Hunting Guide 2022

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2022

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2022 HUNTING GUIDE

2 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

37th Anniversary

Pheasant Country PF Chapter

BANQUET AND AUCTION Largest PF Membership Banquet in US and Canada As seen on NBC Sports!

PHEASANT COUNTRY CHAPTER #872 Mitchell, SD

“Mitchell’s Pheasant Opener Kickoff Celebration”

At the World’s Only Corn Palace

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14TH, 2022 Doors Open at 5:00 p.m.

Includes Hor D’oevres served by: The Depot • DAR’S Cooking • County Fair • Dimock Cheese with a cash bar. The Corn Palace will be decked out in beautiful fall colors and the Starfire Band will be playing. 2022 Wild Dakota Calendar girls will be here! OVER 130 GUNS TO BE GIVEN AWAY! Auction includes:

Sodak-Gun • Round firepit • Rolling Hills Lodge • Granite Springs Hunt, Mark Anderson, Mary Hunt Art work John Green, and Nicole Heitzman Original Artwork Finished at Banquet • Hand Carved Items by Troy Bollock Bonnie Bullock Quilt • Barb Goldammer’s hand Made Hunting Clothes & Doll • Matt Koop Pheasant and Duck Mount • and many more unique items.

Numerous Raffles:

• 37th Anniversary 5 Gun Raffle • Wheel of Guns - 6 Guns -60 Chances- $100.00 per chance • Cabela’s Table • Blarney’s Raffle • Coca Cola Raffle • Silent Auction • $1,000 Case of Cash • 100 Gun Raffle Bash • Miller Lite Table • Shot Glass Raffle • Mystery Gun • Fast Draw Raffle and many more raffles! Veteran’s Raffle, Free to all Veterans.

TICKETS:

Tickets can be purchased at the Corn Palace Box Office from now until the banquet starts, anytime at Sodak or Cabela’s on October 13th & 14th, or from any committee member. Tickets are sold on a first come basis. We have had a huge response and apologize in advance for anyone who does not receive a ticket. Only 700 tickets sold and $60.00 per ticket includes membership and dinner. Big Gun tickets online also.

Contact:

Dave Allen, President (605)996-8649 or j_allen01@hotmail.com Doug Backlund, Banquet Chair (605) 656-0010 Kevin Bruscher,Treasurer (605) 770-9129 for more information

Order Tickets www.pheasant-country.org

Pheasant Country Chapter 872

Make plans to attend

All are welcome!


2022 HUNTING GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 3

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT

South Dakota hunting license and season information BY MITCHELL REPUBLIC

Here’s a list of what hunters need to know ahead of the hunting seasons in the Mitchell area. Hunting season dates

• Archery: Sept. 1 to Jan. 1, 2023.

► Pheasant

• East River: Nov. 19 to Dec. 5; Dec. 10-18 (antlerless only in Dec.)

• Resident only: Oct. 8-10 • Statewide: Oct. 15 to Jan. 31, 2023. • *Future opening dates: The pheasant season traditionally opens on the third Saturday in October, which is Oct. 21 in 2023 and Oct. 19 in 2024.

• Cubby’s, 1000 S. Burr St. or 1700 W. Havens Ave. • Northside Sinclair, 1905 N. Main St.

• Youth small game, ages 12-15: $10

• Black Hills: Nov. 1-30

• SoDak Sports, 515 E. Spruce Ave.

• Waterfowl (valid two, five-day periods, lottery only): $116

• Muzzleloader: Dec. 1 to Jan. 1, 2023.

• Walmart, 1101 E. Spruce Ave. • Westside Sinclair, 1527 W. Havens Ave.

• *Shooting hours: 10 a.m. Central time to sunset for the entire season. (Central time is used for opening shooting hours statewide.) ► Prairie chicken/grouse

► Antelope

• Sept. 17 to Jan. 1, 2023.

• Archery: Oct. 17 to Oct. 31.

► Ducks

• Firearms: Oct. 1 to Oct. 16.

• Low Plains — north zone: Sept. 24 to Dec. 6

► Fall turkey

• Senior combination (age 65 and up): $40

• Nov. 1 to Jan. 31, 2023.

• Small game: $33

*For those seasons not listed here, see the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks Department website at gfp.sd.gov.

• One-day small game: $12

• Low Plains — south zone: Oct. 22 to Jan. 3, 2023. • High Plains: Oct. 8 to Jan. 12, 2023. ► Deer • Mentored/Apprentice: Sept. 10 to Jan. 1, 2023

• Small game (two 5-day periods): $121

• Runnings, 1313 S. Burr St.

