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Music: Student rapper performs at South by Southwest, p. 4

Student Government: Candidates debate campus issues, p. 5

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012 • Volume 116, Issue 114

CALLIN’ BATON ROUGE

Newt Gingrich to speak at campus forum on Thursday Kate Mabry Staff Writer

BILL HABER / The Associated Press

Republican presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich addresses supporters gathered at a local restaurant March 16 in New Orleans.

Women’s Basketball: Penn State ends LSU’s season, p. 7

Following Rick Santorum’s visit to an LSU baseball game, Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich is scheduled to make an appearance on campus Thursday. The event is a Tea Party forum and straw poll hosted by the LSU College Republicans, according to Austin Stukins, state grassroots coordinator for Louisiana Team Gingrich 2012. Stukins is an interior design junior at the University. As of Tuesday afternoon, the event was planned for 8 p.m. in the Cox Auditorium. However, due to scheduling confusion, Baton Rouge Tea Party Treasurer Mark Holmes is working with Associate Director for Student Involvement Michelle Lowery to solidify a location. Holmes said Lowery will book a different venue if the auditorium is unavailable. Holmes said he is extending the forum and straw poll invitation to the other presidential candidates as well. If candidates are unable to attend the event, GINGRICH, see page 6

ACADEMICS

Professor takes part in relativity debate

Brian Sibille Staff Writer

A University professor participated in a national debate Tuesday night about Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, hosted by the American Museum of National History. Gabriela González, physics and astronomy professor, was one of six “of the world’s leading voices in this great scientific debate” chosen to discuss recent discoveries about neutrinos that may GONZÁLEZ travel faster than the speed of light, according to the museum’s website, where the debate was live-streamed. The debate was held in honor of scientific author Isaac Asimov and was hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson, a well-known astrophysicist who recognized the University for being the home of a world-renowned gravitational wave observatory. The debate was lighthearted, DEBATE, see page 6

ELECTION WATCH: SG presidential campaigns

‘Be Heard’ campaign requests student involvement Danielle Kelley Staff Writer

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second in a four-part series profiling the Student Government candidates. The articles will be printed in order according to presidential candidate’s last name. Taylor Cox and Carrie Hebert said they promise student voices will “Be Heard” if they are elected as Student Government president and vice president. The two mass communication juniors met at S.T.R.I.P.E.S. before attending their first classes of the fall 2009 semester. “He was the first friend I met at LSU,” Hebert said. Since then, Cox has been

involved in multiple student organizations like LSU Ambassadors and is currently SG’s assistant director of student outreach. Hebert has never been associated with SG. Her extracurricular involvement comes from the Greek system, where she is the LSU Panhellenic Council director of operations. Hebert said despite her inexperience with SG, she is qualified for the vice presidential job. “For two-and-a-half years here I’ve walked around campus. I’ve seen what I liked and I’ve seen what I didn’t like, and now it’s my turn to do something about it,” she said. Cox said in order to influence the administration and faculty on University decisions, he will need the help of all students.

“We will not be people’s microphone. We are going to make a stand. We hope that every student stands alongside of us to make a difference in the University,” Cox said. Cox said he hopes the new provost will incorporate student opinions in budget discussions. However, the University’s Budget Committee, which brainstorms scenarios for the University depending on the size of a cut, does not have a student member. “They know they are stepping onto a battle ground,” Cox said. “Several have mentioned they are excited to work with students. … That’s exactly what I as a leader want to hear from a faculty or administration leader.” BE HEARD, see page 6

XERXES A. WILSON / The Daily Reveille

Mass communication juniors Taylor Cox and Carrie Hebert are running for Student Government president and vice president, respectively, under the campaign “Be Heard.”


The Daily Reveille

page 2

INTERNATIONAL

Nation & World

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

NATIONAL

STATE/LOCAL

Diana’s Kensington Palace home reopens to public after makeover

Former GOP presidential candidate Pawlenty shaves campaign debt

Louisiana lieutenant governor Jay Dardenne backs Mitt Romney

LONDON (AP) — It’s the past home of Queen Victoria and Princess Diana, the future residence of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge and, it’s hoped, a stop on tourists’ London itineraries. Kensington Palace — part museum, part royal abode — is reopening to the public after a two-year, $19-million makeover designed to give visitors a sense of what it’s like to live in a centuriesold building that has witnessed both affairs of state and the heart. French hunt for gunman suspected of fatally shooting seven people

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Former GOP presidential candidate Tim Pawlenty has whittled his campaign debt down to $17,500. The remaining red ink is detailed in a monthly federal campaign report filed Tuesday. It’s down from the nearly half-million dollars Pawlenty owed last fall. Minnesota’s former governor dropped out of the White House race in August after a poor showing at the Iowa GOP’s straw poll. Justice Department committed to protecting gays and lesbians

(AP) — Gov. Bobby Jindal is steering clear of endorsements in the GOP presidential competition, but Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne is jumping into the endorsement game in advance of Louisiana’s presidential primary, backing Mitt Romney. Romney’s campaign announced Monday the support of Dardenne and Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain. Dardenne said he supports Romney’s economic and energy plans in his bid to be the Republican Party’s nominee against Democratic President Barack Obama. Louisiana university leaders at odds over budget plans

TOULOUSE, France (AP) — Police searched southern France on Tuesday for a gunman suspected of fatally shooting seven people in attacks that may have been motivated by neo-Nazi ties or grudges against minorities. The shooter is suspected of carrying out three deadly attacks: leaving four people dead on Monday at a Jewish school in Toulouse, three of them young children; killing two French paratroopers and seriously wounding another Thursday in nearby Montauban; and fatally shooting another paratrooper in Toulouse on March 11.

MUSTAFA NAJAFIZADA / The Associated Press

Afghan men raise the holy mace Tuesday during Nowruz, a celebration of the Persian New Year, at the Imam Ali’s shrine in Afghanistan.

Afghan military deal with the U.S. will respect sovereignty MAZAR-E-SHARIF, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan’s vice president said Tuesday that any longterm military agreement with the U. S. will respect his nation’s sovereignty and will be based on the interests of both countries. Afghanistan and the United States are pressing to get a deal signed to govern the continued presence of U.S. forces in the country after 2014, when the majority of combat troops are scheduled to leave.

wednesday’S KLSU SPECIALTY SHOWs

9PM-11PM Jam spread with big red (jam bands)

11PM-1AM that 80s show with dj mcFly (80s flashback)

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — The Justice Department is “committed to using every tool in its arsenal” to combat bullying and harassment based on sexual orientation and has already made strides in bringing more prosecutions in that area, Attorney General Eric Holder said Tuesday. “I’m proud to say this Department of Justice has never been more committed to this [issue],” Holder said, during a speech at a conference at the University of Texas at Arlington aimed at promoting safe schools and communities for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals.

(AP) — Tensions surfaced Tuesday over the Board of Regents’ plans for dividing dollars among Louisiana’s public colleges as university leaders face lost money for certain campuses. The board is proposing to split about $1 billion in state funding based on its performance-based formula, which considers graduation rates, skills training for high-need job areas and other benchmarks — rather than doling out dollars solely on student enrollment.

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University students Alexandra Alley (left) and Stacey Shubert (right) stand chained to a makeshift jail Tuesday in Free Speech Plaza to demonstrate their view on human trafficking. Submit your photo of the day to photo@lsureveille.

The Daily Reveille holds accuracy and objectivity at the highest priority and wants to reassure the reporting and content of the paper meets these standards. This space is reserved to recognize and correct any mistakes which may have been printed in The Daily Reveille. If you would like something corrected or clarified please contact the editor at (225) 578-4811 or email editor@lsureveille.com.

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Check out the LMFAO entertainment blog to read about coffee addiction in college on “The Full Monty.” Read about the reaction to the women’s basketball game on the Tiger Feed sports blog.

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The Daily Reveille (USPS 145-800) is written, edited and produced solely by students of Louisiana State University. The Daily Reveille is an independent entity within the Manship School of Mass Communication. A single issue of The Daily Reveille is free. To purchase additional copies for 25 cents, please contact the Office of Student Media in B-34 Hodges Hall. The Daily Reveille is published daily during the fall and spring semesters and semi-weekly during the summer semester, except during holidays and final exams. Second-class copies postage paid at Baton Rouge, La., 70803. Annual weekly mailed subscriptions are $125, semester weekly mailed subscriptions are $75. Non-mailed student rates are $4 each regular semester, $2 during the summer; one copy per person, additional copies 25 cents each. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Daily Reveille, B-39 Hodges Hall, LSU, Baton Rouge, La.,70803.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

BATON ROUGE COMMUNITY

The Daily Reveille

page 3

U-High student to compete in wheelchair tennis tourney Lea Ciskowski Contributing Writer

Set in a sport wheelchair equipped with slanted wheels that provide extra balance and more fluid turns, 14-year-old Alex Saporito spins and wheels himself from the baseline to the net and from alley to alley, racquet ready in hand. When he’s not on the court, Alex is a seventh-grade student at the University Laboratory School. Alex will compete in the Cajun Classic Wheelchair Tennis Tournament, which takes place in Baton Rouge today through March 25 at the YMCA Lamar Tennis Center. The Cajun Classic has been held annually since 1989 and is sanctioned by both the International Tennis Federation, ITF, and the United States Tennis Association, USTA. It is also the longest-running professional tennis tournament in Baton Rouge. Nearly 120 “professional and amateur tennis players from 21 nations will compete in the tournament for world-ranking points and thousands of dollars in prize money,” said Jennifer Edmonson, the tournament director. Alex was born with spina bifida, a condition where the backbone and spinal canal do not close before birth, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Alex can walk with crutches but

uses a wheelchair to play tennis and for other activities that require him to put more weight on his legs. Before Alex began playing tennis, he spent his summers and free time playing video games. But his mother, Mary Saporito, wanted him to be more active. Through her own research and a consultation with a physical therapist, Mary found Carlos Roldan, a United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) professional and instructor at Baton Rouge YMCA Lamar Tennis Center, who directs a wheelchair tennis program for all ages. “We enrolled Alex in the program and he has participated in it for almost three years now,” said Scott Saporito, Alex’s father. Alex practices with Roldan and his other students, who range in age from early teens to 60-year-olds, every Saturday for two hours. He increased his court time once he became more serious about the sport, practicing two days during the school week in addition to his Saturday program. Alex also practices with U-High’s tennis team. “I actually received this sport wheelchair at a tournament last year because the directors wanted to recognize my growing dedication to the sport,” Alex said. “I think they knew I was becoming more serious about tennis, and they wanted to provide me with a proper wheelchair.”

