ 225-293-3000 for additional Info on available rentals! Visit www.keyfindersBR.com for weekly updates on new rentals! 1 BEDROOM FOR LEASE! LSU AREA CONDO @ BROOKE HOLLOW $595 DOWNSTAIRS CORNER UNIT. WATER & SEWER INCLUDED! BEST DEAL IN THE LSU! AVAILABLE NOVEMBER FIRST! Keyfinders Realty, Inc. 225-293-3000

WEDDING DRESS FOR SALE $270 (was $800) Elegant strapless Galina street size 4 w/ pearls around the bodice. Free veil w/purchase. 985.273.9886

1 BEDROOM APARTMENT Wood floors & crown molding. Nice courtyard area. Water, sewer, garbage included. Near LSU. $485/ month. Call today for a showing. 1330 Jim Taylor Drive 225.615.8521 CHATEAU DU COUR Large Updated 1 or 2 BR, 1 Ba apt in Tigerland. 32 unit complex gated entry. $495, 595. $300 dep. 767- 3935 772-2429. cdc-tigerland.com 3 BEDROOM 3 br 2 ba at Brightside Park Condominiums. Recently updated. Water, sewer, & garbage included. Extended basic cable too. All kitchen appliances and washer & dryer provided. Lewis Companies Inc. 225-766-8802 or 907-9180 TOWNHOUSES & CONDOS FOR LEASE 2 & 3 bedrooms FOR LEASE in the LSU and surrounding areas! Gated Communities, New Construction, Great Amenities & Rent Specials! Call Keyfinders

WWW. KEYFINDERSBR. COM

DO YOU LIKE PONIES? Are you a Brony? Join our herd! lsubrony@yahoo.com DEAR TRI DELTA I am a 25 year old political science student. I am going to graduate in May. I am shy and have been called a sweet guy. All I want is to go on one date with a member of the tri delta sorority. They have some of the smart-

est and prettiest girls. Looking for one dinner and a movie or maybe to spend a game day together. I just want this more than anything in the world. bwood8@lsu.edu INTELLECTUAL NICE GUY looking for a female friend to do things with. (i.e. texting, getting lunch, hanging out...) Emphasis on person to person activities. Not looking for anything fancy just someone to talk to while getting lunch or over coffee or just hanging out when there is nothing better to do. I understand people are busy so not looking for something everyday but every once in a while would be nice to actually have someone to hang out with. SERIOUS offers only please. If interested or have any questions, contact me at pumpitup120@yahoo.com. Put personal ad or something to distinguish your email in the subject line in case it goes in spam.

LICENSED COUNSELOR (LPC) Offering individual, coulples and adolescent counseling. $25.00 per hour. Contact: Cheryl Robin, LPC, at 225-235-1689.

September�17�-September�2�1 ARGH ANNUAL SCAVENGER HUNT HAS ARRIVED

Tune to KLSU 91.1 FM for daily clues. Collect the clues to win the booty valued at over $600!

Miss a clue? For a complete copy of the contest rules. log on to www.klsuradio.fm


The Daily Reveille

page 16

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Watch for this ad every Tuesday!

Involvement • Leadership • Service

Facebook: LSU Campus Life Twitter: @LSUCampusLife

Thursday Night Live

Comedian

James Davis

Campus Life Student Spotlight: John Lewis

Sept 20th at 8pm in the

Live Oak Lounge

CHANGEBREAK BREAK Peru 2013 Looking for a new way to SERVE and GROW as a leader? leader? VLSU will be traveling with 10 students to Cai Cay, Peru from May 27 through June 8, 2013 to serve with the people of Cai Cay to improve their community and provide educational opportunities to their youth. The cost to participate is $1,000.

Deadline to apply in the Campus Life Office SEPTEMBER 26th at 4:30PM Room 350 in the LSU Student Union

marshMADNESS National Wildlife OCTOBER 6th Branch Refuge in Lacombe, Louisiana.

Register by FRIDAY SEPT. 28

Transportation and lunch will be provided.

at volunteer.lsu.edu.

Junior, Computer Engineering Connection to Campus Life: Helped with Harambee’ 2012, Late Night LSU, Community Bound, Fresh Start, and Umoja. Favorite thing to do: Solve problems, helping people, and video games Recent achievement: Accquired 141 hours of community service from January 2012 to August 2012 Favorite Movies: Gladiator, The Patriot, Ted Plans for the future: Graduate School Campus Life Spotlight showcases the diversity of involved students at LSU. Send nominations to campuslife@lsu.edu with name, email and why they should be in the Spotlight.

LEADING

Applications available at lsu.edu/campuslife

SATURDAY Plant marsh grass in Big

See past spotlights at campuslife.lsu.edu

IMPACT self

Wednesdays, Sept. 19th and 26th

An interactive program to advance your leadership skills from the three perspectives of leadership described by the social change model.

Register at lsu.edu/campuslife

Highland project

SEPTEMBER 24-­28

Highland Elementary School Register at lsu.edu/volunteer

Registration closes September 19th. LSU student volunteers will teach the children at Highland Elementary School about Hispanic Heritage Month, through the reading of a story and a Guatemalan Worry Doll art project.

Sun. Nov. 4 through Sun. Nov. 11 Schedule of events and applications for individual and group participation available now @ lsu.edu/homecoming. including

Homecoming Court Applications *All undergraduate student classifications represented on the Homecoming Court

Service Project: CANapalooza Proceeds benefit the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank

campuslife.lsu.edu      578-­5160

Attendees requiring accommodations for a disability or medical condition should contact Campus Life at 225.578.5160 at least 7 days prior to event.


The Daily Reveille - September 19, 2012  

News, Sports, Entertainment, Opinion

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