• West River: Nov. 12-27; Dec. 10-18 (antlerless only in Dec.)

(Mentored hunting is available for South Dakota residents only, and hunter safety practices are required for individuals ages 1216 who are not participating in a mentored hunt.)

• Low Plains — middle zone: Sept. 24 to Dec. 6

• Habitat Stamp: $25

Places to buy hunting licenses in Mitchell

Cost for licenses ► Resident fees • Habitat Stamp: $10 • Combination (small game and fishing): $55

• Youth small game (ages 12-15): $5 • State migratory bird certification: $5 • Predator/varmint: $5

• Cabela’s, 601 Cabela Drive.

• Furbearer: $30

• Coborn’s, 1800 N. Main St.

► Non-resident fees

• Waterfowl (valid 3 days, lottery only): $81 • Predator/varmint: $40 • Furbearer: $275 • State migratory bird certification: $5 • Shooting preserve (annual): $121 • Shooting preserve (5-day): $76 • Shooting preserve (1-day): $46 • 2022 licenses are valid Dec. 15, 2021 through Jan. 31, 2023. • 2023 licenses will be valid Dec. 15, 2022 through Jan. 31, 2024. *Habitat Stamps are required for most hunting, fishing and trapping in South Dakota. License holders can purchase one-time, good for the entire license year. Purchase is not required for oneday licenses, any youth license, private shooting preserve licenses or landowner hunting licenses.


4 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

2022 HUNTING GUIDE

PHEASANT FACTS TO KNOW There are some things you may know and may not about this colorful bird:

► Weight: Male ring-necked pheasants weigh 2 to 3 pounds, while hens average 2 pounds. ► Length: Males measure 24-35 inches long with a rooster’s tail often accounting for more than 20 inches of that length. Hens are smaller with a much shorter tail. ► Flight speed: 38-40 mph but can reach 60. ► Favorite foods: corn, seeds, and insects. ► Preferred habitat: undisturbed grass. ► Average nest initiation: early May. ► Average incubation start: late May. ► Length of incubation: 23 days. ► Average first hatch: mid-June. ► Average clutch size: 12 eggs. ► Average nest success: 40-60 percent. ► Average hen success: 50-70 percent. ► Average rate of chick survival: 50 percent. ► Major nest predators: fox, racoon, skunk. ► Major adult predators: man, fox, hawks, owl. ► Survival rate: mild winter, good habitat, 95 percent. ► Survival rate: severe winter, good habitat, 50 percent. ► Survival rate: mild winter, poor habitat, 80 percent. ► Survival rate: severe winter, poor habitat, 20 percent. Source: Mitchell Republic

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2022 HUNTING GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 5

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SPORTSMEN AGAINST HUNGER READIES FOR ANOTHER KEY FALL TO FEED SD IN NEED

YEARS

ANNIVERSARY 1972-2022

Organization has collected more than 1 million pounds of meat in last 30 years BY RON FOWLER Sportsmen Against Hunger

Due to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) being found by the Department of Game, Fish and Parks in deer and elk in many counties of central and western South Dakota, Sportsmen Against Hunger (SAH) required testing of donated deer and elk harvested by hunters in these areas the last two years. However, testing results indicated a very small percentage of the deer tested positive for CWD. With the low CWD occurrence rate, and since public health officials have found no link between CWD and any neurological disease in humans, SAH is no longer requiring testing of donated deer and elk for CWD. When adding to this the knowledge that hunters do not knowingly harvest sick animals, and game processors do not process meat which does not appear healthy, the risk of processed donated deer and elk meat being diseased or contaminated is extremely low. Since there is still some degree of risk, SAH is putting a “Notice” label on the SAH burger bags of donated venison to say that the venison has not been tested for disease or lead contamination. This will let clients of food pantries, where the donated venison is made available to families in need, decide for themselves if they want to take and eat the meat. Even with the requirement that hunters who took deer or elk from out-of-state or the CWD endemic

area of West River South Dakota had to have their animal tested for CWD before it could be donated, the number of animals donated remained high. In 2021, a total of 152 deer were donated by 134 hunters. Other game donated by sportswomen and sportsmen last year included seven antelope, 258 pheasants, 2,417 Canada geese, and 480 walleye. With the additional salvage processing of elk and deer, such as from the Rapid City deer reduction program, the total amount of donated processed game meat last year was 18,615 pounds. Adding this amount to historical donations since inception in 1993, Sportsmen Against Hunger, the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks, participating game processors, and food pantries associated with Feeding South Dakota has now been responsible for more than 1 million pounds of game meat being provided to families near the poverty line. This translates into 4 million meals of meat for these families in need. ​The mission of South Dakota Sportsmen Against Hunger is to encourage and facilitate donation of wild game meat to individuals in need in South Dakota. For families struggling with food insecurity, a primary shortage is fresh meat. Many families enjoy game meat because of its nutritional value, low fat, and high protein.