Alex has since traveled to Georgia, Kansas, Missouri and California for different tennis tournaments and programs. “We usually travel together,” Scott said. “It gives us a chance to do some things together and to visit places we would not normally visit.” Alex, No. 4 seed in the amateur Division C, will compete in the singles draw and the doubles draw with his partner, Glen Singletary, the No. 1 seed in Division C. The Greater Baton Rouge Community Tennis Association is sponsoring the event. Rusty Jabour, president of the GBRCTA, said the tournament represents the diversity that tennis allows. “We hope that this tournament proves to people that, no matter the age or the ability, they can play this sport,” Jabour said. Cox Communications will televise the Cajun Classic’s finals matches Monday, March 26, on Cox4. “There has never been a wheelchair tennis match televised in its entirety in the United States before,” Edmonson said. Edmonson said Cox hopes to provide more exposure to wheelchair tennis and wants to display the players’ talents. LSU pre-med, pre-physical therapy and kinesiology students will be on hand at the tournament for a service-learning component for

admitted to committing the three burglaries on March 13. Scott, who is unaffiliated with the Unviversity, was charged March 16 with three counts of burglary. He remains in East Baton Rouge Parish prison.

Garfield Street, where the passenger of the vehicle fled on foot. Lalonde said officers detained the driver and identified him as Knox. Officers were not able to find the passenger who fled. After officers identified Knox, Lalonde said they learned he was driving with a suspended license. Upon further investigation, officers found two bags containing about 300 pills. Lalonde said the officers determined the pills to be Oxycodone and Roxicodone. Knox also had more than $1,700 in cash and a loaded handgun in his vehicle. He was arrested at 12:50 a.m. and booked into the East Baton Rouge Parish prison.

AUSTIN BENNETT / The Daily Reveille

U-High seventh-grader Alex Saporito trains Saturday to compete in the Cajun Classic Wheelchair Tennis Tournament held in Baton Rouge.

their classes, and Mike the Tiger will make an appearance as well. The tournament will also host a fish fry and crawfish boil over the weekend. While attempting to describe the different techniques that professional wheelchair tennis players use — J turns, S turns, figure 8’s — Scott Saporito said, “You just have to see

it. You’re going to be amazed.” Tournament play begins at 8 a.m. today and will conclude Sunday, March 25. Admission is free for all matches, including the finals on Contact Lea Ciskowski at lcisckowski@lsureveille.com

CAMPUS CRIME BRIEFS Union McDonald’s employee arrested for theft, possession of controlled substance Marika Johnson of 2122 Caroling St., Baton Rouge, was arrested March 12 for theft and possession of a controlled substance. LSU Police Department spokesman Capt. Cory Lalonde said LSUPD received a report Feb. 29 that said several Lortab pills were stolen from the purse of an employee at McDonald’s in the Student Union. During the investigation, LSUPD investigators identified another McDonald’s employee, 36-year-old Johnson, as a suspect. Lalonde said after speaking with Johnson at her residence, she admitted to taking to the pills and was arrested at 2:30 p.m. Johnson was booked into the East Baton Rouge Parish prison. Man arrested for burglary of vehicles at Nicholson Apartments Officers charged 21-year-old Andre Scott of 239 West Grant St., Baton Rouge, with three counts of burglary of a vehicle. On March 13, LSUPD received three reports of vehicles being burglarized at the Nicholson Apartments. Lalonde said electronic items were stolen from the vehicles. Upon further investigation, Lalonde said LSUPD received information from the Baton Rouge Police Department that Scott was a possible suspect. After being questioned while he was incarcerated at the East Baton Rouge Parish prison, Scott

Man arrested for illegal possession of firearm, possession with intent to distribute Corey D. Knox of 6545 Brownfield Ave., Baton Rouge, was arrested March 17 for possession with intent to distribute pills, illegal carrying of a firearm and driving with a suspended license. At 12:45 a.m., Lalonde said officers were attempting to conduct a traffic stop near Highland Road and Raphael Semmes Drive. The car did not initially stop until the intersection of Highland Road and East

Contact The Daily Reveille’s news staff at news@lsureveille.com

Monday: $14.99 All You Can Eat Wings and $3 Specialty Drinks Tuesday: $3 Margaritas and Mexican Beers....Kids Eat Free Wed: $4.50 34oz Mother Plucker Mugs....Live Trivia at 8pm Thursday: $12.99 All You Can Eat Boneless Wings... $4.50 34oz Mother Plucker Mugs and $5.50 Patron Margaritas. Sunday: $3 Specialty Shots, Specialty Drinks and Margaritas. Everyday: $4 Goose, Crown, Jack and Patron. $3 Jager. Did you attend the Living Expo in the Union March 7th? We want to hear what you thought about it! What was your favorite part about it? Least favorite? Tell us via email: events@lsulegacymag.com Thanks for coming to our event! African American Cultural Center Robing Ceremony sign up & purchase your kente cloth today! $25 Office of Multicultural Affairs (student union 335) or AACC (Hatcher Hall 316) Military Money: Benefits & Budgeting Wednesday, March 21, 2012 1:00 p.m., Peabody 225 Details about your Veteran benefits and learn practical basics about budgeting and savings Presenters: louisiana Department of Veteran Affairs, LSU Student Financial Management Center RSVP at http://fye.lsu.edu/vet-events or call (225) 578-1188 DO YOU HAVE AN OCCURRENCE? Call Becky at the Student Media Office 578-6090, 9AM- 5PM or E-mail: oncampus@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

page 4

BATON ROUGE COMMUNITY

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Baton Rouge sees most AIDS diagnoses nationwide Staff Writer

The number of AIDS diagnoses in Baton Rouge has increased and lifted the Capital City to the No. 1 slot for the most cases per capita nationwide through the year 2010. According to the HIV Surveillance Report released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 33.7 of every 100,000 people in Baton Rouge have an AIDS diagnosis. The New Orleans area has the fifth-most number of AIDS cases, the report found. A.J. Johnson, CEO and founder of the Baton Rouge AIDS Society, said there are several factors behind the city’s climb in AIDS rate. Johnson said the problem is twofold — the community has a lack of awareness and a fear of talking about the issue.

He recommends that everyone supports AIDS awareness, get tested for HIV/AIDS and use condoms. “If you’ve been sexually active and haven’t been tested, you’re part of the problem,” he said. But Johnson said late testing is a major issue in the community. Often, Baton Rouge residents aren’t tested until they’ve become symptomatic, which is what accounts for the number of AIDS cases, according to Johnson. Timothy Young, executive director for HIV/AIDS Alliance for Region Two (HAART), also said his organization has encountered the issue of late testing. He said many people who are already HIV-positive go to the clinic for testing, but when they do, their disease has already progressed from HIV to AIDS. Seirra Fowler, health promotion coordinator for the Student Health

Center, said another problem is testing too early. Fowler said a test won’t show if someone is HIV-positive until three to six months after having unprotected sex. She said one-fifth of people with HIV/AIDS aren’t aware they’re infected. Fowler said she hopes Baton Rouge’s No. 1 ranking will serve as a wake-up call for the community. “I hope it scares people into getting tested,” she said. HIV is becoming an epidemic across the South, and especially among the African-American community, Young said. Lower-income areas lacking access to adequate health care are also heavily affected, he said. Young said he’s unsure why the black community is affected so strongly, but the CDC reports that 1 in 16 black men will be diagnosed

with HIV at some point in their lives. “The most important thing that can be done is for everyone to have an HIV test and know their status,” Young said. Johnson said he believes other metropolitan areas have lower incidences of AIDS because of increased testing and community support. “If you go to New York and go to the AIDS walk, you could have thousands of people outside,” he said. “But if you go to the AIDS walk in Baton Rouge, you’re gonna have enough that you can see at one time — you’re gonna have less than 50 people at that walk. So what does that say about the community?” Both BRASS and HAART offer services to help those affected by HIV and AIDS. BRASS offers testing 24 hours a day — sometimes free of charge, and other times with a fee for service, Johnson said. BRASS also works