Mike Kuchera, Owner of Mike Kuchera’s South Dakota Guide Service Inc., Mitchell, South Dakota, will be celebrating his 50th year in the pheasant hunting business with the 2022 South Dakota pheasant hunting season beginning on October 15th. Mike started hunting pheasants as a kid on the family farm in southeastern North Dakota with his dad and brothers. As a youngster he developed a deep passion for hunting birds and for wildlife and developing bird habitat. After high school, Mike moved to Mitchell and later created his own pheasant hunting guide service. In 1985, he became one of the founding members of Pheasant Country Ltd., Mitchell, which later affiliated with Pheasants Forever. It was in the late 80’s when he met Debra, who became his wife and partner in the hunting service. Debra runs a pack of Labrador retrievers and has run numerous hunting dog breeds throughout the years. She trains her dogs specifically for Mike’s service and handles them throughout the season. Many of the hunters comment that they “just love to see Deb’s dogs work”. Mike and Debra thank God for their health and the many blessings bestowed upon them and for enabling them to continue following their passion for hunting and sharing it with others. Over the years, Mike and Debra have been able to escort groups to Scotland many times, which has been a bonus. They are thankful for the many friends they have gained from across the globe through this business. May everyone have a fun and safe 2022 pheasant hunting season!

P.O. Box 10, Mitchell, South Dakota 57301 Call: (605) 996-1120 | Email: mkuchera@santel.net Website: www.sdpheasants.com • Find us on


6 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

2022 HUNTING GUIDE

Two pheasants in a public hunting area northeast of Mitchell. Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

MILD WINTER, NORMAL SPRING AND SUMMER RAINS HAVE EXPECTATIONS HIGH FOR 2022 PHEASANT SEASON Habitat looking excellent for birds, GF&P says BY ERIK KAUFMAN Mitchell Republic

PIERRE, S.D. — Timely rains across South Dakota have set the stage for an excellent pheasant hunting season in 2022. That’s according to the recently released 2022 Ringneck Outlook from South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, which indicates the additional moisture in prime pheasant habitat country has helped break the drought conditions that plagued much of the territory during the 2021 season. “South Dakota experienced spring and summer rains across much of the primary pheasant

range, which have been very positive for nesting and broodrearing habitat,” the report reads. “These rains turned much of the primary pheasant range lush and green, providing a surge in plant growth beneficial for nesting and brood-rearing habitat.” The primary pheasant habitat zone occupies the east-central portion of the state and runs from the North Dakota border and Nebraska border. The Ringneck Outlook essentially replaced the traditional pheasant brood count survey, which was discontinued in 2020

after 70 years. The new report is not based on science-backed numbers and is compiled through more anecdotal sources than its predecessor. Tom Kirschenmann, director of wildlife for South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, indicated last month that conditions did indeed look good for hunters hoping to bag some birds this fall. “We’re in a really, really good spot right now when it comes to pheasant hunting and pheasant production out there right now,” Kirschenmann told the GF&P commission at its meeting in July.

“Since three or four months ago, we’ve had some significant rainfall across the state, in particular in the primary pheasant range. Habitat conditions look fantastic out there right now.” The combination of mild winters, such as the one in 202122, and normal temperatures and precipitation in the spring and summer have traditionally provided a boost to pheasant health and numbers, Kirsechnman said. Bird survival over the winter was likely excellent, according to the report, which means more nesting hens in the spring.

SEASON: Page 7


2022 HUNTING GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 7

SEASON From Page 6 Rains also mean more water and food for young pheasants, which increases the likelihood for survival during the crucial first four to six weeks of life. “In the grand scheme of things, habitat conditions look great, whether it be finalizing those initial nesting attempts or renest attempts, we’re going to have quality habitat out there,” Kirschenmann said. “With great habitat, we’re going to have a brood habitat where those hens are going to be raising those young, and with that lush habitat comes a high number of bugs and insects, which is the primary food source for those young birds.” Those older birds who were able to come through the mild winter are also more likely to survive the occasional severe weather event that can roll through during the summer, Kirschenmann said. “We’ve had significant storm events all across South Dakota, not just in pockets. The great thing about those is that typically as birds get a little bit older they can survive those types of events,” Kirschenmann said in July. “Very localized events can certainly have an impact on bird numbers, but when you look at it from a statewide perspective, we don’t see or forecast a negative impact to pheasant production out there.”