MUSIC

One of the University’s own busted a rhyme over the weekend at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas. Aspiring rapper and business management freshman Dale Tabor Jr., deemed “Deeds” behind the mic, performed songs from his upcoming mixtape at District 301, a bar and venue part of SXSW. The budding musician got the chance at SXSW to meet rappers like University alumnus Dee-1, Curren$y and many members of Jet Life Recordings, like Trademark Da Skydiver, Young Roddy and Sir Michael Rocks, said Tabor. “I enjoyed it,” the New Orleans native said. “The audience gave me good feedback. It gave me a lot of drive to go back next year and be more prepared.” The artist is finishing his “New Orleans 2 Baton Rouge” mixtape, which is slated to be finished at the

end of April before final exams. The mixtape is a storybook of Tabor’s experience of moving from New Orleans to Baton Rouge for college. Though the culture has changed around him since the move, he is still the same person he was in the Big Easy, he said. “I’m always going to represent New Orleans, the city where I’m from and that made me who I am,” Tabor said. Tabor started rapping for fun at parties and freestyling with friends until peers suggested he enter the studio, he said. Christian Radke, Tabor’s friend and fellow rapper, knew a studio at a local church that the duo could use. Radke helped Tabor produce music, and the two starting “spittin’” verses together in the studio. They soon took the stage at venues like The Howlin’ Wolf and the House of Blues in New Orleans and The Varsity Theatre in Baton Rouge. “We actually opened for Kreayshawn when she came to Baton

Rouge,” Tabor said. Tabor received his stage name from rapping with his friend “Fish.” Fish would say things like, “My boy D is up to bat next,” and “D is” evolved into “Deeds.” Tabor said the name stuck because he would do almost any thing, or deed, for the people in his life. The rap game is just a hobby for Tabor at the moment. It’s something he considers pursuing in the long run, but school is currently his main focus. “You just have to be patient,” Tabor said. “You gotta grind for it, but if you grind too much, sometimes your gears break.” He plans to attend the festival again next year with a team of promoters in the hopes of playing multiple shows at different venues. “It takes an army of people to get your name out there and an army of people to listen,” Tabor said. Contact Ferris McDaniel at fmcdaniel@lsureveille.com

SUPPORT KLSU SUPPORT STUDENT JOBS MARCH 26- APRIL 1

ome s e r Sco tuff free s

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EVERY THURSDAY $1 U CALL IT drinks 8 to 10pm EVERY SATURDAY Free U CALL IT drinks 8 to 10 plus the Boots and Daisy Dukes Contest $hundreds awarded cash and prizes

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TONIGHT Friday March 23

Contributing Writer

Contact Emily Herrington at eherrington@lsureveille.com

Weekly Specials

LSU rapper makes debut at SXSW Ferris McDaniel

with the faith-based community to encourage communication and awareness among congregations. HAART offers free HIV testing and provides assistance in accessing medication, as well as providing education and awareness and health fairs, Young said. The Wellness Fair is today from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Royal-Cotillion Ballroom of the Student Union, and free HIV screenings will be offered. The Student Health Center also offers testing for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. Fowler said the health center plans to increase its involvement in promoting HIV/AIDS awareness.

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ways you can donate! 1. Call 225- 578-5578 2. Log on www. klsuradio.fm 3. Stop by B51 Hodges Hall All donations support LSU’s Official radio station KLSU 91.1F.m.

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The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

page 5

Candidates debate a variety of topics on diversity

Danielle Kelley Staff Writer

Editor’s note: Candidates are listed in alphabetical order by presidential candidates’ last name. Student Government presidential and vice presidential candidates answered a series of questions Tuesday night during the Diversity Debate hosted by the Black Student Union while more than 100 students listened. The questions centered on diversity topics like students with disabilities, the LGBTQ community and minority funding. When asked about how to raise awareness about sexual violence on campus, Renew LSU’s presidential candidate Bat Brunner mentioned his initiative to update emergency call boxes. He said moving the boxes to darker areas on campus would “reduce the amount of sexual offenses and crime in general.” Taylor Cox, Be Heard’s presidential candidate, suggested

bringing preventive sexual violence information to classrooms, sororities and fraternities to reduce crime. “I hope as a Student Government we can only promote for women and the gentlemen on campus to be more proactive,” Cox said. The candidates also discussed how they would fund minority groups without taking away funding from other organizations. “Landon [Hester] and I would like to represent LSU as a whole. We want to fight budget cuts to our last breath,” said Kristina Lagasse, Your LSU’s vice presidential candidate. Joseph Hollins, the R.E.A.L. Campaign’s vice presidential candidate, said he would help minority groups by finding outside funding rather than taking from other organizations. All vice presidential candidates were asked if they had any initiatives dealing directly with the LGBTQ community. “We want to make everyone feel more comfortable and feel

safe and secure,” said Madeleine Davis, vice presidential candidate for Renew LSU. She did not say whether or not Renew LSU had an initiative directly intended for the LGBTQ community. Carrie Hebert of Be Heard mentioned her initiative to establish a “Diversity Advisory Board.” The board will include members from the LGBTQ community, she said. Lagasse said she wants to connect campus through “an open line of communication.” She did not clarify whether Your LSU did or did not have a direct initiative for the LGBTQ community. Joseph Hollins responded that, though the R.E.A.L. Campaign does not have any direct initiatives for the LGBTQ community, he and his brother, presidential candidate Joshua Hollins, want “more cohesion” on campus and in SG. Though it isn’t on his pushcard, Your LSU’s presidential candidate Landon Hester said he would like to have an LGBTQ representative on his cabinet.

! G N I

PHOTO STORY

Masked figures silently frolicked through the quad Tuesday morning in a silent performance for perplexed onlookers. The masqueraders are students in assistant professor Nick Erickson’s stage movement class, practicing the skills of silent acting. Erickson said the performance was like a midterm, allowing students to express all they had learned in the class which focuses on the importance of movement, body language and non-verbal acting in stage production. The exercise began with the students clustering in the middle of the quad for a choreographed routine which steadily evolved into full improvisation.

S S I

M

The vice presidential candidates also discussed what creative events SG could hold to “create more cohesiveness amongst the student population.” Hebert mentioned their Tiger Nights initiative. The monthly event would show a movie or host a guest speaker, she said. Hebert also mentioned an ongoing SG service project. “If we’re all making LSU a better place, it’s for the better of the community,” she said. Davis criticized the current SG for not getting outside students involved. She has never been affiliated with SG. “I have realized how it looks on the outside,” she said. “The reason why so many students aren’t involved in SG is because they feel like it’s an elite circle. … If I were to be elected vice president, I think it would be very informative to have an open-door policy.” The last question of the night asked each candidate to select which of their opponent’s initiative was the most unfeasible. Cox questioned Your LSU’s

bike share initiative. He said SG has already been told it would be too costly to put into effect. Brunner also confronted Your LSU and its phone and laptop super chargers initiative. He said the super chargers have already been paid for. Hester rebutted Brunner and said he would bring more super chargers across campus. His running mate Lagasse said she thought the wording of some Scantron initiatives was misleading. Joshua Hollins said he did not like the generalizations of all of his opponents. He said he would like to see concrete solutions. “How you going to do it? Not generalizations, but real solutions for real problems for real students,” he said. The next SG debate will be Thursday at 6 p.m. in the LSU Student Union Live Oak Lounge.

Contact Danielle Kelley at dkelley@lsureveille.com

Your Senior Portrait

from the LSU Yearbook!

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We can publish a high quality head shot taken by a professional, as long as the studio is willing to give us the publishing rights. Contact Brianna at bpaciorka@gmail.com.

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Contact Brianna at bpaciorka@gmail.com to set up a time to take a photo in Hodges Hall on campus! Be Sure to include full name, major, and concentration by March 31st INCOMPLETE INFORMATION WILL NOT BE SUBMITTED TO THE YEARBOOK

photos by XERXES A. WILSON / The Daily Reveille


The Daily Reveille

page 6

ACADEMICS

New college raising money, donors School will open on July 1 Shannon Roberts Contributing Writer

The College of Human Sciences and Education, a new college that will comprise six current college units, will open July 1, and plans are already in place to raise money for scholarships and endowments. Wayne Miller, senior director of development in the College of Education, is spearheading fundraising for the college. He has been at the College of Education for a little more than four years, and this role is an expansion of his work, he said.

BE HEARD, from page 1

If elected, Cox and Hebert hope to establish a Diversity Advisory Board to hear minority students’ opinions. Part of Be Heard’s campaign includes the student seat for Cox on the LSU Board of Supervisors. Current SG President Cody Wells also said he would seek the position when running for president last year. Wells lost the position to Ryan Perkins, who represents the LSU Health Sciences Center at Shreveport. “Taylor and I definitely feel we need to find a common ground [with administration and faculty],” Hebert said. “That’s the only way things will be done.” Cox plans to institute a letterwriting program to fight budget cuts and a day for all students to protest at the Capitol to protect “the value of our degree.” SG has hosted several letterwriting campaigns in the past. EducateLA, which was run by several SG members last year, organized a Capitol protest last spring that had dismal attendance. “It’s going to take us banding together as a student body,” Cox said. “If that means all 20,000 of

GINGRICH, from page 1

Holmes said he hopes representatives for the candidates will speak on their behalf. During the straw poll at the Cox Auditorium, Holmes said ballot cards will be distributed during the event to record participants’ responses. “Anyone can come regardless of party affiliation,” Holmes said. “We’ve got a good shot at filling up the auditorium.” Holmes said audience members will be able to ask questions to candidates or representatives. Questions may also be submitted online to the BRTP for consideration. Participants should arrive early and expect some sort of security, Holmes said. He also solicited to other tea parties around the state to get involved in the straw poll. “We’re considering the possibility of having multiple simultaneous events,” he said. Additionally, Holmes said he is considering creating an online ballot

Miller is meeting with appointed directors from each of the separate merging units to plan strategies for meeting possible donors. Their goal is to identify potential donors and connect them back to the units for which they have passions, Miller said. “It’s not going to be one size fits all,” he said. “It’s going to be directed at each individual donor or alum’s passion for their college.” Miller plans to have these strategies in place by the time of the college’s opening, he said. Jeff McLain, vice president for development for the LSU Foundation, said his office is actively seeking potential donors because people rarely come to the University to give monetary gifts anymore.

us going to the state Capitol to let Bobby Jindal know … that we are here for a purpose and that is to get an education.” Some changes Cox and Hebert want to make at the University include rerouting the Tiger Trails buses, moving classroom booking online, placing microwaves in vending areas across campus and creating more study areas in Middleton Library. Hebert said other SG presidents and vice presidents were not as successful because they did not speak with students regularly. “I don’t think [J Hudson] rallied the students enough,” she said. “If he had taken the time to talk to students … I think he would have had much greater success. His heart was in the right place.” If elected, Cox said he would incorporate other candidates’ approaches toward the budget. “[Joshua and Joseph Hollins’] approach is definitely different and unique; Carrie and I have a totally different approach,” Cox said. “Regardless of what happens, I know Contact Danielle Kelley at dkelley@lsureveille.com but is concerned about an online ballot’s accuracy. “We want to be careful about an online ballot and make sure we have control over it,” he said. On March 10, Gingrich won the state Tea Party caucus in Abita Springs. Ron Paul followed in second place.

Contact Kate Mabry at kmabry@lsureveille.com

“We’re out there actively engaging alumni and donors to join us in making LSU the best place it can be,” McLain said. The College of Human Sciences and Education won’t be all that different from the way its units function currently, but it will offer more options for students, McLain said. Miller said the ultimate goal and top priority is to find donors who will make endowments. Contact Shannon Roberts at sroberts@lsureveille.com

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 DEBATE, from page 1

with panelists joking about the complexity of their scientific studies and differences between science in the United States and Europe. González, who has been at the University since 2001, has a “superb” reputation among the international science community, Michael Cherry, physics department chair, told The Daily Reveille before the debate. “She is an important member of the department,” Cherry said. He said González is an expert in the area of relativity. She’s a member of the team at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory in Livingston, or LIGO, a project comprised of hundreds of scientists

around the world that tries to study light speeds and detect ripples in space-time. She was chosen as the project’s spokesperson to communicate progress and findings to the scientific community, Cherry said. González spoke mostly about the LIGO project during the debate, and said it was “measuring effects of gravity never seen before.” She has the ability to understand the complexity of scientific concepts like relativism and communicate in an understanding way, Cherry said. He said Tuesday’s debate focused on new findings in special relativity, and González was speaking as an “impartial outsider.” Contact Brian Sibille at bsibille@lsureveille.com


Sports

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

End of the line

page 7

Manning could be risky for Denver MIC’D UP

MICAH BEDARD Sports Columnist

Down 14-7 with 12:12 to play in the first half, LSU went on an 8-0 run to take a one-point lead, sparked by four points from junior guard Bianca Lutley, who finished the game with 14 points and 10 rebounds for her first double-double of the season. Lutley’s layup at the 10:57 mark of the first half gave the Lady Tigers their first lead of the contest. “I thought our team did a good job offensively getting the looks that we needed,” Caldwell said. “We didn’t bring the same

In a far less arrogant and self-fulfilling manner than LeBron James, Peyton Manning is taking his talents to the Rocky Mountains. The former Indianapolis Colts’ quarterback finalized his five-year, $96 million deal yesterday to become the newest starting signal caller for the Denver Broncos. That’s a lot of money for a lot of uncertainty. Just in case you’ve been living under a rock for the past year, Manning missed the entire 2011 NFL season with a neck injury. He’s been officially cleared by doctors to resume football activities. But that still doesn’t convince me he will return to the Peyton Manning who once set the NFL record for touchdowns in a season. Andrew Brandt of the National Football Post reported that Manning will make $18 million for the 2012 season. If he passes a physical in March 2013, he’ll be guaranteed $40 million in 2013 and 2014. Mind blown. Although I can’t blame Manning for taking such a gargantuan offer, what was Denver thinking?

PENN STATE, see page 15

MANNING, see page 15

Lady Tigers’ season comes to a close with 90-80 loss to Penn State BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

LSU freshman forward Krystal Forthan (12) sits in the middle of the court as Penn State players celebrate Tuesday after the Tigers’ 90-80 loss to the Nittany Lions in the NCAA tournament at the PMAC.

Scott Branson Sports Contributor

The LSU women’s basketball team’s season came to an end Tuesday night in the PMAC at the hands of No. 4 seed Penn State, 90-80. In their last three NCAA tournament appearances, the Lady Tigers (23-11) have lost in the second round. The Lady Lions (26-6) set the pace in the game’s opening minutes, jumping out to a quick 9-0 advantage. PSU shot 3-for-4 during the stretch, including a three-pointer

from sophomore guard Maggie Lucas just 10 seconds into the contest. Lucas tallied 19 points in the first half behind a 5-of-6 shooting effort from beyond the arc. The Lady Lions’ 90 points is the highest total conceded by the Lady Tigers this season, surpassing the 81 points scored by Vanderbilt on Jan. 29. “Penn state is a very explosive team with very explosive guards,” said LSU coach Nikki Caldwell. “When you play a team like Penn State, they’re going to make you pay for those defensive mistakes.

BASEBALL

Offense comes alive in 15-5 victory Moore hits insidethe-park home run Hunter Paniagua Sports Writer

There’s a sentence in the Alex Box Stadium ground rules that warns fielders if a ball appears to be stuck in the right field wall, it actually isn’t. That rule came into play in the seventh inning Tuesday after freshman first baseman Tyler Moore laced a line drive to rightcenter field. The ball rolled to the wall, and Southern center fielder David Wright threw his hands in the air, calling the ball unplayable. But Moore didn’t stop running. Umpire Chris Symons trotted

to the outfield, examined the ball, and overruled Wright, awarding the inside-the-park home run to Moore. The homer, which drove in three runs and helped contribute to the offensive breakout from the Tigers in a 15-5 victory for No. 11 LSU (17-4) against Southern (9-11), came as a surprise to many, including junior first baseman Mason Katz. “If we were in Vegas, those odds would have been the highest odds ever,” Katz said. “He’s the slowest kid on our team, one of the slowest kids probably in the [Southeastern Conference], and he’s getting an inside-the-park home run.” Moore came off the bench to go 2-for-3 with four RBIs, and was one of five LSU players to drive in multiple runs, leading

LSU coach Paul Mainieri to say that Moore’s production Tuesday could land him more playing time in the future. “I’ve been waiting for that swing,” Mainieri said. “I really want to get more of a left-handed presence in our lineup, and now it gives me more of an option there.” The scoring outburst came as a welcome sign for an offense that has struggled throughout the season. The Tigers found themselves in a rare position of having to bail out the pitching staff, as Southern matched LSU’s run production early in the game. LSU jumped to an early lead, scoring three runs in the first inning, but the Jaguars matched OFFENSE, see page 15

TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

LSU freshman outfielder Chris Sciambra slides into third base Tuesday during LSU’s 15-5 victory against Southern in Alex Box Stadium.


The Daily Reveille

page 8

MEN’S BASKETBALL

LSU BASKETBALL TEAM SEASON BY SEASON COMPARISON 70 2009 - 2010 season 2010 - 2011 season 2011 - 2012 season

60 50 40 30 20 10 Points per game

Opponents’ points per game

Rebounds per game graphic by CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

Tigers show marked improvement compared to last two seasons Albert Burford Sports Contributor

The LSU men’s basketball team didn’t make it to the NCAA tournament this season. It didn’t achieve 20 wins, and it didn’t come close to contending for the Southeastern Conference regular season title. But the Tigers did plenty of things they haven’t done in three years — they produced a winning record and they qualified for a postseason tournament. The Tigers even saw progress in fieldgoal percentage, where they finished ranked No. 303 out of 345 Division I teams, at 40.5 percent, up from No. 316 last season and No. 314 in 2009-10. And scoring isn’t the only way LSU has improved. The Tigers have seen bigger improvements in rebounding than in any other capacity of their game. At the conclusion of the 2010-11 season, LSU ranked No. 186 in Division I with 34.7 rebounds per game. After this season, the Tigers rank No. 49 in the country with 37 rebounds per game. That stat will likely only

improve in the next season as LSU returns its two leading rebounders in junior center Justin Hamilton and freshman forward Johnny O’Bryant III. LSU coach Trent Johnson said both players will need to get bigger, stronger and faster during the offseason. “Those two are going to log a lot of minutes, and they should, because it’s hard to get a player of that caliber and that size to come in and have an impact like they can have,” Johnson said. “There just aren’t a lot of guys out walking around like Justin and Johnny right now out of high school and junior college.” Johnson said O’Bryant, a fourstar recruit in high school, needs to hone his raw talent. “One of the biggest things he needs to do is he has to learn to take care of the ball, and he will,” Johnson said. “He’s an 18-year-old with a man’s body.” LSU’s defense held its opponents to their lowest season scoring average against the Tigers since the 2006-07 season, at 64.2 points per game.

The Tigers also specialized in forcing turnovers and minimizing their own turnovers. LSU posted a +1.6 turnover margin, its best since the 2002-03 season. But while LSU improved its team scoring, sophomore guard Andre Stringer went through a slump, shooting 34.9 percent from the field on the season, while sophomore guard Ralston Turner shot 37 percent from the field. “You can’t live with it, and I don’t believe [their percentage reflects their talent],” Johnson said. “I think more of it is, quite frankly, them wanting to win so bad that they don’t have a unique ability to relax and say, ‘look, make plays.’” Johnson said he feels confident that LSU will continue its improvements next season. “My confidence doesn’t come from the past,” Johnson said. “My confidence comes from what’s in that locker room.”