SEASON: Page 8

Young pheasants are seen in a field in Sanborn County, South Dakota. Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

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8 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

2022 HUNTING GUIDE

SEASON From Page 7 The pheasant hunting season annually provides a major positive impact to the state economy, drawing hunters from inside the state, outside and state and even internationally. In 2021, the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks estimates that resident hunters generated $86.4 million in revenue for the state, while non-resident hunters brought in $160.4 million, for a total of $246.8 million. Resident hunters, which numbered 54,411 last year, and non-resident hunters, which numbered 75,606, harvested 473,728 and 593,695 birds, respectively, for a total of 1,067,423 total, according to statistics from South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks. Brown County topped the list of dollars generated by resident and non-resident hunters in 2021, with $4.2 million and $12.4 million brought in, respectively, for a total of $16.6 million. Lyman County was second with $2.4 million and $9.3 million, totaling $11.7

million; Brule County was third with $2.3 million and $9.2 million for a total of $11.5 million and Tripp County came in fourth with $2.2 million and $9 million for a total of $11.3 million. Davison County just missed the top 10, coming in 11th with $2.1 million and $5 million, totaling $7.1 million. Officials hope to see this year’s pheasant season at least match, if not exceed those numbers. And while conditions look positive for the start of the season, there are potential challenges every year. “Certainly there is always the concern this time of year of all the haying activity going on, but that is nothing new. That is something that happens and coincides with the pheasant hatch and those new broods coming out,” Kirschenmann said. The 2022 Ringneck Outlook also indicated that South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks is prioritizing cultivating good habitat for state wildlife, such as the kind found on land

enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. The GF&P is looking at enrolling the James River Watershed Conservation Resource Program (CREP) to the fully allocated 100,000 acres and enrolling 25,000 in a new Big Sioux Watershed CREP. But all in all, hunters of every stripe should find birds when they head out on the hunt in the coming weeks. “We are very, very positive and very optimistic of what we’re seeing right now, just because of the rain events and what that has done for habitat conditions, and we anticipate those things will carry over into the fall,” Kirschenmann told the commission in July. “It’s great to have rain because it always has an impact on that necessary habitat for nesting and for brood survival and raising those young chicks out there. I would say things look beyond fantastic right now.” The resident-only pheasant hunting season runs from Oct. 8-10 and the traditional season from Oct. 15 through Jan. 31.

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Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 9

NEW PARTNERSHIP IN SD SET TO BOLSTER PRAIRIE POTHOLE REGION BY LANDON DIERKS Mitchell Republic

$17M in investment expected over next five years to improve wetlands

MITCHELL — A new partnership between Ducks Unlimited and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is part of a five-year project and $17 million investment, and much of eastern South Dakota, in addition to parts of North Dakota and Montana, is set to benefit. Part of a region known as the Prairie Pothole, 34 of 44 counties in eastern South Dakota are included in the target area of a Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) known as the “Scaling Soil Health in the Prairie Pothole Region” project. Announced in June 2022, the project’s goal is “to help farmers and ranchers improve soil health, restore grasslands and improve rotational livestock grazing infrastructure,” per a Ducks Unlimited press release from June.

POTHOLE: Page 10

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A drake and hen mallard take flight. Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

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2022 HUNTING GUIDE

10 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

POTHOLE From Page 9 With RCPP roots in the so-called farm bills of 2014 and 2018 and funding coming from the USDA as part of a five-year grant, the project has several avenues available to reach one overarching outcome. “One of our primary goals is to keep those wetlands intact and healthy and try to find ways to work with farmers and ranchers to keep them involved in working lands conservation in a way that makes sense for them,” said Bruce Toay, the manager of conservation programs for Ducks Unlimited in South Dakota. According to Toay, a resident of Ipswich, a new opportunity was identified in the more recent farm bill through an element called the “alternative funding arrangement.” Generally, it allowed increased flexibility for conservation partners to deliver cost-share programs, leading to this three-state RCPP proposal, which was put together in 2020. “The project will enable the integration of cover crops and small grains into reduced tillage cropping systems and the restoration of large tracts of native grassland. Livestock grazing infrastructure assistance for things like fencing and water development will also be available,” Ducks Unlimited said. As Toay puts it, the RCPP, which also includes conservation partners in South