Contact Albert Burford at aburford@lsureveille.com

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

SOFTBALL

LSU defeats Ga. Tech, 2-1, in midweek game Albert Burford

Sports Contributor

The LSU softball team wasn’t fazed by a midweek outof-conference game before its first Southeastern Conference road trip of the season. The Tigers (20-8) pulled out a 2-1 win against Georgia Tech (19-14) in a game played through an off-and-on drizzle. The Yellow Jackets struck first after putting a runner on third base for three consecutive innings. Georgia Tech freshman second baseman Chelsie Thomas crossed home plate in the fourth inning as LSU freshman shortstop Dylan Supak overthrew senior first baseman Heidi Pizer. The Tigers responded in the bottom of the same inning as an attempted pick-off throw to first base allowed sophomore outfielder Alex Boulet to steal home for the score. “I saw her get turned around,” she said. “So I just took off.” Sophomore third baseman Tammy Wray stepped up to the plate next and drove freshman second baseman Rikki Alcaraz home with an RBI single. “Even after an inning where they scored we were able to come back the exact same and get two

runs,” said senior pitcher Brittany Mack. “It was great that when they got the momentum, we took it right back from them.” LSU had another chance to score in the fifth inning when junior catcher Lauren Houston stepped up to the plate with the bases loaded. Houston struck out looking to strand the three runners, but two runs proved enough for the Tigers. Mack gave up five hits and no earned runs while throwing nine strikeouts to improve to 9-4 on the season. “Bottom line is, Brittany Mack was phenomenal tonight,” said LSU coach Beth Torina. “I thought she was really tough to hit for the entire game. It was one of her best performances of the year.” The Tigers have won 10 of their last 11 games. “When we’re clicking on all cylinders and we’re all healthy, this team is going to be a very, very tough team to beat,” Torina said.

Contact Albert Burford at aburford@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

FOOTBALL

page 9

Offensive line impresses as Tigers prepare for Pro Day

Wide receivers return kickoffs Chris Abshire Sports Writer

Rain forced most of the LSU football team’s Tuesday practice indoors, and the Tigers held a light scrimmage to prepare for the annual Spring Game, which is only 10 days away. “I enjoyed the scrimmage,â€? said LSU coach Les Miles. “We completed some balls, and the offense moved the football well against the ďŹ rst defense. But not

without a challenge, which is how it’s supposed to be.�

PRO DAY AWAITS LSU will host its annual Pro Timing Day in the Indoor Practice Facility on Thursday, and nine former Tigers are scheduled to work out in front of pro scouts. “We like to see our guys move to the next step in their careers, and we like that guys like [defensive tackle Michael] Brockers and [cornerback Mo] Claiborne get a chance to show off in a familiar place,� Miles said. On Thursday morning, the hopeful NFL prospects will be measured and have their vertical

jump, bench press, broad jump and 40-yard dash numbers, among others, recorded. They will then work out with individual NFL coaches in the afternoon and receive personal evaluations.

OFFENSIVE LINE IMPRESSES Miles said the offensive line has especially impressed the coaching staff in scrimmages so far, with Tuesday evening’s session being no different. Miles, a former offensive lineman at Michigan, indicated that losing two starters from last year’s crew won’t be an issue with the depth the line is developing.

BASEBALL

Sports Writer

Few players need motivation to leg out a blooper and turn a single into a double, but a pair of LSU players added a little incentive to encourage taking that second base. Junior right ďŹ elder Raph Rhymes and junior ďŹ rst baseman Mason Katz crafted a bet to see who could hit more doubles by the season’s end. It started last year as a competition between Katz and former outďŹ elder Mikie Mahtook, but as the season dragged on, the race eventually formed around Katz and Rhymes. “That’s a fun thing we try to get going,â€? Katz said. “Last year, it startKATZ ed with me and Mikie competing for a race and then he started hitting homers, and I was able to run away with the doubles until Raph started coming along.â€? RHYMES Katz won handedly in 2011, hitting 21 doubles and beating Rhymes by a three-double margin. Rhymes still doesn’t enjoy talking about Katz’s victory. “I was pretty upset because he got a whole year to talk about it,â€? Rhymes said. “This year, I haven’t been on top of my game. I got to catch up. I can’t let him beat me two years in a row.â€? Katz took the early lead in 2011, hitting his ďŹ rst double in the fourth game of the season against McNeese State on Feb. 22. Katz continued to build his advantage during a streak of 17 consecutive plate appearances in which he reached base. By the end of the streak, Katz had seven doubles compared to Rhymes’ three. Rhymes’ deďŹ cit in the doubles race isn’t a mark on his productivity, but more a result of where he’s hitting the ball. Of Rhymes’ 38 hits this season, 32 have been singles.

Rhymes said jokingly that he might have to start ignoring any stop sign ďŹ rst-base coach Will Davis throws up in order to get more doubles. “I’ve got to start hitting some doubles somehow,â€? he said. “I’ll just keep rolling. If I hit it up the middle, I’ll just keep going.â€? Katz doubled once again against Southern on Tuesday, but before that hadn’t hit a double since March 4, allowing Rhymes to cut the deďŹ cit to just two. But as Rhymes draws closer, Katz hasn’t let up on the trash talk. “He’s been letting me know that the competition is still on,â€? Rhymes said. “He was the champion last year, and I think he reminds me of it every day. I can’t let him win this year. Having to deal with that again, I can’t let that happen.â€? This year, Katz and Rhymes may not be the only two in position to lead the team in doubles. Senior third baseman Tyler Hanover and senior shortstop Austin Nola trail Katz by two, and senior designated hitter Grant Dozar has ďŹ ve doubles this season. “Last year it was pretty clear early that me and Raph were starting to go away with it,â€? Katz said. “But a lot of guys are coming up with doubles, so we might have to add some people into the bet.â€? One person who hasn’t been let into the bet is LSU coach Paul Mainieri, who hit one double in 1976, his one season playing for LSU. Mainieri said he wasn’t aware of the players’ friendly competition. “It’s nice if players have little internal competitions like that,â€? Mainieri said. “They push each other to a higher level by doing that. I hope they tie and they each hit about 30.â€? As for the parameters of the bet, Katz said that’s something he’s not yet prepared to share. “That is conďŹ dential right now,â€? he said. “Maybe later on as the season goes, me and Raph will come out with it, but we like to keep it quiet right now.â€? Contact Hunter Paniagua at hpaniagua@lsureveille.com

KICKOFFS AN OFFENSIVE GAME With LSU losing its two featured kickoff returners from last season, cornerbacks Claiborne and Ron Brooks, the Tigers are turning to the other side of the ball for their replacements. A wide receiver committee of sophomore Odell Beckham Jr.

— who had ďŹ ve returns for 120 yards in 2011 — sophomore Jarvis Landry, freshman Paul Turner and senior Russell Shepard have taken the return reins this spring, according to Miles. “Odell has some experience there, but I know they’re enjoying the opportunity,â€? Miles said. “They’re having fun trying to outdo the other.â€?

Contact Chris Abshire at cabshire@lsureveille.com

MILES OF IMPROVEMENT

Katz, Rhymes compete to hit most doubles Hunter Paniagua

“It looks like a veteran bunch out there, and that’s led by Josh Dworaczyk and Chris Davenport,� Miles said. “Whether it’s [sophomore] Elliot Porter in a reserve role at center or [freshman] Trai Turner knocking guys off the line, that’s a position we like this spring.�

CATHERINE THRELKELD /

The Daily Reveille

LSU football coach Les Miles greets 16-yearold Thomas Loupe (center), the victim of a gunshot wound to the chest in February, at spring practice on Tuesday. Loupe, son of Baton Rouge Metro Councilman Chandler Loupe (left), was involved in a drug deal on Mary Lou Drive in Baton Rouge. “That’s a person that had some unfortunate circumstances,� Miles said. “The opportunity to make somebody smile is something we always embrace.�

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The Daily Reveille

page 10

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Despite rainy weather, Lady Tigers push past Ohio State, 4-2 Ian Fontenot Sports Contributor

The LSU women’s tennis team picked up a key non-conference victory against No. 66 Ohio State, 4-2, at W.T. “Dub” Robinson Stadium in a match that took six hours to complete. Coming off a weekend doubleheader that saw split results, including a 4-3 loss against No. 26 Minnesota and a 4-0 win against Prairie View A&M, the Lady Tigers were able to secure their ninth win of the season before entering the remaining Southeastern Conference schedule. “It seems like every time we step on the court, we’re in a war,” said LSU coach Tony Minnis. “Ohio State is always a very solid team, and Coach Chuck [Merzbacher] is one of the best [coaches] in the country.” After a brief rain delay, No. 49 LSU (9-6) got on the board first by sweeping through doubles. LSU senior Whitney Wolf and junior Keri Frankenberger took down Kara Cecil and Kelsey Haviland, 8-6, on court 1. On court 2, senior Olivia Howlett and sophomore Yvette Vlaar defeated Fidan Manashirova and Gabby Steele, 8-6. Junior Kaitlin Burns and sophomore Ariel Morton wrapped up doubles play for the Lady Tigers, beating Ohio State’s Kelsey Dieters and Noelle Malley on court 3, 8-6.

Wolf kept LSU’s momentum going as she defeated Cecil on the top court, 6-1, 6-3. On court 5, Dieters became the first Buckeye on the board with a 6-3, 6-1 win against junior Ebie Wilson. Ohio State (5-9) then evened the match at 2-2 as Steele took down Frankenberger, 7-5, 6-3, on court 4. Yvette Vlaar regained the lead for good for the Lady Tigers as she defeated Malley on court 6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5). On court 2, Howlett battled from behind against Haviland in her second set for a 6-3, 7-5 victory to clinch the match for the Lady Tigers. With rain rolling in, Burns and Manashirova left their match unfinished on court 3. “I’m really pleased we were able to pull it out,” Minnis said. “Its good coming off of those tough couple of losses to get back into the win column.” Part two of the scheduled doubleheader against Grambling State will be rescheduled due to inclement weather. The Lady Tigers will be back in action this weekend as they host No. 12-ranked Tennessee on Friday and travel to Athens, Ga. on Sunday to face No. 7 Georgia.