Dakota such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, South Dakota Grassland Coalition and South Dakota Soil Health Coalition is “bringing together a lot of attractive conservation practices in a way that we hope will be attractive to farmers and ranchers.” But there are also components of the project that include education — part of which includes mentorship programs available through various partners — and data collection to help quantify the RCPP’s effectiveness in efforts such as improving soil health. Though the current RCPP and grant have a five-year timeframe connected, Toay wants to see such efforts continue for many years beyond. “It has to make sense for them to have a long-lasting impact,” Toay said of the project and accompanying programs. “As these farm bills develop, I’m hopeful we can continue a Phase 2 or 3 down the road once we figure out a model that works. There are always things that we haven’t thought of, so part of the program is we want to learn from the producers we work with. … We certainly want to be adaptive in a way that’s going to help us build better in the future.”

"ONE OF OUR PRIMARY GOALS IS TO KEEP THOSE WETLANDS INTACT AND HEALTHY." -Bruce Toay, the manager of conservation programs for Ducks Unlimited in South Dakota

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2022 HUNTING GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 11

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CWD REGULATIONS REMAIN IN EFFECT FOR FORESEEABLE FUTURE IN SD BY ZECH LAMBERT Mitchell Republic

MITCHELL — Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is an issue that’s becoming more and more prevalent throughout South Dakota. CWD is a disease that affects deer, elk, reindeer, sika deer and moose, according to the CDC. It often isn’t noticeable in the animal until later stages, but it spreads easily through bodily fluids. In recent years, the disease has spread east of the Missouri River, and in an attempt to stop the human spread of the disease, the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks implemented regulations roughly two years ago with regards to carcass transportation and disposal. While Hunters can transport a deer or elk anywhere in the state, they are required to “dispose of all carcass remains with a waste management provider” if they transport it to another county than where it was harvested, according to the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks website. And while hunters are not

required to dispose of carcasses in a landfill if they remain in the county of harvest, it is still illegal to dispose of the remains on public lands or on a road ditch. Steve Griffin is a big game and wildlife biologist and said despite the implementations of the regulations there’s no way to track if they are effective. “There’s no way to measure it,” Griffin said about the rate the disease spreads. “What you can assume is with the regulations that it will move slower, because the disease will not be transported around as readily.” Still, it’s impossible to completely stop the spread since CWD will still naturally spread. When there is a positive case, the Game, Fish and Parks will test the next year within a 25-mile radius. Such is the case in Buffalo County, just east of the Missouri River. With a hunter reporting a case there last year, testing will be done within 25 miles of the area where the positive case was found to see if the disease has spread or not.

CWD: Page 12

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2022 HUNTING GUIDE

12 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

CWD From Page 11 “(In) Buffalo County, we basically know that it’s probably there. So we’re moving on and putting our effort to the counties to the east of that to see if it’s in those counties,” Griffin said. “We’re trying to follow the front of the disease and the best way to do that with our manpower and cost and all of that is to move to wherever might be going and follow that front to determine where it is.” With no way of telling if the regulations are working or not, Griffin said there are no plans to implement any further regulations, citing the ones in place are already “pretty restrictive.” As the second full year that the regulations have been in effect rolls around, Griffin is urging hunters to submit samples when requested. He expects South Dakota’s CWD rules to remain as-is for years to come. “They will be the same in effect this fall again and I would expect that this would be (that) they’re set rules,” Griffin said. “We have to follow them every year. … We appreciate the support of our hunters when we ask for samples because that assists us in finding out what’s going on with the disease in the state.” In the South Dakota CWD Surveillance period of July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022, a total of 1,314 samples were collected for CWD surveillance. Of the 118 elk sampled, 10 were found to be positive for CWD; 13 of 221 mule deer sampled were positive with CWD and 31 of 975 white-tail deer were positive with CWD.

A white-tailed deer in Sanborn County in South Dakota. Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

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2022 HUNTING GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 13

A hunter moves a decoy in a Sanborn County pond. Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

IF YOU SEE A VIOLATION, REPORT IT.

» » » » » »

Do not confront the violator. Get a license plate number. Get a description of the violator. Get a description of the vehicle. Get the location of the violation. Be able to describe the violation.