Contact Ian Fontenot at ifontenot@lsureveille.com

XERXES A. WILSON / The Daily Reveille

[Left] LSU junior tennis player Kaitlin Burns prepares a backhand in her doubles match against Ohio State on Tuesday at Dub Robinson Stadium. [Top] LSU senior tennis player Whitney Wolf hammers a backhand in her doubles match. The Lady Tigers beat the No. 66-ranked Lady Buckeyes, 4-2, one day after the LSU men’s tennis team fell to the Ohio State men’s tennis team, 1-6.


The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

SPORTS BRIEFS Courville wins Freshman of the Week honors for third time LSU freshman gymnast Rheagan Courville was named Southeastern Conference Freshman of the Week for the third time this season following her performance in Friday’s meet against West Virginia, the league office announced Tuesday. Courville earned her fourth all-around title of the year with a season-high tying 39.500, while picking up her seventh vault title of the season and helping lead LSU to tie its season-high score of 196.850 in the team’s final home meet of the season. The showing brought her total to a team-leading 17 individual titles this season — the most by a Tiger freshman since April Burkholder won 20 titles in 2003. The Baton Rouge native is the first LSU gymnast to earn the honors three times in one season since the SEC began awarding the distinction in 2009. Three track and field athletes win four Athlete of the Week honors Following their performance in Saturday’s outdoor season opener at the Louisiana Classics meet, three members of the LSU track and field teams earned four spots on the Southeastern Conference’s Athlete of the Week list, which was announced Tuesday. Freshman sprinter Aaron Ernest was named both the SEC Men’s Runner of the Week and SEC Men’s Freshman of the Week after claiming three event titles in collegiate outdoor debut. The New Orleans native

claimed the 100-meter dash title, setting a new wind-legal personal record with a time of 10.31 seconds, ranking him No. 3 in the NCAA. Ernest added the 200-meter dash title to his outing, running a 21.29 into a headwind of 1.5 meters per second. A duo of Tiger discus throwers swept the SEC Field Athlete of the Week honors, with freshman Rodney Brown winning the SEC Men’s Field Athlete of the Week and senior Samia Stokes being named SEC Women’s Field Athlete of the Week. Brown set a personal-best throw of 190 feet, 8 inches on his second attempt of Saturday’s competition en route to a secondplace finish in his first collegiate outdoor appearance. Miles opens practice to student body next Thursday LSU students will get a unique opportunity next week. LSU coach Les Miles and the Tiger football team are opening practice to the student body on Thursday, March 29 for “LSU Student Appreciation Day.” Any LSU student with a valid ID can watch practice that day at the Charles McClendon Practice Facility from 4 to 6 p.m. The players and coaches will also talk to students following practice for a meet-and-greet. “We have the best student section in college football,” Miles said in a news release. “This is just a small way of saying thanks to our student body for their continued support and helping make Tiger Stadium the best place to play in college football.”

LSU has advised students who wish to attend practice to park in front of the LSU Soccer Stadium and enter the practice facility in the northwest corner of the complex, on the side closest to the vet school. Hornets ink former Tiger Chris Johnson on Tuesday The New Orleans Hornets have a former Tiger on their roster again. Chris Johnson, 26, was waived by the Portland Trailblazers on March 15 and claimed off waivers by the Hornets, the team announced Tuesday. Johnson played for the Trailblazers since March of last season and also played briefly for the Boston Celtics in the 2010-11 season. Prior to his stint with the Celtics, he was a member of the NBA Development League’s Dakota Wizards. He averaged 16.2 points and 9.2 rebounds in 35 games for the Wizards and was named the 2010-11 Defensive Player of the Year for the league. The 6-foot-11, 210-pound Johnson played for LSU from 2005-09, averaging 7.2 points, 5.2 rebounds and 2 blocks in 88 games. He was named to the 2009 Southeastern Conference All-Defensive Team and the 2009 All-Louisiana Third Team.

Contact The Daily Reveille’s sports staff at sports@lsureveille.com

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page 11

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The Daily Reveille

Opinion

The

page 12

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Please, no Gallery criticism

Peanut

As the premiere of “Mad Men” approaches, what do you want to see happen in the show’s fifth season?

Gov. Jindal nears dictator status as he ignores his constituents’ complaints THE C-SECTION

compiled by PAUL BRAUN

“I would like to see them go more in-depth in the advertising. I would like to see them get more into Joshua Smith the work life.”

interdisciplinary studies senior

“I want to see Sterling and Joan get back together. They do love each other.” Katherine Bruner chemical engineering sophomore

“I want to see more focus on the main characters and fewer characters with two-episode Hilary Soileau mass communication subplots.” sophomore

“I would like to see them kind of go back to their roots, get back into the ad industry and focus less on the relationship Joseph Gipson political science building.” sophomore “I would like to see more about how the changing culture affects the advertising work they do and the struggles they Paige Shugart face in the mass communication sophomore industry.”

CHRIS GRILLOT Columnist After witnessing Gov. Bobby Jindal mismanage Louisiana education for the last few years and the anger he spurred across the state, you’d think the governor might try to get back on his constituents’ good side. But he obviously has other plans. Five months into his second term, Jindal has ordered higher education officials not to complain to him, fired an outspoken public official and pissed off nearly every public school teacher in the state. The first big mishap occurred Feb. 9, when Jindal unveiled his 2012-13 spending plan for Louisiana. That same day, LSU System President John Lombardi wrote an e-mail to higher education officials, informing them Jindal expects gratitude and wants no “negative messages about higher ed funding this year.” Basically, Jindal doesn’t want to hear your complaints. Why? Probably because he doesn’t care. Part of a democratic decisionmaking process is to accept and consider criticism, not refuse to receive it. How can we point out flaws if Jindal won’t accept any criticism? Strike one. On March 7, Jindal fired Martha Manuel, the state’s executive director of the department of elderly affairs, the morning after she spoke out against his plan to move the Office of Elderly Affairs from the Governor’s Office to the Department of Health and Hospitals. Jindal’s reasoning: Manuel’s logic was “not in line” with his thinking. In another instance, The Huffington Post reported Jindal suddenly fired Melody Teague, head of elderly affairs, in 2009 on the grounds of poor performance in handling the state’s food stamps in the wake of Hurricane Katrina — which was four years earlier. Interestingly, she had spoken out against his policies in a forum the day before she was fired. Coincidence?

The Daily Reveille Editorial Board

Matthew Jacobs Chris Branch Ryan Buxton Bryan Stewart Andrea Gallo Clayton Crockett

Editor-in-Chief Associate Managing Editor Associate Managing Editor Managing Editor, External Media News Editor Opinion Editor

GERALD HERBERT / The Associated Press

Gov. Bobby Jindal addresses the Louisiana State Legislature’s opening session March 12 in Baton Rouge.

Those aren’t the only two times Dictator Jindal has fired his critics. In 2008, he dismissed James Champagne, former executive director of the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission, after he and Jindal disagreed on motorcycle helmet laws. Strike two, Bobby. With these actions, Jindal has proven he simply won’t deal with critics. He’ll fire them if he can. I’m glad I don’t work for Jindal. I’d probably lose my job over this column. Most recently, Jindal has ignored teachers’ dire concerns regarding his education plan. If you’ve paid any attention to the news lately, you know public schools in some areas were shut down for two days last week because so many teachers went to protest at the Capitol. I think we can accurately say they feel passionate about this cause, and it’s completely warranted. The teachers are mostly opposing two parts of Jindal’s education plan. One part will create a voucher system for students who live in districts where public schools are rated a C or lower to go to private schools. This essentially makes private

schools become public, and will only help a few people. Private schools won’t be able to accept all the students, and some districts won’t even have the option. Another part of the plan will basically eliminate tenure for teachers. A quick look at the bill validates teachers’ worries. Now, teachers can receive tenure if they get “satisfactory” evaluations three years in a row. Under the new bill, teachers must get “highly effective” evaluations five years in a row. The evaluations are based on how students perform on a standardized test at the end of the year. You can be a good teacher and still have bad students. This bill holds teachers responsible for underachievers. Unfortunately, teachers can’t force every child to learn — some children just don’t want to. Brown University, the governor’s alma mater, should have taught Jindal that. Jindal introduced the plan March 13 and has been accused of forcing it through the Legislature quickly so it won’t be reviewed. Rep. James Armes told the Leesville Daily Leader he has never seen a bill pushed so fast through the

Editorial Policies & Procedures

The Daily Reveille (USPS 145-800) is written, edited and produced solely by students of Louisiana State University. The Daily Reveille is an independent entity within the Manship School of Mass Communication. Signed opinions are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editor, paper or University. Letters submitted for publication should be sent via e-mail to opinion@lsureveille.com or delivered to B-26 Hodges Hall. They must be 400 words or less. Letters must have a contact phone number so the opinion editor can verify the author. The phone number won’t be printed. The Daily Reveille reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for space consideration without changing the original intent. The Daily Reveille also reserves the right to reject any letter without notification of the author. Writers must include their full names and phone numbers. The Daily Reveille’s editor-in-chief, hired every semester by the Louisiana State University Media Board, has final authority on all editorial decisions.

legislative session. He also brought up another good point. The bill was brought before the House of Representatives on Tuesday, which is conveniently the scheduled day for the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP) in the state’s public schools. Teachers couldn’t travel to protest on Tuesday, once again fulfilling Jindal’s desire to ignore criticism. Strike three, Führer. Overall, Jindal has proven his disregard for his constituents again. Except this time it’s only taken him five months in office. Like I said earlier, a democracy only works when leaders accept citizens’ criticism. Without it, we’re looking at a dictatorship, similar to the way Huey P. Long ran Louisiana in the 1930s. And it looks like Jindal’s heading down that road. Chris Grillot is a 20-year-old English and mass communication senior from New Orleans. Follow him on Twitter @TDR_cgrillot.

Contact Chris Grillot at cgrillot@lsureveille.com

Quote of the Day

“Dictators ride to and fro upon tigers which they do not mount. And the tigers are getting hungry.”

Winston Churchill British prime minister Nov. 30, 1874 — Jan. 24, 1965


The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Opinion

page 13

HEAD to HEAD

Is Obamacare good health care reform?

No. Obamacare’s individual mandate limits freedom, subsidizes insurance industry. MANUFACTURING DISCONTENT

DAVID SCHEUERMANN Columnist It’s been two years since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, affectionately referred to as “Obamacare,” passed, yet the debate over the health care bill is still raging in Washington and around the country. Republican presidential candidates have repeatedly called for the law’s repeal throughout their campaigns, and Republican congressmen are using the law’s upcoming anniversary to drum up support for their cause. As Obamacare heads to the Supreme Court next week, many of its provisions will come under review. Although many of President Barack Obama’s supporters would trip over themselves to defend the bill, Republican critics have a point about the bill’s failings. The No. 1 criticism of Obamacare is its implementation of an individual mandate for health insurance. Under the law, citizens are told they must buy basic health insurance or pay a fine to the IRS. Forcing citizens to pay for a service they may not want is a power that the federal government seems to have pulled out of its hat. This lack of choice goes against the very fabric on which this nation was founded: freedom. By allowing the government to use its coercive power to affect our purchasing habits, we are setting a precedent for submitting our individual liberty in the hope that the government knows best. Public opinion seems to agree as well. An ABC/Washington Post poll found that 67 percent of Americans are opposed to the individual mandate and would like to see it scrapped from the law. However, it’s interesting how many liberals are willing to support this mandate considering that its biggest fans are the health insurance companies — companies that are not darlings of the left. The insurance companies argue that forcing all Americans to buy coverage will help them pay for more sickly patients while keeping costs down. Of course, it isn’t surprising that the insurance companies would argue for the mandate. It essentially guarantees that the government will force uninsured Americans to become new customers for the insurance companies. Subsidies for those who would have trouble buying insurance also means that insurance companies would benefit from taxpayer money. It is arguably socialism for the health insurance industry. This wasn’t always the case, however. When Obama was first campaigning for his health reform bill, he alluded to the inclusion of a public option several times. This was a government-run program that would compete in a market alongside private insurance companies. In fact, a large number of polls around the time the health care bill was being debated showed that most Americans favored the inclusion of a public option, with the greatest majority favoring it as a separate choice

among other private options. However, the provision was nowhere to be found in the final bill. This is because Obama had brokered a deal with for-profit hospital lobbyists to ensure that a public option would not be included in the final bill in exchange for their political support. The deal was, in fact, already negotiated while Obama was campaigning on the possibility of including a public option in the final bill. This fact demonstrates how Obamacare was an appeal to special interests more than it was a bill drafted in order to truly address the problems with health care in this country. Yes, there are many provisions in the law that are beneficial to the American people. These include providing coverage to Americans with “pre-existing conditions,” allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ plans until they are 26, and requiring insurance companies to publicly justify premium increases. However, the law is a testament to the problems facing American governance today. It continues the expansion of the federal government’s powers by mandating individuals to purchase health insurance, and it subsidizes big business by funneling taxpayer money and taxpayers themselves into the welcoming arms of the health insurance industry. David Scheuermann is a 20-year-old mass communication and computer science sophomore from Kenner. Follow him on Twitter @TDR_dscheu.

Contact David Scheuermann at dscheurmann@lsureveille.com

Yes. Obamacare protects consumers from insurance companies, needs to go further. SHOCKINGLY SIMPLE

ANDREW SHOCKEY Columnist One simple promise has proven undeniably effective at garnering support from conservatives in the last dozen or so Republican debates. “I will repeal Obamacare.” Few words carry as many negative connotations as the president’s health care plan, but in the face of vocal and often delusional critics, it’s no surprise Obamacare has turned into a dirty word. The president’s health care plan has been criticized as everything from a socialist plot to destroy private enterprise to a conspiracy to cut costs through death panels and forced contraception. In reality, Obamacare is a relatively benign piece of legislation that seeks to provide consumer’s protection from health insurance companies. The law helps the uninsured afford health insurance, prevents claim denials by insurers and fights discrimination based on preexisting conditions. In fact, Obamacare is so benign that many universal health care proponents, including myself, feel while the law may be a step in the right direction, it ultimately falls far short of the universal health care system Americans need and deserve. American citizens have a right to basic health care to better protect their inalienable right to life. Obviously, there is no section in the Constitution or Bill of Rights that directly establishes this right, but the Founders recognized their own fallibility in the Ninth Amendment, essentially saying the rights of the people are not limited to those in our founding documents. Citizens should enjoy a right to health care to protect their right to life in the same

way they enjoy legal representation to protect their right to liberty. If a citizen is accused of a crime and cannot afford representation, a lawyer is provided at taxpayer expense. The accused are granted representation because it provides them with the best possible chance to defend their rights to life and liberty in the face of false accusations. Falsely imprisoning citizens unable to defend themselves for crimes they did not commit would constitute a failure of the state to protect their right to liberty because the citizens did nothing to deserve a suspension of their rights. Similarly, citizens who require medical treatment to protect their lives from unforeseeable illness or injury deserve assistance from the state because they did nothing to put their lives in jeopardy. A universal health care system is morally defensible under these rights, but it still faces some practical concerns. Critics argue universal health care would hamper patient-doctor interactions and take away patients’ right to choose their doctors. In reality, a single-payer system would have minimal effects on patient-doctor interactions since a significant number of doctors are already paid through a single-payer system — Medicare. Arguments over doctor choice also rest on the fanciful premise that patients currently enjoy the freedom to choose any doctor they want. Health insurers routinely determine the hospitals and doctors their customers can visit. Many citizens are concerned a universal health care system would be economically unsustainable and point to the struggling Medicare system as proof. While Medicare is a single-payer system, it exclusively pays for the care of the elderly who generally have much higher health care costs than the rest of the population. If the costs of their care were spread out over the rest of the population, costs would become much more manageable as younger citizens provide less drain on health care funds while contributing more. “Death panels” was the Republican buzzword of the Obamacare debate, but anyone afraid of a shadowy council of accountants deciding who lives and who dies should look no further than the health insurance industry. In 2007, 17-year-old Nataline Sarkisyan died of complications to leukemia after Cigna, her health insurance provider, refused to cover the cost of a liver transplant her doctors estimated would give her a 65 percent chance of survival. Obamacare and universal health care will not create death panels. They might in fact help shut down a few. Andrew Shockey is a 21-year-old biological engineering junior from Baton Rouge. Follow him on Twitter @TDR_Ashockey.

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama signs the Affordable Care Act on March 23, 2010, in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Supreme Court deliberations over the law will start Monday.

Contact Andrew Shockey at ashockey@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

page 14

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012 MANNING, from page 7 After the Broncos’ front office finally got its chance to see the prodigal son Tim Tebow lead his team to the playoffs in his first year as the full-time starter, it’s shocking they would make such a bold move. Let’s think about these tortured Broncos fans. What are they going to do with their Tebow jerseys? Tape over the five with duct tape and draw an eight over it? After all, the 15 that Tebow donned last season ranked No. 2 in NFL jersey sales. It’s crazy to think that Tebow has gone from the savior of the Broncos to trade bait in the blink of an eye. There’s no doubt the national media will be all over Denver from this point forward. However, if Manning fails to live up to his lofty expectations, the Broncos’ brass will hear it from the Denver faithful. While the issue of wavering fan support is one of the reasons Manning is a risky sign for Denver, his play on the field is what I’m most concerned about. In today’s NFL, with late and unnecessary hits at a premium, I feel like it’s only a matter of time before he goes down. Hard. Linebackers like Ray Lewis and James Harrison aren’t going to feel any sympathy for Manning when he sets foot on the field in 2012. In fact, I think more big hitters around the league will be neck-hunting him. The question still remains: Will Peyton still be an elite quarterback? I vote no. Manning was made such a top priority because of one man — Denver’s vice president of

PENN STATE, from page 7

type of defensive intensity that we are typically known to have. That has a lot to do with Penn State’s ability to spread you.” LSU senior forward LaSondra Barrett scored her first bucket with 2:51 left in the first half on two free throws, which pushed the Lady Tigers to a 31-30 lead. Barrett ‘That senior finished with class is going a team-leading to be a class 18 points and 12 rebounds in that’s not replaceable, her final collegiate game. nor will we On the try to.’ heels of seven points from Nikki Caldwell three different LSU women’s Lady Tigers basketball couch — sophomore guard Adrienne Webb, sophomore forward Theresa Plaisance and freshman forward Krystal Forthan — LSU took a 37-36 lead to halftime. After the break, the Lady Lions took a brief lead before a 6-0 LSU scoring run gave the Lady Tigers a 47-42 advantage. PSU answered with a layup before Plaisance knocked down her second three-pointer of the game to push the Lady Tigers lead to four with 14:40 to play. The Lady Lions retook the lead with 13:21 left in the contest on a three-pointer from senior

football operations and former Bronco John Elway. Manning turns 36 on Saturday, meaning in the final year of his contract he will be 40. Elway has blinders on. He’s convinced that, much like himself, Manning can deliver two Super Bowl titles at the ages of 37 and 38. That won’t happen. Manning and Elway are two completely different quarterbacks. Elway was able to use his feet to create plays while Manning is the prototypical pocketpasser. Elway had future Hall-ofFamers offensive lineman Gary Zimmerman and tight end Shannon Sharpe. He also had running back Terrell Davis in the backfield, MVP of Super Bowl XXXII . The current Broncos’ roster is a far cry from the talent level seen of the Super Bowl victors of 1998 and 1999. Denver has to start building to win a championship this year. There’s no guarantee Manning will still be playing in 2013 — if he can complete the entire 2012 season. Peyton is determined to prove he still has some gas left in the tank. I just don’t think his neck will hold up long enough for the world to see that. Micah Bedard is a 21-year-old senior from Houma. Follow him on Twitter @DardDog.