APPRECIATE LANDOWNERS BECAUSE YOU NEVER KNOW WHERE THE HUNT WILL LEAD All it took was one guy to say, “Sure, go ahead” to restore my hope in South Dakota hunting. The first few weeks of my first fall here were tough sledding. LUKE I ran into some head-shaking and HAGEN sorrys when I Editor knocked on doors to ask if I could access someone’s property and chase ducks and geese.

But a McCook County landowner changed the sour tune’s note to positive. That’s been nearly 15 years ago, and boy, do I still appreciate that permission slip. Getting landowner permission is earning a Willy Wonky golden ticket. Not necessarily because getting access is elusive or hard to find, but because you feel so great when you’ve got it. You leave the doorstep from the farmer’s house feeling the same way as those kids in the movie when they open the candy bar and see they’ve landed some luck.

LANDOWNERS: Page 14

1.888.OVERBAG | tips.sd.gov INFORMATION THAT LEADS TO AN ARREST IS ELIGIBLE FOR A REWARD.


14 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

2022 HUNTING GUIDE

LANDOWNERS From Page 13

A black lab retrieves a drake mallard in a cornfield.

Remember, the hunting community needs private landowners and we need to appreciate them when getting access onto property. It is intimidating to ask someone you don’t know for something you want. But landowners are always happy when you ask. These people are typically strong conservation-minded folk who think about how the environment impacts their land — it’s why wildlife are using that property in the first place. Agriculture and nature go hand-in-hand, and we as outdoor enthusiasts need to do a better job recognizing that. It also never hurts to drop off a gift card, an Easter ham or send a Christmas card with pictures from the hunt. Leave a good impression for all hunters. It’s unfortunate when calling or asking for permission to hunt and hearing disappointing stories of previous hunters who’ve left gates open to allow for cattle to roam free, or left a garbage pile (including spent shotgun shells — pick them up please). It is true that one bad experience can ruin access for people for years down the road.

Luke Hagen / Mitchell Republic

LANDOWNERS: Page 15

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2020 WEST HAVENS | 996-3242


2022 HUNTING GUIDE

"IT IS INTIMIDATING IN TO ASK SOMEONE YOU DON'T KNOW FOR SOMETHING YOU WANT. BUT LANDOWNERS ARE ALWAYS HAPPY WHEN YOU ASK." LANDOWNERS From Page 14 And while every year I’ve gotten denied permission here and there, sometimes due to those rulebreakers that I had nothing to do with, the green lights make it all worthwhile. I’ve met some fantastic people knocking on doors seeking hunting access, people who I’ve shared some of my life’s most cherished moments with and with whom I’ve made lifelong friendships. A couple years after gaining access to that first landowner’s private property, I rolled into a tilled cornfield one early morning and a set of headlights and a trailer was already parked where I wanted to set up. Someone had beaten me to the spot. I approached and rolled down my window. The other vehicle did the same. “Good morning,” he said. “Morning,” I responded. “You

must have permission, too?” “Yeah. How many guys do you have hunting?” he asked. “Three, including me.” “Let’s set up together, all four of us can hunt together. I’m by myself.” he said. Now, veteran hunters know that’s not always how those situations usually turn out. When a landowner gives access to more than one person and both want to hunt, most often a wrestling match ensues and an argument breaks out. That morning, we were both just happy to be able to hunt where the birds wanted to be. More than a decade later, he and I have spent hundreds of hours together hunting. We formed a bond and share a love of waterfowling and have enjoyed countless memories. All because one landowner told a couple of guys they could hunt his field.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022 | 15

Your Local Outfitter.

GUNS.

AMMO.

GEAR.

Two Locations in Pheas Pheasant Country MITCHELL, SD

ABERDEEN, SD

515 E Spruce Street

850 S Highway 281

605.996.0316

605.225.2737

M- F 9am-7pm / Sat. 9am - 6pm / Sun. 12pm - 5pm Visit us Online at SoDakSports.com


16 | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2022

2022 HUNTING GUIDE

BRIN G REMARKABLE

flavor

T O Y O U R TA B L E.

For a deliciously fresh shopping experience, shop Coborn’s, today. Ask questions of our friendly staff, explore, experience and enjoy all we have to offer. Need snacks for the road, beverages or a juicy steak for grilling? You’ll find remarkable freshness and our friendly associates in every aisle.

fresh. friendly.

1800 North Main | Mitchell, SD 57301 coborns.com | (605) 996-5593

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R E M A R K A B LY I N C R E D I B LY