Contact Micah Bedard at mbedard@lsureveille.com guard Zhaque Gray. Just more than minute later, Lutley sank two free throws to give the LSU a 54-53 lead with 12:15 remaining. After trading buckets, an 8-2 PSU run in the next 2:46 culminated in a 61-57 lead for the Lady Lions with 7:44 to play. The Lady Tigers contained Lucas to start the second half and held her without a basket until the 3:04 mark. But she finished with a game-high 30 points and played all but two minutes in the contest. LSU cut its deficit to two with 4:33 to play on a layup from senior forward Courtney Jones, but the Lady Lions pulled away in the game’s final minutes, riding an 8-3 run over 1:38 to extend its lead to eight with 37.5 seconds remaining. “That senior class is going to be a class that’s not replaceable, nor will we try to. We’re just going to try to groom every body to be ready to go next year,” Caldwell said. Additional reporting by sports writer Luke Johnson.

Contact Scott Branson at sbranson@lsureveille.com

The Daily Reveille OFFENSE, from page 7

that total in the second. The Tigers responded with three of their own in the next half-inning and proceeded to cross the plate in seven different innings. “They didn’t give up,” said Katz, who went 2-for-3 and had three RBIs. “Every time we scored in the beginning, they scored. It was good for us to not just get a lead and lull.” LSU pitchers Cody Glenn and Joe Broussard allowed four runs in the first three innings, but only one was earned as senior third baseman Tyler Hanover

page 15 committed a pair of errors on routine grounders. “Those two throws just got away from him,” Mainieri said. “It wasn’t because a lack of focus or concentration. I’d rather see him make some errors when it doesn’t really matter.” Southern didn’t score again after the fifth inning, as six different LSU pitchers combined to shut out the Jaguars. It started with freshman Carson Baranik, who entered in the sixth inning, making his first career appearance after serving a suspension for a DUI earlier in the season. Baranik threw six

consecutive balls to start, but settled down and struck out two of the four batters he faced. “I’m just grateful for the opportunity to come back out here and represent LSU in a good way,” Baranik said. “I really do apologize to all the fans for what I did. It was a very big mistake that I made, and I learned from it.”

Contact Hunter Paniagua at hpaniagua@lsureveille.com


page 16

The Daily Reveille

Wednesday, March 21, 2012


The Daily Reveille

Opinion

The

page 12

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Please, no Gallery criticism

Peanut

As the premiere of “Man Men” approaches, what do you want to see happen in the show’s fifth season?

Gov. Jindal nears dictator status as he ignores his constituents’ complaints THE C-SECTION

compiled by PAUL BRAUN

“I would like to see them go more in-depth in the advertising. I would like to see them get more into Joshua Smith the work life.”

interdisciplinary studies senior

“I want to see Sterling and Joan get back together. They do love each other.” Katherine Bruner chemical engineering sophomore

“I want to see more focus on the main characters and fewer characters with two-episode Hilary Soileau mass communication subplots.” sophomore

“I would like to see them kind of go back to their roots, get back into the ad industry and focus less on the relationship Joseph Gipson political science building.” sophomore “I would like to see more about how the changing culture affects the advertising work they do and the struggles they Paige Shugart face in the mass communication sophomore industry.”

CHRIS GRILLOT Columnist After witnessing Gov. Bobby Jindal mismanage Louisiana education for the last few years and the anger he spurred across the state, you’d think the governor might try to get back on his constituents’ good side. But he obviously has other plans. Five months into his second term, Jindal has ordered higher education officials not to complain to him, fired an outspoken public official and pissed off nearly every public school teacher in the state. The first big mishap occurred Feb. 9, when Jindal unveiled his 2012-13 spending plan for Louisiana. That same day, LSU System President John Lombardi wrote an e-mail to higher education officials, informing them Jindal expects gratitude and wants no “negative messages about higher ed funding this year.” Basically, Jindal doesn’t want to hear your complaints. Why? Probably because he doesn’t care. Part of a democratic decisionmaking process is to accept and consider criticism, not refuse to receive it. How can we point out flaws if Jindal won’t accept any criticism? Strike one. On March 7, Jindal fired Martha Manuel, the state’s executive director of the department of elderly affairs, the morning after she spoke out against his plan to move the Office of Elderly Affairs from the Governor’s Office to the Department of Health and Hospitals. Jindal’s reasoning: Manuel’s logic was “not in line” with his thinking. In another instance, The Huffington Post reported Jindal suddenly fired Melody Teague, head of elderly affairs, in 2009 on the grounds of poor performance in handling the state’s food stamps in the wake of Hurricane Katrina — which was four years earlier. Interestingly, she had spoken out against his policies in a forum the day before she was fired. Coincidence?

The Daily Reveille Editorial Board

Matthew Jacobs Chris Branch Ryan Buxton Bryan Stewart Andrea Gallo Clayton Crockett

Editor-in-Chief Associate Managing Editor Associate Managing Editor Managing Editor, External Media News Editor Opinion Editor

GERALD HERBERT / The Associated Press

Gov. Bobby Jindal addresses the Louisiana State Legislature’s opening session March 12 in Baton Rouge.

Those aren’t the only two times Dictator Jindal has fired his critics. In 2008, he dismissed James Champagne, former executive director of the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission, after he and Jindal disagreed on motorcycle helmet laws. Strike two, Bobby. With these actions, Jindal has proven he simply won’t deal with critics. He’ll fire them if he can. I’m glad I don’t work for Jindal. I’d probably lose my job over this column. Most recently, Jindal has ignored teachers’ dire concerns regarding his education plan. If you’ve paid any attention to the news lately, you know public schools in some areas were shut down for two days last week because so many teachers went to protest at the Capitol. I think we can accurately say they feel passionate about this cause, and it’s completely warranted. The teachers are mostly opposing two parts of Jindal’s education plan. One part will create a voucher system for students who live in districts where public schools are rated a C or lower to go to private schools. This essentially makes private

schools become public, and will only help a few people. Private schools won’t be able to accept all the students, and some districts won’t even have the option. Another part of the plan will basically eliminate tenure for teachers. A quick look at the bill validates teachers’ worries. Now, teachers can receive tenure if they get “satisfactory” evaluations three years in a row. Under the new bill, teachers must get “highly effective” evaluations five years in a row. The evaluations are based on how students perform on a standardized test at the end of the year. You can be a good teacher and still have bad students. This bill holds teachers responsible for underachievers. Unfortunately, teachers can’t force every child to learn — some children just don’t want to. Brown University, the governor’s alma mater, should have taught Jindal that. Jindal introduced the plan March 13 and has been accused of forcing it through the Legislature quickly so it won’t be reviewed. Rep. James Armes told the Leesville Daily Leader he has never seen a bill pushed so fast through the

Editorial Policies & Procedures

The Daily Reveille (USPS 145-800) is written, edited and produced solely by students of Louisiana State University. The Daily Reveille is an independent entity within the Manship School of Mass Communication. Signed opinions are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editor, paper or University. Letters submitted for publication should be sent via e-mail to opinion@lsureveille.com or delivered to B-26 Hodges Hall. They must be 400 words or less. Letters must have a contact phone number so the opinion editor can verify the author. The phone number won’t be printed. The Daily Reveille reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for space consideration without changing the original intent. The Daily Reveille also reserves the right to reject any letter without notification of the author. Writers must include their full names and phone numbers. The Daily Reveille’s editor-in-chief, hired every semester by the Louisiana State University Media Board, has final authority on all editorial decisions.

legislative session. He also brought up another good point. The bill was brought before the House of Representatives on Tuesday, which is conveniently the scheduled day for the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP) in the state’s public schools. Teachers couldn’t travel to protest on Tuesday, once again fulfilling Jindal’s desire to ignore criticism. Strike three, Führer. Overall, Jindal has proven his disregard for his constituents again. Except this time it’s only taken him five months in office. Like I said earlier, a democracy only works when leaders accept citizens’ criticism. Without it, we’re looking at a dictatorship, similar to the way Huey P. Long ran Louisiana in the 1930s. And it looks like Jindal’s heading down that road. Chris Grillot is a 20-year-old English and mass communication senior from New Orleans. Follow him on Twitter @TDR_cgrillot.

Contact Chris Grillot at cgrillot@lsureveille.com

Quote of the Day

“Dictators ride to and fro upon tigers which they do not mount. And the tigers are getting hungry.”

Winston Churchill British prime minister Nov. 30, 1874 — Jan. 24, 1965


The Daily Reveille: March 21, 2012